SOCIAL ASSISTANCE
AND
RELATED PROGRAMS

("SARP")

1994

(Archive copy for historical purposes only)

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ASSETS

Liquid Assets

Newfoundland

"Liquid assets" is defined as cash on hand or in the bank, readily marketable securities, and investment in companies, but does not include insurance payments in respect of persons lost at sea or a grant paid to the applicant or his spouse under the Department of Rural Development Act, 1973, during a period of one year, commencing with the date on which the grant is paid.    Regulation 2(f)

Also excluded from liquid assets are federal compensation payments received by

i) a person who contracted AIDS because of contaminated blood products,

ii) a person who suffered birth defects due to the use of thalidomide, or

iii) a Japanese Canadian under a special redress agreement.

Regulation 2 (d.1)

A life insurance policy carried by a recipient on his life is not a readily marketable security and consequently is not considered a liquid asset.    Policy 120

In the determination of eligibility for social assistance, the following exemptions are allowed on the liquid assets of an applicant's household:    Regulation 11 - long term exemption levels increased 03-90

Case Type

Single Person

Family

Unemployed Employable

Long Term (excluding  disabled and aged)

Disabled or Aged

Family with Disabled Child(ren)

$    40

2,500

3,000

-

$  100

5,000

5,500

5,500

Lump sum payments

Lump sum payments which are not related to nor paid with respect to a specific period of time are to be considered liquid assets during the month received.  Included in this category of financial resources are:  income from the sale of land, property or equipment of any kind, inheritance or payment from an estate, winnings from games of chance, lotteries or bingo, income from the sale of a fishing license of any kind, and awards made by the Newfoundland Crimes Compensation Board.  Where the total of the lump sum payment and other non-exempted liquid assets exceeds the exemption levels appearing above, the allowance is suspended until asset levels are reduced to allowable (exempt) levels; the reduction of assets must result from payment of legitimate expenses for basic needs only.   Policy 120(e)(iii)

Prince Edward Island

"Liquid assets" includes cash on hand, in a bank, credit union or co-operative, and the realizable value of stocks, bonds, debentures, cash surrender value of life insurance policies, savings receipts, mortgages and  bequests or settlements.    Regulation 1(o)

Liquid Asset Exemption Levels - Regulation 7(9),10, 42(2)

a) Short-term assistance:

- a seasonally - unemployed applicant who requires assistance for less than four months is allowed an exemption on liquid assets of $50.

b) Long-term assistance (four months or longer)

i) single person - $   200

ii) single disabled person                   -        900

iii) couple, one or both spouses disabled -      1,800

iv) single parent, one dependent child -      1,200

- for each additional child - 300

- maximum exemption under (iv) -      2,400

v) married person living with spouse        -      1,200

- for each dependent child       -        300

- maximum exemption under (v)    -      2,400

vi) beneficiary in a residential

institution or nursing home

  - single person                   - 2,500

  - married person                  - 5,000

Windfalls such as gifts, inheritances or lottery wins, maintenance arrears from separation or divorce, and retroactive payments from DVA, CPP, OAS, etc., shall be exempted up to the appropriate levels noted above.  Remaining amounts shall be considered a cash asset for determining eligibility, or as income in the calculation of benefits.    Policy 7 (13-4-4)

There is a total exemption of any award made under section 19 of the Victims of Crime Act for pain and suffering, for treatment of mental and nervous shock, or for grief or sorrow as a result of the victim's death.    Regulation 12 - effective 30-09-89

Nova Scotia - Provincial

"Liquid assets" includes cash, bonds, stocks, debentures or other assets that can be converted readily into cash and includes the beneficial interest in assets held in trust and available to be used for maintenance but does not include the amount remaining to be paid under a mortgage or agreement for sale or the cash surrender value of a life insurance policy.    Regulation 3(k); Policy 05-05-03

NOTE : Current policies regarding lump sum or retroactive payments are covered in section 3.1.

The assets of the applicant or recipient shall include the assets of the spouse or person cohabiting with the applicant/recipient.    Regulation 44(1)

The following liquid assets are exempted from the calculation of financial resources of an applicant or recipient:

a) $1,500 for a single elderly person;

b) $2,500 for an elderly person who is married and cohabits with a spouse;

c) $2,500 for a parent with a dependent child;

d) $3,000 for a single disabled person;

e) $5,500 for a couple where both spouses are eligible, a disabled parent with a dependent child, or a parent (with dependents) whose spouse is in a sanatorium or hospital.    Regulation 45, 46

Benefits shall not be granted where the applicant or recipient or his/her spouse with whom the person is cohabiting is receiving a War Veterans' Allowance.    Regulation 45(1)(b), 46(1)(b)

Up to $1,500 for each dependent child set aside in trust by a court or by a person other than an applicant or recipient for the child's training or education shall not be considered a liquid asset, provided that:

a) the sum set aside is not available for the current support of any member of the household; and

b) contributions to the trust fund do not include any amount which is considered as income in the determination of the amount of benefits payable to that household.    Regulation 49; Policy 05-05-10

The Director may discontinue benefits where the trustee withdraws any amount from the trust fund without the Director's prior written consent or where a person uses the trust fund as collateral for securing a loan.    Regulation 49(7)

Where a client has been awarded compensation for pain and suffering, loss of amenities, enjoyment, etc., the amount shall be considered as an asset; the most common source of this type of compensation is a settlement from a private insurance company.  Where a damage award includes lump sum compensation for lost income and lost or damaged property, the lump sum portion is treated as an asset and periodic payments are considered unearned income.    Policy 05-05-07

Nova Scotia - Municipal

Under the Municipal Assistance Regulations, there is no provision allowing applicants to retain assets.  Generally speaking, applicants with assets are not granted municipal assistance.  The City of Halifax Social Planning Department will allow a client over 65 years of age to retain $1000 to be applied to his/her own funeral and burial expenses; monies received from the expropriation or sale of a residential property are also exempted, provided they are placed in a trust fund administered by a recognized trust company in Halifax, such trust fund to be used for the specific purpose of purchasing another residence.  (See also section 4.2) Policy 1.1.7

New Brunswick

The following are all considered liquid assets:

a) cash surrender value of life insurance exceeding $1,000.  If life insurance was cashed at the time of application, the value of the policy exceeding $1,000 per unit is considered a liquid asset;

b) trust fund, i.e. any monies held by a bank or company for an applicant or member of a unit.  Some trust funds are not convertible (i.e., those for burial expenses or education).  These will not be considered as liquid assets;

c) cash on hand, including any mortgages, collectable loans, and the total amount of valuables kept in a safety deposit box;

d) all property not used as a dwelling for the applicant;

e) any monies held after the designated waiting period are considered as liquid assets regardless of the source when determining the eligibility of clients who work irregularly.    Regulation 7; Policy p. 40-44

Clients are allowed an exemption on liquid assets up to $500 per recipient but not to exceed $1,000 per unit and up to $1,000 per unit for the cash surrender value of insurance.    Regulation 7(2)(d)

Extended asset limits for blind or disabled clients only:

a) $1,000 for each blind or disabled clients but not exceeding $2,000 for a unit consisting of more than one such person;

b) $300 for each additional dependent where either the unit head or spouse is designated as blind or disabled.  (see section 2.8)    Regulation 7(2)(e)

The principal sum of compensation or other money paid in a lump sum shall not be included in the calculation of available resources of a recipient where:

a) the compensation and related allowances are paid to the recipient for property or in lieu of other income pursuant to federal or provincial agreements of expropriation or recompense;

b) the total principal sum paid is deposited to the credit of the recipient in an account in a Canadian chartered bank or other approved financial institution;

c) withdrawals are made from the account only with the prior written approval of the designated officer for expenditures agreed to by the recipient and the designated officer; and

d) the recipient authorizes the designated officer to communicate from time to time with the financial institution with which the principal sum is deposited to determine compliance with paragraph (c).    Regulation 7(4)

A person who is eligible for social assistance and who applies for residency in a nursing home or special-care home may set aside up to $4,500 (since May 1991) in accordance with the provisions of the Pre-Arranged Funeral Services Act , and that amount will not be considered as a financial resource in the determination of eligibility for social assistance.  (1991-1992 Agreement between NB and the provincial Funeral Directors and Embalmers Association.)

Quebec

The liquid assets of a household (either an independent adult or a family) include what it has in cash or in an equivalent form and the value of assets that can be converted into cash in the short term, such as:

a) the funds, on demand or short-term, of which a financial institution is the depository, or those which the institution holds for its account, if it has the right to dispose freely of them, i.e. bank accounts, savings certificates;

b) the securities it owns if these are regularly quoted in the market on which they are traded;

c) debts of which it may obtain immediate repayment;

d) every asset which is readily convertible to cash;

e) the total amount of a term deposit made in favour of an independent adult or member of a family, even if they do not have ready access to that amount, where that deposit is made when that adult or that family is receiving benefits under a last resort assistance program or in such a manner as to render them eligible for such a program.    Regulation 67

For the purpose of establishing eligibility, liquid assets shall be excluded up to the following amounts:

- single adult: Financial Support Program $2,500

   Work and Employment Incentives Program 1,500

- family:         Financial Support Program 5,000

Work and Employment Incentives Program 2,500

Regulation 68

Also excluded from the calculation of liquid assets is any compensation or amount received (either from the federal government or the Québec government's humanitarian fund for such persons), by persons who contracted AIDS because of contaminated blood products by persons who are victims of thalidomide under the Extraordinary Assistance Plan) or by persons who were departed at the Allan Memorial Institute between 1950 and 1965.   Regulation 68.1

Where the non-exempted liquid assets of a household exceed the appropriate exemption level, an amount equal to the difference shall be subtracted from the benefit payable to that household.  The recovery of the excess amount shall be carried out to a maximum of the highest amount in relation to which the liquid assets are thus surplus for one month in a period; each period consisting of consecutive months during which the liquid assets are thus surplus shall be considered separately in establishing the recovery.   Act 8(2)(d), 13(2)(d); Regulation 110

The following liquid assets shall be excluded for benefit calculation purposes:

(1) those accumulated by a dependent child through his own work;

(1.1) those owned by a dependent child where they are administered by a tutor, an executor or a trustee and deposited in a trust account which is not accessible;

(2) the amount of loans and scholarships that a dependent child receives as a student where, within six months of its receipt, it is used for the purposes for which it was obtained; and

(3) the cash surrender value of a life insurance policy.

Any part of an amount referred to in subparagraph 2 of the first paragraph shall constitute liquid assets for all of a month in which it is used contrary to that provision and the exclusion provided for in section 68 (see above) is not applicable thereto.    Regulation 69

For benefit calculation purposes, an aggregate exemption of $60,000 is allowed on the following:

(1) the value of pension credits accumulated in a retirement plan other than the Quebec Pension Plan or an equivalent plan, and amounts that have accrued with interest as a result of the beneficiary's participation in another retirement savings instrument which, under the plan or instrument, can be returned to the participant;

(2) a sum received in the form of an amount or a pension credit referred to in paragraph 1, where it is used within 30 days of its receipt as a contribution to another retirement plan or retirement savings instrument;

(3) the amount of a grant or a loan to be used to repair a residence, where it is used within six months of its receipt for the purposes for which it was obtained; and

(4) the amount of a grant or a loan to be used to start a business or to create one's own employment, where it is used within six months of its receipt for the purposes for which it was obtained.

The exclusions provided for in subparagraphs 2 to 4 of the first paragraph apply only where the amounts referred to are deposited without delay into a trust account, a chartered bank or another institution legally authorized to receive deposits.

Any part of an amount referred to in subparagraphs 2 to 4 of the first paragraph shall constitute liquid assets for all of a month in which it is used contrary to those provisions or for all of a month in which it is not deposited in accordance with the second paragraph and the exclusion provided for in section 68 (see above) is not applicable thereto.    Regulation 71

The amount of a loan taken out in order to consolidate the debts of a beneficiary or of a member of his family to purchase furniture or household articles, an automobile, tools needed for employment or a pre-arranged funeral contract shall be excluded for benefit calculation purposes where:

(1) it is deposited without delay into a trust account, a chartered bank or another institution legally authorized to receive deposits, or

(2) it is used within 30 days of its receipt for the purposes for which it was obtained.

Any part of an amount referred to in the first paragraph shall constitute liquid assets for all of a month in which it is used contrary to that provision or for all of a month in which it is not deposited in accordance with subparagraph 1 of this paragraph and the exclusion provided for in section 68 (see above) is not applicable thereto.    Regulation 70

An amount from a succession shall be excluded for benefit calculation purposes to a maximum of the debts and encumbrances of the succession by which the beneficiary is bound.    Regulation 72

Ontario - Provincial

"Liquid assets" means cash, bonds, stocks, the cash surrender value of a life insurance policy, debentures, an interest in real property, a beneficial interest in assets held in trust and available to be used for maintenance and any other assets that can be readily converted into cash, but does not include:

i) the amount remaining to be paid to an applicant, recipient or beneficiary, as the case may be, under a mortgage or agreement for sale;

ii) that portion of the sale price of an applicant or recipient's property that is applied (or where the Director approves, that will be applied) to the purchase of his new residence or of another asset deemed necessary for the health and welfare of a beneficiary (within three months of the sale of the asset);

iii) an interest in real property that is used by the applicant or recipient as his principal residence or that is the subject of an arrangement approved by the Director (respecting the use of such interest for the health or welfare of a beneficiary);

iv) any federal Child Tax Credit for the calendar year in which it is received; or

v) any payment received by a student under the Ministry of Colleges and Universities Act or the Canada Student Loans Act for purposes of tuition, books or educational supplies;

vi) any bursary received by a student under Regulation 773 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario 1990;

vii) payments received under any of the following agreements to which Ontario is a party:

- Helpline Reconciliation Model Agreement

- Multi-Provincial/Territorial Assistance Program Agreement

- Grandview Agreement; or

viii) any amount received as damages or compensation for pain and suffering or expenses incurred (or to be incurred) as a result of injury or death of an applicant or beneficiary to a maximum of $25,000.  Some sources of this type of income include the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board and the Japanese Canadian Redress Agreement.    Policy 0302-07; Regulation 1(1), 6(1); 13(2)(6,41)

The following liquid assets are exempted from the calculation of financial resources of an applicant for, or recipient of, FBA:

i) $2,500 for a single person (including a foster child);

ii) $5,000 for a childless couple, or a single parent with at least one dependent child (plus $500 for each additional dependent child in each case);

iii) $3,000 for a single GAINS-D applicant (see section 6.3);

iv) $5,500 for a GAINS-D-eligible childless couple or single parent, plus $500 for each beneficiary in the household after the second.    FBA Regulation 3; Policy 0302-02 (p.3)

Notwithstanding the above, the Director may determine that a beneficiary with liquid assets having a value in excess of the maximum amount otherwise permitted to him under the Regulations continues to be eligible for a benefit where the amount of the excess is not greater than 10% of that maximum.  This provision does not apply in the case of an applicant for FBA.    Regulation 4

An applicant for or recipient of Family Benefits may be permitted to accumulate assets exceeding the above maxima if he/she is saving for an item or service deemed by the Director to be necessary for the well-being of the person (e.g., special van, electric wheelchair).    Regulation 4(2); Policy 0302-03

Prepaid funerals up to $2,250 for the applicant/recipient and $2,250 for his/her spouse are not included as liquid assets.    Policy 0302-02 (p.3)

Registered Retirement Savings Plans

If the applicant is able to access an RRSP fund, regardless of the penalty involved, then he or she will be expected to do so.  The value of the RRSP will be treated as a liquid asset and subject to the above exemption levels.   Policy 0302-02

Trust Funds

With respect to funds held in trust for an applicant, recipient or beneficiary, the client must make all reasonable efforts to obtain the release of any such funds.  When a dependent child in a family receiving or applying for Family Benefits has assets - including money held in trust which can be accessed - exceeding the maximum allowable family assets, the child is not seen to require support and should be deleted from the household for the calculation of FBA entitlement.  Where assets (including accessible trust funds) exceeding allowable levels belong to the applicant/recipient or spouse, the family is not entitled to FBA; the family is also disqualified where the last remaining child in the home has a trust which is accessible and in excess of allowable asset levels.  Where the trust fund is not available for release, the Family Benefits allowance shall be calculated at the full rate of entitlement.    Policy 0302-07

In the case of a blind or disabled person or a permanently unemployable person (see section 2.8), an exemption is allowed with respect to a beneficial interest in assets held in trust and available to be used for maintenance provided that (a) the capital of the trust is derived from an inheritance and (b) the sum of the values of the original capital of all trusts does not exceed $65,000, unless the Director has approved a higher amount.  The latter case would apply where the client can prove that the capital and estimated income from the trust are required to meet the person's lifetime expenses, as defined in the Regulation (including aids and devices, health needs, necessary residential renovations, necessary education or training expenses, and up to $3,300 per year of other disability-related expenses).   Regulation 1(1), 13(2)(49) - eff, 07-93

Ontario - Municipal

"Liquid assets" means cash, bonds, debentures, the case surrender value of a life insurance policy, stocks, an interest in real property, the beneficial interest in assets held in trust and available to be used for maintenance, and any other assets that can be readily converted into cash, but does not include:

i) an interest in real property used as principal residence by the applicant or recipient,

ii) that portion of the sale price of real property that is applied (or where the municipal welfare administrator approves, that will be applied) to the purchase of a principal residence,

iii) a prepaid funeral plan up to a maximum amount approved by the Director,

iv) assets that are considered necessary for personal use (e.g., car, television set),

v) pre-approved assets considered necessary for the client's well-being (e.g., van conversions),

vi) payments received under any of the following agreements to which Ontario is a party:

- Helpline Reconciliation Model Agreement

- Multi-Provincial/Territorial Assistance Program Agreement

- Grandview Agreement, and

vii) any amount received as damages or compensation for pain and suffering or expenses incurred (or to be incurred) as a result of injury or death of an applicant or beneficiary to a maximum of $25,000.   Regulation 1(1); Policy 0403-02

Income tax refunds and other types of refunds are considered as assets.    Policy 0402-07

The Municipal Welfare Administrator must determine the level of liquid assets a person may have and still be eligible for assistance.  The maximum liquid asset exemption level ($2,500 for a single person, $5,000 for a couple plus $500 for each additional person) may apply to a household temporarily on general assistance which will eventually transfer to Family Benefits or other long-term assistance program.  Assets equal to l-3 months' assistance may be exempted in the case of temporarily unemployable persons or employable persons with dependents.  In the case of single employable persons, assets equal to l-2 weeks' assistance may be exempted.  Where the person is 65 years of age or over, or deemed to be permanently unemployable or disabled, the maximum asset exemption level is $3,000 for a single person or $5,500 for two persons (plus $500 for each additional person).    Policy 0403-02

If a trust fund is in the applicant's name but is not accessible to the applicant because of the terms of the trust, then the fund is not to be considered a liquid asset.    Policy 0403- 03

Registered retirement Savings Plans

If the applicant is able to access an RRSP fund, regardless of the penalty involved, then he or she will be expected to do so.  The value of the RRSP will be treated as a liquid asset and subject to the above exemption levels.   Policy 0403-02

Manitoba - Provincial

Liquid assets include cash on hand or in a bank or other institution, bonds, shares, annuities, mortgages, agreements for sale, funds held in trust and other convertible assets.    Policy E0-31-01

If a Director decides that a trust fund is not immediately accessible, he may:

a) grant eligibility for up to 4 months pending the release of funds, or

b) grant eligibility for an indefinite period of time where it is not feasible to release funds from a trust in the foreseeable future.    Policy E0-31-03

Liquid assets exempted from the calculation of financial resources of the applicant or recipient are as follows (effective 03-92):

a) $1,000 for a single person or $2,000 for a person with one dependant plus $500 for the second and each additional dependant (max. household exemption $3,000);

b) for disabled clients (see section 2.8), liquid assets under $2,000 for a single person or $3,000 for a person with one dependant plus $500 for the second each additional dependant (max. household exemption $4,000);

c) for long term clients of General Assistance (see section 5.1), $400 per recipient in the household, up to a maximum of $2,000 per household (there is no asset exemption for short term clients of General Assistance);

d) cash surrender value of life insurance policies up to $2,000 per household;

e) for funeral and burial expenses of an applicant or recipient 65 years or over (in addition to the asset exemption in "c"):

- funeral plan up to $1,000 paid one year prior to the application for social allowances; or

- in the absence of financial resources of equivalent value (from life insurance, the client's residence and essential inventory and equipment for farming or business), liquid assets up to $300. Regulation 8(1) (a); Policy EO-31-01, EO-31-02

For persons owning or operating farms, a Maximum Allowable Net Farm Assets level of $20,000 is allowed.  This is calculated as follows:

a) a complete inventory of all property owned, equipment, livestock, saleable produce, etc., is taken;

b) values are ascribed to all farm assets on the basis of:

the fair market value for property, livestock, saleable produce, etc;

- the book value (purchase price minus depreciation) for equipment and machinery, based on the Income Tax Schedule;

c) allowable home property, personal property and liquid assets are excluded from the assessed inventory;

d) the remaining asset values are totalled to establish the Gross Farm Assets and all related liabilities such as outstanding mortgages, bank loans, etc., are deducted to establish the Net Farm Asset level.   Policy E3-31-01

NOTE : Provisions for exemption of essential farm equipment, basic stock herd and seed for next year's crop are to be exercised within the $20,000 Net Farm Asset Allowance.

In calculating the financial resources of an applicant or recipient, the Director shall exempt gifts of a non-recurring nature received while in receipt of a social allowance or general assistance, up to a value of $100 each, and federal compensation payments to persons infected with AIDS through blood transfusions or the use of blood products.   Regulation 8(1)(a)(viii,ix)

Lump Sum Payments

When certain types of unearned income are received as a lump sum, all or part of such income may be included in the household's exempt liquid assets (see above).  Examples of such types of income include the following:

- cash replacement for material assets lost (incl. sale, transfer, fire or theft) and not to be replaced;

- compensation for injury, disability, retirement or death (after deduction of funeral costs) excluding ongoing pension income;

- inheritances and windfalls not covered by another policy.

Any amount remaining after applying the liquid asset exemption must be treated as completely available to reduce current benefits or to reduce an outstanding overpayment.

In calculating the financial resources of an applicant or recipient, the director shall exclude property of a value of up to $25,000 that is held in trust for the dependent child of a client or a child under section 5(1)(f) of the Act (see section 2.11 of this report) provided that:

i) the property derived from compensation for injury or death or from an inheritance,

ii) the terms of the trust are in writing, and

iii) no property is removed from the trust without the prior consent of the director.   Regulation 8(1)(a)(vii) - effective 06-91; Policy E0-31-04

Lump sum payments from other types of sources (e.g., UIC, crop insurance, strike pay) and various kinds of ongoing private and public pensions (e.g., CPP) are not subject to any exemption (see previous paragraph). Policy E1-21-03

Manitoba - Municipal

Under the Municipal Assistance Regulation, the following assets are exempt from the determination of the financial resources of an applicant or recipient:

a) the cash surrender value of life insurance policies, up to a maximum total value of $2,000 per household;

b) gifts of a non-recurring nature received while in receipt of social assistance, of a value up to $100 each;

c) up to $25,000 held in irrevocable trust for a dependent child (same terms as for the provincial program - see above); and

d) federal compensation payments to persons infected with the HIV virus through blood transfusions or the use of blood products.   Regulation 6

For Winnipeg, there is an additional exemption of liquid assets of a recipient of a value up to $400 per person, not exceeding $2000 per household; this exemption does not apply to an applicant for municipal assistance.   By-law 6162/93 No. 3(1); Policy p.33

The Winnipeg Municipal Assistance Policy Manual states that the liquid asset exemption cannot be used to shelter non-exempt income such as U.I. or an income tax return; however, a client may bank his/her clothing allowance during summer months to save up for winter outerwear, a family could save federal Child Tax Benefits or exempted earnings to purchase furniture, etc. Policy p.33

Saskatchewan

The liquid assets of a household include cash on hand, in the bank or other institution, the immediate realizable value of stocks, bonds or other securities, mortgages, agreements for sale, wills, and other settlements.  Monies held in trust for children are not considered as assets if they are not available for ongoing maintenance.    Regulation 29B(1), Policy 18-2-3

The first $50 of interest earned on an annual basis from bank accounts, bonds, savings certificates or other interest-bearing financial assets shall be considered a liquid asset.  Any amount exceeding $50 is considered as a financial resource available to cover the cost of ongoing needs.  Where the household has reached its maximum liquid asset exemption (see below), all interest must be treated as income.    Policy 18-2-7; Editorial Comment

Prepaid funeral expenses not exceeding $2,500 and the total cash surrender value of life insurance are not included in the computation of financial resources.    Regulation 28(2)(o.1); Policy 18-2-2 ,3

Persons who apply for social assistance are allowed a total exemption on cash and liquid assets up to $1500 for a single recipient or $3000 for a recipient and one dependent, plus $500 for each additional dependent.    Regulation 28(2)(p.1)

An exemption on liquid assets is allowed only once on any one application.  Where a client is allowed the maximum exemption at the time of granting, then uses these assets and later acquires other assets, no further exemption may be allowed.    Policy 17-1-4

There is an exemption allowed against inheritances, bequests and devises (including the value of property) received by a recipient or a recipient's dependant not exceeding the amount of:

- $1,500 for a recipient with no dependants or

- $3,000 for a recipient with one dependant plus $500 for each additional dependant   Regulation 28(2)(cc.1) - limits eff. 08-92

There is a total exemption of any sums received as pain and suffering awards or under the Extraordinary Assistance Plan or Japanese Canadian Redress Agreement.    Policy 17-1-6

Investments such as GIC's, bonds and mutual funds can be redeemed (with reduced interest rates), sold or used as collateral for loans; they are, therefore, assessed as a resource (i.e., no exemption or exclusion).  RRSP's and government-administered pension plans are not considered a financial resource where there is a valid contract that locks in the funds.   Policy 18-2-2

Monies held in trust for children shall not be considered an asset if they are not available for distribution, or where monthly maintenance payments from the trust account are being made in accordance with the Regulations (see section 3.5 for detail).    Regulation 29(B)(1)(ii)

In the determination of financial resources, a total exemption is allowed against all amounts received by a recipient and any dependants pursuant to an agreement with respect to the settlement of an outstanding treaty land entitlement claim or other land claim of an Indian band, not exceeding $1,500 for a person with no dependants or $3,000 for a recipient with one dependant plus $500 for each additional dependant.   Regulation 28(2)(cc.2) - effective 03-94

Alberta

"Liquid Assets" includes Registered Retirement Savings Plans, Registered Retirement Income Funds, term deposits, life insurance, pension contributions, Guaranteed Investment Certificates, and other assets that can be readily converted to money.   Regulation 1(h)

All assets of the head of the household and all persons living in that household (and included in the household's budgetary requirements) such as cash on hand, bank accounts, stocks, bonds, securities, cash surrender value of life insurance policies, real estate (other than specified exemptions), etc. may be considered as liquid assets.   Policy 01-05-01, 01-05-02

Assets of a person dwelling with a client but not living in a common-law relationship are not considered as a financial resource provided that the cohabitant is contributing a reasonable amount for room and board or is paying a proportionate share of expenses.    Regulation 2(2); Policy 01-05-02

Real estate other than the allowable exemption (see section 4.2) shall be considered equivalent to a liquid asset which can be sold or against which a loan may be secured.

Unless the Director orders otherwise, a person who is applying for a social allowance on an emergency one-time basis is not allowed any exemption against liquid or other assets.   Regulation 2(3)

An applicant or recipient who is applying for a non-continuous supplementary allowance is not allowed any exemption against liquid assets or income.   Regulation 2(4)

The following cash and liquid asset exemptions apply in determining whether an applicant is able to provide basic necessities:

a) in the case of an applicant without dependants who is assigned to the Transitional Support Sub-Program or the Assured Support Sub-Program, the combined cash and liquid assets of the applicant are exempt to the extent of $1,500;

b) in the case of an applicant without dependants who is assigned to the Employment and Training Support Sub-Program or the Supplement to Earnings Sub-Program, the applicant's cash and liquid assets are exempt to the extent of $1,500 not more than $50 of which may be in the form of cash;

c) in the case of an applicant with dependants who is assigned to the Transitional Support Sub-Program or the Assured Support Sub-Program, the combined cash and liquid assets of the family unit are exempt to the extent of $2,500;

d) in the case of an applicant with dependants who is assigned to the Employment and Training Support Sub-Program or the Supplement to Earnings Sub-Program, the family unit's cash and liquid assets are exempt to the extent of $2,500, not more than $250 of which may be in the form of cash.   Regulation 5(1)

For the purposes of determining whether a recipient continues to be eligible for a social allowance, the combined cash and liquid assets of the recipient and the members of the family unit are exempt to the extent of:

a) $1,500 in the case of a recipient without dependants, and

b) $2,500 in the case of a recipient with dependants,

regardless of the sub-program to which the recipient or any adult member of the family unit has been assigned.   Regulation 5(2)

Where an adult applicant or recipient or any adult member of the family unit has a severe handicap, the combined cash and liquid assets are exempt to the following extent:

a) $3,000 in the case of an applicant or recipient without dependants;

b) $5,000 plus $500 for each dependant, in the case of an applicant or recipient with dependants.   Regulation 5(3)

If the cash and liquid assets of an applicant and the members of the family unit exceed the exempt amounts under this section but the applicant is otherwise eligible to receive a social allowance, the Director may reduce the amount of the social allowance paid in the first month by the excess amount.   Regulation 5(4)

Where a person receives a payment under the Japanese Canadian Redress Agreement or the Extraordinary Assistance Plan, any part of that payment that the person keeps after the month in which it is received shall not be considered as cash or liquid assets for the purposes of this section.   Regulation 5(5)

If any money received by a person or a member of the person's family unit, on behalf of a dependent child (other than money received for the maintenance or education of the child) is placed in a trust within 90 days of the money being received or within 90 days of the person's most recent application for social assistance, whichever is later, that money and any interest or income earned by that money that accrues to and forms part of the trust is exempt from the determination of the person's or the family unit's assets, as the case may be.   Regulation 6(g); Policy 01-05-02

Any cash assets (or their equivalent) that a person has as a result of damage to property, loss of property, loss of employment, bodily injury or loss of life caused by the tornado of July 31, 1987 shall not be considered as financial resources.    Regulation 2(1.1)

British Columbia

"Assets" means any form of cash or equity in property, stocks, bonds, certificates, or other possessions that could be converted to cash, including any beneficial interest in real or personal property held in trust.  (see also section 4.2 for exclusions) Regulation 2(4)

Any payment received under the Japanese Canadian Redress Agreement is excluded from the calculation of financial resources.    Regulation 8(3)(m.1); Policy 3.15.3 - effective 02-89

Individual payments received under the federal Extraordinary Assistance Plan to haemophiliacs and others infected with HIV (AIDS) from blood or blood products shall not be deemed to be assets when determining eligibility for benefits.    Regulation 8(3)(o); Policy p. 1.23 - effective 10-90

In determining eligibility, "assets" shall not include any money paid by the minister, pursuant to a written agreement, to a handicapped person to enable the handicapped person to live in the community instead of in an institution, or anything purchased in accordance with that agreement.   Regulation 8(3)(p) - effective 03-92

- see also section 3.9

For those who are handicapped and those who are likely to be unemployable for a minimum of three months from the date of application, the total cash surrender value of an uncashed life insurance policy is totally exempt from the determination of financial resources.    Policy 3.16.2(no. 7)

Assets shall not include payments made by the BC Ministry of Health to individuals infected with HIV from blood products, or to the surviving spouses or dependent children of these individuals, under a policy adopted in September 1993; the BC sales tax credit is also excluded from the determination of assets.   Regulation 8(3)(s,t)-effective 03-94

The following liquid assets are not considered in the calculation of an applicant's financial resources.

Category of Client

Asset Exemption Level

"Hardship Assistance cases" (see section 5.2.10 note "l")

Single person under 55 years of age

Nil

$2,500

Single person 55 years of age and over or single handicapped person (see section 2.8)

$3,000

Person under 55 years of age, one dependant (also under 55)

- each additional dependant

$5,000

500

Person 55 years of age and over, one dependant or handicapped person with one dependant

- each additional dependant

$5,500

$  500

Family unit including at least one person over age 65 receiving OAS/GIS/SPA

no limit

Persons in special care

- single person

- person with dependants

- person applying for comforts allowance

$1,500

$2,500

$  500

Regulation 8; Policy 3.33.1, 4.13.1 - asset exemption levels increased as of 05-92

Where a recipient has assets banked in a non-interest bearing form, e.g., checking account, and where the combined value of any such assets exceeds $500, the current bank rate interest will be imputed on the amount in excess of $500; such imputed interest will be charged as unearned income and pro-rated over a twelve-month period.    Policy 3.15.8

Yukon

All liquid assets such as cash on hand, in a bank or other institution, the immediate realizable value of stocks, bonds or other securities, mortgages, agreements for sale and wills or other settlements shall be considered as financial resources.    Regulation 19(1)

The following amounts are not considered as liquid assets for the respective client groups:

i) Permanent exclusions from the labour force (see sections 2.7, 2.8)

- single person $ 1,500

- couple, both permanent exclusions 2,500

ii) Single parents

- family unit 1,500

- each dependent child under 19 years of age 300

iii) Unemployed employable (anticipated duration on

assistance less than 90 days)

- single person 100

- person with dependants 200

iv) Unemployables (anticipated duration on assistance

90 days or more)

- single person 500

- person with dependants 1,000

An additional exemption of up to $1,500 is allowed for a client classified as a "permanent exclusion from the labour force", a single parent, or a dependent child under 19 years of age, where such amount has been placed irrevocably in trust for future funeral or burial expenses.  In the case of a dependent child, the amount cannot be available for distribution, or maintenance payments from such fund must be made in accordance with the Regulations.    Regulation 19

Asset exemptions for elderly persons requiring assistance in the form of nursing or special care, or residential accommodation in a senior citizens' home are $1,500 for a single person and $2,500 for a married couple.    Regulation 22

Northwest Territories

"Liquid assets" means cash, bonds, debentures, stocks, the beneficial interest in assets held in trust and available to be used for maintenance and any other assets that can be readily converted into cash.    Regulation 2(1)

In the determination of financial resources which are considered as available for current maintenance, persons applying for regular social assistance are allowed no exemptions on liquid or other assets except where such assets should not be converted into cash for sound social or economic reasons (in the Director's opinion).    Regulation 20(5)

For elderly persons in nursing homes or homes for special care or other residential accommodation, asset exemptions are $1,000 for a single person and $1,500 for a married couple.

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