Canadian Social Research Links

Provincial and Territorial
Anti-Poverty Strategies and Poverty Reduction Campaigns

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Les stratégies antipauvreté et les campagnes de réduction de pauvreté
provinciales et territoriales

See also:
National Information - Canada and Elsewhere
Ontario information
(These links take you to separate pages of links)

Updated January 22, 2017
Page révisée le 22 janvier 2017

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NEW

British Columbia

Long Overdue:
Why BC needs a poverty reduction plan
By Seth Klein, Iglika Ivanova and Andrew Leyland
January 11, 2017
BC is Canada’s only province without a poverty reduction plan. This report examines the most recent statistics on poverty and its associated hardships in BC, and demonstrates that strong policies are urgently needed to dramatically reduce and ultimately eliminate poverty in our province.

Complete report (PDF - 1.7MB, 44 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/BC%20Office/2017/01/ccpa-bc_long-overdue-poverty-plan_web.pdf

Report Summary (PDF - 740KB, 4 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/BC%20Office/2017/01/ccpa-bc_long-overdue-poverty-plan_summary_web.pdf

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan unveils Poverty Reduction Strategy with 50 in 10 pledge
http://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/saskatchewan-unveils-plan-to-reduce-poverty-including-more-housing-health-care
February 24, 2016
The Saskatchewan government has unveiled a plan that it hopes will reduce the number of people in poverty by 50 per cent by the end of 2025.

Advocates for the homeless are still waiting to see what the provincial government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy will look like.
http://leaderpost.com/news/local-news/province-still-without-poverty-reduction-strategy
January 12, 2016
In August, an 11-member advisory committee struck by the province released its recommendations on how to reduce poverty in Saskatchewan.
At the time, the province refused to commit to the outlined goal of cutting poverty in half by 2020. Donna Harpauer, the Minister of Social Services, said the recommendations would be analyzed, but would not set a deadline for when a provincial strategy would be adopted.

Five months later, a strategy is still not in place.

Source:
Regina Leader-Post

http://leaderpost.com/

Provincial/Territorial Poverty Profiles
Includes a 10-to-15-page program overview for each jurisdiction (PDF files - approx. 100K each)

October 1, 2015
2015 Poverty Progress Profiles

NOTE : This link will take you to a collection of links to poverty reduction plans currently in effect in all Canadian jurisdictions except BC. You'll also find a copy of the profile for each jurisdiction (except BC) in the Canadian Social Research Links provincial/territorial pages (for links to jurisdictions, see the left column of the Canadian Social Research Links home page)
Source:
Canada Without Poverty
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

Proposed Quebec welfare rules carry unfair penalties, advocates warn
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/proposed-quebec-welfare-rules-carry-unfair-penalties-advocates-warn-363979491.html
By Sidhartha Banerjee
January 1, 2016

MONTREAL - A Quebec government plan to introduce new welfare rules to get people back into the workforce has anti-poverty advocates warning the measures could leave many even more destitute.
The recently tabled bill aims to get first-time welfare recipients into a job program quickly, offering an extra few hundred dollars every month if they're employed for a year.
(...)
In Quebec, welfare recipients currently receive $616 a month plus a credit that increases the amount to $747.
But those who don't participate would see their benefits cut in half to $308 per month.

Source:
The Canadian Press

http://www.thecanadianpress.com/

---

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm

NOTA : La version française suit l'anglais ci-dessous.
Campaign 2000

2015 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty in Canada: Let’s End Child Poverty for Good
(November 24, 2015)

From Campaign 2000:
[ http://www.campaign2000.ca/ ]

Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty in Canada: Let’s End Child Poverty for Good.
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
November 24, 2015
The 2015 report card, entitled Let’s Do This: Let’s End Child Poverty for Good outlines the once in a generation opportunity before Canada to eradicate child and family poverty. With the federal government committed to collaboratively developing a national poverty reduction strategy, Canada must seize the opportunity to finally end the child poverty crisis for good.

The complete report card:

LET’S DO THIS – LET’S END CHILD POVERTY FOR GOOD:
Campaign 2000 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada, 2015
(PDF 1.2MB, 20 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/NationalReportCardEn2015.pdf

English media release (PDF):
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/MediaReleaseEnNov24_2015.pdf

Infographic
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/Infograph2015.png

Mapping Child Poverty: A Reality in Every Federal Riding
http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/releases/ChildPovertyBackgrounderOctober%208_15.pdf
On the eve of the 2015 federal election, Campaign 2000: End Child and Family Poverty in Canada has mapped the prevalence of child poverty on a riding by riding basis. This is the first time that child poverty rates have been mapped by riding from coast to coast to coast. PDF and interactive versions of the maps are available from Campaign 2000.

---

Related link:

High hopes for federal action to end child poverty
Canada finally has a government ready to tackle child poverty. Activists want to make sure Ottawa gets it right.

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2015/11/24/high-hopes-for-federal-action-to-end-child-poverty.html
November 24, 2015
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Canadians have elected a government that appears ready to tackle child poverty with a list of progressive measures, including a new national benefit that could lift 315,000 children out of poverty, say advocates who have been urging federal action for a generation.

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Version française:

FAISONS-LE! METTONS FIN UNE FOIS POUR TOUTES À
LA PAUVRETÉ DES ENFANTS:
Rapport 2015 de Campagne 2000 sur la
pauvreté des enfants et des familles au Canada
(fichier PDF - 1,3Mo, 20 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/NationalReportCard2015FR.pdf

Communiqué:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/MediaReleaseFRNov24_2015.pdf

-------------------------
Provincial reports:

The Campaign 2000 website [ http://www.campaign2000.ca/ ] features report cards from provincial partners in Nova Scotia, Manitoba and British Columbia, aas well as media releases from those provinces, and an infographic featuring key findings and recommendations. Report Cards from our other provincial partners, including Ontario, will be released in early 2016.

British Columbia 2015 Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 59 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/2015-BC-Child-Poverty-Report-Card-FirstCall-Web-2015-11.pdf

Manitoba Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2015 (PDF - 10 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/Manitoba2015RepCard.pdf

Nova Scotia 2015 Report Card: End it Now (PDF - 28 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/NovaScoatia2015RepCard.pdf

Source:
Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/

---

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

From the
Prime Minister's Office:

Prime Minister of Canada makes ministerial mandate letters public
http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/news/2015/11/13/prime-minister-canada-makes-ministerial-mandate-letters-public
News Release
Ottawa, Ontario
13 November 2015
Today, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau took the unprecedented step of publicly releasing all ministerial mandate letters, as part of his plan for open and transparent government for Canadians.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sample excerpts from the mandate letter
for the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development:

http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/minister-families-children-and-social-development-mandate-letter
(...)
I will expect you to work with your colleagues and through established legislative, regulatory, and Cabinet processes to deliver on your top priorities:

* Work with the Minister of Finance to design and implement the Canada Child Benefit (CCB), which will build on the existing Canada Child Tax Benefit and the National Child Benefit Supplement and will replace the Universal Child Care Benefit.

* Work with the Minister of Finance to improve the income security of lower income seniors living alone by increasing the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) by ten percent, indexing Old Age Security (OAS) and GIS payments to a new Senior’s Price Index, cancelling the increase in age of eligibility for OAS (65 to 67), and working with provinces and territories to ensure adequate and coordinated support programs to address seniors’ poverty.

* Work with the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs to launch consultations with provinces and territories and Indigenous Peoples on a National Early Learning and Childcare Framework as a first step towards delivering affordable, high-quality, flexible and fully inclusive child care.

* Lead the development of a Canadian Poverty Reduction Strategy that would set targets to reduce poverty and measure and publicly report on our progress, in collaboration with the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour. Our strategy will align with and support existing provincial and municipal poverty reduction strategies.

* (...)
More
:
http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/minister-families-children-and-social-development-mandate-letter

Source:
Ministerial Mandate Letters

http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/ministerial-mandate-letters
The mandate letters provide a framework for what Ministers are expected to accomplish, including specific policy objectives and challenges to be addressed.

Follow the above link to access all 30 mandate letters, one for each Minister of the Trudeau Cabinet.

The Trudeau Cabinet:
HTML : http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/cabinet (mouse over each Minister's photo to see the name of his/her ministry)
PDF : http://www.pm.gc.ca/sites/pm/files/docs/cabinet.pdf (name of each ministry incl.)

---------------------------------------

THAT WAS THE GOOD NEWS.
THE BAD NEWS IS THAT BRITISH COLUMBIA
IS THE ONLY PROVINCE THAT STILL DOESN`T HAVE AN ANTIPOVERTY STRATEGY!
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/poverty-reduction-in-canada/

British Columbia Antipoverty Links
http://canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm#bc



NEW from
Canada Without Poverty:

October 1. 2015

2015 Poverty Progress Profiles
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/poverty/poverty-progress-profiles/
Posted October 1, 2015
(...)
Currently all provinces and territories, with the exception of British Columbia, have poverty strategies in place, or are in the process of developing them. To get a better sense of how each region is doing, Canada Without Poverty has compiled Poverty Progress Profiles which look at the current status of poverty, plan development and implementation or organizational appeals for a plan, and details on specific thematic areas related to poverty.

Recommended reading --- overview of historical and recent (as at Oct. 1, 2015) poverty reduction initiatives in each Canadian province and territory except British Columbia.

Source:
Canada Without Poverty:
[ http://www.cwp-csp.ca/ ]

------------------------------------------------------

Provincial/Territorial Poverty Profiles:
* Includes a 10-to-15-page program overview for each jurisdiction (PDF files - approx. 100K each)
* Below, provincial./territorial summaries are organized in chronological order, with the oldest (QC) at the top of the list .

QUÉBEC:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Province-Poverty-Profiles_QC-2.pdf

---

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Province-Poverty-Profiles_NF.pdf

---

NOVA SCOTIA:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2015-Province-Poverty-Profiles_NS.pdf

---

ONTARIO:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Province-Poverty-Profiles_ON.pdf

---

NEW BRUNSWICK:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2015-Province-Poverty-Profiles_NB.pdf

---

MANITOBA:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2015-Province-Poverty-Profiles_MB.pdf

---

NUNAVUT:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/2015-Province-Poverty-Profiles_NU.pdf

---

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2015-Province-Poverty-Profiles_PEI.pdf

---

YUKON:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Province-Poverty-Profiles_YK.pdf

---

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2015-Province-Poverty-Profiles_NWT.pdf

---

ALBERTA:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2015-Province-Poverty-Profiles_AB.pdf

---

SASKATCHEWAN:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Province-Poverty-Profiles_SK.pdf

---

BRITISH COLUMBIA:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2015-Province-Poverty-Profiles_BC.pdf

NOTE: BRITISH COLUMBIA IS THE ONLY PROVINCE THAT STILL DOESN'T HAVE AN ANTIPOVERTY STRATEGY.
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/poverty-reduction-in-canada/

British Columbia Antipoverty Links
http://canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm#bc

-------------------
Source:
Canada Without Poverty:
[ http://www.cwp-csp.ca/ ]


Human Rights and Poverty Reduction Strategies:
A Guide to International Human Rights Law and its
Domestic Application in Poverty Reduction Strategies
(PDF - 217KB, 20 pages)
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/FINAL-Human-Rights-Guide-August-2015.pdf
August 2015

Table of contents:

* Introduction
* Who should read this Guide?
* What you will learn from this Guide?

II. The Human Rights Approach
What are human rights and where do they come from?
How are human rights relevant to my work?
What rights are important for people living in poverty?
What is the human rights approach to poverty reduction?
Why is the human rights approach the right approach?

III. Putting the Human Rights Approach into Action
Identifying people living in poverty
Incorporating international human rights standards
Consulting people who live in poverty
Promoting substantive equality and non-discrimination
Setting goals and establishing timelines
Monitoring progress
Ensuring accountability

IV. Checklist

Selected content (from the Foreword):
This Guide is not intended to replace existing poverty reduction strategies, but to inform their development and execution. It is designed to complement, strengthen and give greater meaning to the vital work that is already being done to address poverty in provinces and municipalities across Canada.

Source:
Canada Without Poverty

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/


From the
Tamarack Institute:

Poverty Reduction Summit: Every City, Province and Territory Working Together
http://events.tamarackcommunity.org/povertyreductionsummit
Date: May 6-8, 2015
Location: Ottawa, ON

The Poverty Reduction Summit: Every City, Province and Territory Working Together is an unprecedented gathering that will bring together senior leaders from across the country and beyond to align their efforts and merge their passion for poverty reduction. The Summit will strengthen communication and increase the alignment of our activities to achieve our common goal by amplifying the success of each community, province and territory's poverty reduction strategy. The Summit will motivate collective action leading to poverty reduction for 1 million Canadians. Join us May 6-8 in Ottawa as we leverage our collective efforts and build the movement to reduce poverty across Canada.

Online program and list of workshops:

----- Summit Learning Agenda (a.k.a. summit program)
http://events.tamarackcommunity.org/povertysummit-agenda

----- List of (24) workshops
http://events.tamarackcommunity.org/povertysummit-agenda#workshops

Learn more about the summit:
http://goo.gl/gt3KSL
- includes sponsors/partners, keynote speakers, members of the coordinating team, cities attending and more

Registration details and
Online registration

http://goo.gl/YrbshU
The registration rates (in Canadian dollars) are as follows:
$695 for single registration
$555 per person for a group of two or more
* Subsidies available.

Source:
Tamarack : An Institute for Community Engagement
http://tamarackcommunity.ca/
Founded in 2001, Tamarack is a charity that develops and supports learning communities to help people collaborate and to co-generate knowledge that solves complex community challenges. Our deep hope is to end poverty in Canada.

-----------------------------------------------------

MAY 11 (2015) UPDATE:

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi vows to take ‘leadership’ on basic income guarantee issue
http://leadersandlegacies.com/2015/05/09/calgary-mayor-naheed-nenshi-vows-to-take-leadership-on-basic-income-guarantee-issue/
May 9, 2015
Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi called for “brave steps” in the fight against inequality and vowed to take leadership on pushing for a basic income guarantee.
Speaking to a National Poverty Reduction Summit in Ottawa on May 7
*, Nenshi told a capacity crowd that it’s up to Canada’s mayors to take leadership on important issues, like reducing poverty.
“The frustrating thing is that we know what the answers are.”
Bringing up the idea of a guaranteed annual income (or basic income guarantee) – and noting that this is just an extension of the Child Tax Credit, except that it would be for all Canadians who might drop below the poverty line – he called for courage from politicians to take steps to deal with poverty.
---
* National Poverty Reduction Summit spotlights inequality
May 11, 2015
http://leadersandlegacies.com/2015/05/11/national-poverty-reduction-summit-spotlights-inequality/

Source:
Leaders and Legacies

http://leadersandlegacies.com/
Leaders and Legacies is a social purpose organization and a news site for unique, asset-based articles about Canada’s leaders, particularly those leaders whose enterprises are engaged in improving our nation through an emphasis on healthy communities, policy changes to support a basic income guarantee, education, renewable energy, citizen engagement, and indigenous Canada.

NEW



Provincial and Territorial Anti-Poverty
Strategies and Poverty Reduction Campaigns

Click any provincial or territorial link in this yellow box for information about that jurisdiction. Scroll down to the next yellow box for Summaries of provincial-territorial poverty reduction plans across Canada, many of which include links for further research.

For links to information from the Canadian national/federal perspective and selected international links, see National Antipoverty Information - Canada and Elsewhere
(This link takes you to a separate Canadian Social Research Links page)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Provincial/territorial poverty reduction
strategies and campaigns and news:

Clicking on any link below in this yellow box will take
you directly to a specific section further down on this page.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*** Newfoundland and Labrador
*** Prince Edward Island
*** Nova Scotia
*** New Brunswick
*** Québec
*** Ontario
<=== On a separate page of this website
*** Manitoba

*** Saskatchewan

*** Alberta
*** British Columbia -------------- UPDATED NOV. 20 (2015)
*** Northwest Territories
*** Yukon
*** Nunavut


Vibrant Communities
Vibrant Communities is a community-driven effort to reduce poverty in Canada by creating partnerships that make use of our most valuable assets – people, organizations, businesses and governments.Vibrant Communities links communities from all across Canada, British Columbia to Newfoundland and Labrador, in a collective effort to test the most effective ways to reduce poverty at the grassroots level.
Source:
Tamarack Institute for Community Engagement:
Tamarack exists to build vibrant and engaged communities in Canada. Our work will result in more collaborative approaches and less poverty.



Summaries of provincial-territorial poverty reduction plans

The summaries below offer a wealth of information on the progress of poverty reduction initiatives in each jurisdiction.
Recommended reading!

---

Poverty as a Human Rights Violation* (PDF - 324K, 21 pages)
June 2013
http://www.povnet.org/sites/povnet.org/files/SSRN-id2279838.pdf
(* Except in governmental anti-poverty strategies)

By Vincent Greason
June 18, 2013
This paper explores how six provincial anti-poverty strategies are remarkably similar in spite of the fact that they address differing socio-economic realities, have been developed by governments representing different political parties and (supposedly) differing political ideologies. He finds that none of the strategies address poverty as a human rights violation even though many human rights are directly related to poverty.

[ Author Vincent Greason works at the Table ronde des organismes volontaires d’éducation populaire de l’Outaouais (TROVEPO), a coalition of popular education groups. This is their (unilingual French) website : http://www.trovepo.org/ ]

Found in:
PovNet
http://www.povnet.org/
PovNet is an online resource for advocates, people on welfare, and community groups and individuals involved in anti-poverty work. It provides up-to-date information about resources in British Columbia and Canada.

---

Poverty Progress Profiles
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/poverty/poverty-progress-profiles/
May 2012
Canada Without Poverty has compiled Poverty Progress Profiles for 2012 which look at the current status of poverty, plan development and implementation or organizational appeals for a plan, and details on specific thematic areas related to poverty (such as housing, welfare, employment support, and early childhood education and care). A coordinated plan marks the first step towards poverty elimination, but without committed action and implementation that goal cannot be achieved.

Source:
Canada Without Poverty

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

---

Provincial Poverty Reduction Plans
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/poverty-reduction-in-canada/
---- includes information and embedded links to related documents for all provinces and territories with a poverty reduction plan.
Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

Campaign 2000 E-Bulletin - Winter 2011
http://goo.gl/9ATSk
December 2011
Campaign 2000’s year-end overview of the state of poverty reduction in Canada
- includes
Updates from regional (provincial) partners; territorial information yet to come
For most provinces, you'll also find a link or two to related readings, a poverty group's website or a discussion paper on poverty reduction.
Recommended reading!
Source:
Campaign 2000 E-Bulletin

[Subscription and archives page]:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/enews.html
The E-Bulletin provides updates on activities to reduce and end child and family poverty across Canada with news and views, political analysis, commentary on government action or inaction, and links to the latest research and reports.

Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000.

September 2009 comparative
analysis of the antipoverty policies:

Comprehensive Policies to
Combat Poverty Across Canada, by Province

NOTE: I stumbled across this September 2009 comparative analysis of the antipoverty policies of all Canadian jurisdictions as of the summer of 2009. It's not the most timely analysis, because there have been many new developments since 2009, but I highly recommend this analysis nonetheless. It's an excellent comparison of the existing measures across jurisdictions, in table format.

Comprehensive Policies to
Combat Poverty Across Canada, by Province
(PDF - 315K, 18 pages)
September 2009
By Anika Mendel
[ Version française - fichier PDF - 310Ko., 18 pages]
 "(...)The National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy has conducted a scan of comprehensive laws and strategies. This refers to legislation, plans or strategies “that are multifaceted, crossing program areas and jurisdictions. This scan seeks to provide a descriptive overview of existing comprehensive antipoverty policies, and to guide the reader towards these policy documents and analyses of them. It also aims to provoke discussion concerning current and future policy responses to poverty."


Source:
National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy
[ Institut national de santé publique - English home page]
---
[ Centre de collaboration nationale sur les politiques publiques et la santé ]
[ Institut national de santé publique - page d'accueil en français ]

Provincial/Territorial Anti-Poverty Initiatives

Newfoundland and Labrador Poverty Reduction Strategy



Poverty Reduction

The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador's Poverty Reduction Strategy is a government-wide approach to promoting self-reliance, opportunity, and access to key supports for persons vulnerable to poverty. The strategy currently includes more than 90 ongoing initiatives that were informed by the input of the public and developed by 13 government departments and agencies in order to meet the needs of groups most vulnerable to poverty.


May 25, 2009
From the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Tracing a Path from the Past to the Future Newfoundland and Labrador (PDF - 652K, 49 pages)
By Fran Locke with Penelope Rowe,
Community Sector Council Newfoundland and Labrador

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009

---

For a good objective summary of Newfoundland and Labrador's Poverty Reduction Strategy, see:

Poverty Reduction Strategies in Quebec and in Newfoundland and Labrador
October 2007
Source:
Parliamentary Research Library
(Government of Canada)


The rest of the NL links below are in reverse chronological order.



October 1. 2015

2015 Poverty Progress Profiles
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/poverty/poverty-progress-profiles/
Posted October 1, 2015
(...)
Currently all provinces and territories, with the exception of British Columbia, have poverty strategies in place, or are in the process of developing them. To get a better sense of how each region is doing, Canada Without Poverty has compiled Poverty Progress Profiles which look at the current status of poverty, plan development and implementation or organizational appeals for a plan, and details on specific thematic areas related to poverty.

Recommended reading --- overview of historical and recent (as at Oct. 1, 2015) poverty reduction initiatives in each Canadian province and territory except British Columbia.

-------------------------------------------------------------

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Province-Poverty-Profiles_NF.pdf
* Includes a 10-to-15-page program overview (PDF file - approx. 100K )

Source:
Canada Without Poverty:
[ http://www.cwp-csp.ca/ ]

From
Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2014
:

March 27, 2014
Poverty Reduction Strategy Total Investments Surpass $1 Billion
http://www.releases.gov.nl.ca/releases/2014/aes/0327n22.htm
With approximately $170 million in Budget 2014, the total investment in the Poverty Reduction Strategy to support the Provincial Government’s long-term approach to alleviate poverty has surpassed $1 billion. A highlight of this historic investment will help the most vulnerable with $4.8 million to raise the basic rate for people receiving Income Support by five per cent, beginning July 1, with a projected investment of $32.3 million over the following five years.
- incl. info about :
* Financial Supports for Seniors and Persons with Low Incomes
* Supports for Affordable Housing and Addressing Homelessness
* Supports for Persons with Disabilities
* Supports for Children, Youth and Families

Related Backgrounder:
Supports to Help Vulnerable Populations, Seniors and Individuals with Low Incomes

http://www.releases.gov.nl.ca/releases/2014/aes/0327n23.htm

Source:
News Releases

http://www.budget.gov.nl.ca/budget2014/releases/default.htm
Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2014:
http://www.budget.gov.nl.ca/budget2014/
March 27, 2014


A tale of two provinces: a case for action against poverty
http://www.cpj.ca/content/tale-two-provinces-case-action-against-poverty-0
July 18, 2012
By Simon Lewchuk
British Columbia & Newfoundland and Labrador have more in common than being our country’s coastal bookends. Twelve years ago, they shared the distinction of having some of the highest poverty rates in the country: BC’s was the highest at 15.1 per cent while Newfoundland was a not too distant fourth place at 13.2 per cent (Low-Income Cut Off – After Tax).
Fast forward ten years, however, and a much different picture emerges. As the recently released Statistics Canada low-income data for 2010 reveals, Newfoundland now has one of the lowest poverty rates amongst the provinces, with 6.5 per cent of the population living in poverty. BC, on the other hand, still has the distinction of having, by far, the highest poverty rate amongst the provinces at 11.5 per cent. The rate in BC dropped, but less than it did in Canada as a whole over the same period (and certainly far less than in Newfoundland, which led the way with a 50.8% decrease).
So what made the difference?

Source:
Citizens for Public Justice

http://www.cpj.ca/


Responsible Social Investments in Budget 2012
Include $150 Million for Poverty Reduction
http://www.releases.gov.nl.ca/releases/2012/aes/0424n07.htm
News Release
April 24, 2012
Moving forward to provide strong social programming, including initiatives to prevent, reduce and alleviate poverty, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador is making significant investments through Budget 2012 to help this province’s most vulnerable – including $150.8 million under the Poverty Reduction Strategy, an increase of approximately $11.3 million from last year.

Source:
Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2012
People and Prosperity: Responsible Investments for a Secure Future.
http://www.budget.gov.nl.ca/budget2012/
April 24, 2012
- main budget page, includes links to all budget papers



Guide to Programs and Services
for Individuals and Families Guidebook
(HTML)
The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Programs and Services for Individuals and Families Guidebook is an initiative of the Poverty Reduction Strategy. (...)
The Guidebook provides access to basic information such as a program’s name and purpose, a telephone number, and in some cases, an email or related web site address.
Information is divided into seven general headings:
* Financial Help
* Housing, Shelter and Home Supports
* Education and Learning
* Employment (Job) Help
* Medical, Health and Wellness
* Justice Help
* Other Services of Interest
NOTE : Click the link above, then scroll down to access the PDF version of this guide; you can also order the guide in paper format and in Braille.
Source:
Newfoundland and Labrador
Poverty Reduction Strategy


Poverty Reduction Strategy 2010 Consultations Completed
December 16, 2010
The following statement was given today in the House of Assembly by the Honourable Joan Burke, Acting Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment:
I rise today in this Honourable House to provide an update on the Poverty Reduction Strategy.
In keeping with the Provincial Government’s commitment to consult the public every two years about poverty, an extensive set of consultations was conducted this past fall. In fact, this is the third set of consultations we have held since 2005, demonstrating the significance of public input in the initial development and continuation of our anti-poverty efforts. These latest consultations are especially significant, as they will help inform the development of the next four-year action plan to fight poverty in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Source:
Human Resources, Labour and Employment


Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2010

2010 Budget Highlights
March 29, 2010
"(...)Investments in Poverty Reduction:
* Total investment of $134 million this year, a total of $482.7 million since 2006.
* $2.5 million to increase the income thresholds under the Newfoundland and Labrador Prescription Drug Program Access Plan, a total investment of $139.6 million.
* $310,000 to enhance the Family Justice Services Division.
* $519,000 for the continuation of the Family Violence Intervention Court.
* $2.4 million in funding for the Supportive Living Community Partnership Initiative, doubling the amount of $1.2 million provided last year.
* $125,000 to provide community-based supports for Inuit women in Labrador to receive guidance on how to make the most of the Poverty Reduction Strategy, the Aboriginal Training Initiative, Victim Services and emerging economic activities.
* $100,000 in sustaining funding for the Newfoundland Aboriginal Women’s Network.
* Investment of $6.8 million this year in the federal-provincial Affordable Housing Program to build an additional 230 rental housing units for seniors, persons with disabilities and persons requiring supportive services.
* $17.6 million and leveraging additional federal funds to modernize more than 2,300 housing units.
* An additional $1.4 million to raise the Housing Corporation’s annual maintenance budget to $10.2 million.
* Providing $1.2 million to raise the heating allowance for the Housing Corporation’s low-income tenants.
* $70,000 in additional funding for transitional employment support services for victims of violence and $44,000 in additional funding for Women’s Centres.
* $200,000 for the continuation of the Home Heating Oil Tank Storage Replacement Assistance Program."
Source:
Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2010
March 29, 2010

[ Budgets for previous years ]

Source:
Department of Finance


Newfoundland and Labrador
Market Basket Measure
(NLMBM)
Thanks to an anonymous newsletter subscriber for pointing out that Newfoundland and Labrador's new customized Market Basket Measure doesn't appear on the Antipoverty Links page of this website. In my haste to share the link to the First Progress Report on the NL Poverty Reduction Strategy
(PDF - 4MB, 76 pages, December 2009) in last week's Canadian Social Research Newsletter, I skimmed past the section on the NLMBM in that report. According to my subscriber's email, "... NL has developed their own variation on the market basket measure, the NLMBM, which uses tax data rather than surveys, and therefore purports to capture the entire population. They've also developed a NLMBM of Housing Affordability. Part of what's interesting is that they've got gender analysis embedded in the NLMBM data that's being developed - not a claim that can be made about any of the other poverty measures."

---

In the 2006 Action Plan:
[ Reducing Poverty: An Action Plan for Newfoundland and Labrador (PDF file - 1.6MB, 60 pages), 2006]
...a commitment was made to improve capacity to measure and track progress in poverty reduction.
[Excerpts] A major innovation has been the development of the Newfoundland and Labrador Market Basket Measure (NLMBM). This new measure uses a similar approach to the federal government's Market Basket Measure (MBM). Like the MBM, it compares the incomes of families to the cost of a basket of goods and services necessary to live a productive and socially inclusive life. Unlike the MBM and all other available measures of low-income that use surveys to estimate low-income levels, the NLMBM uses tax-filer data and other sources to provide more accurate income and expense information for all tax-filers. This allows for the reporting of low-income levels in communities and neighbourhoods, as well as results for other subgroups such as different age groups or family types. This is important because it allows for the tracking of progress for different parts of the province as well as for different vulnerable groups so that it can be ensured that PRS is working for all. The NLMBM is available on Community Accounts [ www.communityaccounts.ca]

The NLMBM is developed and maintained by the Newfoundland and Labrador Statistics Agency.
In future years, NLMBM depth, persistence and other indicators of low income will be reported as they become available.

NOTE: For more info on the NLMBM, see Appendix II of the first progress report (PDF - 4MB, 76 pages, December 2009) or
request information from povertyreduction@gov.nl.ca

---
MAY 20 (2010) UPDATE:

The N&L Market Basket Measure was released in January 2010 into the Community Accounts [ www.communityaccounts.ca] data. On the Community Accounts page, the NL MBM shows as the “Incidence of Low Income” under the “Income, Consumption & Leisure” accounts. For most geographies it can be broken down by family type. Currently available for 2005.

Newfoundland and Labrador Market Basket Measure Maps are presented by Rural Secretariat Region. These maps show incidence of low income for communities by Rural Secretariat Region. They also display a Remoteness Index which is a spacial measurement of access to essential government and community services.


First Progress Report Shows Significant Results in Province’s Fight Against Poverty
News Release
December 14, 2009
Newfoundland and Labrador has realized significant improvement in the overall level of poverty since 2003. In fact, Newfoundland and Labrador has moved from being a province with one of the highest levels of poverty in Canada to the province with the third lowest level.
Today, the Honourable Susan Sullivan, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment and lead Minister for the Poverty Reduction Strategy, released Empowering People - Engaging Community - Enabling Success: First Progress Report on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. This document demonstrates that through the Poverty Reduction Strategy, the Williams Government is meeting its commitment to prevent, reduce and alleviate poverty in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Complete report:

Empowering People - Engaging Community - Enabling Success:
First Progress Report on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Poverty Reduction Strategy
(PDF - 4MB, 76 pages)
December 2009
This report provides a summary of progress achieved towards meeting the goals and objectives of the 2006-10 Poverty Reduction Strategy Action Plan:
1. Progress towards improved access to and coordination of services for people with low income
2. Progress towards a stronger social safety net
3. Progress towards improved earned incomes
4. Progress towards an increased emphasis on early childhood development
5. Progress towards a better educated population

Source:
Dept. of Human Resources, Labour and Employment

---

Related media reports (Dec. 14-15/09)

Province Making Progress on Reducing Poverty: Report
http://www.vocm.com/newsarticle.asp?mn=2&ID=3174

N.L. report on poverty says there are 30,000 fewer poor people in province
http://www.canadaeast.com/rss/article/889226

Report indicates province winning in fight against poverty
http://www.thetelegram.com/index.cfm?sid=310583&sc=79


From the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Newfoundland and Labrador: Innovative Strategies in Government-Community Collaboration (PDF - 85K, 9 pages)
By Fran Locke, Penelope Rowe and Anne Makhoul
April 2009
An ambitious experiment, Newfoundland and Labrador’s Strategic Social Plan (SSP) – unveiled in 1998 – called for involvement of the voluntary, community-based sector and citizens in policy formulation. Dismantled in 2004, it also provided the foundation for Newfoundland and Labrador’s current Rural Secretariat and its celebrated Community Accounts database.


Income Support Benefits Enhanced as Part of Poverty Reduction Strategy
April 9, 2009
The Williams Government has increased basic income support benefits by $4.3 million annually. This increase, effective April 1, is part of Budget 2009’s $132.2 million investment in poverty reduction initiatives and is in line with the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In March 2006, the Provincial Government announced it would tie income support rates to the CPI to ensure that cost of living increases are factored into the amount an individual or family receives through basic income support benefits. In doing so, Newfoundland and Labrador became one of only two provinces in Canada at the time to link its income support rates to cost of living increases.
Source:
Human Resources, Labour and Employment


Standing Strong in the Fight Against Poverty
March 26, 2009
News Release
The Williams Government continues to stand strong and lead the way in its fight against poverty by investing $132.2 million in Budget 2009 to help individuals and families with low incomes. The 18 new significant initiatives announced today will help realize the provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy’s commitment of becoming the jurisdiction with the lowest poverty rates in Canada by 2014.
Source:
Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2009


Consultations Helping to Advance the Poverty Reduction Strategy
November 13, 2008
Over the past month, the Provincial Government hosted consultations on the poverty reduction strategy across the province. There were 32 public and community roundtable stakeholder sessions held. Local residents and community group leaders attended the sessions and provided a significant contribution of their time and thoughtful insight in support of the further advancement of the Poverty Reduction Strategy. This marks the end of this phase of the consultations. However, consultation submissions are being accepted up to December 15, 2008.
Source:
Human Resources, Labour and Employment

Province of Newfoundland and Labrador
Launches Poverty Reduction Consultations
October 16, 2008
The Provincial Government is planning a series of public consultations to strengthen its Poverty Reduction Strategy. This will include a series of public sessions, round tables, focus groups, and a website. These consultations are designed to engage individuals living in poverty, the community and the general public in a dialogue on the strategy’s themes, goals and objectives. (...) The Provincial Government will hold public consultation sessions and roundtables in 15 communities across the nine rural secretariat regions of the province. Individuals and groups can also provide their feedback and views. [click the link above for other means of providing input into the consultation]
The deadline for consultation submissions was December 15, 2008.

New Poverty Reduction Benefits Now in Effect
News Release
July 7, 2008
The Provincial Government is moving forward with a series of investments to improve social benefits and improve equality for individuals and families. Effective July 1, an additional $2 million in benefits under the Poverty Reduction Strategy are being provided to strengthen the social safety net. In Budget 2008, the Provincial Government announced an investment of $12 million in new poverty reduction initiatives. That brings the total ongoing annual investment in poverty reduction to more than $100 million.

Newfoundland and Labrador Continues to
Invest to Lead the Country in Poverty Reduction Initiatives

The Williams Government continues to act on its commitment to alleviate, prevent and reduce poverty in the province with new measures that focus on improving earned incomes, strengthening the social safety net and supporting youth at risk. Budget 2008 provides an additional $9.6 million in new Poverty Reduction Strategy initiatives and this funding is in addition to the $2.4 million announced April 1 to index basic income support rates. That brings the total investment in the current fiscal year to $12 million and once fully implemented in 2009-10, the Provincial Government’s annual investment in poverty reduction will be more than $100 million.
Source:
News Releases - links to 11 news releases related to Budget 2008
[ Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2008 April 29, 2008 ]

New Poverty Reduction Benefits Now in Effect
News Release
July 7, 2008
The Provincial Government is moving forward with a series of investments to improve social benefits and improve equality for individuals and families. Effective July 1, an additional $2 million in benefits under the Poverty Reduction Strategy are being provided to strengthen the social safety net. In Budget 2008, the Provincial Government announced an investment of $12 million in new poverty reduction initiatives. That brings the total ongoing annual investment in poverty reduction to more than $100 million.

Government Increases Income Support Benefits
April 1, 2008
In accordance with the Consumer Price Index (CPI), effective today April 1, the Williams Government, as part of the Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS), is increasing basic income support benefits by $2.4 million annually. (...) The PRS is focused on reducing, alleviating and preventing poverty in the province. Over a 10-year period, Newfoundland and Labrador intends to move from the jurisdiction with the highest poverty rates to one with the lowest in Canada.

Province Supports Tax Measures and Support Trusts for People with Disabilities
News Release
March 31, 2008
The Provincial Government has amended regulations to support improvements to the tax system for individuals with low incomes, and people with disabilities and their families by exempting both the federal Working Income Tax Benefit and the Registered Disability Saving Plan from the calculation of Income Support benefits. The two exemptions are effective April 1, 2008.

Opposition Fails to Understand Poverty Reduction Strategy
June 14, 2007
News Release
The Honourable Shawn Skinner, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, said he is disappointed with claims by the Opposition that government is failing in the fight against poverty in our province.

Government Increases Basic Income Support Benefits
March 30, 2007
Effective April 1, government will fulfill another key commitment to poverty reduction by providing an additional $3 million annually to further increase basic income support. This will be accomplished by tying the basic income support rate to the provincial consumer price index (CPI) which means an increase of 1.8 per cent.

Budget 2007 - A vision of opportunity with New Actions to Address Poverty

Budget 2006 - The Right Choices: Reducing Poverty; Increasing Self Reliance


Province reaffirms commitment to poverty reduction
News Release
May 26, 2006
Paul Shelley, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, is pleased to announce the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador has decided that Income Support (social assistance) payments will not be affected by the introduction of the new federal Universal Child Care Benefit. (...) The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador is developing an integrated poverty reduction strategy. Budget 2006 included a significant investment to help people move ahead and break the cycle of poverty. (...) The full strategy will be released later this spring.

Increased income support rates will add up to reduced poverty: Minister*
March 29, 2006
News Release
Budget 2006 will make major investments in a broad range of programs and services that will help the working poor, youth-at-risk, and families with low incomes, says Paul Shelley, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, and the lead minister for government’s poverty reduction strategy.
[*NOTE: as part of its increased supports to people in need, the provincial govt. will start indexing welfare benefit levels as of 2007-08; rates will be tied to the Newfoundland and Labrador Consumer Price Index. Québec is the only other Canadian jurisdiction that indexes its rates every year based on the prevailing rate of inflation. This is a sound policy that prevents households receiving welfare from falling further behind because of ongoing increases in the cost of living. Congratulations, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, on this progressive social policy!]

March 30, 2006
The Right Choices: Reducing Poverty; Increasing Self Reliance
(part of Budget 2006 - March 30/06)
Departments of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, Health and Community Services and Education
- includes a backgrounder with more detailed info
"The Williams government is removing barriers to employment and providing assistance to those who need it most through a sweeping investment in initiatives designed to combat poverty, announced Paul Shelley, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, and the lead minister for government’s poverty reduction strategy. Budget 2006 outlines government’s integrated approach to poverty reduction, unveiling investments of over $30.5 million in 2006-07 and $62 million annually to support an expanded eligibility for the prescription drug program, the elimination of school fees, increases to income support programs, and enhanced Adult Basic Education (ABE) offerings. This initial phase of the poverty reduction strategy is a strong basis for meeting government’s pledge to significantly reduce poverty in Newfoundland and Labrador."

Poverty Reduction Strategies in Quebec and in Newfoundland and Labrador
26 October 2007
Source:
Parliamentary Research Library
(Government of Canada)

Report on poverty reduction workshops rich with insights
News Release
December 20, 2005
"A report on what was heard in workshops about poverty across Newfoundland and Labrador illustrates how broad and complex the challenge of reducing poverty is, says Paul Shelley, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment. (...) In the 2005 Speech from the Throne and Budget, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador committed to develop a comprehensive, government-wide poverty reduction strategy. Funding of $200,000 was committed in March 2005 to develop this strategy. The consultants’ report on workshops held this summer is one component of this work."

Complete report:

Report on Workshop Sessions on the Development of a Poverty Reduction Strategy (241K, 61 pages)
October 2005
Prepared by management consultants Goss Gilroy Inc.

Related Link:

Building pathways to poverty reduction - (backgrounder about the government’s strategic approach to reducing poverty)
March 21, 2005
Human Resources, Labour and Employment
"Joan Burke, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, said today that several Budget 2005 measures help lessen poverty in Newfoundland and Labrador, including funding for the development of a strategic plan on addressing the issue of poverty."
- highlights include a two-part increase in income support (welfare) for couples and single clients without children (1% in July 2005 and 1% in January 2006), a 10% increase in the earnings exemption level and more funds for employment-related activities for people with disabilities, for the Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit and for "a second pilot project to assist single parents in receipt of income support prepare for, find and keep employment."

-------------------------------------------------

Reducing Poverty in Newfoundland and Labrador - Background Report and Workbook (PDF file - 1.5MB, 44 pages)
Government of Newfoundland and Labrador
June 2005
"In the 2005 Speech from the Throne, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador committed to refine and implement a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy in collaboration with stakeholders both within and outside the government. This document is designed to provide readers with background information on poverty in the province, current initiatives being undertaken by the provincial government and ideas for future action."
Selected content from the background report:
Poverty and its Determinants - Profile of those Living in Poverty - Low income in Newfoundland and Labrador - Incidence of Poverty - Rural and Urban Poverty - Depth of Poverty - Persistence - Factors Influencing Poverty - The Provincial Labour Market - Current Initiatives of the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador - Income Support (welfare) Program - Career, Employment and Youth Services - Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit (NLCB) - Low Income Tax Reduction Program - Initiatives for Children and Families - Initiatives to Increase Women’s Economic Security - Minimum Wage - Housing Supports - What Are other Jurisdictions Doing to Reduce Poverty? (Quebec, rest of Canada, Ireland, Scotland) - Recommendations from Community-Based Groups - Tax Relief - Asset Building Approaches - Finding the Right Policy Mix - more...
+ workbook for citizens to complete and return to the provincial government.

Work on the development of a provincial poverty strategy kicks into high gear
News Release
June 24, 2005
Joan Burke, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, announced that workshops will begin today on the development of a strategy to reduce the level of poverty in Newfoundland and Labrador. The sessions, to be held in approximately 10 communities over a two-week period, will engage those working with community-based, labour and business organizations and is just one of several activities planned to gather input on how best to reduce poverty in the province."

Preparing our youth for success
March 21, 2005
Human Resources, Labour and Employment
"Joan Burke, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, says Budget 2005 places a renewed focus on the young people of Newfoundland and Labrador, especially those youth who live in poverty and who rely on income support. 'Low education levels, a lack of a high school diploma and limited work experience are key characteristics of a dependence on income support from one generation to the next and a cycle of poverty,' said Minister Burke. 'In 2003 youth, 18 to 29 years old, represented one-quarter of the income support caseload and almost 50 per cent of all new entrants. These numbers are alarming and are an indication of many complex issues that require a focused, coordinated approach.'"

Minimum wage earners in Newfoundland and Labrador to see increase in pay
News Release
January 6, 2005
"Joan Burke, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, announced today that government has approved a $1 increase to the province’s minimum wage. The increase will be implemented in four 25 cent increments over a two-year period. (...) The minimum wage in Newfoundland and Labrador is currently $6 per hour. That wage will increase by 25 cents to $6.25 effective June 1, 2005, to $6.50 effective January 1, 2006, to $6.75 effective June 1, 2006 and to $7 effective January 1, 2007."
Related Links: go to the Minimum Wage Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

New Income and Employment Support Act and Regulations
News Release
December 7, 2004
"The new Income and Employment Support Act and the accompanying Income and Employment Support Regulations (...) replace the outdated Social Assistance Act and Regulations which have been in effect since 1977.
The new act better reflects the Department of Human Resources, Labour and Employment’s two major areas of responsibility: providing income support in a stable dignified manner to eligible individuals and families; and delivering programs and services that support individuals in achieving their employment and career goals.

Income and Employment Support Act, S.N.L. 2002, c. I-0.1
(proclaimed November 30, 2004)

Income and Employment Support Regulations
(O.C. 2004-461 - Filed November 26, 2004 )

Related Links:

Income and Employment Support Act introduced in House of Assembly
November 19, 2002
- incl. backgrounder : the consultation process, key changes, next steps

Department moves to next step of Redesign Initiative
News Release
May 11, 2004
- consolidation of 20 district welfare offices, redeployment of staff, total number of actual layoffs ~30 staff throughout the province

Mothers and families encouraged to take advantage of Mother Baby Nutrition Supplement
New Release
July 7, 2003

Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit rate increase
July 4, 2003

Income and Employment Support Act introduced in House of Assembly
November 19, 2002

Minister announces changes to current income support regulations
November 19, 2002

Minister announces consultation findings
August 5, 2002
News Release
Human Resources and Employment
"Ralph Wiseman, Minister of Human Resources and Employment, released today the Report of a Consultation on the Social Assistance Act. The report is a summary of the department’s community consultations concerning the review of the Social Assistance Act and Regulations. The findings from these consultations will assist the Department of Human Resources and Employment as it drafts the new legislation."

Minister releases report on supported employment (for persons with developmental disabilities)
May 9, 2002
Human Resources and Employment
"Ralph Wiseman, Minister of Human Resources and Employment, today released an evaluation of his department’s Supported Employment Initiative."
Summative Evaluation of the Supported Employment Initiative
(PDF file - 412K, 142 pages)

Budget 2002-2003 News Releases
March 21, 2002
Changes to NLCB help low income families
For the second consecutive year, low income families with children will be able to earn more money and still qualify for the Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit (NLCB).
Department’s innovative changes continue
With a series of recent initiatives, the Department of Human Resources and Employment continues its major redesign of programs and services to assist persons on social assistance achieve independence and extend support to low income working families.
Backgrounders

- Social Assistance Review - province-wide public consultations now underway, scheduled for completion in April - new legislation to be tabled in the fall 2002
- Employment Assistance Programs
- info about NewfoundJOBS - Linkages Youth Employment - Supported Employment - Single Parent Employment Support Program - Employability Assistance for People with Disabilities - more...

Review of Social Assistance Act under way
Press Release
January 7, 2002
"Gerald Smith, Minister of Human Resources and Employment, announced today the beginning of a review process which will help in updating the department's Social Assistance Act and Regulations. This is the first review of the legislation in its entirety since 1977.
(...)
Following the consultation process, which should conclude early this spring, the information gathered will be used when drafting the new Social Assistance Act and Regulations. The new legislation is expected to be introduced in late 2002."

Government committed to reducing child poverty in province
News Release
December 7, 2001
"... government’s commitment to addressing the issue [of child poverty] as demonstrated by the significant range of initiatives undertaken in recent years..."
- includes a brief snapshot of almost a dozen such initiatives - social assistance redesign, the Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit, Early Childhood Development and other health and literacy programs for children


Related Links:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/socupr.htm
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd.htm

Changes in legislation benefit people living with disability
News Release
October 26, 2001
Government has approved the necessary regulatory changes recommended by the Departments of Human Resources and Employment and Health and Community Services to exempt support trusts when determining eligibility for social assistance and supportive services for people living with a disability.

Minister gives update on redesign initiatives
Human Resources and Employment 

October 10, 2000 

Julie Bettney, Minister of Human Resources and Employment, announced today the latest details on initiatives designed to improve service for income support clients. The initiatives, which went into effect on October 1, include an extended drug card for singles and families without children, a new liquid assets policy, and a revised rate structure for singles over 29. On an annual basis, these supports are valued at $1.7 million. More...

Implementation of Province’s Strategic Social Plan–on target, on time, says Bettney
July 7, 2000 

The SSP is a vision for social change developed by and for the people of Newfoundland and Labrador

New initiatives announced
Human Resources and Employment 

May 15, 2000 

"...three new initiatives designed to help reduce barriers to employment and make it easier for people on income support to enter or return to the workforce"
- incl. an extended drug card for singles and families without children, a new liquid assets policy, and a revised rate structure for singles over 29. 

All three measures are effective October 1, 2000 

Strategic Social Plan demonstration projects approved 
July 23, 1999 

Funding available for Strategic Social Plan demonstration projects

May 4, 1999 

Statement by the Minister of Human Resources and Employment concerning

Demonstration Projects under the Strategic Social Plan

May 4, 1999 

March 1999 Budget: 
- Income support and employment initiatives

- New Low Income Seniors' Benefit introduced

Initiatives to improve the financial position of social assistance clients
(January 29,1999) 

Strategic Social Plan (December 1, 1998 Press Release) 

First meeting of Premier's Council on Social Development
Strategic Social Plan Welfare Reform - October 26, 1998 (Executive Council) 

Premier Unveils Strategic Social Plan
(Press Release, August 31, 1998) 

The Strategic Social Plan (SSP) - 1998 blueprint for welfare reform
- includes links to the full report (large file, available only in .PDF format), the press release, application forms for funding of demonstration projects under SSP and the SSP newsletter 

Report of the Social Policy Advisory Committee (April 1, 1997)

- Go to the Newfoundland and Labrador Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nfbkmrk.htm

[GO BACK TO THE TOP OF THIS PAGE]

Prince Edward Island

Guaranteed livable income plan possible, Ghiz confirms:
Premier would like to see P.E.I. as centre of pilot project

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/guaranteed-livable-income-plan-possible-ghiz-confirms-1.2597948
April 4, 2014
P.E.I. Premier Robert Ghiz says he doesn't expect he will discuss the idea of a guaranteed livable income with the current federal government. (CBC)
Premier Robert Ghiz says he'd like to see P.E.I. become the site of a pilot project for a guaranteed livable income in Canada.
The idea has been brought up by various community groups, but this is the first endorsement by the provincial government.

Source:
CBC News

http://www.cbc.ca/news/

---------------------------------------------------------

From
PEI Community Services and Seniors:

Social Action Plan outlines direction to prevent and reduce poverty
http://www.gov.pe.ca/newsroom/index.php3?number=news&newsnumber=8398&dept=&lang=E
May 30, 2012
News Release
Prince Edward Island’s Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty maps out how government will protect and support low income Islanders over the next three years, says Minister of Community Services and Seniors Valerie E. Docherty.
(...)
The Social Action Plan protects and builds on many existing social programs such as health care, education, early learning and child care. In addition to these services, the provincial government invests more than $100 million each year in programs directly aimed at reducing poverty, and tens of millions more in programs that prevent poverty and support social inclusion. Since 2009, more than $16 million in new funding has been added to these programs.

Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty - main page
http://www.gov.pe.ca/sss/index.php3?number=1043012&lang=E
- links to all PEI poverty reduction papers including the Action Plan itself as well as the related documents and backgrounders below:

Prince Edward Island : Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty (PDF - 284K, 16 pages)
http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_sapspeech.pdf
May 2012
"The Social Action Plan fulfills a commitment made in the 2010 Speech from the Throne. That commitment was followed by a poverty reduction discussion paper which was the starting point of many discussions and consultations. We heard from the diverse voices of our Island population: people living in poverty, people with disabilities, representatives of business, labour, health, women, Aboriginal persons, as well as newcomers. "

Backgrounders [small PDF files]:

* Seniors [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback1.pdf ]

* Social Assistance Program [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback2.pdf ]

* Social Housing [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback3.pdf ]

* Support for Islanders with Disabilities [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback4.pdf ]

* Support for Low Income Islanders [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback5.pdf ]

Related Documents [PDF files]:

* Discussion Paper - Preventing and Reducing Poverty in Prince Edward Island: A Strategy for Engagement (PDF - 803K, 52 pages)
http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/cssl_povertyred.pdf
July 2011
[ Version française du document de discussion ]

* Summary of the discussion paper (PDF - 770K, 7 pages)
http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/cssl_povsummE.pdf
[ Version française du résumé du document de discussion - (PDF - 1Mo., 7 pages):
http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/cssl_povsummF.pdf ]

Source:
PEI Community Services and Seniors
http://www.gov.pe.ca/sss/

Government of Prince Edward Island
http://www.gov.pe.ca/

---

Related links:

Missed Opportunity for PEI Poverty Strategy
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/05/31/missed-opportunity-for-pei-poverty-strategy/
By Angella MacEwen
May 31, 2012
The government of Prince Edward Island has introduced a Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty, following community consultations, including face-to-face meetings and written submissions by community groups. (...) Given that Christine Saulnier and I estimated that poverty costs the PEI government just under $100 million per year in 2009 (The Cost of Poverty in PEI [ http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/cost-poverty-prince-edward-island-2011 ] ), any new investments in poverty elimination are welcome. Also welcome is the recognition that spending needs to be focused on investments, such as affordable housing, weatherizing and repairs to existing housing, adult literacy, and early childhood education. Most notably missing from Wednesday’s announcement is a set of clear goals, and a mechanism for evaluating progress towards those goals.
(...)
For a serious poverty reduction and elimination ‘Action Plan’, governments must honestly assess need, set clear goals, and transparently monitor progress towards those goals. If there is no method to evaluate progress and success, then there is also no method to enforce poverty reduction and elimination, and there is the risk that it becomes a purely cosmetic exercise.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum Blog
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/relentless/

---

From CBC PEI:
http://www.cbc.ca/pei/

Government maps out poverty plan
The province will spend an extra $4 million to help people at risk

May 30, 2012
The P.E.I. government mapped out plans Wednesday to protect and support low income Islanders over the next three years. Community Services and Seniors Minister Valerie Docherty said the province will spend an extra $4 million to help supplement rent, to establish two new daycares and to help seniors renovate their own homes

Related CBC PEI Stories:

* Crane calls for P.E.I. poverty reduction plan
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2011/11/26/pei-crane-poverty-reduction-584.html
Nov 26, 2011

* Poverty reduction plan delayed
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2011/05/17/pei-poverty-reduction-delayed-584.html
May 17, 2011

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Province seeks feedback on poverty reduction discussion paper
News Release
July 18, 2011
[ Version française du communiqué ]
Islanders are being asked to help shape a strategy to prevent and reduce poverty in Prince Edward Island, says Community Services, Seniors and Labour Minister Janice Sherry. The provincial government released a detailed paper today with information on trends, impacts and programs, as well as questions for the public to consider when providing input on how to reduce poverty in Prince Edward Island.
(...)
The discussion paper on a poverty reduction strategy contains sections on:
• Measures and definitions of poverty
• Poverty reduction strategies in Atlantic Canada and work to date in Prince Edward Island
• Patterns and trends in poverty in Prince Edward Island
• Profiles of high risk groups
• Impacts of poverty and a rationale for taking action
• Descriptions of the various programs and services that could form part of the strategy
• Consultation process and questions for public consideration

The discussion paper:

Preventing and Reducing Poverty in Prince Edward Island: A Strategy for Engagement (PDF - 803K, 52 pages)
Discussion paper
July 2011
[ Version française du document de discussion - ]
Table of contents:
* Introduction: Towards One Island Society
* Definitions and Methodology
* Poverty Reduction Initiatives in Atlantic Canada
* A Profile of Poverty on Prince Edward Island
* Populations at Risk
* Other Key Populations
* Impacts of Poverty: Why a Poverty Reduction Strategy is Needed
* Overcoming Poverty in Prince Edward Island
* Preventing Poverty
* Promoting Social Inclusion
* Reducing Poverty
* Potential Elements of a Poverty Reduction Strategy
* Next Steps
* References

Summary of the discussion paper (PDF - 770K, 7 pages)
[ Version française
du résumé du document de discussion
- (PDF - 1Mo., 7 pages) ]

Your comments
NOTE: Because there is no "s" after the "http" in the URL for the electronic comments form, the answers and comments you provide will not be encrypted for security/privacy.

---

The advice and input from Islanders will be drawn together as it is received, and made public in the fall of 2011, to support further discussion of solutions, approaches, and priorities. This work will lead to the completion of PEI’s first Social Action Plan to reduce poverty, in 2012.

Source:
Preventing and Reducing Poverty in PEI - A strategy for engagement
[
PEI Community Services, Seniors and Labour ]

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Poverty costs PEI over $240 million a year
News Release
January 26, 2011
It is estimated that the total cost of poverty in Prince Edward Island is at minimum between $240 and $320 million per year, which corresponds to about $1,720 and $2,265 per person, per year. These costs are calculated in The Cost of Poverty in PEI, published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia (CCPA-NS), in partnership with Poverty Bites and the MacKillop Centre for Social Justice.

The report:

The Cost of Poverty in Prince Edward Island (PDF - 361K, 7 pages)
"(...) The average poverty rate for unattached individuals in PEI is similar to the Atlantic Canadian average, and higher than the national average. When you look at a breakdown of unattached individuals low income rates, one group stands out – using the Market Basket Measure (MBM), in PEI 29% of unattached men and women over 65 are living in low income, compared to 5% Canada wide, and 14% for Atlantic Canada (see Figure 3 in the report)."

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia (CCPA-NS)
[ CCPA National Office ]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Prince Edward Island is the latest
province to commit to a poverty reduction strategy.

From the PEI Throne Speech (November 12, 2010):
(...) in the New Year, my government will release a Poverty Reduction discussion paper that will begin the process, in consultation with Islanders, of examining further options to improve the well -being of Islanders who are vulnerable are in need. (...) On April 1, 2011, my government will end the so-called ‘clawback’ of the National Child Benefit from our families on Social Assistance.

Also from the same Throne Speech:

“...on April 1, 2011, my government will end the so-called ‘clawback’ of the National Child Benefit from our families on Social Assistance. [See the next link below.]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
PEI Advisory Council
on the Status of Women:

PEI Equality Report Card (PDF - 403K, 20 pages)
June 2009
During the 2007 election, the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women introduced its plan for an Equality Report Card for PEI, and in June 2008, we published the first, pilot report. The Equality Report Card is a process to assess our Province’s progress towards women’s equality goals.
(...)
We urge the government to consult and collaborate with community-based organizations to develop a Poverty Reduction Strategy like those in other provinces. We see the three priority areas below as key elements of Poverty Reduction:
* Improvements to the Employment Standards Act * Investment in affordable, accessible, appropriate housing (incl. housing for seniors and persons with disabilities * Increase direct allowances to social services recipients to
cover all of their basic needs.
(...)
There has been no action towards the promised Poverty Reduction Strategy to consider how we are doing across the province and across departments to assist people who live in poverty. There is no political will to name the problem of poverty and to provide poverty reduction initiatives. The full-time position in government that is meant to be dedicated to Poverty Reduction has been vacant for over a year.

Source:
PEI Advisory Council
on the Status of Women

The PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women was established to advise the Minister Responsible with respect to matters relating to the status of women, the development of public awareness regarding issues affecting women, and the promotion of change in attitudes within the community in order that women may enjoy an equality of opportunity.
[ Related Press Release : Government Earns a C on 2009 Equality Report Card - June 16, 2009 ]

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May 25, 2009
New resource from the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Prince Edward Island:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Prince Edward Island
(PDF - 401K, 34 pages)
By Kathleen Flanagan

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership

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Social advocate encouraged by
commitment to poverty eradication strategy

February 24, 2009
By Jim Day
Talk is cheap when poverty eradication is on the table.
Yet Mary Boyd, one of the province’s most determined social advocates, liked what she heard from those in power last week.
Premier Robert Ghiz and Health and Social Services and Seniors Minister Doug Currie made a brief appearance Thursday at a workshop held by Island organizations Poverty Bites and the MacKillop Centre for Social Justice aimed at renewing efforts for action on the seemingly insurmountable goal of eliminating poverty in P.E.I.
Ghiz urged the group to not let up on government in pushing for change.
“It is important to stay at the forefront of issues,” he told the gathering that consisted of many people Boyd described as the voice of those suffering in poverty.
Source:
The Charlottetown Guardian

 

[GO BACK TO THE TOP OF THIS PAGE]

Nova Scotia Poverty Reduction Strategy



Nova Scotia Poverty Reduction Strategy

April 2009
The Nova Scotia government released its Poverty Reduction Strategy on April 3, 2009.
The strategy provides a framework for addressing the needs of those most vulnerable and those at risk of falling into poverty, while promoting the prosperity necessary for Nova Scotia to grow. The vision for 2020: to break the cycle of poverty by creating opportunities for all Nova Scotians to participate in the prosperity of the province and enjoy a better standard of living.

The three main goals of the strategy are:
1. Enable and reward work
2. Improve supports for those in need
3. Focus on our children
4. Collaborate and coordinate

Poverty Reduction Strategy Released
News release
April 3, 2009
Training low-skilled workers, increasing affordable housing and improving benefits for low-income families are the focus of Nova Scotia's $155 million Poverty Reduction Strategy. Community Services Minister Chris d'Entremont and Labour and Workforce Development Minister Mark Parent introduced the strategy today, April 3, in Kentville. It responds to a series of recommendations from the Poverty Reduction Working Group, which was mandated through legislation supported by all three parties.

Nova Scotia’s Poverty Reduction Strategy:
Preventing Poverty, Promoting Prosperity
(PDF - 1.4MB, 45 pages)
- April 2009

Background Information
- includes a brief overview of the 16-month process that preceded the release of the Poverty Reduction Strategy in April 2009, along with links to the Poverty Reduction Working Group Report, the Poverty questionnaire results and a news release on the Working Group's recommendations.

Quotes, quick facts and summary of investments
- includes links (down the right-hand margin of the page) to audio commentary on the Poverty Reduction Strategy by both ministers responsible.

Source:
Community Services
Labour and Workforce Development

---------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------

The links below are in reverse chronological order.

From the Nova Scotia Office
of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

Fast Facts: Let's Make Poverty Reduction a Priority (PDF - 165K, 2 pages)
(...) Overall progress on poverty reduction has been slow for many reasons, including the lack of federal commitment to poverty reduction and the
weakness of Nova Scotia’s poverty reduction strategy. In addition, we are told governments have no choice but to focus on balancing budgets and paying down deficits as quickly as possible. As the Alternative Federal Budget and the Nova Scotia Alternative Budget have shown year after year, governments do have a range of choices that remain fiscally responsible.
Source:
Nova Scotia Alternative Budget 2011

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - Nova Scotia Office
[ CCPA National Office ]

---------------------------

The Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Card 2010 : 1989–2008 (PDF - 816K, 27 pages)
by Lesley Frank
November 24, 2010
This year’s report card examines the period 1989 to 2008, the year for which the most recent data is available. It also reviews changes for a later period (1997 to 2008) to assess the impact of the 1998 National Child Benefit initiative, which is specifically aimed at preventing and reducing child poverty.

News Release:

14,000 children in Nova Scotia still living in poverty is 14,000 too many
November 24, 2010
HALIFAX, NS –Twenty-one years ago (in 1989), the government of Canada promised to end child poverty by the year 2000. In 2000, not only had they not kept the promise - the child poverty rate was even higher. Today, ten years after the goal date, the broken promise remains. This year’s annual report published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives –Nova Scotia and Campaign 2000 reports that 14,000 Nova Scotia children were living in poverty in 2008. Based on the most recent available data (for 2008), the report card shows that there has been some progress made, however.

Earlier related report
from the CCPA Nova Scotia Office:

The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia (PDF - 822K, 34 pages)
October 2010
The Nova Scotia Government’s 2009 Poverty Reduction Strategy sets out dual goals of reducing poverty and creating opportunities for prosperity. Inherent in this vision is an understanding that when we help those in need, we make Nova Scotia a better place to live for everyone. As has been so aptly demonstrated by the research of Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett in their book The Spirit Level [Facebook link], money spent on reducing poverty and inequality is an investment in all of our futures. [Excerpt from the Introduction]

Poverty costs Nova Scotia over $1billion a year
News Release

October 16, 2010
HALIFAX - The total economic cost of poverty in Nova Scotia is at least $1.5 to $2.2 billion dollars per year, accounting for between 5% - 7% of Nova Scotia’s GDP in 2008. The portion of the total cost borne by society (the social cost) is at least $500 to $650 million dollars. This corresponds to 6% - 8% of Nova Scotia’s 2007/2008 budget, or around $1,400 to $1,700 for each Nova Scotian household

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - Nova Scotia Office
[ CCPA National Office ]
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.


NOTE:
This is one of a series of provincial reports all released under the Campaign 2000 banner on November 24 (2010), the anniversary of the 1989 unanimous House of Commons resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000. For links to the complete collection of federal and provincial reports and (selected) related media coverage, go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

Related materials:

Fast Facts: The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia PDF - 400K, 2 pages)
October 2010
The estimated economic costs of poverty for 2008 are broken down as follows:
1. Health Care Costs: $241 million or 6.7% of the Nova Scotia government’s health care budget.
2. Crime Costs: between $30 and $60 million represents Nova Scotia’s costs as a per capita share of the national cost of crime.
3. Cycle of Poverty or Intergenerational transfer of poverty costs: between $12 and $21 million in social costs and $91 to $160 million/year after taxes in private costs.
4. Lost productivity – $135 to $200 million in lost government revenue (the social cost) and $930 million to $1.3 billion in lost market income (the private cost).

Source:
CCPA Nova Scotia Office
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) ]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Nova Scotia Report Card on Child and Family Poverty 2009 (PDF - 214K, 23 pages)
November 2009
While Nova Scotia remains within the group of provinces with lower rates of child poverty, policymakers and elected representatives (those with the power to legislate the end of poverty) must act quickly and decisively to expand the progress achieved in recent years. Specific, targeted policies are needed to ensure that poverty rates and gaps are The Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Card 2009 Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives–Nova Scotia 18 reduced for particular groups where there is greater risk of children and their families being exposed to poverty and the potential harm it carries. Most notably, income assistance rates need to be increased to a level that will provide families with children, who depend on welfare income, an annual income that will raise families out of poverty.

15,000 Nova Scotia children still in poverty
Press Release
November 23, 2009
HALIFAX, NS - Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Cards have recorded changes in child poverty since 1999. Each annual card has tracked progress on the government of Canada’s 1989 promise to end child poverty. The report released today, by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Nova Scotia, is the tenth card, and is being released on the 20th anniversary of Canada’s promise to eliminate poverty by the year 2000.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - Nova Scotia Office
[ CCPA National Office ]

Related link
Campaign 2000

---

A Poverty Reduction Strategy for Nova Scotia (PDF - 47K, 9 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
November 2009
In December 2007, the Government of Nova Scotia passed Bill 94, An Act to Establish a Poverty Reduction Working Group in Nova Scotia. The mandate of the Working Group was to prepare a report recommending strategies and priorities to reduce poverty. Based on the recommendations of the Working Group, the Government of Nova Scotia released on April 3, 2009 its Poverty Reduction Strategy entitled Preventing Poverty, Promoting Prosperity. The Strategy puts forward a framework for tackling the needs of persons living in and at risk of falling into poverty, while promoting prosperity for the province. Preventing Poverty, Promoting Prosperity is a multi-year plan with four main goals: enable and reward work, invest in households in need, focus on children, and coordinate and collaborate. The paper describes the various measures that have been undertaken or are being planned in order to achieve each of these goals.
Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

---


May 25, 2009
New resource from the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Nova Scotia:
The Causes and Consequences of Poverty:
Understanding Divisions and Disparities in Social and Economic Development in Nova Scotia

(PDF - 440K, 43 pages)
By Christine Saulnier, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (Nova Scotia Office)

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership

N.S. anti-poverty plan focuses on housing, retraining
April 3, 2009
The Nova Scotia government is promising to spend millions of dollars on new housing and retraining as part of a multi-year strategy to reduce poverty. Community Services Minister Chris d'Entremont said the idea is to help low-income Nova Scotians by giving them proper shelter and a chance to get a job. Under the $155-million plan, people on income assistance only get a modest increase to offset the cost of living.
Source:
CBC Nova Scotia

---

The Poverty Reduction Strategy Working Group has handed
government its recommendations on how to best tackle poverty in Nova Scotia

News Release
June 26, 2008
Group members come from organizations representing diverse interests, many of which work with people struggling with poverty. The group met every two weeks over the winter and spring to develop recommendations for the province's poverty reduction strategy. It presented its recommendations to Judy Streatch, Minister of Community Services, and Mark Parent, Minister of Labour and Workforce Development, co-leads for the strategy, at a meeting today, June 26.
(...)
Recommendations from the group include improving access to transportation, education and training for low-income Nova Scotians, more support for the disabled, a continued increase in supports to families during the early years of a child's life, a consolidation and enhancement of low-income pharmacare programs, and a change in description of the Employment and Income Assistance Program from a program of last resort to a simple program of support.

Complete report:

Report of the Nova Scotia
Poverty ReductionWorking Group
(PDF - 129K, 41 pages)
Draft dated June 26
Target Areas for Action:
* Awareness and Engagement * Employment Supports and Income * Disability Issues * Transportation
* Education and Skills Training * Housing * Child Care and Early Childhood Development * Health

Results of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Questionnaire:
A summary of the public consultation on
poverty reduction in Nova Scotia
(PDF - 333K, 17 pages)
May 2008

Source:
Department of Community Services

Related link:

Fighting poverty: Major attitude shift needed [expired link]
By Katherine Reed
July 10, 2008
The Working Group on Poverty Reduction appointed by the province last December released its draft report recently and immediately invoked the ire of activists by insisting on waiting for a year to actually take action. In a July 1 article in The Chronicle Herald, Wayne McNaughton, co-chair of Community Action on Homelessness, pointedly asked why this was the case and why the government was not ready with costed-out proposals to respond to the report. Why indeed?
The measures required to meaningfully address poverty in Nova Scotia are substantial and would only come about as a result of a massive change of attitude and approach. I wonder if anyone has the stomach for it, frankly.
Source:
The Chronicle-Herald (Halifax)

-----------------------------------------

From the Nova Scotia Department of Community Services:

Government Seeks Public Input on Poverty Strategy
News Release
March 5, 2008
The province is inviting the public to share ideas on how to best tackle poverty in Nova Scotia. People are encouraged to fill out a questionnaire on what types of actions can be taken to reduce poverty. The public consultations will help government develop a long-term poverty-reduction strategy for Nova Scotia. The initiative is being co-led by the departments of Community Services and Environment and Labour, in co-operation with a poverty-reduction strategy working group. The group, made up of organizations with diverse interests, will make recommendations on strategy content and implementation.

There are three ways the public can share comments:
-- Fill out a short questionnaire online. [expired March 2008]
-- Fill out the questionnaire at any provincial government building, Department of Community Services office or Access Nova Scotia location.
-- Request a questionnaire or share thoughts by calling, toll-free, 1-888-825-2111.

In November, the first phase of consultations was held with representatives from a diverse range of provincial organizations interested in the fight against poverty. The questionnaire is phase two of the consultations. The public's comments will be added to information gathered from consultations across government on a variety of issues that affect poverty.

NOTE : The consultation ended in March 2008.

Poverty Backgrounder
Research and statistics about poverty in Nova Scotia, including:.
* How is poverty measured in Canada? * What is the low-income cut-off (LICO)? * In Nova Scotia, how many people live in low-income? What about children? * How do Nova Scotia's low-income statistics compare with the rest of Canada? * What are some characteristics of Nova Scotia's low-income population? * Where does Nova Scotia's low-income population live? * Is there any way to tell how poor low-income Nova Scotians are? * Social Trends in Nova Scotia - 2007 * Statistical Links

Related links:

Our Kids Are Worth It: Strategy for Children and Youth
December 3, 2007

Our Framework for Social Prosperity - Weaving the Threads: A Lasting Social Fabric
November 30, 2007

Government to Hold Poverty Reduction Consultations
October 10, 2007
(starting November 1)
The provincial government will hold a series of consultations this fall designed to get the community's input on how to best tackle poverty in Nova Scotia.
The consultations will be part of the government's development of a poverty strategy for Nova Scotia. The initiative will be co-led by the departments of Community Services and Environment and Labour.
Source:
Department of Community Services

Poverty fight needs credibility (dead link)
October 15, 2007
Many Nova Scotians would agree that the province needs a comprehensive anti-poverty strategy, especially to improve the lot of the 19,000 children living below what’s conventionally regarded as the poverty line. But now that the government is promising to develop, one the question is how sincere the Tories are and when we might see such a thing implemented.
The government is planning a two-day consultation with anti-poverty groups and other experts for Nov. 1 and 2, after which a public consultation is planned as well. The government has been studying anti-poverty strategies in jurisdictions such as Newfoundland and Labrador, Quebec and Ireland.
Source:
The Cape Breton Post

Framework for a Poverty Reduction Strategy in Nova Scotia (PDF - 351K, 38 pages)
October 17, 2007
"(...) The framework includes the context, key concepts and strategies that will be necessary to reduce poverty in Nova Scotia."
Source:
Nova Scotia Poverty Reduction Strategy Coalition

- Go to the Nova Scotia Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nsbkmrk.htm

 

[GO BACK TO THE TOP OF THIS PAGE]

Bringing the Pieces Together: New Brunswick's poverty reduction plan



NOTE: For the latest information on poverty
reduction in New Brunswick, scroll down past this yellow box.

The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation
The Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation will lead and co-ordinate the implementation of Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan. The co-chairs and president are members of a 22-member board of directors representing government; business; community non-profit organizations; and persons having experienced poverty

Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation Publications
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/esic/publications.html

--------------------

Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation to hold public sessions to renew poverty reduction plan
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/esic/news/news_release.2013.08.0807.html
News Release
26 August 2013

FREDERICTON (GNB) – A series of public dialogue sessions will be held this autumn by the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation, leading to a renewal of Overcoming Poverty Together – The New Brunswick Poverty Reduction Plan (Nov. 2009). (...)
Sessions which will take place in 12 communities are considered an important phase of the public engagement process leading to the renewal of the poverty reduction plan.

---

New Brunswick Social Assistance Reform
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/social_development/promos/social_assistancereform.html

[All changes to the NB Social Assistance program came into effect in October 2013.]

One of the priority actions in the province’s poverty reduction plan was to reform the social assistance system.
The changes outlined below represent the broadest number of policy changes to the social assistance program since the 1990’s and are expected to have a significant impact on clients.
* Social Assistance Rate Increase
* Wage Exemption Policy
* Shelter Deductions for Disabled Clients
* Social Assistance Rate Schedules
* Household Income Policy
* Income Supplement

Source:
New Brunswick Social Development

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/social_development.html

---------------------

Economic and Social Inclusion Act introduced
News Release
Feb. 19, 2010
FREDERICTON (CNB) - Legislation introduced today will implement the province's poverty reduction plan and ensure the delivery of poverty initiatives at the community level. Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock introduced the Economic and Social Inclusion Act in the legislative assembly.

The Legislation:

BILL 39, 2010:
The Economic and Social Inclusion Act

The Economic and Social Inclusion Act will serve as the legislative framework to implement New Brunswick's poverty reduction plan (see "The Plan", below).
(...) Specifically, the act will:
* establish the New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation, a Crown corporation to monitor and advance the plan;
* provide for the establishment of community inclusion networks; and
* provide for the establishment of a co-ordination unit to provide support for the board and the community inclusion networks.

________________________

The New Brunswick Economic
and Social Inclusion Plan:

Overcoming Poverty Together:
The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan
(PDF - 100K, 5 pages)
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/esic/pdf/Plan-e.pdf
November 13, 2009
By 2015, New Brunswick will have reduced income poverty by 25% and deep income poverty by 50%, and will have made significant progress in achieving sustained economic and social inclusion. Other changes include an increase in the minimum wage, stable funding for homeless shelters, protection for roomers and boarders, and more....

________________________

The Progress Reports:

1.
March 2010
Overcoming Poverty Together:
The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan
Progress Report as of March 15, 2010
(PDF - 144K, 8 pages)
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/esic/pdf/progress1-e.pdf

_____

2.
August 2010
Overcoming Poverty Together:
The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan
Progress Report as of August 11, 2010
(PDF - 239K, 11 pages) 
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/esic/pdf/PovertyReductionProgressReport-e.pdf
Since the Final Forum on November 12 and 13, 2009, when Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan was adopted, a great deal of work has been done to implement the consensus plan. This document is a summary of these efforts.

_____

3. June 2013
Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan
Progress Report : April 1st to March 31st, 2013
(PDF - 6.7MB, 36 pages)
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/esic/pdf/ProgressReportMarch2013.pdf
Undated (PDF file dated June 2013)

________________________

Overcoming Poverty Together (PDF - 1MB, 37 pages)
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/esic/pdf/Booklet-e.pdf
Undated (PDF file dated January 2011)

________________________

Source:
New Brunswick Social Development



New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice
(CFSJ)
- the main NGO involved in the critique of the government's poverty reduction plan
Click the link above to go directly to the website, or scroll down the page you're now reading to see the latest CFSJ reports below, in reverse chronological order.


. [The links below are in reverse chronological order.]

[NOTE : The English version follows the French below.]

Du nouveau du Front commun pour la justice sociale
du Nouveau-Brunswick inc.:

Des petits pas pour la réduction de la pauvreté:
Examen annuel 2014 des gouvernements
de David Alward et Brian Gallant

Décembre 2014
Affiché sur le site le 2 janvier 2015

Sommaire exécutif (PDF - 232Ko., 4 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Sommaire%20ex%C3%A9cutif-Bilan%202014.pdf
Le bilan annuel, des Petits pas pour la réduction de la pauvreté, a été dévoilé aujourd'hui. Il analyse les actions entreprises par le gouvernement provincial en 2014 pour réduire la pauvreté.

Rapport complet (PDF - 418Ko., 14 pages):
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/FCJS-Bilan%20Annuel-%20gouvernment%20Alward%20et%20Gallant_%202014-final.pdf

Source:
Front commun pour la justice sociale
du Nouveau-Brunswick

http://frontnb.ca/Default.asp/fr

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English version:

NEW from the
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice Inc. :

Small Steps towards Poverty Reduction:
2014 Annual Review of
David Alward- Brian Gallant governments

December 2014
[Posted January 2, 2015]
The NB Common Front for Social Justice unveiled today its Annual Review of actions taken by the provincial government to reduce poverty in 2014.

Executive Summary (PDF - 228KB, 4 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Summary-Review%20Alward-Gallant-%202014%20-%20%20Final_.pdf

Full Report (PDF - 495KB, 12 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/CFSJ%20Annual%20Review%202014-Final.pdf
Today in New Brunswick, depending on the method used to measure poverty, the number of citizens living under the poverty line is still between 88,000 and 100,000. Child poverty in the province has moved from 19.8% in 1989 (the year Canada adopted the resolution to end child poverty) to 21.1% in 2012.
[Source : Excerpt from the Intro to the report.]

Source:
NB Common Front for Social Justice

http://frontnb.ca/Default.asp/en

Propositions pour le Budget provincial 2014-2015 (PDF - 403Ko., 12 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/M%C3%A9moire%20Blaine%20Higgs%202014-2015.pdf
Le 6 janvier 2014
Le Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick a fait des propositions pour le prochain Budget provincial de 2014-2015.

Source:
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick

http://frontnb.ca/

---

New Brunswick

Proposal for 2014-2015 Provincial Budget (PDF - 352K, 11 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Brief-%20Blaine%20Higgs,%202014-15%20Budget_1(1).pdf
January 6, /2014
The New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice has made some concrete proposals for the upcoming Provincial Budget.

Source:
New Brunswick
Common Front for Social Justice Inc.
http://frontnb.ca/Default.asp/en

Still a long way to go : 2013 Annual Review of David Alward’s government
December 2013

NOTE : The English version follows the French below.

---

Beaucoup de chemin à faire : Réduction de la pauvreté,
le Bilan de l'année 2013 du gouvernement de David Alward
(PDF - 356Ko., 11 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Bilan%20Alward%20Francais_Final_1_.pdf
décembre 2013

Lecture recommandée --- ce texte de 11 pages présente un bilan des politiques récentes (2013) du gouvernement de David Alward

Extrait de la
conclusion du texte:

Le Front commun pour la justice sociale reconnait que le gouvernement de David Alward du Nouveau-Brunswick a entrepris certaines actions qui aideront les gens en situation de pauvreté. Cependant notre bilan démontre clairement qu’il y a encore beaucoup de chemin à faire pour réduire de façon significative la pauvreté dans la province et, de plus, que la réduction de la pauvreté n’est pas une priorité pour ce gouvernement.
(...)
Nous comprenons que la province est en situation économique difficile, mais il faut considérer la lutte contre la pauvreté comme un investissement social.

Source:
Front commun pour la justice sociale inc.

http://frontnb.ca/Default.asp/fr

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

English version:

Still a long way to go : 2013 Annual Review of David Alward’s government (PDF - 388K, 10 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Annual%20Review%20Alward%20Final_1.pdf
December 2013

Recommended reading - includes a list of recent (2013) policies of the Alward Government
affecting people on welfare and people living in poverty in the province.

Excerpt from the
Conclusion of the report:

The Common Front for Social Justice recognizes that the David Alward government has taken some actions that will be helpful to people living in poverty, However, our review clearly shows there’s still a long way to go to significantly reduce poverty in the province and moreover, that poverty reduction is not a priority for this government.
(...)
We understand the province’s difficult economic situation, but the fight against poverty has to be considered as a social investment, just like investments being made in the private sector. We must invest in poverty reduction.

Source:
Common Front for Social Justice Inc.

http://frontnb.ca/

Fact Sheets : 2013-2018 Renewal of NB Poverty Reduction Plan
September 13, 2013

The New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice has published a series of Fact Sheets with proposals to reduce poverty.

Fact Sheets
http://www.frontnb.ca/default.asp?id=127
September 2013
---
[NOTE : The fact sheet links are in the paragraph under "Did you know?" - move your cursor over the text to find the links.]
---
Click the link above to access a collection of 10 short PDF files (one or two pages each) on the following topics:
*
Basic welfare rates
* Food banks
* Seniors
* Taxation
* Minimum Wage
* Child Care
* Drug Plan
* Pay Equity
* Home support workers
* Disability

Source:
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice

http://www.frontnb.ca/
The Common Front for Social Justice is fighting to build a more human society based on the respect and dignity of all. We want a New Brunswick without poverty. We want a society which give each and everyone a decent living, in particular by having a minimum wage and social income on which citizens can to live on and not just exist.

---------------------------------

Fiches d'information
Version française
http://www.frontnb.ca/default.asp?id=127
Pour la version française de cette collection de fiches d'information, cliquez le lien ci-dessus, ensuite cliquez le lien vers le site en français (coin droit, haut de la page). Les liens vers chacune des fiches se trouvent dans le paragraphe "Saviez-vous?". Les fiches touchent le sujets suivants :
Banques alimentaires - Taux de base de l'assistance sociale - Impôts - Salaire minimum - Aînés - Garderies - Invalidités - .Assurance-médicaments - Aides familiales - Équité salariale.

Source:
Front commun pour la justice sociale
du Nouveau-Brunswick inc.
http://www.frontnb.ca/Default.asp

---

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

Progress report on poverty reduction plan released
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/esic/news/news_release.2013.06.0560.html
14 June 2013
News Release
FREDERICTON (GNB) – The third progress report on the poverty reduction plan, Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan, was released today by the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation.
(...)
The update, which covers the period from April 1, 2011, to March 31, 2013, consists of a general report on Overcoming Poverty Together; a report on the activities and projects undertaken by the community inclusion networks; and a report on the priority action plan established at the onset of the initiative.

Complete report:

Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan
Progress Report : April 1st to March 31st, 2013
(PDF - 6.7MB, 36 pages)
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/esic/pdf/ProgressReportMarch2013.pdf
Undated (PDF file dated June 2013)

Assessment of the New Brunswick
Poverty Reduction Plan in June 2013
(PDF - 620K, 24 pages)
http://goo.gl/5TG3N
By Auréa Cormier, Provincial Council member
June 1, 2013
Overview and analysis of each of the NB Government's 29 initiatives under one of three categories:
* Meeting basic needs
* Life-long learning and skills acquisition
* Community participation
"There were numerous initiatives undertaken at the community level. However, the CFSJ is concerned that this is not sufficient to achieve the Plan’s goal of a 25% reduction in the number of people living in poverty."

Related news release (small PDF file, 2 pages)
http://goo.gl/vV8dz

Source:
Common Front for Social Justice Inc.

http://www.frontnb.ca/

Version française du site:

Front commun pour la justice sociale
du Nouveau-Brunswick inc.
http://www.frontnb.ca/go-FR.asp?rd=Default.asp

New Brunswick 2012 Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 372K, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/provincial/New%20Brunswick/2012ReportcardNB.pdf

[ Version française:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/provincial/New%20Brunswick/2012ReportcardNB_FR.pdf ]

According to the latest 2010 Statistics Canada data, using the Low Income Measure, 22,000 New Brunswick children are living below the poverty line. Although this constitutes a significant, and consistent, drop over the past 5 years (from 24.6% in 2006 to 16.1%) there is still a long way to go.

Source:
Saint John Human Development Council
http://sjhdc.ca/
The Human Development Council identifies and addresses social issues in Greater Saint John through research, information, coordination and networking.

---

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

At Budget Time, the Poor Get Ignored
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/hassan-arif/budget-2012-poor_b_1390150.html
April 2, 2012
In times of budget deficits, austerity frequently becomes the buzzword with cuts to social programs, the civil service, and balancing the budget in strict mathematical terms. The programs often most readily cut are those designed to help the poorest and most vulnerable -- as this group has less resources to organize itself politically and lobby governments.

This tendency is true of governments of various political stripes, the Chretien Liberals abolished Canada's national housing program -- making Canada the only industrialized country without a national public housing program -- in the 1990s while, more recently, the Alward Conservatives here in New Brunswick have been rolling back provisions of the last government's poverty reduction program. Cutting programs that help the poor may be politically expedient, but it is not morally right, and fiscally can have disastrous consequences.

Source:
Huffington Post Canada
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

From Words to Action : Open Letter to the Premier of New Brunswick (PDF - 64K, 2 pages)
http://www.frontnb.ca/Document/2012-alward-letter.pdf
March 22, 2012
Within the next few days, your government will table its 2012-2013 budget. For the Common Front for Social Justice and for New Brunswickers who live in poverty, the budget will be an opportunity to judge whether your government is serious about making the fight against poverty a priority.
(...)
Ordinary citizens, working people, community organizations working with the poor, senior citizens, the Common Front for Social Justice and, indeed, all of New Brunswick expect you to take decisive action to begin finally reducing poverty in our beautiful province.
Source:
Common Front for Social Justice

http://www.frontnb.ca/

---

Version française:

Des paroles aux actions : Lettre ouverte au Premier ministre du N.-B. (PDF)
http://www.frontnb.ca/Document/2012-lettre-alward.pdf
Dans peu de temps, votre gouvernement déposera son budget pour l’année fiscale 2012-2013. Pour le Front commun pour la justice sociale et pour tous les citoyennes et citoyens de la province vivants en situation de pauvreté, ce sera l’occasion de constater si votre gouvernement est sérieux lorsqu’il dit que la lutte à la pauvreté est une priorité pour lui.
(...)
Les citoyens, les organisations communautaires travaillant auprès des plus démunis, le Front commun pour la justice sociale et toute la société civile s’attend que vous allez faire un pas financier décisif pour enfin débuter le long chemin vers la réduction de la pauvreté dans notre belle province.
Source:
Front commun pour la justice sociale
http://www.frontnb.ca/

To N.B. financial planners: daylight saving time is here! (Word file - 35K, 2 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/daylight_saving_time.doc
March 2012

[ Version française : Revenir à l'heure de 2008 (fichier Word - 18Ko., 2 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/reculer_horloge.doc ]

(...)
It is time to undo the damage done by the 2009 tax reform which significantly reduced provincial revenue. There is an urgent need for the province to generate more income in order to maintain our social programs, reduce our deficit and invest for the future.
(...)
The province has just reverted to daylight saving time. This is the right moment to ask the Finance Minister to see the light and revert to the 2008 taxation system, adding a fifth tax bracket for the wealthy. He will then be able to reduce the deficit and maintain our much needed social programs.

Source:

Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ)
http://www.frontnb.ca/
The Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ) is a non-profit organization whose mandate is to lobby for more justice, better social policy and a greater solidarity within society, especially with those living in poverty.

Front commun pour la justice sociale (FCJS)
http://www.frontnb.ca/

New Brunswick anti-poverty advocate quits the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation Board
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/01/31/new-brunswick-anti-povert_n_1244372.html
January 31, 2012
FREDERICTON - An anti-poverty advocate has resigned from a government-appointed body in New Brunswick in protest over decisions by the government affecting the poor. Pam Coates quit the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation [ http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/esic.html ] Board, citing the Conservative government's decisions to double the co-payment cap on prescriptions for low-income seniors and delay a minimum wage increase."Both are blatant examples of obstacles/barriers to getting out of poverty and will in some cases enhance and encourage more poverty," she wrote in a Jan. 18 letter to the board. The board consists of 22 members representing the government, businesses, non-profit organizations and people who have experienced poverty.
Source:
MetroNews.ca

http://www.metronews.ca/

Poverty costs New Brunswickers $2 billion dollars per year
News Release
September 27, 2011
Halifax/Moncton
A new study released today, entitled Cost of Poverty in New Brunswick, co-authored by economist Angella MacEwen and Christine Saulnier, reveals that:
* Poverty costs the New Brunswick government a half a billion dollars per year.
* These costs accounted for 6.5% of the 2009/10 New Brunswick government budget.
* Health care spending on poverty alone costs the government $196 million per year.
* When the costs to government are added to the broader costs to the economy, the total cost of poverty for the province is $2 billion dollars.
* Investing in a comprehensive plan to alleviate poverty could cost as little as half as much as the quantifiable costs of poverty.

The report:

The Cost of Poverty in New Brunswick (PDF - 421K, 12 pages)
http://goo.gl/KYOa6
(...) For the New Brunswick government, we estimate that the direct cost of poverty is approximately a half a billion dollars per year—and that these costs account for 6.5% of the 2009/10 New Brunswick government budget.

Source:
Nova Scotia Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

PROPOSED MODIFICATIONS REGARDING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE POLICIES
BRIEF TO THE MINISTER OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND
THE COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL ASSISTANCE REFORM
BY THE N.B. COMMON FRONT FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE, INC.

PDF file - 724K, 14 pages
Moncton, N.B.
May 25, 2011
For a long time, the New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice has been aware that social assistance policies did not work to the advantage of recipients. There are many policies that, in our view, are inadequate and need changes or revisions. This is why we decided to write a Brief concerning some key policies which must be modified. Our document target nine of these policies that we believe the committee looking a social assistance revision should seriously consider. We have analysed each one, explained their weaknesses and made recommendations for changes so that these policies can help recipients, not hinder them.
Source:
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice
The Common Front for Social Justice is one of the largest democratic and popular organizations in New Brunswick, with close to 75,000 group and individual members. The Common Front brings together individuals as well as local, regional and provincial organizations to work towards the eradication of poverty.

-----------------------------

Version française:

MODIFICATIONS PROPOSÉES AUX POLITIQUES DE L'AIDE AU REVENU
MÉMOIRE ADRESSÉ À LA MINISTRE DU DÉVELOPPEMENT SOCIAL ET
AU COMITÉ SUR LA RÉFORME DE L'AIDE SOCIALE
PAR LE FRONT COMMUN POUR LA JUSTICE SOCIALE INC.

Fichier PDF - 2,3Mo., 15 pages
Moncton, NB
Le 25 mai 2011
Pendant plusieurs années, le Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brusnwick était conscient que les politiques d’assistance sociale présentes n’étaient pas en faveur des bénéficiaires. Il y avait plusieurs politiques qui n’étaient pas adéquates et avaient besoin de changements ou de modifications; c’est pourquoi nous avons décidé de proposer des changements à certaines d’entre elles. Notre document cible neuf politiques que nous croyons que le comité de révision des politiques sur l’aide sociale à besoin de se pencher dessus. Nous avons analysé chacune d’entre elles, expliqué leurs faiblesses et fait des recommandations de changements afin de s’assurer que les politiques ne mettent pas les bénéficiaires dans une situation plus précaire qu’ils ne le sont présentement.
Source:
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick

Le Front commun pour la justice sociale est un des plus importants organismes démocratiques et populaires au NB. Il compte environ 75 000 membres individuels et collectifs. Il regroupe des individus et des organisations locales, régionales et provinciales travaillant ensemble à l'élimination de la pauvreté.

New from the
Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ):
[Posted January 15, 2011]

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Reality of Poverty in 2010 (PDF - 60K, 2 pages)
News Release 
December 28, 2010
"This year had its good, bad and ugly side for people living in poverty" stated Linda McCaustlin, co-­-chair of the Common Front for Social Justice. The Common Front for Social Justice did an analysis of the actions taken by the Shawn Graham and David Alward governments over the past year that had a direct impact on the financial situation of more than 100,000 individuals and families living in poverty in this province.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Reality of Poverty in 2010 (PDF - 134K, 6 pages)
With 2010 coming to an end, the Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ) seizes the opportunity to take a close look at the actions and/or inactions of the government of NB with regard to the reduction of poverty during the past year. The following outlines some areas which had a direct impact on the financial situation of citizens during the past year and where the CFSJ has noted some progress but also, unfortunately, some drawbacks.
Source:
Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ)

As a non-profit community organization composed of social, unions and religious groups, the CFSJ scrutinizes the various social policies in order to see how they affect low income people. It also aims at promoting more solidarity within our society.

***

Liens vers la version française
du communiqué et de l'analyse:

Communiqué de presse (fichier PDF - 60Ko., 2 pages)
Le 28 décembre 2010

Analyse:
La bonne, la méchante et l'affreuse réalité de la pauvreté au Nouveau-Brunswick en 2010 (fichier PDF - 123Ko., 7 pages)

Source:
Front commun pour la justice social
À titre d'organisme à but non lucratif formé de groupes sociaux, syndicaux et religieux, le Front commun pour la justice sociale s’est donné comme mission de scruter les diverses politiques sociales pour voir comment elles affectent les gens à faible revenu. Sa vision est celle de voir un jour une société plus solidaire.

Child Poverty Report Card : New Brunswick (PDF - 980K, 16 pages)
November 2010
Prepared by Kathryn Asher, Researcher with the Human Development Council, a local social planning council that co-ordinates and promotes social development in Greater Saint John.

Source:
Human Development Council - Saint John


NOTE:
This is one of a series of provincial reports all released under the Campaign 2000 banner on November 24 (2010), the anniversary of the 1989 unanimous House of Commons resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000. For links to the complete collection of federal and provincial reports and (selected) related media coverage, go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

Recent postings to the website of the
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ):

[ Site en français:
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick ]

---

The new government of David Alward should immediately
increase revenues for people who are living on social assistance
(PDF - 69K, 2 pages)
November 17, 2010
News release
“The last two Hunger Count Reports have revealed that during the last two years, there was an 18% increase in food bank usage in N.B. Just this year, the number of people using food banks has also increased. Thirty-four percent of food bank clients are children; thirteen percent are wage earners but the majority of them (61%) are social assistance recipients. This is completely unacceptable in a country as rich as Canada”, says Linda McCaustlin, co-chair of the Common Front for Social Justice.
[ Version française:
Le nouveau gouvernement de David Alward devrait immédiatement augmenter le revenu des personnes qui dépendent de l'aide sociale
- Communiqué de presse, le 17 novembre 2010 ] (fichier PDF) ]

POVERTY : A VIOLATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS
Report on the 3rd Summit on Poverty in New Brunswick
(PDF - 2.2MB, 5 pages)
Moncton, NB – October 16 & 17, 2010
(...) Under the theme “Poverty, a Violation of Human Rights”, 150 participants heard the views of several speakers, who concurred in affirming society’s responsibility for guaranteeing everyone’s right to a standard of living sufficient to ensure their health and welfare and that of their family.
* Panel: Why does society tolerate poverty?
* What is being done internationally to enforce the human rights of the poor?
* Human Rights: From principles to practice
* What can be done in New Brunswick to increase respect for human rights? (incl. recommended action to reduce poverty)
[ Version française:
Rapport du 3e Sommet sur la pauvreté, octobre 2010 (fichier PDF) ]

---

Impact of Food Cost on Food Security in New Brunswick:
Survey conducted by the Common Front for Social Justice during the summer of 2010
(PDF - 2.4MB, 27 pages)
November 2010
Conclusions:
* Food cost has dramatically increased.
* There were no major differences in food cost between cities and the few rural areas surveyed.
* Cost of the 66 items in the food basket: $254 at Coop Stores, $257 at Superstores and $259 at Sobeys
* Seniors with guaranteed income supplement: 15% of income goes toward food (10.4% is the Canadian average.)
* Minimum wage worker: 17% of income for food
* People on social assistance: 35 - 50% of income for food
[ Version française:
Répercussion du coût des aliments sur la sécurité alimentaire au N.-B. - novembre 2010 (fichier PDF) ]

October 6 (2010) Press conference document (PDF - 62K, 2 pages)
A food costing survey conducted by the CFSJ in July and August 2010 documented what many people living on limited income already knew from
experience, namely that food is considerably more expensive now that four to five years ago. Overall, people on social assistance, minimum wage workers and seniors on fixed income have an incredibly small amount of money to feed themselves adequately. Housing cost competes for a large portion of their monthly income. Some spend as much as 60% of their income on housing alone. With the current cost of nutritious food alone, they would need to spend from one-third to one-half of their allocation for food, leaving them empty-handed for all other necessities of life.
[ Version française:
Document pour la conférence de presse du 6 octobre 2010 (fichier PDF) ]

---

Inequality in Canada (and New Brunswick)
- A Brief History, Why it Matters, and What WE can Do
By Rob Moir, Economist at UNBSJ
October 2010
PDF version (11.4MB, 27 pages)
Powerpoint version (2.1MB, 27 slides)
[ Aucune version française ]

---

New Brunswick Poverty Reduction Plan: Updates and Developments (PDF - 1.3MB, 29 pages)
By Jean-Claude Basque and Auréa Cormier
June 2010
Excerpts:
* The Crown Corporation creates an additional layer of bureaucracy
* Decision making is further away from our elected members of the Legislative Assembly
* The Board, the Secretariat and the group coordinating the Community Inclusion Networks is a costly administrative structure
* Minister Lamrock said there would be no appeal process if decisons made by the Community Inclusion Networks are contested
* For 97% of social assistance recipients, there are no changes in sight before July 2011
* CFSJ's concerns with the Service delivery are:
--- Difficulties of access to services in rural areas
--- Uneven quality assurance in some of the networks
--- Possibility of lack of services, in some of the networks, in the language of choice

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Recherchistes francophones:
Sur la version française du site Web du
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick,
...vous trouverez les liens vers la version française de chacun
des textes mentionnés ici, ainsi qu'à d'autres textes du Front commun.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

New Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation
won't have representatives in at least four areas of New Brunswick
(PDF - 126K, 2 pages)
News release
June 29, 2010
According to the New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice, "[A]t least four areas of New Brunswick won't have any representatives of people living in poverty on the new Board of Directors of the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation.”

---

Tired of being manipulated? (PDF - 6.6MB, 32 pages)
By Claude Snow
June 2010
Caring for people is a MUST.
Public social services are essential.
Less taxes = Less services.

---

Annual Report 2009-2010 (PDF - 77K, 2 pages)
June 2010
- Our actions in 2009-2010, notably on the Poverty Reduction Plan

---

Third Summit on Poverty - October 15-16, 2010 (PDF - 1.3MB, 1 page)
"Poverty: A Violation of Human Rights"
Moncton, NB
June 2010
- flyer, including conference program and some speakers

---

Revealing Statistics on the Socioeconomic Status (PDF - 21K, 1 page)
June 2010

---

Two Different Worlds (PDF - 1.3MB, 34 pages)
- Catalogue for the art exhibit held at Moncton City Hall May 31st to June 4th, 2010.
"In the same province, citizens are living side by side, day in and day out, but in two completely different worlds."

---

Source:
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice
The CFSJ promotes alternative policies in order to create a society concerned mainly about human beings.

* fairer distribution of power, thus a more dynamic democracy with greater participation;
* fairer distribution of wealth, thus a more equitable tax system;
* to improve the Canadian social security net, such as public health, public welfare and unemployement insurance;
* to challenge the corporate agenda by attempting to counter policies of privatization, deregulation and the withdrawal of the state;
* to increase the value and the dignity of human work.
- incl. links to : Documents | Press Releases | Action Alerts | Links | Home | Site Map | Contact us | Français

Statement of the Winnipeg Roundtable to the Council of the Federation:
The provincial and territorial road to poverty eradication

4 Aug 2010
Statement from a roundtable of cross-Canada participants calls on the Premiers and federal party leaders to "reflect the inherent decency of most Canadians and start to work on a plan for poverty eradication".

Catastrophic drug costs can affect the poor and affluent alike [dead link]
June 1st, 2010
[Minister of Social Development ] Kelly Lamrock's recent response to a request that New Brunswick implement a catastrophic drug cost insurance plan shows that either he doesn't understand why such a plan is required or he is purposefully misleading the public. This insurance plan isn't required for the poor; it's something everyone needs. (...) The strong endorsement made in the report of the Romanow Commission in 2002 that such a plan be developed in Canada was followed in 2003 by a commitment from the federal and provincial governments that a national program would be established. All provinces except New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island have implemented such a plan. (...) Minister Lamrock wants to consult with the stakeholders. He wants to engage businesspeople and health officials.
It will be part of the poverty-reduction strategy.
Source:
The Daily Gleaner (New Brunswick)

NB Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation needs
real representation of people currently living in poverty,
says co-chair of the New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice
(PDF - 58K, 2 pages)
News Release
April 7, 2010
(...) There has to be real representation of people currently living in poverty, the process has to be open and language of service needs to be included in the new proposed Bill 39, Economic and Social Inclusion Act...
Source:
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Recherchistes francophones:
Sur la version française du site Web du
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick,
...vous trouverez les liens vers la version française de chacun
des textes mentionnés ici, ainsi qu'à d'autres textes du Front commun.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Related links:

Poverty Reduction plan needs serious debate
April 14, 2010
The surprise announcement that this Friday will see the end of this Legislature session means that several bills now awaiting the attention of legislators will be rammed through without much debate. One of these is Bill 39, the Economic and Social Inclusion Act. This is the bill that gives legs to the government's poverty reduction plan announced several months ago. The Conservatives participated in and endorsed the plan so there is a good chance this bill will see swift passage. It is also one that hasn't received much scrutiny precisely because the Official Opposition was part of the process that developed it.
Source:
Telegraph-Journal

---

Group wants changes to proposed poverty bill [dead link]
April 14, 2010
Proposed provincial legislation to create a new Crown corporation to administer the Poverty Reduction Plan of government needs to be amended to recognize both official languages and better represent the plight of New Brunswick's poor, says the New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice co-chairman. In a statement, Linda McCaustlin said Bill 39, to create the New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation, should also change the make-up of its proposed board of directors in order to eliminate any possible political influence.
Source:
Times & Transcript

More recent letters, commentaries
and articles by the Common Front for Social Justice:

Income Gaps and Food Banks (PDF - 98K) - brochure, April 2010

Food Banks and Soup Kitchens: An Overview (PDF - 151K) - March 2010

It all boils down to unfair distribution (PDF - 88K) - editorial by Ed Finn

Food crisis, root causes and solutions (PDF - 1.3MB) - Auréa Cormier, October 17, 2009

Equal Opportunities Program under attack (PDF - 82K) - commentary by Ysabel Provencher, PhD, Université Laval

The Second Report Card on Homelessness in Greater Moncton, 2009 (PDF - 3.5MB) - The Greater Moncton Homelessness Steering Committee

Commentary (53K) - Jean-Claude Basque, March 2010

These are the faces of poverty and social injustices in New Brunswick (PDF - 10K) - for The Daily Gleaner, March 3, 2010.

---

For earlier releases from the Common Front for Social Justice,
scroll down to the yellow box further down on this page.

Reconstructing Social Assistance in New Brunswick: Vision and Action (PDF - 77K, 19 pages)
By Ken Battle, Michael Mendelson, Sherri Torjman
July 2010
The Government of New Brunswick has launched a comprehensive reform of its social assistance system as a key element of its poverty reduction strategy. This report contains two papers. The first is a vision paper written for New Brunswick by the Caledon Institute that sets out a philosophy and key elements of reform. The second is an account of New Brunswick's plans and actions to implement the vision for reform.
Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

Also from Caledon on this subject:

Breaking down the welfare wall in New Brunswick (PDF - 34K, 2 pages)
March 2010
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
[ Version française : Briser le mur de l'aide sociale (PDF)]
This op ed was published as a Globe and Mail online commentary. It points out that one of the most promising developments in Canadian social policy is the rise of provincial poverty reduction plans. New Brunswick recently announced a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy, which includes fundamental reform of its social assistance system. The province is taking some important steps in this ambitious reform including the creation of a provincial working income supplement. New Brunswick will also extend the length of coverage under its health card for up to three years to recipients who leave welfare for work or training. It will launch a prescription drug program, plus vision and dental care for all low-income children. The op ed highlights other needed reforms, such as a boost to the New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit.

Media coverage:

Poverty Reduction Plan ‘not all that rosy,’ says advocate (dead link)
By Gilean Watts
April 7, 2010
Shawn Graham’s Poverty Reduction Plan only benefits a very small number of welfare recipients, says a leading provincial poverty advocacy group.
“If you listen to the media it seems that the Poverty Reduction Plan was a real good thing, but if you look at it and analyze between the lines then you start wondering if it’s really not all that rosy,” said Auréa Cormier of the New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice at a public discussion at St. Thomas University last Thursday. According to Cormier, 97 per cent of welfare recipients will not be affected by the province’s Poverty Reduction Plan, which was introduced in November. The three per cent that will benefit are those in the interim assistance program, which provides money to employed welfare recipients.
Source:
New Brunswick Beacon

The working poor's best hope
New Brunswick may well provide the bold
leadership in social policy that this country so urgently requires
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
February 26, 2010
(...) As Ottawa continues to bury its head in the snow, the initiative for tackling the long-lamented scourge of poverty has shifted to the provinces. Quebec and Newfoundland were first out of the gate with provincial poverty-reduction plans; several other provinces have been introducing their own campaigns. The way to break down the welfare wall is to extend income supports and services traditionally reserved for those on welfare to the working poor – Canada's forgotten poor. New Brunswick, which is taking important steps to do exactly this in its ambitious reform, may well provide the bold leadership in social policy that this country so urgently requires.
Source:
The Globe and Mail

Related link:

Caledon Institute of Social Policy
[The co-authors of the above G&M article are president, vice-president and
senior scholar, respectively, of the Caledon Institute of Social Policy.]
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy does rigorous, high-quality research and analysis; seeks to inform and influence public opinion and to foster public discussion on poverty and social policy; and develops and promotes concrete, practicable proposals for the reform of social programs at all levels of government and of social benefits provided by employers and the voluntary sector.

Also from Caledon:

New Brunswick’s “Overcoming Poverty Together” Earns Praise and Creates Hope (PDF - 42K, 9 pages)
February 2010
By Anne Makhoul
Between October 2008 and November 2009, the New Brunswick government embarked on a three-stage public engagement process in order to design an economic and social inclusion plan. Its goal was to ensure that all sectors of New Brunswick society, including business, community nonprofit organizations and citizens, would share responsibility with the government for creating new opportunities for residents. Together they will implement action in three areas: Being (meeting basic needs), Becoming (life-long learning and skills acquisition) and Belonging (community participation).

From
New Brunswick Social Development:

Changes to Household Income policy introduced
February 17, 2010
FREDERICTON (CNB) - The provincial government is improving the Household Income Policy for Department of Social Development clients. Kelly Lamrock, minister of social development, made the announcement today. (...) The new policy, which only applies to clients who were in receipt of assistance as of Jan. 1, represents a $5-million investment this fiscal year. It is an interim measure that will help current clients economically until Social Assistance Reform, including an important and significant overhaul of the Household Income Policy, is complete in mid-2011.


Recent releases from
The Common Front for Social Justice Inc.:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Recherchistes francophones:
Sur la version française du site Web du
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick,
...vous trouverez les liens vers la version française de chacun
des textes mentionnés ici, ainsi qu'à d'autres textes du Front commun.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Reading Between the Lines of "Overcoming Poverty Together-
NB Economic and Social Inclusion Plan"
(PDF - 1.6MB, 28 pages)
[Dead link - try searching the website]
Analysis by the Common Front for Social Justice
[Powerpoint presentation]
February 2010
NOTE: This is an analysis of the poverty situation and the New Brunswick Government's poverty reduction plan; the 2010-2011 provincial budget is mentioned in some bullet points on p. 26.
"... 2010-2011 budget offers no relief for those most in need"
"For 97% of social assistance, there will be no changes in rate until April 2011 or possibly later."

---

Reading between the lines of “Overcoming Poverty Together –
The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan”
(PDF - 373K, 11 pages)
January 2010
Complete report (PDF - 373K, 11 pages) (dead link)
Summary (PDF - 241K, 5 pages)
The purpose of this document is to express the concerns that the CFSJ has regarding the released document entitled Overcoming Poverty Together – The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan (hereafter called the Plan). Our analysis will address the following issues:
1) Who was left out of the plan?;
2) Limits to employability not considered;
3) Delivery structure and possible consequences;
4) Financial support towards the Plan, and
5) Missing elements.

---

Front for Social Justice applauds
minimum wage hike, argues more needs to be done

NB Media Co-op
January 8, 2010

---

Comparison of New Brunswick's minimum wage with the Atlantic average (PDF - 32K, 1 page)
January 2010
As of April 1, 2011*, assuming the other Atlantic provinces stay the same, NB workers will make 11¢ per hour more than the average minimum wage of all Atlantic provinces.
[*the English PDF file says April 2010 but this is incorrect. The French version of this PDF file has the correct date.]
[ One of the elements of the provincial poverty reduction plan (see below) is to raise the minimum wage to the Atlantic average by September 1st, 2011 and adjust for inflation annually thereafter. The Common Front argues that this is a good thing for full-time workers, but many of New Brunswick's poor households work part-time, thus reducing the impact of the increase on the target population. ]

---

Poverty in 2009 - The real picture
December 2009
- evaluation of nine crucial issues that have a direct impact on people living in poverty

Source:
Common Front for Social Justice Inc. (CFSJ)
The Common Front for Social Justice is fighting to build a more human society based on the respect and dignity of all. We want a New Brunswick without poverty. We want a society which give each and everyone a decent living, in particular by having a minimum wage and social income on which citizens can to live on and not just exist.

---

Related links:

Overcoming Poverty Together:
The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan
(PDF - 100K, 5 pages)
PDF file dated November 17, 2009
By 2015, New Brunswick will have reduced income poverty by 25% and deep income poverty by 50%, and will have made significant progress in achieving sustained economic and social inclusion.
Source:
Government of New Brunswick

---

Poverty levels not improving: advocacy group
January 16, 2010
By Greg Mulock
With a new year underway, a provincial advocacy group says the poor in New Brunswick are possibly worse off than they were at the outset of 2009. "The Common Front for Social Justice analyzed different actions taken in 2009 to reduce poverty," said a news release. "It realized the situation for people living in poverty has not changed. On some level it even deteriorated, especially for recipients on social assistance."
Source:
Telegraph-Journal (New Brunswick)

New Brunswick Report Card on Child and Family Poverty (PDF - 445K, 12 pages)
November 2009
In November 2009, New Brunswick joined the ranks of provinces that have adopted comprehensive poverty reduction strategies. Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan has set a target of reducing income poverty by 25% and deep income poverty by 50% by the year 2015.

Version française:
Rapport sur la pauvreté des enfants et des
familles au Nouveau Brunswick • 2009
(PDF - 456Ko., 12 pages)
Novembre 2009

Source:
Human Development Council - Saint John
The Human Development Council provides information about community services throughout New Brunswick. (...) The Council works collaboratively with community agencies, individuals, government departments, businesses, churches, and labour to initiate, develop and implement creative strategies to meet the needs of the community.

Related link:
Campaign 2000


NOTE:
This is one of a series of provincial reports all released under the Campaign 2000 banner on November 24 (2010), the anniversary of the 1989 unanimous House of Commons resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000. For links to the complete collection of federal and provincial reports and (selected) related media coverage, go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm


From the
New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal:

Poverty plan deserves support (dead link)
November 17, 2009
By Peter Smith
A
lmost lost amid the din of the war of words over the proposed sale of NB Power is a plan that has both the premier and the leader of the Opposition sitting at the same table. New Brunswick's first poverty reduction plan was announced in Saint John late last week. This represents a significant move towards helping some of the province's most vulnerable citizens. (...) The statistics on poverty change little from year to year and always seem grim. According to figures available on the Social Development website, more than 100,000 New Brunswickers live in poverty. More than 13,000 single parents live in poverty, and that figure represents 45 per cent of all single parents. More than 23,000 children are living in poverty in this province, which is about one in every six children. About one in 10 senior citizens live in poverty, and about 39,000 New Brunswickers are on social assistance.

Bring an end to poverty (dead link)
November 16, 2009
In August, the provincial Poverty Reduction Initiative released a landmark report [ A Choir of Voices - The What Was Said Report ]. Drawing upon the testimony of more than 2,500 people, it gave voice to the frustration and isolation experienced by those living on marginal incomes. It also called attention to the degree to which public policy has backfired, trapping families and communities in lives of hardship. The intent is to reduce poverty through co-ordinated action. On Friday, co-chairs Gerry Pond, Léo-Paul Pinet and Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock emerged from a two-day forum with a plan of action. Government, businesses, communities and non-profit groups must to pull together to accomplish its goal: a 25-per-cent reduction in poverty by 2015.

Cut the roots of poverty with a living wage (dead link)
October 21, 2009
By Janice Harvey
Finally, poverty reduction is a legitimate public debate. Shawn Graham's government has embarked on a poverty reduction strategy, the preliminary results of which will be revealed sometime next month. PC Leader David Alward has recently announced the Conservatives will eliminate the so-called economic unit policy, increase the amount people can earn before being penalized on their welfare payments and adjust the way prescription drug coverage is handled.
(...) At a legislated minimum wage of $8.25 an hour, an individual can work the legislated work week of 40 hours and still fall below the poverty line. This should not be the case. This amounts to legislated poverty.
(...) Second, we have to consider those who cannot work, whether temporarily or permanently. Green parties from their inception have advocated for an annual guaranteed livable income. It's an idea whose time has come.
(...) A guaranteed annual income, sometimes called a negative income tax, replaces all the piecemeal, ineffective measures now administered by provincial agencies including welfare payments, various supplements, prescription drug coverage and many others. It treats people with dignity and provides a basic level of well-being across the community without discrimination. A living minimum wage and a guaranteed livable income for households are essential (but not the only) elements of a structurally fair economy. To not address them is to perpetuate the current structural injustice while trying to paper over its worst abuses.

From CBC New Brunswick:
[dead links - try searching the dept website using the headline]

N.B. unveils sweeping changes to social assistance
November 13, 2009
The provincial government is promising sweeping changes to its social assistance system as part of a new poverty-reduction plan. Some of the changes will take effect immediately, while others will be implemented over the next five years, Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock said Friday after a two-day poverty forum in Saint John. Social assistance rates will immediately increase by 80 per cent for people on the "lowest rung" of the system, who currently live on less than $300 a month, he said. It's unclear how many people are included in that "single, employable adults" category. A 2008 report by the National Council of Welfare found New Brunswick paid the lowest amount by far to members of that group in 2007 — $3,258 a year. That rate would have to double to reach the Atlantic provinces average, the report said.

New Brunswick poverty strategy coming: premier
Premier Shawn Graham says poverty reduction must involve business and education initiatives.
November 12, 2009
Changes to combat poverty in New Brunswick could be implemented during the next year, says Premier Shawn Graham. About 50 people representing the non-profit sector, industry and government gathered in Saint John on Thursday to talk about ways to reduce poverty in the province. It is the final in a series of forums held across New Brunswick during the past year to help develop a strategy to reduce poverty and drive social change.

Graham promises money for poverty issues
October 9, 2009
Premier Shawn Graham is committing to give Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock the money he needs to fix New Brunswick's welfare system. Lamrock criticized successive governments, including his own, in a speech Thursday in Saint John and said he wants to put an end to welfare policy that tries to push people off assistance simply to save money.

N.B. minister slams own government on poverty issues
Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock proposes changes
October 8, 2009
The New Brunswick government came under intense criticism for its handling of poverty issues Thursday, but not from the Opposition. Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock accused his own government of nickel-and-diming the poor and proposed some big, and likely expensive, changes. In an extraordinary speech to a group of Saint John business leaders, Lamrock trashed social assistance policies as being bureaucratic and designed exclusively to save money, not to help the poor.

New Brunswick: one step closer to a poverty reduction strategy (dead link)
By Mariel Angus
August 11, 2009
In 2002, Quebec became the first province in Canada to introduce a poverty reduction strategy. Seven years later, four other provinces – Newfoundland & Labrador, Ontario, Manitoba and Nova Scotia – have established strategies as well. Now, New Brunswick is one step closer to establishing its own strategy to reduce poverty for the approximately 100,740 people in the province living on low income.
Source:
Citizens for Public Justice

From New Brunswick Social Development:

Report on poverty reduction dialogue sessions released
August 6, 2009
FREDERICTON (CNB) - The leadership team of the New Brunswick Poverty Reduction Initiative has released A Choir of Voices - The What Was Said Report. The report summarizes public dialogue sessions held last winter as the first phase of Bringing the pieces together, the comprehensive public engagement initiative that aims to develop a poverty reduction plan for the province. (...) A Choir of Voices is the basis of discussions being held during Phase II of the initiative, during which participants in round-table sessions will develop options for how poverty can be reduced. This process is intended to ensure that the voices of New Brunswickers are heard.

A Choir of Voices - The "What Was Said" Report (PDF - 1MB, 57 pages)
June 2009
In preparation for moving ahead with Phase II of the public engagement initiative to develop a poverty reduction plan for New Brunswick, this report presents a summary of the input received from New Brunswick residents who participated in Phase I – The public dialogue. The comments are based on personal experiences. Throughout the dialogue a lack of education, income, job opportunities, and information about community supports and resources were heard often as the causes of poverty. In addition, many great solutions were suggested, and are summarized in this report.


New Brunswickers invited to help reduce poverty
News Release
October 17, 2008
MONCTON (CNB) - The provincial government is inviting New Brunswickers to become involved in the development of a poverty reduction plan. (...) The province is launching a public engagement initiative called Bringing The Pieces Together, which will give New Brunswickers the opportunity to become involved in reducing and preventing poverty. This initiative, to be completed by the end of 2009, will be conducted in three stages: a dialogue phase; a round table phase; and a final forum phase. The result will be the publication of a poverty reduction plan for New Brunswick.

Booklet - A Poverty Reduction Plan (PDF - 267K, 8 pages)
October 2008
Background

Fact Check - Poverty in New Brunswick
October 2008
* People * Income * Costs * Employment / Pensions * Community Services

A snapshot of New Brunswick
October 2008
* People * Work * Education * Housing * Health * Community Services

Source:
New Brunswick Social Development


May 25, 2009
From the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

New Brunswick:
Restoring Hope or Treading Water?
(PDF - 263K, 19 pages)
By Kurt Peacock, University of New Brunswick (Saint John)

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]


Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ) Press Conference (PDF - 113K, 3 pages)
October 30, 2008
"The Common Front for Social Justice [is] interested in the initiative presented by the Minister of Social Development in her endeavour to launch a Poverty Reduction Plan and for her decision to have public participation, including people living in poverty. However, let us be clear, the process to develop this plan will take over one year and there is nothing right now to address immediate problems. (...) We urge the present government to adopt immediate measures to alleviate the sufferings of people and to allow them to have a minimum amount of comfort throughout the winter months. In our view, the government must adopt measures, as soon as possible, in four specific areas:
- heating costs,
- current legislation regarding minimum wage,
- basic welfare rates, and
- housing assistance."
Source:
Press releases (links to 30 releases going back to 2003)
[ Common Front for Social Justice ]
The Common Front for Social Justice is fighting to build a more human society based on the respect and dignity of all. We want a New Brunswick without poverty. We want a society which give each and everyone a decent living, in particular by having a minimum wage and social income on which citizens can to live on and not just exist.

Poverty is everybody's business in N.B. (dead link)
October 2, 2008
By Elsie Hambrook
Nasty prejudices still get in the way of concerted action on poverty. Some people paint all the poor with the same brush. They think the poor are "lazy" or "irresponsible", that if they made different choices, worked harder or "smarter", they could pull themselves out of poverty. Denial is also a stumbling block, as in "I'd never go on welfare, it'll never happen to me." The reality is that many people work full-time but earn less than the poverty line, juggle part-time or seasonal jobs, education and training along with family responsibilities and still can't make ends meet. For some New Brunswickers, poverty is as close as a few missed paycheques, the result of a separation or divorce for women, or of an illness or disability that strikes before the Old Age Pension kicks in.
Source:
Times & Transcript
[ Author Elsie Hambrook is the new Chairperson of the
New Brunswick Advisory Council on the Status of Women ] everybody's business in N.B.]

Related link:

Shouldn't we have a plan to reduce poverty?Destination Unknown (PDF - 500K, 2 pages)
A Woman's View
(PDF - 63K, 2 pages) (dead link)
We should be hard-headed about poverty in New Brunswick – “hard-headed” as in focussed and scientific about finding and doing what works to eliminate poverty. Some current poverty programs, here and in other jurisdictions, may have the effect of keeping people poor, for all the care that goes into what gets called a “poverty program”. What is worse, effective programs may be undone by other initiatives, given the lack of coordination and of monitoring.
From the column by Ginette Petitpas-Taylor
Former Chairperson of the
New Brunswick Advisory Council on the Status of Women
in the Times & Transcript, July 17, 2008.

 

[GO BACK TO THE TOP OF THIS PAGE]

National Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion
With its National Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion, under the theme, “The Will to Act, The Strength to Succeed”, the Québec government intends to progressively transform Québec, over a ten-year period, into one of the industrialized societies with the least poverty.
- incl. links to: * Summary of consultation process * Bill * Parliamentary committee * Useful links * Policy statement * Summary of policy statement * Report on government action

Source:
Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale (English home page)

______________________________________________________

AVIS aux recherchistes francophones:
Vous trouverez la plupart des liens ci-dessous en français sur la page
de liens du Québec pour francophones:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

NOTE : The links below this line are ad

Québec : National Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion

ded in reverse chronological order.

______________________________________________________

Public Consultation – Fight against Poverty and Social Exclusion
http://www.mess.gouv.qc.ca/consultation_pauvrete/index_en.asp

The Gouvernement du Québec wants to consult its partners and the general public on what we should do next in implementing the National Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion [ http://goo.gl/wpiOSw ] established under the Act to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion [ http://goo.gl/mZevbr ].

The objective of the consultation is to gather opinions from the public, particularly from persons living in poverty, organizations representing Native peoples and provincial and regional partners, on the main issues surrounding the fight against poverty and social exclusion.

There are two ways to share your opinion with us:
1. General Public Organizations: Answer the Online questionnaire [ http://goo.gl/M7NKNL ] (until December 16, 2015) OR submit a brief (until January 29, 2016)

Marois rolls out anti-poverty plan on PQ’s day of skirmishes with opposition
http://m.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/marois-rolls-out-anti-poverty-plan-on-pqs-day-of-skirmishes-with-opposition/article15176544/

By Rhéal Séguin
QUEBEC CITY
October 30, 2013
(...)
As her government faced repeated charges that it was mismanaging the economy with anti-business policies, Ms. Marois unveiled a three-year, $320-million plan to help welfare recipients, immigrants and community groups as part of a new government campaign against poverty.

Last year, the government came under attack for abandoning its social democratic roots after introducing a $19-million-a-year cutback in welfare payments mainly to older recipients and couples with young children as part of the plan to eliminate the deficit.

On Wednesday, Ms. Marois said social assistance will increase by $50 a month over the next three years, wiping out the cutback and offering some reprieve to welfare recipients. Immigrants will receive special assistance to learn French and integrate into the workforce. More than half of the new funding will go to supporting community groups who help deal with the needs of the poor.

Source:
Globe and Mail

http://theglobeandmail.com/

Plans to cut parental programs draw scorn in Quebec
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/plans-to-cut-parental-programs-draw-scorn-in-quebec/article20635161/
September 16, 2014
Trial balloons filled the skies over Quebec’s National Assembly with the launch of the fall session and reports that Philippe Couillard’s government is planning cuts to sacred provincial programs.

The province appears poised to end the province’s $7 daily fee for the public daycare system, drastically cut benefits in Quebec’s parental leave program, and slash spending on education, including money for school boards, milk programs and books, according to recent reports from anonymous sources. Details remain scant on what the government actually wants to do and whether main purpose of the leaks is to reduce expectations.

14 comments about this article:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/plans-to-cut-parental-programs-draw-scorn-in-quebec/article20635161/comments/

Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

________________________________

Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion in Québec:
2012 Progress Report
(PDF - 648K, 90 pages)
http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/publications/pdf/progress_report_CEPE_2012.pdf

[ Version française : http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/publications/pdf/CEPE_Etat_situation_2012.pdf ]

January 29, 2013
In its 2009 advice to the Minister entitled Taking the Measure of Poverty (*see link below), the CEPE made 19 recommendations regarding indicators for measuring Québec’s progress in fighting poverty and exclusion. The present report is in follow-up to the recommendation calling for the yearly publication of a progress report on poverty and social exclusion in Québec. It represents a compilation of the most recent data on poverty and inequality in Québec available at the time of publication.

Table of Contents:

Chairman’s Message
Highlights
Introduction

Section 1 :  Key Poverty and Inequality Data
 Low Income
*  The main thresholds
*  Low income rate
*  Interregional comparisons
* Interprovincial comparisons
* Analysis of the changes in low income rates based on the Market Basket Measure (MBM), Québec and other provinces
*  International comparisons
Disposable Income and After-Tax Low Income Thresholds Based on Various Social and Fiscal Scenarios
* Supplementary Indicators
* Income Inequality
* Gini coefficient
* Interquintile ratios
* Polarization coefficient

Section 2 : Work of the CEPE: Retrospective and Outlook
* Reading committee for the 2011 progress report
* Social Exclusion: Issue, Definition, Dimensions and Indicators
* Working Paper: Esquisse du faible revenu chez les immigrants au Québec
* Concerted Action on Poverty and Social Exclusion, Phase 2: Current Projects
Conclusion

NOTE : In this report, you'll find links to 24 tables and 25 figures (charts).

---

* Taking the Measure of Poverty: Proposed Indicators of
Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion to Measure Progress in Québec
[PDF - 668K, 80 pages)
http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/publications/pdf/Avis_CEPE_en.pdf
Advice to the Minister
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion
2009

[ Version française : http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/publications/pdf/Avis_CEPE.pdf ]

Source:
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion
(English Home Page)
http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/index_en.asp
Version française:
http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/
The Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (CEPE) is an observation, research and discussion centre entrusted with providing reliable and rigorous information, notably of a statistical nature, on poverty and social exclusion issues. The CEPE was created in the spirit of the Act to combat poverty and social exclusion Link to external site. in spring 2005 under the aegis of the ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale (MESS)

Ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale (MESS) - English Home Page
http://www.mess.gouv.qc.ca/Index_en.asp

Ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale (MESS) - page d'accueil en français
http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/

________________________________

Québec : March 2012 update on poverty reduction

New from the
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion:
(Centre for the study of poverty and exclusion)

Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion in Québec:
Looking Ahead to 2013
2011 Progress Report
(PDF - 328K, 100 pages)
http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/publications/pdf/Progress_Report_CEPE_2011.pdf
By Athanase Barayandema, Guy Fréchet, Aline Lechaume et Frédéric Savard

March 2012

Excerpt from the abstract:

The 2009 Advice to the Minister entitled Taking the Measure of Poverty: Proposed Indicators of Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion to Measure Progress in Québec (PDF - 311K, 80 pages) [ http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/publications/pdf/Avis_CEPE_en.pdf ] contained 19 recommendations regarding indicators for measuring Québec’s progress in fighting poverty and exclusion. Responding to the CEPE’s recommendation calling for the yearly publication of a progress report on poverty and social exclusion in Québec, the present report represents a compilation of the most recent data, i.e. available at the time of publication, on poverty and inequality in Québec.
---
Selected highlights:
While progress has been made in recent years, it has not been on all fronts. The low income rate has dropped since the late 1990s, but remains worrisome, particularly among unattached individuals, who account for nearly half of all people living in poverty and who also tend to be the poorest of the poor. The latter portrait underlines the heightened vulnerability and precarious status of unattached individuals, who are at risk of facing multiple disadvantages and living well below the Low Income Cut-Offs.
---

Another recent release from CEPE:

The Costs of Poverty in Québec According to the Model by Nathan Laurie (PDF - 146K, 31 pages)
http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/publications/pdf/Costs_poverty_QC.pdf
By
Athanase Barayandema and Guy Fréchet
March 2012
(...) In this study, we attempt to gauge those costs [of poverty] based on a review of the scientific literature and our application of one of the models identified, namely the model put forward by Nathan Laurie and published by the Ontario Association of Food Banks in 2008. As a recent study on this issue in the Canadian context, the method can be transposed relatively faithfully to Québec realities.
- includes a summary of the literature which deals with the costs of poverty here and elsewhereinformation on the methodology used and an estimate of the various costs of poverty determined using the selected model, including health system costs, crime-related costs, intergenerational costs and economic losses.
[ Spoiler: ... poverty costs Québec society as a whole between $15.7 billion and $17.0 billion a year, or from 5.8% to 6.3% of its real GDP. Social costs alone are estimated at over $5 billion a year. (Excerpt from Summary, page v) ]
- types of costs included: remedial costs, intergenerational costs, opportunity costs

More CEPE Documents:
http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/publications/publications_en.asp

Source:
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion
(English home page)
(Centre for the study of poverty and exclusion)
http://www.cepe.gouv.qc.ca/presentation/index_en.asp
The Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (CEPE) is an observation, research and discussion centre entrusted with providing reliable and rigourous information, notably of a statistical nature, on poverty and social exclusion issues. (...) One of the main mandates of the CEPE is to develop and recommend to the Minister a series of indicators to be used in measuring poverty and social exclusion and social and economic disparities, as well as other indicators of poverty.

________________________________

Poverty Reduction in Québec: The First Five Years (small PDF file - 9 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
December 2010
This report is part of a series of papers on provincial poverty reduction strategies prepared for the Vibrant Communities project*. The report focuses upon the first five years of the poverty reduction initiative – though it should be noted that Québec recently renewed for another five years its commitment to reduce poverty and social exclusion. Some community groups have questioned the government's genuine commitment to tackling the problem of low income. Québec nonetheless has been a leader in many important respects, including the introduction of a legislative base as a foundation for poverty reduction, a series of linked actions in diverse fields, a long-term time frame within which to carry out this work, and an associated research and monitoring capacity.
[ * Vibrant Communities project : On the Caledon website home page, click "Special Projects" in the top menu, then
"Vibrant Communities" for a description of this initiative PLUS links to dozens of Vibrant Communities reports ]

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
Canada's Voice for Progressive, Practicable Social Policy

---------------------------------------------------

Government Action Plan for Solidarity and Social Inclusion 2010-2015:
Québec announces an action plan of nearly $7 billion for individuals in situations of poverty

News Release
June 6th, 2010
Today, Sam Hamad, Minister of Employment and Social Solidarity and Minister of Labour, and Lise Thériault, Minister for Social Services, unveiled the Government Action Plan for Solidarity and Social Inclusion 2010-2015: Québec’s Combat Against Poverty, which comes with total investments of nearly $7 billion. The Ministers were accompanied by the President of the Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale (CEPE), Alain Noël, and by the Chair of the Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale (CCLP), Damien Arsenault.

This action plan builds on a number of measures (e.g. Child Assistance and the Work Premium) introduced under the first Action Plan covering 2004-2010, and adds other structuring measures such as the Solidarity Tax Credit and an increase in funding ($115 million) for the Fonds québécois d’initiatives sociales (FQIS), which will enhance support for local, regional and Aboriginal anti-poverty projects.

________________

The Plan:
(English documents)

Government Action Plan for Solidarity and Social
Inclusion 2010-2015: Québec’s Combat Against Poverty

This second action plans builds on existing initiatives and was also inspired by the ideas expressed by the nearly 2,500 individuals and Québec and regional organizations consulted during the Rendez-vous de la solidarité.

2004-2010 Government Action Plan
to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion

Brief overview of the original Action Plan, which "brought together a slate of measures worth $4.5 billion over the past six years[ending in 2010]."
* scroll to the bottom of that page to find links to the key reports on the initial Action Plan, including the 2004 Plan itself in great detail and annual reports for each year starting in June 2005

Final report of the
first Action Plan:

Year Five Report (PDF file., 233K, 50 pages)
February 2010
Table of contents:
INTRODUCTION
QUÉBEC’S APPROACH TO COMBATING POVERTY
UPDATE ON THE VARIOUS MEASURES
* Improve the lives of people living in poverty
* Increase the income of individuals and families
* Measures for groups at risk of persistent poverty
* Better housing
* Better living conditions for individuals and families
* Prevent poverty and social exclusion by developing people’s potential
* Support for parents and early childhood
* School success and persistence
* Measures for young people under age 25
* Support for initiatives to promote seniors’ social participation
* Involve society as a whole
* Ensure consistent, coherent efforts
* Additional efforts
CONVINCING RESULTS AND A CHANGING SITUATION
* Low income rates using the Market Basket Measure
* Work and employment
* Improving disposable income
* Variations in the social aid rate since 2003
* Interprovincial comparison of households receiving last-resort financial assistance
TOWARD A SECOND GOVERNMENT ACTION PLAN TO COMBAT POVERTY AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION
CONCLUSION

________________

Complete text of the
2010-2015 Action Plan
(French only):

Plan d’action gouvernemental pour
la solidarité et l’inclusion sociale 2010-2015 :
Le Québec mobilisé contre la pauvreté
(French only, Fichier PDF., 2,72 Mo, 52 pages)

________________

2010-2015 Action Plan Investments
(French only):

Plan d'action gouvernemental
pour la solidarité et l'inclusion sociale 2010-2015
(dead link)
Communiqué
Le 6 juin 2010
Québec annonce un Plan d'action de près de 7 G$ pour améliorer les conditions de vie des personnes en situation de pauvreté.

Investissements relatifs au Plan d'action
gouvernemental pour la solidarité et l'inclusion sociale 2010-2015
(French only) (Fichier PDF., 17 ko, 1 page)

Le Plan d'action en un coup d'oeil
- Près de 7 milliards de dollars sur cinq ans, alloués selon quatre orientations:
1. Renforcer la solidarité en rapprochant les décisions des milieux locaux et régionaux
2. Valoriser le travail et favoriser l’autonomie des personnes.
3. Soutenir le revenu des personnes défavorisées.
4. Améliorer les conditions de vie des personnes et des familles à faible revenu.

________________________________

Related links to resources in English
from the Québec Government:

Rendez-vous de la solidarité 2009
A society engaged in action

(solidarity consultations)
In order to take into account the experience and knowledge of as many people as possible in drafting the 2010-2015 Government Action Plan for Solidarity and Social Inclusion, consultations, collectively called Rendez vous de la solidarité, were organized. In all, nearly 2,500 citizens and groups from all sectors of society had the opportunity to exchange viewpoints and express themselves.

Click the link above for more information on the Rendez vous initiative, including the province-wide and regional meetings with groups and individuals, focus groups, discussions with representatives of Aboriginal groups and an online citizen consultation.

Source (QC govt departments):
* Employment and Social Solidarity
* Health and Social Services

________________

Media coverage:

Montreal
Facing off across poverty line:
Shelter to shut doors for a day; 'Disheartened' by Quebec action plan
[This link has expired except from the ($) archives]
By T'cha Dunlevy
June 7, 2010
Aubin Boudreau, Director General of The Shelter Acceuil Bonneau, closes his eyes and pauses for a moment to collect his emotions. Boudreau was speaking to the press concerning the provincial governments underfunding of homeless shelters that will require the Acceuil Bonneau to close on Monday, in Montreal Sunday, June 6, 2010. On the day that a Montreal homeless shelter announced it would close its doors for a day to decry a lack of funds, the Quebec government announced its $7-billion action plan to improve the conditions of people living in poverty through 2015. Accueil Bonneau will shut down today - as a symbolic gesture - for the first time in its 133-year history. Sam Hamad, the minister of employment and social solidarity, addressed the issue briefly yesterday in a press conference with Minister of Social Services Lise Thériault. However, he focused on his party's anti-poverty plan, which includes housing proposals and tax credits.
Source:
Montreal Gazette

Also from The Gazette:

Plans to cut payments draw ire of welfare-rights groups
[This link has expired except from the ($) archives]
By Jan Ravensbergen
June 10, 2010
MONTREAL - A media report that the Quebec government has developed plans to chop $121 a month in social-assistance supplements received by 11,000 single mothers with pre-schoolers drew sharp condemnation Thursday from a spectrum of welfare-rights advocacy groups. It also triggered a government assertion in Quebec City that while no decision has yet been made, various unspecified "scenarios" are being studied. Other classes of welfare recipients considered able to work, including two-parent families and individuals age 55 or more, are also being targeted for cutbacks - apparently packaged with incentives for participation in job training, according to the report.

---

Homeless shelter closed in protest
June 7, 2010
In protest of what it calls a lack of government funding for Quebec's poor and homeless, Accueil Bonneau is closing its doors for 24 hours Monday, despite the government's announcement Sunday of a $7-billion plan to fight poverty.The plan includes a tax credit, working incentive cash and funds to mobilize groups to fight poverty, explained Employment Minister Sam Hamad. While the Quebec government announced Sunday actions it plans to take to alleviate poverty, including putting forth the sum over the next five years, protestors from homeless shelter Accueil Bonneau said they weren't satisfied.
Source:
CTV News Montreal

________________

Quebec 2010-2011 Budget

Additional Information on the Budgetary measures (PDF - 1.3MB, 204 pages)
"(...) 6.1 Plan to combat poverty
In the coming months, the Minister of Employment and Social Solidarity will unveil the new 2010-2015 government action plan to combat poverty and social exclusion. To support that initiative, the 2010-2011 Budget provides for an additional investment of $1.3 billion for the next five years..."

- includes a table showing annual investments to combat poverty over the next five years under each of several new measures:
* introduction of a Solidarity Tax Credit to provide for compensation for planned tax increases
* additional funding to the Fonds québécois d’initiatives sociales (social initiatives fund), to bolster collaborative intervention by the various organizations involved
* 3,000 new social housing throughout Quebec plus 340 new dwellings in Nunavik
* new measures to help seniors with the cost of home supports
Source:
Quebec 2010-2011 Budget : Choices for the Future
March 30, 2010
[
Ministère des Finances du Québec (English home page) ]

----------------------------


May 25, 2009
Conseil canadien de développement social

La lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion par le
développement social au Québec : un portrait des vingt dernières années
(PDF - 444K, 48 pages)

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs

----------------------------

An Act to combat poverty and social exclusion, R.S.Q., chapter L-7
Québec is the only Canadian jurisdiction to enshrine its anti-poverty strategy in legislation (passed in December 2002).
As noted above, the goal of the strategy is to make Québec one of the industrialized societies with the least poverty within ten years, by 2013.

Among its many provisions, the statute establishes two related entities: a multisectoral advisory body to oversee the implementation of the Action Plan and an "observatory" where information on poverty and social exclusion is collected and disseminated. These two entities are discussed below.

Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale
(Advisory committee in the strategy against poverty, set up under the National Strategy)
- incl. links to : Comité consultatif (About) - Initiatives to combat poverty and social exclusion - Feedback - Press releases - Publications - Useful links
---
NOTE: The Comité consultatif is a public body whose role is to advise the Québec Minister responsible for the application of the Action Plan to combat poverty and social exclusion. This mission is not unlike that of the National Council of Welfare (NCW) at the federal government level with respect to the Minister responsible for Human Resources and Social Development Canada, that is, to represent the interests of all Canadians in offering counsel to the HRSDC Minister in all matters relating to social development. Both the Comité consultatif and the NCW carry out evaluations and other studies, and they present their views and and recommendations directly to the Minister responsible and also to the public. Both groups also monitor the social policies of their respective governments with a special focus on the impacts of new policies on the incidence of poverty and social exclusion.


Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (CEPE)
(Centre for the study of poverty and exclusion)
The Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion is an observation, research and discussion centre entrusted with providing reliable and rigourous information, notably of a statistical nature, on poverty and social exclusion issues. Created within the context of the Act to combat poverty and social exclusion, the CEPE acts under the aegis of the Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale (MESS) and is managed in collaboration with a steering committee composed of members working in the academic research or government sector, or working with people who are experiencing poverty or social exclusion.
- incl. links to:
* Introduction to the CEPE * Statistics * Research activities * Publications * Lexicon * Useful links

Recent release from CEPE:

Taking the Measure of Poverty, Proposed indicators of poverty,
inequality and social exclusion to measure progress in Québec:
Advice to the Minister
(PDF - 311K, 80 pages)
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion
2009
One of the mandates of the Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion is to propose, to the minister of Emploi et Solidarité sociale, measures and indicators of poverty, inequality and social exclusion to measure progress in Québec in the implementation of the Act to combat poverty and social exclusion. This advice is a first proposition in that direction.
[ more reports by CEPE ]
Source:
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (English home page)
The Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (CEPE) is an observation, research and discussion centre entrusted with providing reliable and rigourous information, notably of a statistical nature, on poverty and social exclusion issues. (...) One of the main mandates of the CEPE is to develop and recommend to the Minister a series of indicators to be used in measuring poverty and social exclusion and social and economic disparities, as well as other indicators of poverty.


Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale (CCLP) - English page
[Consultative Committee on the Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion]
"...The primary role of this committee is to advise the Government of Québec on the actions implemented under the National Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion."

Key Reports

Annual Progress Reports on the Government Action Plan to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion:

Year One (2004-2005) Report (PDF file - 605K, 47 pages)
June 2005

Year Two (2005-2006) Report (PDF file - 965K, 38 pages)
October 2006

Year Three (2006-2007) Report (PDF file - 869K, 32 pages)
--- Summary (PDF file - 281K, 2 pages)
October 2007

Year Four Report ( French only --- PDF file., 1,25MB, 39 pages)
October 2008

Final report of the
first Action Plan:

Year Five Report (PDF file., 233K, 50 pages)
February 2010
Table of contents:
INTRODUCTION
QUÉBEC’S APPROACH TO COMBATING POVERTY
UPDATE ON THE VARIOUS MEASURES
* Improve the lives of people living in poverty
* Increase the income of individuals and families
* Measures for groups at risk of persistent poverty
* Better housing
* Better living conditions for individuals and families
* Prevent poverty and social exclusion by developing people’s potential
* Support for parents and early childhood
* School success and persistence
* Measures for young people under age 25
* Support for initiatives to promote seniors’ social participation
* Involve society as a whole
* Ensure consistent, coherent efforts
* Additional efforts
CONVINCING RESULTS AND A CHANGING SITUATION
* Low income rates using the Market Basket Measure
* Work and employment
* Improving disposable income
* Variations in the social aid rate since 2003
* Interprovincial comparison of households receiving last-resort financial assistance
TOWARD A SECOND GOVERNMENT ACTION PLAN TO COMBAT POVERTY AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION
CONCLUSION

Related links
and historical reports:

Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale

Government Action Plan to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion (PDF file - 400K, 66 pages)
April 2004
"(...)This Action Plan is built around two principles: economic security and social inclusion through employment, and increased protection for people with significant employment limitations."
(Excerpt from the Minister's message)

The Will to Act - The Strength to Succeed
Policy Statement
(PDF file - 519K, 52 pages)
Summer 2002
"Together, we can give new impetus to Québec's development, strengthening our social cohesion to ready ourselves for the challenges of the third millennium. With the will to act, we will have the strength to succeed."
[Excerpt from the conclusion]

National Strategy to Combat Poverty and social exclusion:
Summary Policy statement
(PDF file - 85K, 3 pages)
Summer 2002
"The National Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion centers around three converging goals:
- To improve the economic and social situation of people living in poverty or marginalized by society;
- To reduce inequalities that specifically affect people living in poverty; and
- To take comprehensive action by developing a sense of social solidarity."

National Strategy to Combat Poverty : Don't Leave Anyone Out (PDF file - 481K, 37 pages)
Summer 2001
Don't leave anyone out! is a call for all partners and civil society to join forces in order to improve the living conditions of the most disadvantaged members of society, and to ensure that everyone has the means to make choices and participate in the life of his or her community.

More selected reports from the
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion
and the
Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale

Release of the first recommendation of the
Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale
April 3, 2008
Rates that exclude, solutions that unite
The advisory committee makes its first recommendation

Today, April 3, 2008, in Montréal, the chair of the Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l'exclusion sociale, Mr. Tommy Kulczyk, addressed the repercussions of rate increases on the living conditions of low-income individuals with the release of the advisory committee’s first recommendation. The committee illustrates how rate increases on basic commodities like heating, electricity and transportation compromise the ability of the impoverished and socially excluded to integrate society. These increases contribute to social exclusion by forcing these people to spend too much of their meagre resources on basic commodities and increasing their isolation.
The members of the advisory committee feel there is an urgent need to act on a situation that is creating a breach in the efforts made by Québec to fight poverty and social exclusion. The committee has drawn up eleven unifying recommendations comprising short-, medium- and long-term actions that are fully sustainable in approach.

L’urgence d’agir relativement aux répercussions des hausses tarifaires (PDF - 46K, 2 pages) - available in French only.
Communiqué
Montréal, le 3 avril 2008 – Le président du Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale, M. Tommy Kulczyk, a rendu public aujourd’hui le premier avis de cet organisme créé pour conseiller le ministre responsable de la mise en œuvre de la Loi visant à lutter contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale sur les actions à entreprendre pour lutter contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale. Cet avis s’intitule « Des tarifs qui excluent… Des solutions qui rassemblent ».

Les répercussions des hausses tarifaires sur les
conditions de vie des personnes à faible revenu
(PDF - 1.1MB, 28 pages) - currently (April 6/08) available in French only (although a note on the inside cover page states that "this document is available in English; check the Committee's English home page to see if the English has now been posted on their site.)

Source:
Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale (CCLP) - (English home page)
[Consultative Committee on the Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion]

Related links:

Quebec poor getting poorer: report
[This link has expired.]
April 3, 2008
By Kristy Rich
QUEBEC CITY - The Quebec government must do more to protect the buying power of the poor from the rising costs of living, says a government advisory commitee created to ensure the government is respecting its Anti-Poverty Law. Though the cost of electricity and public transit are increasing, committee Chair Tommy Kulcyzk says the government has not fully indexed welfare payments.(..) The report's 11 recommendations include compensating welfare recipients for the cost of increasing tariffs by comparative increases in their sales tax refund; and cutting the cost of public transit fares in half over the next decade.
Source:
CJAD (Montreal AM radio)

Rates that exclude, solutions that unite
The advisory committee makes its first recommendation

Today, April 3, 2008, in Montréal, the chair of the Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l'exclusion sociale, Mr. Tommy Kulczyk, addressed the repercussions of rate increases on the living conditions of low-income individuals with the release of the advisory committee’s first recommendation. The committee illustrates how rate increases on basic commodities like heating, electricity and transportation compromise the ability of the impoverished and socially excluded to integrate society. These increases contribute to social exclusion by forcing these people to spend too much of their meagre resources on basic commodities and increasing their isolation.
The members of the advisory committee feel there is an urgent need to act on a situation that is creating a breach in the efforts made by Québec to fight poverty and social exclusion. The committee has drawn up eleven unifying recommendations comprising short-, medium- and long-term actions that are fully sustainable in approach.

L’urgence d’agir relativement aux répercussions des hausses tarifaires (PDF - 46K, 2 pages) - available in French only.
Communiqué
Montréal, le 3 avril 2008 – Le président du Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale, M. Tommy Kulczyk, a rendu public aujourd’hui le premier avis de cet organisme créé pour conseiller le ministre responsable de la mise en œuvre de la Loi visant à lutter contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale sur les actions à entreprendre pour lutter contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale. Cet avis s’intitule « Des tarifs qui excluent… Des solutions qui rassemblent ».

Les répercussions des hausses tarifaires sur les
conditions de vie des personnes à faible revenu
(PDF - 1.1MB, 28 pages) - currently (April 6/08) available in French only (although a note on the inside cover page states that "this document is available in English; check the Committee's English home page to see if the English has now been posted on their site.)

Source:
Comité consultatif de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale (CCLP) - (English home page)
[Consultative Committee on the Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion]

Recent CEPE reports:

February 7, 2008
Report on low incomes in Québec
This document describes poverty trends in recent years and the proportion of low-income family units among Quebecers, the gap between their income and low-income thresholds, the duration of their situation, and their main sociodemographic and economic characteristics. More detailed information is provided about unattached persons and last-resort financial assistance recipients.
Details and document
Press release (PDF, 94 ko) (French)

February 7, 2008
New "Other Documents" section
You can now consult the new Other Documents section, which comprises a number of documents that are considered to provide important information for understanding poverty-related phenomena.

February 7, 2008
Strategic plan for anti-poverty research and knowledge transfer
The purpose of this strategy is to increase research efforts aimed at a fuller understanding of the problem of poverty and to contribute to producing lasting solutions. The strategy insists on the importance of knowledge transfer and appropriation and the need to make research results known and easy to access.
Details and document



Related reports:

-------------------------------------

Éliminer la pauvreté : ce que peuvent faire les gouvernements (PDF - 316Ko, 9 pages) (dead link)
[Available in French only]

Alain Noël, PhD
Université de Montréal
Le 17 avril 2008
« (...) Collectivement, nous devrons également garder à l'esprit que pour éradiquer la pauvreté, il ne suffit pas de miser sur la croissance économique et sur l'emploi.
Il faut aussi redistribuer le revenu. »
Source:
Petits déjeuners sur la Colline (dead link)
[ Fédération canadienne des sciences humaines ]

NOTE to Anglophones:

In his April 17 presentation, Éliminer la pauvreté : ce que peuvent faire les gouvernements (What governments can do to eliminate poverty), Political Science Professor Alain Noël offers some interesting insights into poverty reduction/elimination in other countries and in Canada, with a special focus on Québec and Newfoundland and Labrador, the two provinces that already have a poverty reduction strategy in place. He also speaks about the recent resurgence of public interest in poverty reduction in Canada and on the world scene, and he suggests that the federal government needs to step up to the plate in terms of its poverty reduction efforts in areas such as Employment Insurance, income security for Canada's seniors, equalization, taxation and Aboriginal people.

Source:
Breakfast on the Hill Series (English home page)(dead link)
NOTE: click the link above to access 46 presentations in the Breakfast on the Hill series, going right back to 1996.
[ Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences ]


From the Family Network:
[Canadian Policy Research Networks ]

A Focus on Income Support: Implementing Quebec's Law Against Poverty and Social Exclusion
May 28, 2004
Commentary (13 pages)
by Alain Noël
"For the time being, it is probably good to praise an effort that was not expected and that appears, in many ways, well intentioned and valuable. From now on, however, the combat will have to continue, not only against poverty and social exclusion, but also against prejudices and a perennial lack of vision."
- assessment of the Charest government's action plan against poverty and social exclusion in Quebec (which was released on April 2) by Alain Noël, who prepared an essay on the original anti-poverty law late in 2002 (see the link below)
- comprehensive, detailed info on the new action plan, including welfare reforms taking effect over the coming year
[Click on the link above , then (on the next page), on the word "Download" under the author's name to open the document in PDF format]

A Law Against Poverty: Quebec’s New Approach to Combating Poverty and Social Exclusion
by Alain Noël
December 2002
Full Report (PDF file - 554 K, 11 pages)
"On December 13, 2002, the National Assembly in Quebec unanimously adopted a law to “combat poverty and social exclusion.” Bill 112 is a framework law that includes a National Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion, a fund to support social initiatives, an “Observatory,” and an Advisory Committee on the Prevention of Poverty and Social Exclusion. This new law is unique in North America, and it constitutes a significant political innovation, if only because it makes poverty reduction an explicit and central policy priority. The bill is also the result of a remarkable process of collective action and public deliberation."


From the Canadian Council on Social Development(CCSD):

The fight against poverty: A model law
"An excellent article by Camil Bouchard and Marie-France Raynault on Quebec’s ground-breaking anti-poverty law recently appeared in Le Devoir."
January 22, 2003

Quebec Renews Fight Against Poverty
June 2002
"On June 12, the Government of Quebec tabled a bill in the National Assembly aimed at establishing a strategy for poverty reduction in the province. This is a major step as Quebec takes the lead in putting poverty back on the public (and legislative) agenda."
- incl. links to five key documents

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm

- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

 

[GO BACK TO THE TOP OF THIS PAGE]


Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy

NOTE : This page was so large that it kept crashing my HTML editing software.
I've had to move the Ontario section of this page to its own separate page.
For all Ontario poverty reduction links, please go to:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty_ontario.htm

Manitoba's Anti-Poverty Strategy



NOTE : Links in this yellow text box are mostly from the Government of Manitoba.
Links below the yellow box are mostly NGO and media links.

The Poverty Reduction Strategy Act
http://web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/statutes/ccsm/p094-7e.php
Continuing Consolidated Statutes of Manitoba, chapter P94.7
It has been in effect since June 16, 2011, when this Act came into force.

ALL Aboard: Manitoba’s Poverty Reduction Strategy
http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/
ALL Aboard is Manitoba's poverty reduction and social inclusion strategy, which formalizes and builds upon poverty reduction efforts underway in the province.

ALL Aboard Publications and Resources
http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/resources_publications.html
- incl. links to all action plans, budget papers, data, public consultations, and much more...

-----------------------------

Latest news:

Manitoba Budget 2015:
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/index.html
(April 30, 2015)

A poverty reduction budget for Manitoba
http://makepovertyhistorymb.com/2015/05/04/a-poverty-reduction-budget-for-manitoba/
May 4, 2015
The provincial government has responded to your calls to invest in housing in Budget 2015!
MPHM partnered with Right to Housing on a campaign focused on two requests to the provincial government.

The Province responded positively on both:

Budget 2015 commits to fully implementing Rent Assist this year – that means Manitobans on Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) who live in private rental housing will receive a shelter benefit that is equal to 75% of median market rent (MMR) beginning in December 2015. Click the link above to see a table for exact dollar amounts. Low-income Manitobans who are not on EIA may also be eligible to receive a shelter benefit through Rent Assist that is as high as 75% of MMR.

Budget 2015 also allocates an additional $10 million for Manitoba Housing and Community Development. This budget will be sufficient to fund existing commitments to increase the housing supply without reducing other important housing initiatives.

Source:
Make Poverty History Manitoba (MPHM)

http://makepovertyhistorymb.com/
MPHM ks a multi-sectoral collaborative coalition representing business, education, student, youth, Aboriginal, newcomer, labour, women’s, disability, urban, rural, and northern communities. The coalition’s efforts are directed primarily at the provincial level. However, its work contributes toward the achievement of Make Poverty History’s national campaign objectives.

The View From Here 2015:
Manitobans call for a renewed poverty reduction plan
(PDF - 1.76MB, 92 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Manitoba%20Office/2015/01/View%20from%20here%20v8%20low-res.pdf
January 30, 2015
More than 95 organizations from across Manitoba, including Make Poverty History Manitoba, endorsed the 50 policy recommendations in The View from Here – a comprehensive community-based poverty reduction plan for Manitoba. Premier Greg Selinger has expressed his support for many of its recommendations. Budget 2015 includes many initiatives that directly respond to the recommendations in the plan...

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Manitoba Office : https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - National Office : http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

Battling child poverty : It takes political will
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/analysis/battling-child-poverty-302382351.html
By Sid Frankel
May 4, 2015
Why does Manitoba have such a high rate of children in care of the child welfare system, the highest rate of infant mortality and a youth crime severity index more than twice the Canadian average? There are a lot of reasons, but one of the prime drivers of all of these problems is child poverty.
In 2012, 83,990 Manitoba children lived in poverty (low income measure, after tax). This is almost three in 10 children (29 per cent), and is second only to Nunavut among Canadian provinces and territories. Did the province do enough about this serious situation in the 2015 budget? Not nearly.
There are four essential actions that it could have taken, but chose not to:
* First, it did not set targets and timelines for child poverty reduction.
* Second, Manitoba's income support programs must be improved.
* Third, the government did continue to expand child care spaces.
* Fourth, the provincial government should demand that the federal government use its constitutional spending power to support the provinces in child poverty reduction.

Sid Frankel is a professor of social work at the University of Manitoba.

Source:
Winnipeg Free Press
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The second annual All Aboard report:

All Aboard Annual Report 2013 - 2014 (PDF - 1.3MB, 46 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/pubs/all_aboard_annual_report_2013_14.pdf
Manitoba’s Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion Strategy
September 2014

In April 2012, the Manitoba government released its four-year (2012-2016) Strategy, which focuses on seven priority areas:
• Building Blocks for Employment (Sustainable Employment and a Stronger Labour Market)
• Targeted Supports for Those Most In Need
• Food Security
• Housing
• Closing the Gap for Aboriginal Peoples in Manitoba
• Creating Opportunities for Youth, and
• Early Childhood Development and Parenting Supports

The ALL Aboard Strategy rests upon the following four interconnected pillars:
1. Safe, Affordable Housing in Supportive Communities
2. Education, Jobs and Income Support
3. Strong, Healthy Families
4. Accessible, Co-ordinated Services


Further poverty reduction efforts needed in Manitoba

http://policyfix.ca/2014/10/28/further-poverty-reduction-efforts-needed-in-manitoba/
By Kirsten Bernas
October 28, 2014
There is some good news in the Province’s recently released second annual All Aboard report (see the link below), which tracks poverty and social exclusion in Manitoba. However, it’s clear that much more needs to be done. The report looks at 21 indicators covering areas such as housing, community belonging, education, employment, earnings, poverty rates, income inequality, early learning and childcare, children in care, teen birth rates, and health.

Since the All Aboard poverty reduction and social inclusion strategy was announced in 2009, there has been a 5.3 percent increase in the number of social and affordable housing units supported by the Province, an 8% increase in graduation rates, and a 5.5 percent increase in the availability of licensed childcare.

From Manitoba Budget 2014
(March 6, 2014):

Reducing Poverty and Promoting Social Inclusion (PDF - 208K, 19 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/papers/poverty.pdf
Contents:
--- All Aboard : Manitoba's Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion Strategy
--- Measuring Progress
--- Provincial Investments : Creating Opportunities for All Manitobans
--- Key All Aboard Initiatives in Budget 2014
--- Making Progress on Employment and Income Assistance
---- Introducing the New Manitoba Rent Assist Program
--- Appendix 1: Manitoba's indicators of poverty reduction and social inclusion
--- Appendix 2: Reporting on commitments

Source:
Manitoba Budget 2014

http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/index.html
Government of Manitoba
http://www.gov.mb.ca/

---

AllAboard Annual Report 2012-2013 (PDF - 1.3MB, 60 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/pubs/all_aboard_annual_report_2012_13.pdf
September 2013
Four-year Strategy:
In April 2012, the province released its
Four-Year (2012-2016) Strategy
( PDF - 1.3MB, 12 pages):
http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/pubs/strategy_paper.pdf

...which focuses on seven priority areas:
• Building blocks for employment
• Targeted supports for those most in need
• Food security
• Housing
• Closing the gap for Aboriginal Manitobans
• Creating opportunities for youth
• Early childhood development and parenting supports

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NOTE : The links below are to older content; they are organized in reverse chronological order, with the most recent content at the top.

Public Consultations on Poverty Reduction
in Manitoba to take place from March 4 to March 22, 2013

http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/consultation.html
ALL Aboard: Manitoba's Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion Strategy represents Manitoba's commitment to reduce poverty. ALL Aboard brings together successful initiatives that help reduce poverty and improve social inclusion, while creating new initiatives to build on past achievements.

Reducing poverty requires that we work together with the public, service providers, community groups, businesses, labour and other important stakeholders. Please participate in the ALL Aboard consultation process taking place from March 4 - 22, 2013. Information gathered will help to determine our next steps. To assist you in participating, please read the draft ALL Aboard Action Plans (available as of March 4).

---

Province invests $950 million this year in All Aboard Poverty Reduction Strategy
More Than 560 Organizations, Individuals Helping Guide Priorities: Irvin-Ross, Mackintosh

April 9, 2010
The province is committing $950 million this year to fighting poverty and promoting opportunities for low-income Manitobans including more than 30 new initiatives and program enhancements, Housing and Community Development Minister Kerri Irvin-Ross and Family Services and Consumer Affairs Minister Gord Mackintosh announced today. (...) The province set its priorities for program enhancements and new initiatives under ALL Aboard based on research and discussion with stakeholders and individuals living in poverty, the minister said. At the top of the list are housing, getting Manitobans off welfare, more child care and building awareness of existing supports.

---

Twenty-nine new child-care sites, 3500 more spaces funded since launch of Family Choices five-year strategy: Mackintosh, Allan
Up to $19-million Investment this Year Includes Phased Launch of Online Wait List, Worker Pension Plan
April 9, 2010
The province is investing up to $19 million more in Budget 2010 for new child-care centres, hundreds more spaces, the phasing in of a centralized online wait list and a pension plan for a stronger workforce, Family Services and Consumer Affairs Minister Gord Mackintosh and Education Minister Nancy Allan announced today. (...) Today’s announcement is part of the province’s ALL Aboard poverty reduction strategy.

---

Minimum wage to increase to $9.50 per hour Oct. 1
Province Balancing Needs of 28,000 Minimum Wage Earners with Needs of Manitoba Businesses: Howard
April 8, 2010
The province will increase the minimum wage by 50 cents to $9.50 an hour on Oct. 1, Labour and Immigration Minister Jennifer Howard announced today. (...) The minimum wage rate last increased by 25 cents to $9 per hour on Oct. 1, 2009, following an additional 25-cent increase on May 1, 2009. (...) With this increase to the minimum wage, Manitoba will maintain its position near the middle of Canadian rates. Regular increases to the minimum wage are an important factor in reducing poverty and are part of ALL Aboard, Manitoba’s poverty reduction strategy, said the minister.

Budget 2010 enhances supports for post-secondary students
New $7.5-million Early Advance on Tuition Rebate to Assist Students Still in School, When They Need it the Most: McGifford
April 8, 2010
Manitoba continues to offer some of the most affordable, accessible and high-quality post-secondary education in the country by introducing a new student grant, improving Manitoba’s bursaries and providing earlier access to the province’s tuition rebate program, putting an extra estimated $7.5 million back into students’ pockets annually, Advanced Education and Literacy Minister Diane McGifford announced today.

April 8, 2010
Rent supplement for Manitobans
with mental health issues expanded to entire province

ALL Aboard: 2010-11 Highlights (Word [.doc] file - 39K, 1 page)
April 2010
* Safe, Affordable Housing in Supportive Communities
* Education, Jobs and Income Support
* Strong, Healthy Families
* Accessible, Co-ordinated Services

---

AllAboard - Manitoba’s Poverty Reduction Strategy (PDF - 562K, 8 pages)
May 2009
In Manitoba, we believe that all people deserve a high quality of life and the opportunity to realize their potential.
Taking action to reduce poverty is the right thing to do.
Source:
Manitoba Family Services and Labour

---

Province marks 10 years of fighting poverty with new strategy called All Aboard
Vision Sets Goals for Affordable Housing, Training, Jobs and Healthy Families: Selinger, Mackintos
h
May 21, 2009
A poverty-reduction strategy called ALL Aboard, based on an annual investment of more than $744 million including $212 million of new investments, will focus on long-term solutions to help low-income Manitobans, Finance Minister Greg Selinger and Family Services and Housing Minister Gord Mackintosh announced today.

---

May 21, 2009
Province launches homeless strategy with focus on mental-health housing
Up to 2,000 Manitobans to Benefit from 285 More Mental-health Housing Units, 600 to Benefit from New Portable Housing Benefit: Ministers
A new strategy to reduce and prevent homelessness will connect homeless people and those with mental-health challenges to stable, secure housing and support services, Healthy Living Minister Kerri Irvin-Ross and Family Services and Housing Minister Gord Mackintosh said today.
The HOMEWorks! homeless strategy includes 10 new initiatives in the following program areas:
* Emergency Shelters * Outreach * Housing with Services * Prevention

Source:
Government of Manitoba

http://www.gov.mb.ca/index.html

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________

The links below are, for the most part, organized in reverse chronological order, with the most recent additions at the top.
______________________________________________________________________________________________

The View From Here 2015:
Manitobans call for a renewed poverty reduction plan

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/view-here-2015
By Kirsten Bernas
January 30, 2015
Given that the policy landscape has changed since 2009, and that the province will be required by legislation to update its strategy in 2017, community advocates believe that now is the time to renew The View from Here 2009 [ https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/view-here ]
- includes links to the complete report released in January 2015 (see below)


Download the complete 2015 report (PDF - 1.76MB, 92 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Manitoba%20Office/2015/01/View%20from%20here%20v8%20low-res.pdf
January 2015

---

Manitoba boosts rental allowance, introduces work program
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-boosts-rental-allowance-introduces-work-program-1.2680741
June 19, 2014
Rental allowance is increasing in Manitoba after years of being stagnant and falling far behind the soaring costs of rent. People on employment and income assistance (EIA) and living in private rental accommodations will receive increases of between $50 and $70 per month for shelter costs. That means single individuals, for example, will receive $435 per month, compared to the previous $365. (...) It is part of a larger overhaul to the rental allowance program. Oswald introduced Rent Assist, a new program for both social assistance recipients and other low-income earners, which will replace the current EIA shelter allowance and RentAid programs

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news

---

From Policy Fix:

Province introduces online calculator for low-income renters
http://policyfix.ca/2014/07/30/province-introduces-online-calculator-for-low-income-renters/
By Josh Brandon
July 30, 2014
If you are a renter in Manitoba paying more than 25 percent of your income in rent, you may be eligible for a benefit of between $20 and $270 per month, thanks to recent changes to a provincial program called Rent Assist.

The Province has just introduced an online calculator on which low-income renters may determine how much of a Rent Assist benefit they are entitled to receive. Starting July 1, 2014, this program provides a benefit up to $270 dollars per month. It replaces an earlier program called RentAid that provided a maximum benefit of up to $230.

The changes in the program were introduced in parallel with recent increases to the Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) shelter benefit.

---

Province introduces online calculator for low-income renters
http://policyfix.ca/2014/07/30/province-introduces-online-calculator-for-low-income-renters/

Policy Fix
http://policyfix.ca/

Policy Fix is the blog of the Manitoba Office
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba
of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

- Go to the Manitoba Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm

From the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Manitoba Office:

Rent Aid changes in 2013:
Province increases aid to low-income families
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/node/11834
By Josh Brandon
September 19, 2013
In August 2013, the Province of Manitoba introduced changes to its RentAid program [ http://www.gov.mb.ca/fs/assistance/shelterbenefit-families.html ] benefiting many low-income households as well as individuals on Employment and Income Assistance (EIA). The changes increased levels of benefits and improved access to the program. This report analyses the effects of these changes and makes recommendations for how the program could be improved further.

The complete report:

Rent Aid changes in 2013:
Province increases aid to low-income families
(PDF - 668K, 4 pages)
http://goo.gl/NN84ux
Last month, the Province of Manitoba quietly amended its RentAid regulations. The changes will increase benefits and widen eligibility for thousands of low-income families, seniors, persons with disabilities and single persons living on Employment Income Assistance (EIA). RentAid benefits received by persons on EIA and by other recipients were increased by $20 and eligible income levels were raised by about 14%. The changes are part of a $6.3 million commitment by the Provincial government in its 2013 Budget to increase RentAid benefits.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Manitoba Office

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba

Manitoba's Campaign 2000 Child and Family Poverty Report Card for 2012 (PDF - 732K, 10 pages)
http://www.spcw.mb.ca/files/4013/5414/7237/C2000_Child_Poverty_Report_Card-2012.pdf
Poverty remains a persistent reality for about 20% of children in Manitoba. While the number of children living in poverty has gone down over the last 20 years, an unacceptably large number - 54,000 in 2010 - are being held back by the limitations of inadequate income, poor housing, limited recreation and compromised learning opportunities.

NOTE : Manitoba's child and family poverty report card was produced by the Social Planning Council of Winnipeg as part of an annual initiative of Campaign 2000 (see the link below). On November 21, Campaign 200 released its 2012 national report on child and family poverty, and provincial reports were also released for British Columbia, Alberta and New Brunswick. Manitoba's report is the latest to be released as part of this collection. Click the Campaign 2000 link below to access the national report and the other provincial reports.

Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

http://www.spcw.mb.ca/

Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations, committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada. Visit the Campaign 2000 website for a complete list of partner organizations.

Related link:

Manitoba's child poverty an 'appalling' 20 per cent
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/manitobas-child-poverty-an-appalling-20-per-cent-181497141.html
By Larry Kusch
November 30, 2012
One in five Manitoba children continues to live in poverty despite a much-ballyhooed NDP government strategy -- announced more than three years ago -- to reduce it.
When it comes to child poverty, only Prince Edward Island has a higher rate in Canada, at 22.5 per cent, to Manitoba's 20.9 per cent, the Social Planning Council of Winnipeg said in a report Thursday. The national average is 14.5 per cent

Source:
Winnipeg Free Press

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/

Manitoba : 2012 Acceptable Living Level (ALL) Report (February 16, 2012)
http://winnipegharvest.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/ALL-REPORT-media-release-February-16-2012.pdf
News Release
February 16, 2012
WINNIPEG-Low-income parents in Winnipeg -- whether they are working or on welfare -- do not have enough money to adequately feed, shelter and clothe themselves and their children. More than a dozen Winnipeg Harvest clients, acting as consultants, today released the 2012 Acceptable Living Level (ALL) for four family types. The 2012 Acceptable Living Level Report sets out how much disposable income is needed in the marketplace to buy a basket of goods and services that can sustain a fair, modest and acceptable living level.

The report demonstrates that current welfare rates, even when federal child benefits are taken into account, fall far short of meeting the 2012 Acceptable Living Level. Even two parents working fulltime at minimum wage jobs have incomes far below the 2012 Acceptable Living Level.

Complete report:

A More Inclusive and Generous Canada:
The 2012 Acceptable Living Level
(PDF - 896K, 95 pages)
http://winnipegharvest.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/2012-A.L.L.-REPORT.pdf

Prepared by:

Winnipeg Harvest
http://winnipegharvest.org/

Social Planning Council of Winnipeg
http://www.spcw.mb.ca/

Manitoba Budget 2012 (April 17, 2012):
Reducing Poverty and Promoting Social Inclusion
- pdf - 442 k
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget12/papers/poverty.pdf
Contents:
--- Reducing poverty and promoting social inclusion
--- Key Priorities for 2012
--- 2012 Budget measures that support poverty reduction and social inclusion
--- How we will measure our progress
Excerpt from p. 4:
"The Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) program (social assistance) is now located within Manitoba Entrepreneurship,
Training and Trade. EIA participants who can work will now get speedy access to employment, training and supports. This is
an efficient and effective way to help Manitobans most in need to move from social assistance into employment.
To support those Manitobans with severe disabilities that prohibit them from working, the province is working actively with
other provincial governments and the Government of Canada to pursue a pan-Canadian basic income support program for
working-age Canadians."
Source:
Budget Papers
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget12/papers.html

Manitoba Budget 2012 : Focused on What Matters Most
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget12/index.html

- main budget page, includes budget highlights and links to all budget papers

News Release
http://news.gov.mb.ca/news/index.html?archive=2012-04-01&item=13733

From the
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg
(SPCW):

Recommendations for Implementing
the Poverty Reduction Strategy Act
(PDF - 388K, 35 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net//PRS_Act_Recommendations.pdf
January 2012
NOTE : I received the above PDF file from someone at the Winnipeg Social Planning Council on March 26.
The Council is experiencing some website hiccups and glitches, but the PDF file will soon/eventually be posted on their own website, after they've worked out the kinks.
[ Gilles]
---
This report will look at the Manitoba legislation and different poverty reduction strategies (PRS), to consider how these government plans have benefited and can benefit people living in poverty. We will compare and contrast strategies to learn what seems to be working and what has been less effective.
(Source : Executive Summary, page 2)
Contents:
* Current conditions of Poverty
--- Defining and Measuring Poverty
--- Social Inclusion and Exclusion
--- Equality and Inequality
--- Implications for Society
* Poverty Reduction Strategies
--- Canadian Trends and Efforts
--- Manitoba Legislation
* Programs, Policy and Practice
--- Provincial Government
--- Municipal Government
--- Community Groups
* Implementing the Poverty Reduction Strategy
--- Structural Weaknesses
--- Operational Weaknesses
--- Recommendations
* Attachments
--- All Aboard (summary)
--- Poverty Reduction Strategy Act (abbreviated)
--- Comparison chart – Canadian PRSs
--- Measures to Combat Social Exclusion and Poverty
* References

Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

http://www.spcw.mb.ca/

The Social Planning Council of Winnipeg (SPC) is a membership-based organization in the voluntary sector committed to providing leadership in social planning and effecting social policy changes.


NOTE:
This is one of a series of provincial reports all released under the Campaign 2000 banner each year.
To see the complete collection of federal and provincial reports and (selected) related media coverage, go to this section of the the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm#child_poverty_2011


From CBC Manitoba:

Not Enough Money
Baby food or a bus pass? A TV or a telephone?
About 100,000 Manitobans make these decisions every day. They live below the poverty line. Some are the poorest of the poor in the country.
Who they are and where they live will surprise you.

From March 22-26 (2010), CBC Television, Radio and cbc.ca will explore why so many Manitobans struggle with poverty and how they survive with Not Enough Money.
------------------------------------------------
NOTE: if you click the link above and scroll to the bottom of the page that opens, you'll find "Poverty by Area", a map of the City of Winnipeg showing family income by neighbourhood throughout the city. I *should* say "...a map of Winnipeg that's SUPPOSED to show family income by neighbourhood..." because that's what a Geographic Information System can do, according to Wikipedia. The Winnipeg map on the Not Enough Money page should be called "How NOT to do a GIS Map."
------------------------------------------------

Making Ends Meet
You don't have much money, but you do have a lot of choices.

Live Chat: Who's accountable?
A round table on poverty.
March 26, 2010

Fighting poverty
What stakeholders and anti-poverty activists say.

Measuring Poverty
Who's to say I am poor?
Looking at the three low-income measures.

Profiles
* Newcomers
- Refugees have a particularly hard time making ends meet.
* Single Parents - Single parents are poorer than their married counterparts.
* The Working Poor - You can work and still be poor.
* The Disabled - Earn about $10,000 a year less than those without a disability.
* Seniors - For many older Manitobans on fixed incomes the "golden years" aren't exactly brilliant.
* Aboriginal people - Manitoba has the largest per capita Aboriginal population in Canada.

Source:
CBC Manitoba

Poverty statistics misleading
By Harvey Stevens
December 5, 2009
The recently released November 2009 Manitoba Child and Family Poverty Report Card 2009 (PDF - 458K, 25 pages) states that "Manitoba is once again the Child Poverty Capital of Canada, tied with British Columbia for having the highest number of citizens under the age of 18 living in poverty." It goes on to show how Manitoba has held that highest ranking for eight of the last 19 years and second highest ranking for an additional five of those years. Unfortunately, these are very misleading statistics which are extremely unfair to Manitoba because they are based on a faulty yardstick -- the pre-tax low income cutoffs (LICOs) developed by Statistics Canada more 40 years ago.
Source:
Winnipeg Free
[ Harvey Stevens is a retired civil servant who worked for 18 years as a senior policy analyst with Family Services and Housing. His area of expertise is poverty measurement and income assistance policy. He tried championing the use of the MBM for setting welfare rates while in government but was unsuccessful. ]

20 Years Lost: The Poverty Generation
Manitoba Report Card on Child and Family Poverty (PDF - 458K, 25 pages)
November 2009
All of the children living in poverty in Manitoba today were born since the members of the House of Commons passed the resolution to eliminate child poverty in 1989. (...) In Manitoba, 47,000 children live in poverty. That’s 18.8 per cent of all children, nearly one in five. Manitoba is once again the Child Poverty Capital of Canada, tied with British Columbia for having the highest number of citizens under the age of 18 living in poverty. That’s almost four percentage points above the national average.
Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

One is too many (PDF - 75K, 2 pages) (dead link)
Media Release
November 24, 2009
Winnipeg Manitoba—a report released today by the Social Planning Council of Winnipeg (SPC) shows that Manitoba has regained the title of Child Poverty Capital of Canada, with nearly 1 in 5 children living in poverty.

Related link:
Campaign 2000

Winnipeg:

Consensus growing to fight poverty
By Harry Finnigan
October 16, 2009
According to Statistics Canada, in 2006 15.7 per cent of Winnipeggers were living in poverty. That translates into almost 100,000 people in Winnipeg being affected every day by not having enough to eat, a proper place to sleep, nor the freedom to live their lives with dignity. For people younger than 18, the percentage is even higher -- 21 per cent fall below the Low Income Cutoff indicator. Though we are no longer known as "the child poverty capital of Canada," those numbers are still cause for alarm as too often it is the children who are the victims of poverty.
Source:
Winnipeg Free Press

Related link:

Winnipeg Poverty Reduction Council
The mission of the Winnipeg Poverty Reduction Council is to significantly reduce poverty in Winnipeg in hopes of creating A City Where Everyone Belongs.

All Aboard Manitoba’s Poverty Train (PDF - 47K, 10 pages)
By Sherri Torjman, Ken Battle and Michael Mendelson
September 2009
This report summarizes the core elements of the newly-introduced poverty reduction strategy in Manitoba . Announced on May 21, 2009, All Aboard represents an annual investment of $744 million, including $212 million in new funding. To tackle the numerous factors that create and sustain poverty, the province is investing in four clusters of intervention: safe affordable housing; education, jobs and income support; strong and healthy families; and coordinated programs and services. The strategy has several elements of success: It is a whole-of-government approach rather than the effort of a single department. It invests in recognized pathways out of poverty and engages partners outside government in the diverse interventions. The strategy provides direct (albeit modest) payments to households with children to boost their incomes immediately. All Aboard includes a process to coordinate its many components and monitor its impact.
Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy does rigorous, high-quality research and analysis; seeks to inform and influence public opinion and to foster public discussion on poverty and social policy; and develops and promotes concrete, practicable proposals for the reform of social programs at all levels of government and of social benefits provided by employers and the voluntary sector.

From the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
:

Manitoba’s poverty reduction plan:
All Aboard – Destination Unknown
(PDF - 500K, 2 pages)
June 22, 2009
On May 21st, the Manitoba government released All Aboard: Manitoba’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. The 8-page glossy document outlines some solid “values and guiding principles” that provide a foundation for a plan, as well as a list of initiatives that the NDP government has introduced since first elected in 1999. (...) However, All Aboard falls seriously short as a comprehensive plan and their “strategy” will be meaningless without a clear destination and a map to get there. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Manitoba recently released The view from here: Manitobans call for a poverty reduction plan. Our plan, developed in collaboration with Make Poverty History Manitoba and others brings together several years of research and consultation with individuals and community organizations directly involved with Manitoba’s most vulnerable citizens. Over 70 organizations representing thousands of Manitobans have now endorsed The view from here and more continue to sign on. (...) Our plan is comprehensive, and most importantly it outlines timelines and targets that, if implemented within the context of a legislated framework, would hold governments, present and future, accountable to ensuring that poverty is significantly reduced. But the Doer government has been consistently resistant to setting timelines and targets and they appear unlikely to pass supporting legislation.

Related links
from CCPA:

The View from Here:
Manitobans call for a poverty reduction plan
(PDF - 559KB, 78 pages)
June 2009
Governments across Canada are implementing comprehensive plans with targets and timelines aimed at reducing poverty and social exclusion. The Province of Manitoba has taken important steps to address poverty and social exclusion in recent years, however, much more remains to be done.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Manitoba Office :
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - National Office : http://www.policyalternatives.ca/



May 25, 2009
From the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Manitoba:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Manitoba (PDF - 371K, 34 pages)
By Tom Carter and Chesya Polevychok, University of WinnipegQuebec
(The English version of this report is forthcoming)

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership


$212 million to battle poverty
Province to place greater emphasis on housing needs

May 22, 2009
WINNIPEG — After years of sniping from left-wing critics that it has done too little to fight poverty, the Doer government fired back Thursday with a new "comprehensive" strategy that brought kudos from social agencies and business leaders alike. The province announced it has earmarked $212 million in new funding this year for bricks-and-mortar projects, as well as programming for low-income Manitobans.
It also signalled a change in how it deals with people with mental-health issues and addictions, placing greater emphasis on housing. The "housing first" approach means the government will try to put a roof over a person's head before offering other supports.
Source:
Winnipeg Free Press

Poverty and Social Exclusion
Solving Complex Issues through Comprehensive Approaches
(PDF - 249K, 4 pages) (dead link)
September 2008
* Definitions of social exclusion
* Government strategies to address poverty and social exclusion (Europe - Canada - Newfoundland and Labrador - Québec - Ontario)
* Common features of poverty and social exclusion strategies (targets - timelines - citizen consultations - action plans/strategies - accountability and reporting - evaluation of progress)
* Why Manitoba needs a Strategy
Source:
Manitoba Office - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - National Office ]

Province acknowledges progress in fight on poverty, but there is more to do: Mackintosh
$4.3 Million to Support Manitobans to Move Into Jobs, Increase Shelter Welfare Rates
May 6, 2008
"(...) Adding to the $27.6-million commitment made last year, the extra $4.3 million in new Rewarding Work initiatives will help people with disabilities, single parents and other low-income people"...
- includes the following:
* Effective 07/08, increases to shelter rates and rooming house rates directly from the Manitoba Shelter Benefit (see the link below)
* Effective 11/08, Rewarding Work Rent Allowance, a $50-per-month benefit to help non-disabled single adults and couples without children pay their rent after they leave welfare for work.
* Effective 02/09, Get Started! - a one-time benefit (ranging from $175 to $325, depending on the case classification) will be paid to people who leave welfare for work to help them pay for costs related to starting a new job.
* Effective 12/08, the Rewarding Work Health Plan will be provided to single parents and persons with disabilities who leave welfare for work; it extends coverage for prescription drugs and dental and optical services for up to two full years after people leave assistance.
(...)
Rewarding Work is part of the province’s anti-poverty strategy [bolding added], which includes Family Choices, Housing First and HOMEWorks, substantially increased education funding, increases to the minimum wage and other related measures to ensure that everyone can take advantage of the growing economy."

Rewarding Work [dead link]
Manitoba’s Rewarding Work is a four-year Manitoba strategy to address poverty by giving people hope and dignity through employment. Rewarding Work programs will provide benefits to low-income working families. They will also help Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) [welfare] participants move from EIA to work by increasing the advantages of employment over EIA.

Year One Investments [dead link]
- Rewarding Work investments in 2007/08 are helping low-income Manitobans in three areas:
(incl. links to more detailed info on the various initiatives)
* Helping low-income families (Manitoba Child Benefit, Manitoba Child Care Program)
* Supporting people to move from welfare to work (enhanced work incentives in the EIA program, new job seekers' allowance, a new training and education policy to help Manitobans on EIA find permanent work, job preparation, minimum wage subsidy for employers who hire and train people on EIA, allowances for work-related costs for all employed EIA clients, mentorship program for youth
* Improving benefits and services for persons with disabilities (marketAbilities, marketAbilities fund, marketAbilities team, personal attendant community education program, Sara Riel Inc. work placement force program, increase in financial assistance from Income Assistance for Persons with Disabilities (IAPD)living in the community, doubling of the EIA liquid asset exemptions for EIA clients with a disability

Year Two [dead link]
In the second year of the strategy, Rewarding Work will focus on assisting people to prepare for and make a smooth transition from income assistance to work.
Examples include an 18% shelter rate increase for non-disabled single adults receiving EIA (starting 07/08), a monthly rent top-up for up to one year (starting 11-08) for non-disabled single adults and childless couples who leave income assistance for work and live in private rent, new one-time work startup allowance (starting 02/09), drug, dental and optical benefits to be extended (starting 12/08) for 24 months (up from 12 months), and more to come...

---

Province Fights Poverty With Jobs: Ministers
October 17, 2007
Rewarding Work Invests $4.75 Million To Remove Barriers to Employment
Four new programs to get Manitobans off welfare and into work under the Rewarding Work strategy were announced today by Family Services and Housing Minister Gord Mackintosh and Competitiveness, Training and Trade Minister Jim Rondeau.
Source:
Family Services and Housing
Competitiveness, Training and Trade

Related links:

Backgrounder (Word file - 35K, 1 page)
October 17, 2007

---

Rewarding Work [dead link]
Last April ['07], the province announced Rewarding Work, a four-year, $27-million plan to bring down barriers to employment and help Manitobans on employment and income assistance find employment. The program complements other poverty-fighting measures announced in the last budget including tax changes that benefits 6,000 low-income Manitobans and an enhanced property credit of $125 a year for working low-income renters and homeowners. Other supports for low-income Manitobans include a minimum wage increase to $8 per hour last April and lower child-care costs.

`REWARDING WORK' TO HELP LOW-INCOME WORKING FAMILIES,
AND MOVE MORE MANITOBANS FROM WELFARE TO WORK: MACKINTOSH

New Child Benefit, Lower-cost Child Care, Stronger Work Incentives, And Skills Package in 10-point Reconstruction of Income Supports
News Release
April 10, 2007
Filling thousands of job vacancies and increasing family prosperity are the objectives of a ground-breaking, four-year action plan to move Manitobans from welfare to work, Family Services and Housing Minister Gord Mackintosh announced today. “Manitobans should always be better off working than on welfare. Yet in getting a job, too often you lose. Benefits are reduced for child allowances, child care, drug, dental and optical coverage, which makes work less attractive,” said Mackintosh. “We must dismantle this welfare wall.”

Backgrounder:

Rewarding Work - Gateway To Opportunities (PDF file - 21K, 3 pages)

Source:
Province of Manitoba

Related link:

Reducing Poverty in Manitoba (PDF file - 134K, 17 pages)
Budget Paper E
Source:
Manitoba Budget 2007 (April 4, 2007)

Google Search Results Links - always current results!
Using the following search terms (without the quote marks):
"Manitoba, "Rewarding Work", welfare"
Web search results page
News search results page
Blog Search Results page
NOTE: the Blog Search Results page had zero results as at April 11 (early morning).
However, because these are dynamic links, the results will vary depending on when you access the above links for all three types of search results pages
Source:
Google.ca

---

Campaign 2000 Report on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
Main page - includes links to both the French and English media releases and reports, as well as links to national report cards for previous years and for selected Canadian provinces.
[ Campaign 2000 ]

November 26, 2007
Anti-poverty initiatives to help Manitobans help themselves : Mackintosh
New Manitoba Child Benefit, Stronger Work Incentive New Job-Seekers' Allowance Announced
Under Rewarding Work, a four-year action plan to move Manitobans from welfare to work, three new measures effective Jan. 1, 2008, include:
· A stronger work incentive allowance will help to ensure people are better off working and keep more of their earnings. Earnings exemptions for 4,200 Manitobans on assistance will almost double so workers can keep $200 of net monthly earnings plus 30 per cent of net monthly earnings over $200. Under the existing program, participants can keep up to $115 and 25 per cent of earnings above that amount, depending on their case category.
· A new $11-million Manitoba child benefit will ensure parents will not lose all support for their children when moving off welfare. Up to 33,000 families with children will benefit. This means an initial gain for low-income, working families of up to $420 tax free each year for every child. Monthly payments will begin in January 2008. For a single parent of three children working full or part time and earning $15,000 or less, this totals $1,260 with partial benefits for parents who earn $15,000 to $20,000.
· A new job-seekers’ allowance will help single, non-disabled adults and childless couples who actively participate in an employment plan. Effective January 2008, the allowance program will provide $25 per month to participants, assisting 3,900 recipients through an annual investment of $1.17 million.

Source:
Manitoba Family Services and Housing

Related link from the CBC:

Manitoba increases welfare shelter rates (dead link)
May 6, 2008
For the first time in 15 years, Manitoba is raising the shelter rates it gives to adults on social assistance.
- the same news release includes: * Health benefits extended * Poverty rates dropping, says government
"(...) The total number of Manitobans living in poverty fell to 11.4 per cent in 2006 from 14.9 per cent in 1999.
Still, Manitoba has the third-highest ranking in the country for poverty."
Source:
CBC News

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Reducing Poverty in Manitoba (PDF - 134K, 17 pages)
April 2007
Budget 2007 introduces “Rewarding Work” – a new four-year plan to refocus the low-income support system to help more people gain employment and higher incomes. This new plan focuses on enhancing opportunities for education and training, expanding employment, making work pay for families, easing the transition from welfare to work and helping people retain jobs.
Source:
Manitoba Budget 2007

 

[GO BACK TO THE TOP OF THIS PAGE]

Saskatchewan poverty reduction policies

Saskatchewan unveils Poverty Reduction Strategy with 50 in 10 pledge
http://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/saskatchewan-unveils-plan-to-reduce-poverty-including-more-housing-health-care

-----------------------------------------------------

Advocates for the homeless are still waiting to see what the provincial government’s Poverty Reduction Strategy will look like.
http://leaderpost.com/news/local-news/province-still-without-poverty-reduction-strategy
January 12, 2016
In August, an 11-member advisory committee struck by the province released its recommendations on how to reduce poverty in Saskatchewan.
At the time, the province refused to commit to the outlined goal of cutting poverty in half by 2020. Donna Harpauer, the Minister of Social Services, said the recommendations would be analyzed, but would not set a deadline for when a provincial strategy would be adopted.

Five months later, a strategy is still not in place.

Source:
Regina Leader-Post

http://leaderpost.com/

-----------------------------------------------------

Saskatchewan government creates advisory group on poverty
http://www.620ckrm.com/ckrm-on-air/ckrm-local-news/9248-saskatchewan-government-creates-advisory-group-on-povery
April 23, 2015
A chance to provide feedback on what can be done to make life those better for those in Saskatchewan who are unable to meet their basic needs is now available.

The Advisory Group on Poverty Reduction [ http://goo.gl/gVbjQI ] has launched its public consultation website as a tool to help the work they are already doing. The group's co-chair is Saskatoon's Allison Robertson. She says it is her hope many will take advantage of the website to offer suggestions..

In addition to the online process, the Advisory Group is also holding one-on-one meetings and a roundtable discussion on poverty reduction at the end of the month. The day-long facilitated discussion will take place in Saskatoon and will include the participation of more than 130 organizations and individuals from across the province. The group is then expected to provide its recommendations to government that will inform the development of a poverty reduction strategy in June 2015.

Online Poverty Reduction Survey
http://gos.fluidsurveys.com/surveys/eccs/poverty-reduction-survey/
Do you know of programs in your community that are working well to help people living in poverty?
Please complete this survey by May 15, 2015 to share your experience with the members of the Advisory Group on Poverty Reduction. survey.

-------------------------------------------------------------

NOTE : Before the announcement in the 2014 Saskatchewan Throne Speech of a SK poverty reduction plan, Saskatchewan was one of two Canadian provinces without an official poverty reduction plan. BC is the remaining holdout : see http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/ ]

---

Poverty strategy among items highlighted in Sask. throne speech:
Good idea, but overdue, NDP Opposition says
October 23, 2014
The Saskatchewan government has announced it's working on a poverty reduction strategy; something the NDP opposition says is a good idea, although long overdue. In the speech from the throne Wednesday, which launched the fall sitting of the Legislature, the government said Saskatchewan has the second-lowest poverty rate in Canada, but there is still more work to be done. The government will develop a poverty reduction strategy, building on the work of groups such as Poverty Costs.

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news

---

Related links:

2014 Saskatchewan Throne Speech
(English and French versions available)
http://www.gov.sk.ca/throne-speech-2014
(There are only three references to poverty and the poverty reduction plan in the Throne Speech, all on page 16.)

Source:
Government of Saskatchewan
http://www.gov.sk.ca/

---

Poverty Costs Saskatchewan:
A New Approach to Prosperity for All
(PDF - 6.8MB, 54 pages)
http://vibrantcanada.ca/files/povertycostssaskatchewan_povertycosts_2014_s.pdf
October 2014
By Charles Plante and Keisha Sharp

Source:
Vibrant Communities Canada

http://vibrantcanada.ca/

---

Poverty Free Saskatchewan
http://www.povertyfreesask.ca/

---

Poverty Costs
http://www.povertycosts.ca/

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Welfare historians, rejoice!
The report below covers a ten-year period, 1995-96 to 2005-06 and focuses on the Saskatchewan antipoverty strategy that started in 1997.

Saskatchewan's Long-Term Social Assistance Caseload:
A review by Saskatchewan Community Resources
(PDF - 533K, 7 pages)
http://www.socialservices.gov.sk.ca/longterm-caseload-review.pdf
2007
In 1997, Saskatchewan introduced an anti­poverty strategy called Building Independence. The Building Independence strategy has brought new programs for low­income working people and people without jobs. The result has been a more comprehensive income support system that combines social assistance with a range of new supplements for low­income people.

Source:
Saskatchewan Social Services

http://www.socialservices.gov.sk.ca/
(formerly Saskatchewan Community Resources)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sask. campaign releases poverty report:
Calls for province to work on comprehensive plan
http://ckom.com/story/sask-campaign-releases-poverty-report/427764
By Bryn Levy
October 17, 2014
Saskatchewan's poor are getting poorer, according to a newly released report by a group calling on the provincial government for a comprehensive poverty-reduction strategy. (...)
The campaign is centred around the claim that Saskatchewan loses $3.8 billion a year in potential revenue and unecessary spending on things like emergency room visits and justice system costs due to poverty.

Poverty Costs Saskatchewan:
A New Approach to Prosperity for All
(PDF - 6.8MB, 54 pages)
http://vibrantcanada.ca/files/povertycostssaskatchewan_povertycosts_2014_s.pdf
October 2014
By Charles Plante and Keisha Sharp

Excerpt from the Executive Summary:

Here are seven simple facts about poverty in our community, and how reducing it helps us all.
1) Poverty costs us all.
2) In spite of a growing economy, poverty has not gone away.
3) Poverty affects us unequally.
4) Poverty is hard on people’s health.
5) Poverty is getting harder and harder to escape.
6) The public supports action on poverty.
7) We can reduce poverty in Saskatchewan.

This report was produced as part of the Poverty Costs campaign, an initiative involving the following community-based organizations:

* Saskatoon Food Bank & Learning Centre
http://www.saskatoonfoodbank.org

* Saskatoon Anti-Poverty Coalition, Upstream
http://www.thinkupstream.net)

* Unite Digital Marketing Co-op
http://www.unitecoop.com

* Saskatoon Health Region
https://www.saskatoonhealthregion.ca

* Saskatoon Poverty Reduction Partnership
http://www.saskatoonpoverty2possibility.ca

Related links:

Poverty Free Saskatchewan
http://www.povertyfreesask.ca/

Poverty Costs
http://www.povertycosts.ca/

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From
Canada Without Poverty:

Where’s the Plan British Columbia and Saskatchewan?
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2014/08/wheres-the-plan-british-columbia-and-saskatchewan/
August 11, 2014
Canada Without Poverty has long been discussing the need for a Federal Anti-Poverty Plan to address the needs of people living in poverty from coast-to-coast. But in reality provincial and municipal governments also have a responsibility to address poverty. Eleven out of thirteen provinces and territories have completed the first step in doing this by drafting and implementing anti-poverty plans. So, who are the two provinces lagging behind? British Columbia and Saskatchewan.
(...)
While Saskatchewan has the lowest unemployment rate in the country, 64% of First Nations Children living in the province live below the poverty line. Saskatchewan has no plan to address the needs of these individuals. In BC, one of the richest provinces in Canada, 10.7% of the population, or 476,000 British Columbians, still live in poverty. How can a provincial government claim to represent their constituents when they are not addressing the needs of more than 1 in 10?
The good news is that change is coming. Community activists in both provinces are stepping up to demand their provincial governments establish a plan to address poverty!

To learn more, visit:

http://www.thinkupstream.net/

http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/SK-Poverty-Progress-Profile-FINAL.pdf

http://www.povertycosts.ca/

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/SK-Poverty-Progress-Profile-FINAL.pdf

Source:
Canada Without Poverty

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Upstream launches “Poverty Costs” campaign
to build support for poverty reduction in Saskatchewan

March 10, 2014

New campaign rallying support for poverty reduction plan in Saskatchewan
http://metronews.ca/news/saskatoon/967349/new-campaign-rallying-support-for-poverty-reduction-plan-in-saskatchewan/
March 10, 2014
A new campaign is aimed at giving Saskatchewan some perspective on the cost of poverty — the $3.8 billion that its organizers claim is spent in the province on the issue every year.
And the Poverty Costs campaign wants the public to voice support for a legislated strategy to deal with it.

Source:
Metro News

http://metronews.ca/

---

Poverty Costs Campaign website:
http://pover-upstream.nationbuilder.com/

Join the call for a comprehensive poverty reduction plan!
Voice your support in a letter to share with our government.

Poverty Costs website launches
http://www.paherald.sk.ca/News/Local/2014-03-09/article-3642878/Poverty-Costs-website-launches/1
March 09, 2014
Last month, Upstream Institute for a Healthy Society director Ryan Meili spoke with the Daily Herald about the website, explaining that the institute has estimated that poverty costs the Saskatchewan economy $3.8 billion per year. (...) The website provides a comprehensive view of what poverty looks like in Saskatchewan, including a sprinkling of various statistics. (...) The website’s intent is to raise public and government awareness, Meili said, noting that poverty should be seen as non-partisan, with no need to blame the government.

Source:
Prince Albert Daily Herald
http://www.paherald.sk.ca

---

Watch the video:
Breaking News: The Saskatchewan PovertyCosts.ca Report (duration 2:18)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uT0lacXXZ_Y

[Thanks to Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre [ http://www.incomesecurity.org/ ] for these links...]

---

Related link:

Poverty Free Saskatchewan
http://www.povertyfreesask.ca/
Poverty Free Saskatchewan is a new network of individuals and organizations working toward poverty elimination. The mission of PFS is to advance the well-being of all Saskatchewan individuals, families and communities by promoting the development and adoption of effective, measurable and timely policies and programs to eliminate poverty in Saskatchewan.

- Go to the Saskatchewan Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/skbkmrk.htm


Child and Family Poverty in Saskatchewan: November 2010 (PDF - 618K, 10 pages)
New data from Statistics Canada for the year 2008 show that Saskatchewan has an overall poverty rate of 12.1%. This represents 115, 000 people — equivalent to more than half the population of Regina — living below the poverty line. Of those, 33,000 are children under the age of 18. In recent years, Saskatchewan’s poverty rate has fallen below the national rate. This trend continues in 2008 with the provincial poverty rate slightly below the national rate of 13.6%, or 4,426,000 people
Source:
Social Policy Research Unit
[ Faculty of Social Work ]
[ University of Regina ]

NOTE:
This is one of a series of provincial reports all released under the Campaign 2000 banner on November 24 (2010), the anniversary of the 1989 unanimous House of Commons resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000. For links to the complete collection of federal and provincial reports and (selected) related media coverage, go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

---

Poverty Free Saskatchewan is a new network of individuals and organizations working toward poverty elimination. The mission of PFS is to advance the well-being of all Saskatchewan individuals, families and communities by promoting the development and adoption of effective, measurable and timely policies and programs to eliminate poverty in Saskatchewan. PFS members believe that poverty elimination requires wide ranging involvement and commitment from many stakeholders.

Poverty Free Saskatchewan Founding Members:
* Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – Saskatchewan
* Regina Anti-Poverty Ministry

Rooted in God's radical love, expressed through compassion and action, the Regina Anti-Poverty Ministry advocates and educates with and for those seeking social and economic justice.
* Regina Anti-Poverty Network
(no website, no related content found online)
* Saskatoon Anti-Poverty Coalition
(Facebook page) (dead link)
* Social Policy Research Unit
(University of Regina)
* Saskatchewan Association of Social Workers

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cost of poverty in Saskatchewan $3.8 Billion:
Report looks at health, justice, more
(dead link)
By Jason Warick
February 2014
Poverty costs the Saskatchewan economy at least $3.8-billion per year, according to figures compiled by a new Saskatoon-based group.
It's the first time a dollar figure has been placed on the lost opportunities and increased expenses to society caused by poverty, said Charles Plante, policy director at Upstream, which bills itself as "a movement to create a healthy society through evidence-based, people-centred ideas."
(...)
[Mr. Plante] said the $3.8-billion figure - nearly $4,000 per Saskatchewan resident - is likely a low estimate, as some factors are difficult to pin down.
(...)
The figure is the centre piece of a campaign Upstream, the Saskatoon Food Bank, the Saskatoon Anti-poverty Coalition and the Saskatoon Poverty Reduction Partnership will launch next month called "Poverty Costs." Upstream director Ryan Meili said they hope to challenge the myth that poverty cannot be eradicated, or that economic growth should be the only goal.

Source:
(Saskatoon) Star-Phoenix
http://www.thestarphoenix.com/

For more information about Upstream, send an email request to
upstream@thinkupstream.net

NOTE : The report where the $3.8-billion figure appears doesn't seem to be online; I suspect that the launch of the Upstream website in mid-March will also mark the release of the report via the project website.

Related link:

Upstream: Institute for a Healthy Society
http://www.thinkupstream.net/
Upstream is a movement to create a healthy society through evidence-based, people-centred ideas. Upstream thinking isn't just for policy-makers. Every one of us can contribute to a better, healthier society. Tell us how you already #liveupstream and inspire others to do the same. Watch a short (1:22) video about the concept behind Upstream and sign up to receive notification of their site launch and updates.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Poverty Free Saskatchewan launches “Let’s Do Something About Poverty” campaign
News Release
October 18, 2010
“Poverty still exists in Saskatchewan and remains a serious problem that affects us all.”
This is the message of Let’s Do Something About Poverty, a discussion document authored by Poverty Free Saskatchewan (PFS) which was released in Regina on October 18th.

The document:

Let’s Do Something about Poverty (12 pages)
Ezine version (cuter technology than PDF, but you can't copy and paste text from this version like you can from the PDF version.)
PDF version (2.6MB)
This discussion paper outlines the current situation in Saskatchewan regarding economic inequality and the extent of poverty in the province. This document is intended to inspire conversations around the province. We are certain Let’s Do Something about Poverty will encourage a renewed dialogue on poverty and foster new and innovative proposals and solutions .

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Saskatchewan Report Card on Child and Family Poverty (PDF - 239K, 8 pages)
November 2009
* 35,000 Children in Poverty in Saskatchewan
* No Consistent Improvement Over Time
* Comparing Three Measures of Poverty
* Third Highest Provincial Child Poverty Rate
* 45% of Aboriginal Children in Low-Income Families
* More than One in Three Immigrant Children Poor
* 40% of Children in Female Lone-parent Families in Poverty
* Families Deeply in Poverty
* Saskatchewan Child Poverty Often Long Term
* One in Three Poor Children in Families with Full Employment
* Government Transfers Benefit Children
* Growing Gap Between Rich and Poor
* Child Poverty Rate High by International Standards
* Poverty Measures
Source:
Social Policy Research Unit
[ Faculty of Social Work ]
[ University of Regina ]

Related link
Campaign 2000


May 25, 2009
From the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Saskatchewan:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Saskatchewan (PDF - 461K, 33 pages)
By Bill Holden, Nicola Chapin, Carmen Dyck and Nich Frasier
Community-University Institute for Social Research

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership

 

Alberta


The Alberta Government page:

Speak. Share. Thrive. – the Alberta Social Policy Framework online
June/July 2012
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/
June/July 2012
The Government of Alberta is leading the development of a social policy framework that will guide the future of Alberta's social policy and programs. The Framework will describe how we create hope and opportunity for all Albertans by working together to improve social outcomes.
- includes links to the following:
* Social Policy Framework 101 (frequently-asked questions) * Library * Blog * Survey * Discussion Kit * Guide to Participation * Help Guide * All Recent Changes

--------------------------------------------------------------

The Alberta Non-Governmental page:

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta.

The Inter-City Forum on Social Policy (ICFSP) has been researching the impacts of poverty in Alberta for several years. In 2010, member municipalities of ICFSP agreed to play a leadership role in engaging interested stakeholders to promote the need for a comprehensive poverty-reduction plan for Alberta. In November 2010, "A Dialogue on Poverty" was hosted by the ICFSP and the Family and Community Support Services Association of Alberta (FCSSAA). Over 100 concerned Albertans from across the province participated. Response from the forum unanimously supported the development of a poverty reduction plan.


[The links below are in reverse chronological order, with the most recent addition at the top.]

Edmonton Council gives go-ahead for plan to end poverty
http://globalnews.ca/news/2719279/edmonton-council-gives-go-ahead-for-plan-to-end-poverty/
May 24, 2016
The City of Edmonton is moving forward with a plan to end poverty in a generation.
On May 24, city council announced it had approved End Poverty in a Generation: A Road Map to Guide Our Journey. [ http://www.endpovertyedmonton.ca/implementation/ ] The road map was developed by the EndPovertyEdmonton Task Force after city council’s endorsement of its strategy.
(...)

The five-year road map has five strategic goals, which the city said are the starting points that will end poverty in Edmonton in a generation.

Source:
Global News
http://globalnews.ca/

Poverty Costs 2.5: Investing in Albertans
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/vibrant-initiatives/poverty-costs/poverty-costs-25/
January 2015
This report is an updated version of the original Poverty Costs 2.0 report [ PDF - http://goo.gl/jE6wbW ] released June, 2013 by Action to End Poverty in Alberta and Vibrant Communities Calgary. It is meant to be a blueprint for a provincial poverty reduction strategy following the Government’s announcement to significantly reduce poverty in 10 years and eliminate child poverty in five years.

Poverty Costs 2.5 has 60+ updated policy recommendations, as well as suggested approaches to measure and define poverty in a progressive way, namely through the adoption of a General and Child-specific Deprivation Index. Furthermore, the report recommends a place-based approach when developing a poverty reduction strategy since we know that local communities are best-suited to understand their own needs and assets as well as deliver unique programs and services focused on prevention rather than alleviation.

The initial report written by VCC and AEPA in 2012, Poverty Costs: An Economic Case for a Preventative Poverty Reduction Strategy in Alberta [ PDF - http://goo.gl/nA0Rx ], found that perpetuating poverty resulted in an annual expenditure of $7.1 to 9.5 Billion dollars. This spending is unsustainable and still no plan exists to reduce it. Poverty Costs 2.5, released January 2015 lays out that plan.

---

From Action to End Poverty in Alberta
and Vibrant Communities Calgary:

Poverty Costs 2.5 - Revised Edition
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/uploads/poverty-costs-2.5/
January 2015
The report includes a more comprehensive and consistent use of the StatCan Low Income Measure ("LIM") as the poverty line, updated policy recommendations, updated poverty statistics for Ablerta, and updates on what Alberta municipalities are doing to reduce poverty.

-----------------------

Sources:

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/

Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/

Societal changes happening in Calgary and Edmonton
from the perspective of two former city councillors:

Joe Ceci of Calgary and Edmonton's Michael Phair each have 15 years of experience in municipal politics. Together they often discuss, debate and trade insights on urban culture, community economic development and municipal governance. Below, you'll find links to recent articles on annexation and taxation, municipal authority, and poverty reduction.

[Joe Ceci is now public policy manager at Momentum [ http://www.momentum.org/ ] , a Calgary community economic development agency.
Michael Phair is currently a part-time educational co-ordinator at the University of Alberta.]

-------------------------------------

Opinion: Protection from recurring cycles of poverty (dead link)
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 4, 2014
(...)
Calgary and Edmonton have reached a place where we must be realistic about poverty reduction, and that means moving beyond the strategic process to full implementation.
Cities don’t have the ability to do this alone. We need the co-operation of all orders of government, with specific focus placed on poverty reduction, universal child care, adoption of a living wage and a guaranteed annual income. Our conversations with others (including those from the private and non-profit sectors as well as governments) must be for the sake of supporting and implementing this kind of lasting structural change.

Source:
Edmonton Journal
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/

-------------------------------------

Guaranteed annual income would wipe out poverty (dead link)
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 3, 2014
(...)
It is time to institute a living wage, based on the household budget approach developed by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives [ https://www.policyalternatives.ca/ ]. The calculations show the minimum income an individual or family must have to be able to afford their most basic needs.
(...)
With the average income for our cities hovering near $60,000, a new economic policy for a guaranteed annual income is necessary. A guaranteed annual income would ensure that people in our cities who have no incomes (or minimal ones) are protected from recurring cycles of poverty. The adaptation of a guaranteed annual income, alongside a living wage policy, would generate further opportunities for community economic development in both cities.

Related link:

Calculating the Living Wage: Webinar for local communities
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc/events/calculating-living-wage-webinar-local-communities (dead link)
Tuesday, September 9th, from 12 PM to 1 PM PDT
The Living Wage for Families Campaign has received more than three dozen requests from communities around BC (and across western Canada) asking how the local living wage can be calculated. To help the living wage movement grow, you are invited to join us for a free one-hour webinar on how the Living Wage for Families calculates the annual living wage, and to learn how you can adopt this methodology to use in your own community (anywhere in Canada).

Source:
BC Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc/

---

Opinion: Boldly broaching two touchy topics (dead link)
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 2, 2014
Calgary and Edmonton are arguably two of Canada’s most diverse and complex cities. They are a big part of the reason why Alberta currently leads the nation in terms of population and employment growth. With all of these economic, social and structural changes abounding, we got together to analyze our cities’ collective positions on development. We found that two components of city governance are inextricably linked to all this growth: taxation and annexation.

Source:
Edmonton Journal
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/

---

Today’s cities should be given greater powers (dead link)
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 2, 2014
Municipal services now extend far beyond roads and sewers. Cities are expected to generate and preserve a rich community experience that enhances urban quality of life. Calgary and Edmonton are in the throes of this challenge, attempting to address the increasing expectations of their citizens. How they go about doing this will inevitably have long-term impacts on the province’s future prosperity and development. Is it worth having a conversation about? We thought so.

Source:
Calgary Herald
http://www.calgaryherald.com/

---

Albertans have bigger priorities than low taxes (dead link)
By Joe Ceci and Michael Phair
September 2, 2014

(...)
The annual collection of property taxes in both cities means hundreds of staff assess every piece of property's value and use a formula to levy and collect the tax. It's time to end the entire property tax system. Instead, a portion of that income tax (which is levied by the federal and provincial governments) should be designated to the cities. This is quite simple and would streamline the currently cumbersome tax system.

Source:
Calgary Herald
http://www.calgaryherald.com/

The Dilemma of Housing in Alberta
By Joe Ceci, Coordinator - Action to End Poverty in Alberta
and Mike Brown, Communications Coordinator, Momentum
http://povertyreduction.alberta.ca/Blog/Dilemma_Housing_Alberta
July 15, 2013
The devastating floods in Southern Alberta, the worst in recent memory, have thrown into question the critical need for safe, affordable housing for the tens of thousands of Albertans.
(...)
Action to End Poverty in Alberta and Vibrant Communities Calgary recently co-published a report entitled Poverty Costs 2.0: Investing in Albertans (June 2013) which notes that housing insecurity is a growing issue in Alberta. The recent flooding has exacerbated this issue and shows an even clearer need for government intervention.

---
Joe Ceci is Coordinator of Action to End Poverty in Alberta.
Mike Brown is Communications Coordinator of Momentum.
---

Source:
Poverty Reduction Blog
http://povertyreduction.alberta.ca/Blog

---

Sources:
Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/
Vibrant Communities Calgary is a non-profit organization that works collaboratively, with various stakeholders and partners, seeking to engage Calgarians and to advocate for long-term strategies that address the root causes of poverty in Calgary.

and

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/
Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta.

---

Momentum (Calgary)
http://www.momentum.org/
Imagine... every person in Calgary can have a sustainable livelihood and contribute to their community.
Momentum uses a Community Economic Development (CED) approach that offers hope and opportunity to people living in poverty.

New from Vibrant Communities Calgary
and Action to End Poverty in Alberta:

Poverty Costs 2.0 : Investing in Albertans
A Blueprint for Reducing Poverty in Alberta
(PDF - 2.6MB, 44 pages)
http://vibrantcanada.ca/blogs/amy-zoethout/poverty-costs-20-investing-albertans
June 2013
(...)
This report provides recommendations for government policy to be implemented at the provincial level. While the first Poverty Costs report made the case that the cost of addressing the symptoms of poverty is much higher than the cost to reduce it, Poverty Costs 2.0: Investing in Albertans makes concrete recommendations to the Provincial Government that will have a significant impact in reducing poverty. In addition to policy recommendations on poverty reduction, this report also provides suggestions on best measures and indicators by which the Government may evaluate progress
(Excerpt from the report's Conclusion, p.34)

Table of Contents:
Foreword
Section I: A Blueprint for Reducing Poverty in Alberta 5
Section II: Why is there Poverty in Alberta? 9
Section III: A Vibrant Action Plan to End Poverty in Alberta 12
--- Alberta’s MLA Committee to Review Low-Income Programs 13
--- Sustenance: A Foundation for Improved Health and Well-Being 14
--- Adaptation: Enhanced Self-Sufficiency 18
--- Engagement: Greater Social Inclusion 22
--- Opportunity: Greater Equity of Outcome 24
Section IV: Ensuring Alberta Succeeds 26
--- Measuring Poverty by Income 26
--- Developing a General Deprivation Index 28
--- Developing a Child Specific Deprivation Index 29
--- Implementation: An Integrated Community-Based Approach 30
--- Moving Forward on the Government’s Commitment to Poverty Reduction 32
--- Place-Based Interventions 33
--- Conclusion 34
Appendices 35
--- Appendix I: Revenue 35
--- Appendix II: The Role of Municipal Government in Alberta’s Provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy 36
--- Appendix III: The Canada Social Transfer and the Deconstruction of Pan-Canadian Social Policy (By Donna Wood, PhD)

NOTE : Appendix III is an abridged version of a longer report by Donna Wood.
The link to the complete report is immediately below:

Recommended reading!

---

The Canada Social Transfer and the Deconstruction of
Pan-Canadian Social Policy

By Donna E. Wood, University of Victoria
March 2013

Complete report (PDF - 732K, 37 pages)
(See table of contents below)
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/uploads/pdfs/Canada_social_transfer_Wood_full.pdf

Brief version (PDF - 84K, 3 pages)
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/uploads/pdfs/Canada_social_transfer_Wood_brief.pdf

Table of Contents:
Intro
Part 1 : Building Canada’s welfare state
--- Social assistance,welfare services and the Canada Assistance Plan
--- Postsecondary education and Established Programs Finance
Part 2 : Federal retrenchment and reinvestment
---Re-investments in health care
--- Re-investmentsin welfare services and postsecondary education
--- The split into the Canada Health Transfer and the Canada Social Transfer
Part 3 : The fall out
--- Social assistance
--- Social services and children’s programming
--- Postsecondary education
Part 4 : Who speaks for the Canada Social Transfer?
--- Social development interests
--- Postsecondary education interests
--- Other interests
--- Interests of federal, provincial and territorial governments
Part 5 : So what does this all mean?
--- Does a dedicated federal social transfer still matter?
--- Should the Canada Social Transfer be formally split?
--- Could national standards or conditions be established?
Part 6 : Contemporary challenges in federal-provincial relations
Conclusion
References

Source:
Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/
Vibrant Communities Calgary is a non-profit organization that works collaboratively, with various stakeholders and partners, seeking to engage Calgarians and to advocate for long-term strategies that address the root causes of poverty in Calgary.

Related link:

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/
Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta.

Calgary Poverty Reduction Strategy
passed by City Council - May 27

From Derek Cook,
Executive Director of the
Calgary Poverty Reduction Initiative:

On Monday, May 27 (2013), Calgary City Council unanimously adopted a poverty reduction strategy for the city. The Calgary Poverty Reduction Initiative is a joint initiative of The City of Calgary and the United Way of Calgary to develop a long-term plan to reduce poverty in the city. Below, you'll find a link to the report, as well as some of the news coverage. The website also includes a collection of reports from the various working groups that provided input to the strategy, on topics such as food, housing, justice, women’s issues, children and youth, employment, seniors, and more.

Link to the Final Report:

Enough For All: Unleashing Our Communities’ Resources to Drive Down Poverty in Calgary (PDF - 468K, 23 pages)
http://www.enoughforall.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Enough-for-all-final-report.pdf
May 2013

Source:
Calgary Poverty Reduction Initiative

http://www.enoughforall.ca/
The Calgary Poverty Reduction Initiative is a joint initiative of The City of Calgary and the United Way of Calgary to develop a long-term community-based strategy to significantly reduce poverty in Calgary. Officially launched in January 2012, the CPRI will engage Calgarians to develop this strategy by May 2013

------------------------------

News Coverage

Council OKs plan to halve poverty by 2023 (Calgary Herald) [dead link]

Poverty reduction initiative endorsed by city (CBC)
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/story/2013/05/28/calgary-poverty-reduction-initiative.html

Interview with Mayor Nenshi on Poverty Reduction Strategy (Global TV)
http://globalnews.ca/video/595528/mayor-naheed-nenshi

High hopes for new plan to tackle poverty in Calgary (Metro Calgary)
http://metronews.ca/news/calgary/686730/high-hopes-for-new-plan-to-tackle-poverty-in-calgary/

Calgary sets a plan for reducing poverty (660 News)
http://www.660news.com/2013/05/27/calgary-sets-a-plan-for-reducing-poverty/

---

From Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre:
[
http://www.incomesecurity.org/ ]

More on Calgary’s “Half in Ten” poverty reduction strategy:
* http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/story/2013/05/28/calgary-poverty-reduction-initiative.html
* http://www.povnet.org/node/5098

New from
Alberta Human Services:
http://humanservices.alberta.ca/

Social Policy Framework provides roadmap for transformational change
31,000 Albertans build new vision for social policy in Alberta
http://alberta.ca/acn/201302/3373421703E69-E310-8B91-0D86BF0497F467DF.html
News Release
February 28, 2013
Premier Alison Redford was joined by Cabinet members, community and business leaders, and stakeholders to adopt Alberta’s Social Policy Framework, a framework created from the input of over 31,000 Albertans to guide community partners and government in creating the type of province that allows all Albertans to live with dignity, reach their potential and live full and rich lives.

The final report:

Alberta’s Social Policy Framework (PDF - 1MB, 28 pages)
https://docs.google.com/gview?url=http://socialpolicyframework.alberta.ca/files/documents/ahs-nonannotatedfrmwrk-webfinal.pdf&hgd=1&chrome=true
February 2013

Contributions came from nearly 400 discussions in communities, electronic surveys, blog postings, and collaborative work on the Alberta Social Policy Framework Wiki [ http://bit.ly/Z00Hpl ] from June to December, 2012. The province-wide conversation brought together Aboriginal Elders, business leaders, communities, non-profit organizations, community groups, service delivery agencies, municipalities, and elected officials.

Visit Alberta’s Social Policy Framework website [ http://www.socialpolicy.alberta.ca/ ] to read Alberta’s Social Policy Framework, learn more about the framework, view additional comments from Minister Hancock, and see a list of organizations which participated in the Speak.Share.Thrive. public engagement.

------------------------------------------------------------

Related links from
the Calgary Poverty Reduction Initiative:

Government of Alberta releases Alberta Social Policy Framework
Calgary Poverty Reduction Initiative welcomes the release
http://www.enoughforall.ca/media-release-government-of-alberta-releases-provincial-social-policy-framework/
Media Release
February 28, 2012
Calgary, AB – The Calgary Poverty Reduction Initiative (CPRI) [ http://www.enoughforall.ca/ ] welcomes the release of Alberta’s new framework as its principles and values truly reflect what is important to Albertans. Earlier today, the Government of Alberta released its Alberta Social Policy Framework that will inform critical government decisions about social policies in the province.

CPRI response to the framework (PDF file - 288K, 3 pages)
http://www.enoughforall.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Media-Release-CPRI-Response-to-AB-Social-Policy.pdf
February 28, 2013

Edmonton Journal:

Albertans identify child poverty as priority (dead link)
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/business/Albertans+identify+child+poverty+priority/7896152/story.html
By Karen Kleiss
January 31, 2013
EDMONTON - The Redford government has quietly released the results of a six-month, $450,000 public consultation that will govern the overhaul of Alberta’s social service programs. The sweeping survey found Albertans’ top priority was reducing child poverty, followed by eliminating family violence and homelessness.

The 37-page report was posted online Friday by Human Services, the new super-ministry that oversees every major social program in the province, including those for unemployed, disabled and homeless Albertans, as well as children in care. The government did not publicize the release of the report, which details Albertans’ priorities for the remaking of the province’s social policy framework — a key plank in Premier Alison Redford’s election campaign.

Albertans who organized meetings and promoted the consultation were disillusioned by the Redford government’s decision to bury the results on an obscure Internet page.

Source:
Edmonton Journal

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/

-------------------------------------------------

The report:

From the
Alberta Social Policy Framework:

Summing Up : Results of Public
Engagement on the Social Policy Framework
(dead link)
June – November 2012
(PDF - 1MB, 39 pages)
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/files/documents/2013-01-07_summing_up_general.pdf
January 2013
Albertans’ Perspectives for a Social Policy Framework

Source:
Engagement Results
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/Engagement_Results (dead link)
Selected recent content:
* Social Policy Newsletter – January 2013
* Summing Up: Albertans' Perspectives – Phases 1 and 2
* Summing Up: Aboriginal Albertans’ Perspectives – Phases 1 and 2
* Summing Up: Data File – Phase 2
* Phase 2 Survey Report
* Phase 2 Survey Data File
* Values Map of Alberta – Results Report
* Values Map of Alberta – Consultant's Report (December 2012)
* Values Map of Alberta – Data File (December 2012)
* Community Conversations Final Map (Phase 1 & Phase 2)

Source:
Alberta Social Policy Framework
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/

The cost of poverty:
Those who suffer most are those who have no choice
http://vueweekly.com/front/story/the_cost_of_poverty/
By Meaghan Baxter
January 24, 2013
Alberta is one of the country's wealthiest provinces, with an abundance of resources and opportunities at our fingertips. However, below the surface is an issue that continues to grow, and one that prevents a staggering number of Albertans from accessing those opportunities, attaining an adequate quality of life, or even simply making ends meet every month.
(...)
On November 20, 2012—also known as National Child Day—PIA, along with the Alberta College of Social Workers and the Edmonton Social Planning Council, published Achieving the Promise: Ending Poverty in Alberta [see the link below], one of many reports being released across Canada by the national coalition Campaign 2000.
(...)
Premier Alison Redford pledged to end child poverty in Alberta within five years during the last provincial election, with further measures to be taken to end poverty in Alberta within 10 years, and is being challenged to make good on her word.

Source:
VueWeekly.com
(Edmonton)
http://vueweekly.com/

---

Achieving the Promise:
Ending Poverty in Alberta
(PDF - 1.7MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/provincial/Alberta/2012ReportCardAB.pdf
November 2012
By John Kolkman and Joseph Ahorro of the Edmonton Social Planning Council [ http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/ ]
and Bill Moore-Kilgannon of Public Interest Alberta [ http://pialberta.org/ ]

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
Email Update - January 2013
An update from the Alberta Inter-City Forum on Social Policy's Action to End Poverty in Alberta.

Poverty Costs 2.0 Back on Track
After some staffing turnover and changes, Action to End Poverty in Alberta and Vibrant Communities Calgary are back on track to publish the Poverty Costs 2.0 report by the end of March 2013. This report will include pragmatic solutions to end poverty in Alberta rather than maintaining poverty as the current system in Alberta does. The Government of Alberta will be releasing its Social Policy Framework in the spring which will be followed by a provincial poverty reduction strategy later in 2013. Our hope is that the policy recommendations in Poverty Costs 2.0 will help shape the policies the government adopts for the provincial strategy.

Leaders' Gathering Video (duration 7:17)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvxzJA0g7ks
Back in June 2012, AEPA hosted representatives from the eight municipalities working on poverty reduction plans. The video associated with that meeting is something we have meant to put in this e-newsletter for some time.

Source:
Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/
Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta

Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/
Vibrant Communities Calgary is a non-profit organization that works collaboratively, with various stakeholders and partners, seeking to engage Calgarians and to advocate for long-term strategies that address the root causes of poverty in Calgary.

---

Related link:

Breaking the Cycle : why investing in poverty reduction would benefit all Albertans
http://www.scribd.com/doc/120665482/Breaking-the-Cycle-by-Joe-Ceci
By Joe Ceci, Coordinator of Action to End Poverty in Alberta
December 2012
(...) With the election of Alison Redford, we have a premier who seems committed to addressing the so-called inevitable problem of poverty. Her government has promised to end child poverty within five years and reduce overall poverty in 10...

Source:
The above article appeared in the December 2012 issue of AlbertaViews:

http://magazinescanada.zinio.com/browse/issues/index.jsp?skuId=416244675&prnt=&categoryId=

AlbertaViews Home Page
http://www.albertaviews.ab.ca/
Alberta Views is the must-read magazine for the people who are shaping the new Alberta. Innovators in politics, education, industry, public service and the arts share and discover fresh perspectives in our in-depth analysis of everything relevant to the public interest of Albertans.

Redford Government challenged to “Achieve the Promise”:
Report reveals 91,000 children live in poor families

http://pialberta.org/content/redford-government-challenged-%E2%80%9Cachieve-promise%E2%80%9D
Media Release
November 20, 2012
A new report on child and family poverty outlines the challenge Alberta faces if we are going to eliminate child poverty in five years and reduce poverty for everyone in ten years, as promised by Premier Redford during the recent provincial election. The report, entitled Achieving the Promise: Ending Poverty in Alberta, was published on National Child Day, November 20th by the Edmonton Social Planning Council, the Alberta College of Social Workers and Public Interest Alberta. This report is one of many reports being released across the country by the national coalition, Campaign 2000.

Achieving the Promise:
Ending Poverty in Alberta
(PDF - 1.7MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/provincial/Alberta/2012ReportCardAB.pdf

November 2012
By John Kolkman and Joseph Ahorro of the Edmonton Social Planning Council [ http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/ ]
and Bill Moore-Kilgannon of Public Interest Alberta [ http://pialberta.org/ ]

Do welfare rules provide a route out of poverty in Alberta? (PDF - 84K, 4 pages)
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/uploads/pdfs/Income_Replacement_J_Stapleton.pdf
By John Stapleton
October 18, 2012
John Stapleton's paper sets out "what Canadians believe to be the six best routes out of poverty" (e.g., * Get Help from Your Family * Get a Job and Keep it * Get Training and Education. Then he compares each of those routes (benchmarks) to the Alberta Works (welfare) program to see whether, indeed, welfare rules provide a route out of poverty in Alberta.

Source:
Poverty Costs 2.0

http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/blog/poverty-costs-20-creating-policies-that-save/
Poverty Costs 2.0 is about sharing great ideas to help us invest in lasting solutions to poverty. The ideas will come in the form of policy recommendations to help move forward on the provincial commitment to create a 5 year plan to end child poverty and a 10 year plan to reduce poverty.

As part of the Poverty Costs 2.0 initiative, John Stapleton's text is the first post summarizing a policy recommendation authored by one of the top policy-thinkers in the country. Full, expanded recommendations will be collated in a book to be released early 2013. The final document will contain no less than 10 papers with recommendations from the best policy minds in Canada as well as several additional papers addressing broad systemic issues within the province.

Poverty Costs 2.0 is an initiative of
Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/

Vibrant Communities Across Canada
There are Vibrant Communities in 10 other cities in Canada – find out more at
http://vibrantcommunities.ca/

Related link:

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/

Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta.

Supporting Albertans To Save
An Asset Building Approach to Poverty Reduction Concept Paper
(PDF - 1.9MB, 14 pages) (dead link)
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/files/documents/supportingalbertanstosave.pdf
June 29, 2012
(...) Asset building is an emerging area of social policy in North America. Generally, asset-based approaches to social policy emphasize investment and future needs rather than a focus on meeting immediate needs, which is the standard approach of income assistance policy. Based on the success of over 500 matched savings programs operating in the United States, over 30 states have developed state-wide matched savings programs and 18 states are currently investing in matched savings. Several U.S. states have legislated matched savings programs, including Minnesota’s Family Assets for Independence Minnesota (FAIM) [ http://minnesotafaim.com/ ], through state statutes. The State of Oregon’s legislated matched savings program has successfully operated for over 5 years and is unique in its use of matched savings as an ‘add-on’ incentive to other social services provided by the state. In Canada, only the province of Manitoba has thus far developed policy support and dedicated stable funding for savings through its Manitoba Saves initiative. Manitoba is also a leader in revising asset limits as a component of Manitoba Saves resulted in raising liquid asset limits to $4,000 per person to a maximum of $16,000 per household.

Source:
Momentum
http://www.momentum.org/
Momentum is a Community Economic Development (CED) charitable organization that works with people living on low incomes to develop productive futures. Momentum offers award-winning programs that assist people in developing financial, personal, social and professional assets.

Related link:

Alberta Centennial Education Savings (ACES) Plan website (Alberta Govt. site) (dead link)
The ACES Plan will contribute $500 into the Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) of every child born to Alberta residents in 2005 and later.
- incl. program info and links to related resources.

---

- Go to the Alberta Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

Speak. Share. Thrive. – the Alberta Social Policy Framework online
June/July 2012
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/
June/July 2012
The Government of Alberta is leading the development of a social policy framework that will guide the future of Alberta's social policy and programs. The Framework will describe how we create hope and opportunity for all Albertans by working together to improve social outcomes.
- includes links to the following:
* Social Policy Framework 101 (frequently-asked questions) * Library * Blog * Survey * Discussion Kit * Guide to Participation * Help Guide * All Recent Changes


July 19 (2012) Email Update from the
Social Policy Framework Project Team:

Thank you for your link to our site. I wanted to clarify that in addition to the survey we are asking people to use the "wiki" to edit, revise, comment on the content we have developed so far for the framework. That content was based on engagement with over 10,000 people in the fall of 2011 and winter 2012.

The engagement is in two phases. The first phase in June and July focuses on the vision, principles and outcomes for the framework. We are pleased with the response to date with good participation in the survey, edits to the wiki and attendance at community-led conversations. In September we will revise the framework based on the feedback we have received in June and July and publish a revised version on the site in August.

The second phase which will start in the fall will focus on roles and responsibilities and strategies. Government has asked for the framework to be completed by November.

On the website you can register and create a use account. You can participate by completing the online survey [see below], by contributing to the blog [ http://povertyreduction.alberta.ca/Blog ] and online discussions and adding to the information contained on the Wiki.

The survey and blog will be online until July 31, 2012. The wiki will remain open through the remainder of 2012. Submissions from community-led discussions are also requested by July 31, 2012. The initial public engagement will take place from June to July 31, 2012. Information collected about the vision, principles and strategies will be collected over the summer of 2012. This will inform further discussions with Albertans in the fall about roles, responsibilities and next steps for the framework.

Social Policy Framework Survey:
https://extranet.gov.ab.ca/opinio6/s
This survey was developed to better understand the opinions of Albertans on issues that matter to them and to determine priorities for the development of Alberta's Social Policy Framework. It consists of 16 questions and should only take about 15 minutes to complete.

Poverty Reduction Strategy 101 (frequently-asked questions)
http://povertyreduction.alberta.ca/Poverty_Reduction_Strategy_101

Guide to Participation
(...)
How to Get Involved:
* Read relevant documents.
* Participate in discussions in your community.
* Contribute by editing the wiki or writing a blog.
* Complete the survey.
* Send us your thoughts directly to hs.socialpolicy@gov.ab.ca

Gilles' Gratuitous Suggestion To All Albertans : You have only until the end of July to present your views in this survey about the kind of Alberta you want. Complete the Social Policy Framework Survey "leading the development of a social policy framework that will guide the future of Alberta's social policy and programs." Click the survey link above and complete it now!

NOTE to the Alberta Government
--- This is the most progressive shift in Alberta social policy since, well, since forever.
But I find it mildly perplexing that the timing and duration of the consultation are not very conducive to a high participation rate - the end of the school year and the start of summer mean the start of the vacation season, a time when many individuals and families are disconnected from the issues, either because they're at the cottage or otherwise away from their computer, or because they choose to take a mental health break from burning issues during the summer period.
Why not recognize that many individuals and families are away during July and allow a bit longer for input via the survey?
Better to take a bit longer to obtain the views of all those who would want to participate in the process...

Op-Ed : Premier's pledge to eliminate child poverty holds promise (dead link)
http://www.openfile.ca/calgary/story/op-ed-premiers-pledge-eliminate-child-poverty-2017-holds-promise
June 13, 2012
By Joe Ceci
On April 11—just 12 days before Albertans would go to the polls—Alison Redford made an announcement that surprised many. Faced with an apparently surging Wildrose Party, Redford promised, if re-elected, her government would eliminate child poverty in Alberta in five years and reduce overall poverty within 10 years. Social welfare advocates, both in Alberta and across Canada, took notice, welcoming Redford's campaign promise as a leap forward in the public discussion of poverty. For far too long in Alberta, the 'pull yourself up by your bootstraps' province, only the most progressive politicians identified poverty as an issue that might be responsive to government intervention.

How did this surprising breakthrough come about, especially during an election campaign that seemed to be a race to the bottom social-policy-wise?
Click the link above to read the complete op-ed...

Source:
Openfile Calgary
(dead link)

---

From Jennefer Laidley
Income Security Advocacy Centre:
http://www.incomesecurity.org/

Latest Media and Policy News
http://goo.gl/mhGYY
April 2, 2012
[Click the link above to access any of the articles below.]

Action on Poverty Around the Country
--- Vibrant Canada blog: Ottawa and Poverty Reduction: What's Happening
--- Action to End Poverty in Alberta - column
--- Letter on Poverty Reduction in Alberta
--- Poverty Reduction in Grande Prairie, Alberta
--- More from Grande Prairie
--- Calgary Poverty Reduction Initiative
--- Revelstoke, BC, planning for poverty reduction
--- PovNet goes to Revelstoke

---

Redford's vow to end poverty portends major shift in social services (dead link)
http://goo.gl/ZTxcA
April 25, 2012
By Karen Kleiss
EDMONTON — Albertans can expect a fundamental reshaping of Alberta's social services sector if Premier Alison Redford wants to make good on her bold election promise to end poverty in 10 years, advocates say.
Other provinces with similar poverty reduction strategies have passed new laws, introduced new programs and changed the way they measure success. Some boosted the minimum wage, improved early childhood interventions, or indexed welfare cheques to inflation. Some have spent billions. And they have seen success. Newfoundland and Labrador saw its poverty rate drop five per cent over five years ending in 2009, Quebec saw a 2.5-per-cent drop over the same period. During the 2008 recession, Ontario lifted 19,000 children and families out of poverty using a poverty reduction strategy.

Source:
Edmonton Journal
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/

---

From the
Alberta Progressive Conservatives:

Plan for Poverty Reduction
http://www.votepc.ca/admin/contentx/dpNews/launch.cfm?itemid=2470
April 11, 2012
Calgary, AB - A Progressive Conservative government is committed to strengthening supports for Albertans in their time of need. Our Plan for Poverty Reduction will focus on a 5-year plan to eliminate child poverty and a 10-year plan to reduce poverty.
Source:
PC Alberta
http://www.votepc.ca/

A Living Wage : How to eliminate poverty in Alberta
http://calgary.openfile.ca/calgary/text/living-wage-how-eliminate-poverty-alberta
By Joe Ceci
April 18, 2012
The question of where to invest time and resources when promoting improvements to social policies in Canada is one that occupies a significant amount of time, probably too much time, for those advocating with the poor. Do you focus on the availability of affordable housing and wrap-around social supports, or education and job training opportunities, or emergency supports for shelter and food—or all of the above? One potential solution that definitely goes under-promoted is the idea that everyone with a job should minimally earn a living wage.
(...)
Dozens of businesses in Calgary have embraced the living wage approach to employee compensation and have become "living wage leaders." A listing of these companies can be found on the Vibrant Communities Calgary website [ http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/ ]. Support them with your purchasing power if you can because they support their employees! And make sure your elected representatives – at all levels of government—support a living wage policy.
Source:
OpenFile Calgary

http://calgary.openfile.ca/

Also from OpenFile Calgary:

* Building a resilient Calgary through poverty prevention
http://calgary.openfile.ca/calgary/text/qa-building-resilient-calgary-through-poverty-prevention
February 9, 2012

* Tearing away the masks of poverty reveals a 'mosaic of faces'
http://calgary.openfile.ca/blog/news/2012/tearing-away-masks-poverty-reveals-mosaic-faces
March 14, 2012

* Why Alberta needs a poverty reduction strategy
http://calgary.openfile.ca/calgary/text/why-alberta-needs-preventative-poverty-reduction-strategy
February 22, 2012

OpenFile Calgary
is part of
OpenFile Canada:

http://www.openfile.ca/
OpenFile is a community-powered news organization operating in seven Canadian cities: Vancouver, Calgary, Hamilton, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal and Halifax. The stories our journalists cover start out as suggestions from people like you. You suggest a story, we assign a reporter. That’s what we mean by community-powered news.

Joe Ceci, author of the first article above on living wage,
is Coordinator of Action to End Poverty in Alberta:
http://actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/

Homelessness in Calgary Down for the First Time in 20 Years
http://goo.gl/TcXOf
February 6, 2012
News Release
The Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF) is pleased to report the 2012 homeless count shows an 11.4 per cent decrease in the number of people experiencing homelessness since 2008.

The report:

The State of Homelessness in Calgary in 2012 (PDF - 460K, 18 pages)
http://calgaryhomeless.com/wp-content/uploads/The-State-of-Homelessnessonlineversion.pdf
February 3, 2012
Key Findings:
1. Results to date show that the 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness in Calgary is working.
2. We are on track with 10 Year Plan projections. We are meeting the promise of Housing First for people housed under the 10 Year Plan.
3. Calgary is the epicentre of homelessness in Alberta, driven by migration, and the labour and rental market.
4. Emerging trends suggest family homelessness is increasingly becoming a regional rather than local phenomenon. Prevention and Housing First programs are working, but Calgary is seeing a high number of Aboriginal and immigrant families in family shelters.
5. The size of the at-risk for homelessness pool may be smaller than originally thought.

(Excerpt, p.2):
The 10 Year Plan, initially launched in 2008, was revised and updated in 2011 with a renewed focus on system planning. Its priorities continue to be the reduction of chronic homelessness and emergency shelter use, while demonstrating client benefits from Housing First interventions and decreases in health, correction and shelter services use.
10 Year Plan Milestones
• House 1,500 chronic and episodically homeless people by 2014
• By 2014, ensure that no more than 10% of those served by “Housing First” programs return to homelessness
• By December 2014, all individuals who engage in rough sleeping will have access to housing and support options appropriate to their needs
• Eliminate 85% of 2010 emergency shelter beds by 2018
• Reduce the average length of stay in family emergency shelters to 14 days by Dec. 2014 and to seven days by December 2018
• Reduce the average length of stay in emergency shelters to seven days by January 2018

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness in Calgary [dead link]
- incl. links to:
* Progress * Fundamentals * Milestones * Strategies * Guiding Principles * History

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
[ http://calgaryhomeless.com/ ]
Our mission :
To end homelessness in Calgary.
Our v
ision : By January 29, 2018, an individual or family will stay in an emergency shelter or sleep outside for no longer than one week before moving into a safe, decent, affordable home with the support needed to sustain it.

Related link:

Alberta announces $3.2b plan to end homelessness
http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/news/alberta_announces__3_2b_plan_to_end_homelessness/
March 16, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
The Alberta government has today released a dramatic plan to end homelessness in 10 years by committing $1.2 billion in capital investments and $2 billion in operating funding. The plan – based on the “housing first” approach (which provides immediate housing and then offers supports as required) – will lead to the creation of 11,000 new homes by 2012, according to the provincial government. Full details, including funding and implementation lines, will be released in next month’s provincial budget.

The Alberta Plan:

A Plan For Alberta : Ending Homelessness in 10 years (PDF - 1.8MB, 48 pages)
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/documents/PlanForAB_Secretariat_final.pdf
October 2008
Prepared By:
The Alberta Secretariat
For Action On Homelessness
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/Alberta_Secretariat.cfm

[ Alberta Municipal Affairs
http://municipalaffairs.alberta.ca/ ]

Preventing poverty would save billions: study
Alberta's current charity model costs $9 billion and is less humane, coalition says
(dead link)
http://goo.gl/MaJd0
By Karen Kleiss
February 6, 2012
EDMONTON - Failure to address root causes of poverty costs Alberta as much as $9.5 billion each year, a new study says. The report, published Monday by a coalition of anti-poverty groups, urges provincial leaders to fundamentally rethink their approach to poverty: Instead of spending to alleviate the symptoms of poverty, invest in preventing people from falling into poverty in the first place.
Source:
Edmonton Journal
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/index.html

Poverty Costs : An Economic Case for
a Preventative Poverty Reduction Strategy in Alberta
(PDF - 3MB, 44 pages)
(dead link)
By Alexa Briggs and Celia R. Lee
February 6, 2012
Table of contents:
* Introduction
* Poverty in Alberta and Canada (Measuring poverty --- Poverty by the numbers --- Poverty in context)
* Tackling poverty (Poverty as a systemic issue --- Poverty reduction --- Who is responsible for Poverty reduction in Alberta
* External costs of poverty (Costs of poverty to health care --- Costs of poverty attributable to crime --- Intergenerational costs of poverty --- Opportunity costs of poverty --- Total external costs of Poverty)
* Investing in a poverty reduction strategy??
* References
NOTE : This report includes a one-page summary (p.12) of poverty reduction/elimination strategies elsewhere in Canada, along with links to dozens of related reports (under "Works Cited", p. 13)

Source:
Co-published by
Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/
and
Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/
This report is also published by the
Alberta College of Social Workers
[ http://www.acsw.ab.ca/ ]
---
Vibrant Communities Calgary is a non-profit organization that works collaboratively, with various stakeholders and partners, seeking to engage Calgarians and to advocate for long-term strategies that address the root causes of poverty in Calgary.

Action to End Poverty in Alberta is a non-profit initiative that works collaboratively with all levels of government, the community and with people experiencing poverty, to help develop and implement a comprehensive strategy and action plan to end poverty in Alberta.

Related links:

Video : Poverty Costs in Alberta (Duration 3:08)
http://youtu.be/SpmxCmh9c64

June 15, 2011
Video : A Better Calgary for All: (Duration 1hr 13 min.)
A Poverty Reduction Discussion with Mark Chamberlain
Co-hosted by Calgary Economic Development and Vibrant Communities Calgary.
http://youtu.be/KPTm9ZNHXzw

January 31, 2012

Action to End Poverty in Alberta (AEPA) and the Social Policy Framework
Developing a Social Policy Framework for Alberta: A response from the Action to End Poverty in Alberta Initiative
(dead link)

The Action to End Poverty in Alberta network is an initiative of the Inter-City Forum on Social Policy (ICFSP) [ http://goo.gl/chwIM ], a collaborative of 19 of Alberta's cities and larger urban areas plus the Family and Community Support Services Association of Alberta [ http://www.fcssaa.ab.ca/ ]. ICFSP is focused on information sharing, networking and advocacy in an inter-governmental context to improve social policies and programs in member municipalities and throughout the province. In 2010, members of ICSFP determined that it was timely to undertake a project to address poverty in Alberta by promoting comprehensive poverty reduction planning throughout the province.

Currently there are 33 members of the AEPA network including numerous municipalities, non-governmental organizations and community agencies. The focus of the AEPA network is to endorse and promote a call for the Province to develop a poverty reduction strategy (PRS).
(...)
Similar to the Province's 10- year Plan to Eliminate Homelessness [ http://housing.alberta.ca/603.cfm ] (and in support of strategy 16 in that plan), AEPA believes that a PRS embedded within government by virtue of legislation and regulations with accountabilities and timelines is plausible and necessary.

Source:
Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/

Attention: Mayors, Councillors & CAOs:
The Journey Towards a Provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy
http://www.auma.ca/live/MuniLink/Communications/Member+Notices?contentId=13564
Member Notice
January 18, 2012
The Alberta Urban Municipalities Association (AUMA) joined the Action to End Poverty Network in late June 2011. The Network consists of non-profit associations (Alberta College of Social Workers, Public Interest Alberta, and the Edmonton Social Planning Council), municipal representatives and community stakeholders. Action to End Poverty is supported by the Inter-City Forum on Social Policy and several other non-governmental organizations and is coordinated out of the office of the Family and Community Support Services Association of Alberta. The focus of the Network is to endorse a call for the Province to develop a poverty-reduction strategy. So far, 27 municipalities have joined the Network.
Source:
Alberta Urban Municipalities Association

http://www.auma.ca/
The Alberta Urban Municipalities Association was founded in 1905 and represents Alberta’s 277 urban municipalities including cities, towns, villages, summer villages, and specialized municipalities, as well as Associate and Affiliate members.
AUMA is a dynamic and evolving association which represents and advocates the interests of all members to both the provincial and federal governments as well as other provincial and federal organizations.

From the
Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations:

Provincial Government Invites Response to Social Policy Framework Discussion Guide
http://goo.gl/Uxi9P
January 2012
The Government of Alberta is in the early stages of developing a social policy framework. In the broadest sense, this framework is about inclusion and supporting a high quality of life for all Albertans. The Ministry of Human Services has developed a discussion guide that is intended to engage stakeholders in the process of developing the social framework. Included in the discussion guide is a series of questions stakeholders are encouraged to contemplate, and to which the Ministry invites comment. We are pleased that the province is engaging the nonprofit sector and other stakeholders in this important policy matter. This discussion guide, along with some context that was recently provided in a memo to the Alberta Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector Initiative (ANVSI), are both available to view online.

Comments can be forwarded by February 6, 2012, to Shannon Marchand or Lora Pillipow, whose full contact information can be found on the last page of the discussion guide. We at CCVO are interested in stakeholder response to this discussion guide and encourage you to copy us at policy@calgarycvo.org. Finally, CCVO is considering hosting a forum in Calgary for interested parties to discuss the social policy framework. Please let us know by Wednesday, January 25th if you would be interested in attending.

Developing a Social Policy Framework for Alberta:
Discussion Guide
(PDF - 124K, 4 pages) (dead link)
http://www.calgarycvo.org/sites/default/files/resources/201201_SPFDiscussionGuide.pdf
January 18, 2012

Context for the Alberta Social Policy Framework Discussion Guide (PDF - 60K, 1 page) (dead link)
http://www.calgarycvo.org/sites/default/files/resources/201201_ContextABSPFDiscussionGuide.pdf

Source:
Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations
http://www.calgarycvo.org/
The voluntary sector is on the front lines of every community issue in the city. We represent Calgary's community infrastructure - the volunteers, employees and supporters of Calgary's nonprofit organizations.

Related link:

Alberta Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector Initiative (ANVSI)
http://culture.alberta.ca/anvsi/
The Alberta Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector Initiative's (ANVSI) purpose is to improve the quality of life for Albertans' through a viable Non-profit/Voluntary Sector (NPVS) which supports strong and vibrant communities

In This Together : Ending Poverty in Alberta (PDF - 2.3MB, 16 pages)
November 2011
This report shows that 73,000 Alberta children lived below Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off (after-tax) in 2009. This was a 40% increase from the year before. The document also offers solutions to alleviating poverty in Alberta.
(...)
The recession caused a sharp increase in poverty rates for children living in two-parent families (Chart 3). In 2007, only 3.4% of these children lived in poverty. In 2009, this increased to 8.0%. The increase is likely due to low income families with both parents working experiencing job loss, reduction in hours and/or pay cuts.
(Excerpt, p. 2)
Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council
Alberta College of Social Workers
Public Interest Alberta

Related link
from Campaign 2000:

Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times:
2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 2.8MB, 16 pages)
[The national report]
November 2011
All we are asking is to give children a chance. Campaign 2000 is looking for a real commitment from this Parliament to reduce poverty by at least 50% by the year 2020, creating a pathway to eventual eradication. The federal government, in our view, must play a lead role.
Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations, committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada.

NOTE: If you wish to see 2011 child and family poverty reports for all participating Canadian provinces on one page (+ links to last year's reports), go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

Keep poverty fight pledge, Redford told: (dead link)
Advocates for poor want premier to honour promise to implement provincewide strategy

November 10, 2011
By Karen Kleiss
EDMONTON - A coalition of anti-poverty activists is urging Premier Alison Redford to keep her promise to implement a province-wide poverty reduction strategy. The groups say Alberta is one of three Canadian provinces that has not implemented a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy, and Redford's pledge - made during the leadership race - is a step in the right direction.
Source:
Edmonton Journal

[ More Edmonton Journal articles about Premier Alison Redford ]

---

Anti-poverty group applauds Redford's commitment (dead link)
November 10, 2011
An anti-poverty group is holding Premier Alison Redford accountable to her commitment to develop a comprehensive strategy to prevent, reduce and ultimately eliminate poverty. In September, Action to End Poverty in Alberta issued a survey to all six Progressive Conservative leadership candidates asking whether they would develop a poverty-reduction strategy bringing together provincial ministries, municipalities, social agencies, business and other organizations. Redford indicated in her response that when she was Alberta's justice minister, she had headed the Alberta Safe Communities Secretariat where multiple government and social agencies worked together for crime prevention and public safety. (...) Joe Ceci, the organization's co-ordinator and a former Calgary alderman, said Alberta is one of the few provinces that is not currently developing or has not yet developed such a strategy and applauded Redford for her commitment.
Source:
Calgary Herald

---

Minister of Human Services Mandate Letter
from the Premier dated November 3, 2011
(PDF - 305K, 2 pages)
"...lead the development of a social policy framework to guide the alignment and redesign of social policy programs to achieve better outcomes for children and families" (page 2)

Alberta Welfare Reform and
Employment Outcomes of Welfare Recipients
(PDF - 231K, 38 pages)
By Rosita Yi Ki Kwan
Prepared for Progressive Economic Forum Graduate Student Essay Contest
April 30, 2011

[ Analysis of the 1993 welfare reform in Alberta using panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics ]

Abstract:
It is well-established in the literature that financial work incentives and employability programs have positive labour supply effect. Though it is found that after a series of welfare reforms based on the work-first approach in Canada, the U.S., and the U.K., former welfare recipients and vulnerable groups, such as single mothers, tended to work in part-time or temporary jobs and witnessed limited wage growth; little is known about other job characteristics, such as union membership and pension plan coverage, of these groups. This study fills this gap by studying the 1993 welfare reform in Alberta using two years of panel data from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. I find that both welfare recipients and single mothers who started working after the reform were more likely to be covered by collective agreement and work full-time. However, welfare recipients tended to work regular evening schedules rather than daytime schedules; while single mothers received lower composite wage rates. Hence, there is mixed evidence as to whether the Alberta welfare reform improved employment outcomes for these two groups. More research in this area is certainly needed.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

Alberta Welfare Reform and
Employment Outcomes of Welfare Recipients
(PDF - 231K, 38 pages)
By Rosita Yi Ki Kwan
Prepared for Progressive Economic Forum Graduate Student Essay Contest
April 30, 2011

[ Analysis of the 1993 welfare reform in Alberta using panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics ]

Abstract:
It is well-established in the literature that financial work incentives and employability programs have positive labour supply effect. Though it is found that after a series of welfare reforms based on the work-first approach in Canada, the U.S., and the U.K., former welfare recipients and vulnerable groups, such as single mothers, tended to work in part-time or temporary jobs and witnessed limited wage growth; little is known about other job characteristics, such as union membership and pension plan coverage, of these groups. This study fills this gap by studying the 1993 welfare reform in Alberta using two years of panel data from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. I find that both welfare recipients and single mothers who started working after the reform were more likely to be covered by collective agreement and work full-time. However, welfare recipients tended to work regular evening schedules rather than daytime schedules; while single mothers received lower composite wage rates. Hence, there is mixed evidence as to whether the Alberta welfare reform improved employment outcomes for these two groups. More research in this area is certainly needed.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

Alberta Welfare Reform and
Employment Outcomes of Welfare Recipients
(PDF - 231K, 38 pages)
By Rosita Yi Ki Kwan
Prepared for Progressive Economic Forum Graduate Student Essay Contest
April 30, 2011

[ Analysis of the 1993 welfare reform in Alberta using panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics ]

Abstract:
It is well-established in the literature that financial work incentives and employability programs have positive labour supply effect. Though it is found that after a series of welfare reforms based on the work-first approach in Canada, the U.S., and the U.K., former welfare recipients and vulnerable groups, such as single mothers, tended to work in part-time or temporary jobs and witnessed limited wage growth; little is known about other job characteristics, such as union membership and pension plan coverage, of these groups. This study fills this gap by studying the 1993 welfare reform in Alberta using two years of panel data from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. I find that both welfare recipients and single mothers who started working after the reform were more likely to be covered by collective agreement and work full-time. However, welfare recipients tended to work regular evening schedules rather than daytime schedules; while single mothers received lower composite wage rates. Hence, there is mixed evidence as to whether the Alberta welfare reform improved employment outcomes for these two groups. More research in this area is certainly needed.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

Time For Action: Working Together To End Poverty In Alberta (PDF - 1.6MB, 16 pages) [dead link]
(...)Work on developing an Alberta poverty strategy has continued throughout 2010. Public Interest Alberta formed a task force to coordinate activities province-wide.
Using the Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness as a model, Alberta should develop its own comprehensive initiative to reduce, eliminate, and prevent poverty.

53,000 Alberta Children Live Below Poverty Line
Report Calls on Governments and Others to Work Together to End Poverty
[dead link]
News Release
November 24, 2010
The Edmonton Social Planning Council and Public Interest Alberta released a new report that shows 53,000 Alberta children lived below Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off (after-tax) in 2008, and that number is probably higher today due to the effects of the recession on our economy

Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council
The ESPC is an independent, non-profit, charitable organization. Our focus is social research – particularly in the areas of low income and poverty. The ESPC provides leadership within the community by addressing and researching social issues, informing public discussion and influencing social policy.

Public Interest Alberta
Public Interest Alberta is a non-profit, non-partisan, province-wide organization focused on education and advocacy on public interest issues. PIA exists to foster an understanding of the importance of public spaces, services and institutions in Albertans' lives, and to build a network of people and organizations committed to advancing the public interest.

---------------

Related link:

Alberta child poverty a 'hidden' crisis: report
53,000 kids affected, perhaps more
(dead link)
By Jana G. Pruden and Amy Minsky
November 25, 2010
Despite a government pledge to end child poverty 20 years ago, a new report says there are 53,000 children living below the poverty line in Alberta -- and possibly more, given downturns in the economy in the past two years, (...)The Alberta report says more than half of the children who live in poverty are from a household in which at least one person works full time year-round.
Source:
Edmonton Journal

---


NOTE:
This is one of a series of provincial reports all released under the Campaign 2000 banner on November 24 (2010), the anniversary of the 1989 unanimous House of Commons resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000. For links to the complete collection of federal and provincial reports and (selected) related media coverage, go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

Alberta Employment Minister Lukaszuk
urged to up basic wage by two bits

By Karen Kleiss
September 16, 2010
Albertans earning minimum wage will get a 25-cent-an-hour raise and the province will implement a poverty reduction strategy if the government accepts new recommendations from an all-party committee. The standing committee on the economy voted Wednesday to recommend Employment Minister Thomas Lukaszuk quickly raise the minimum wage to $9.05 and that he take steps to implement a provincewide poverty reduction strategy similar to the 10-year plan to end homelessness. The current minimum wage of $8.80 an hour and has not changed since April 1, 2009. Alberta is one of three provinces that does not have a poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
Edmonton Journal

On the same topic, from
the Calgary Herald:

Alberta MLAs reopen minimum wage debate; is $8.80 too much to pay? (dead link)
Alberta dropping to second-lowest rate in Canada
By Renata D'Aliesio
September 15, 2010
Alberta's minimum wage -- frozen earlier this year -- is set to sink to the second lowest in Canada as a group of provincial politicians weigh possible changes that would affect how much low-paid workers make. An all-party MLA committee meets today to hash over about a half-dozen draft recommendations on the future of the province's base pay after Employment Minister Thomas Lukaszuk requested a review in February
Source:
Calgary Herald

Related links:

Success! WOW!
September 15, 2010
Yesterday was a great day for the entire Vibrant Communities Calgary family. We would like to thank all of the volunteers and community partners that make it possible for us to do the important work of addressing the root causes of poverty in our community. With the help of Dave Taylor, Independent MLA for Calgary Currie we were able to help motivate the Standing Committee on the Economy to unanimously recommend a Poverty Reduction Strategy for Alberta.
Source:
Vibrant Communities Calgary

* Standing Committee on the Economy (Alberta Legislative Assembly)
* Calgary-Currie MLA Dave Taylor - home page

Women Together Ending Poverty:
Submission to the Minimum Wage Policy Review
(PDF - 86K, 7 pages) (dead link)
June 23, 2010
(...) WTEP believes that the minimum wage should be a living wage thereby providing someone who works full time access to a standard of living that is at least over the low income cut off line. We believe that such a policy is good for women, and good for the economy.
Source:
Women Together Ending Poverty (dead link)
WTEP is a diverse, grassroots women’s group that was formed in Calgary in February 2008, to educate and empower ourselves and other women to take action on the root causes of poverty.

-----------------------------------------

Official minimum
wage levels by province:

Current And Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates For Adult Workers in Canada
This is the BEST resource for info on current and upcoming minimum wage levels by province/territory.

Minimum Hourly Wages for Canadian Adult Workers since 1965
NOTE: this information is broken up into five files - one for each decade.
The link takes you to the latest decade; click the date links at the top of the page to open pages for earlier periods.

Source:
Minimum Wage Database
[ Employment Standards Legislation in Canada ]
[ Labour Program, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada ]

A made-in-Alberta child-tax benefit would reduce cost of poverty
Investment in poor would pay dividends to society, economy

By John Kolkman*
March 16, 2010
Alberta has experienced a modest drop in child and family poverty in recent years due to a strong economy and some reinvestment in social programs. Yet the 2006 federal census, taken at the height of the economic boom, found that 77,595 Alberta children (over one in 10) continued to live in poverty. Moreover, even these modest gains will be put at risk if the Alberta government makes the wrong choices in its upcoming budget. The government of Alberta should consider investing in a refundable child-tax benefit for low and modest income Alberta families. Alberta would thereby join several other provinces that have their own child-tax benefits to supplement federal child tax benefits.
Source:
Edmonton Journal

[ * John Kolkman is research and policy analysis
co-ordinator at the Edmonton Social Planning Council]

Related links:

Child and Family Benefits
- includes links to info about the following programs:
* Canada Child Tax Benefit
* Universal Child Care Benefit
* Goods and Services Tax/Harmonized Sales Tax Credit
* Working Income Tax Benefit
* National Child Benefit Supplement
* Child Disability Benefit
* Provincial and territorial programs
* MORE...
Source:
Canada Revenue Agency

Related links:

Child and Family Benefits
- includes links to info about the following programs:
* Canada Child Tax Benefit
* Universal Child Care Benefit
* Goods and Services Tax / Harmonized Sales Tax Credit
* Working Income Tax Benefit
* National Child Benefit Supplement
* Child Disability Benefit
* Provincial and territorial programs
* MORE...
Source:
Canada Revenue Agency

We Must Do Better: Alberta Report on Recent Forums in the Province (PDF - 2.1MB, 20 pages)
November 2009
During 2009, nearly 400 people came together at seven forums around Alberta to share experiences and thoughts about economic poverty. The Edmonton Social Planning Council and Public Interest Alberta helped organize the forums around the 2008 “We Can Do Better” report.
[ Highlights (PDF file - 58K, 2 pages)] (dead link)

We Can Do Better: Toward an Alberta Child & Family Poverty Reduction Strategy (PDF - 2.1MB, 20 pages) (dead link)
November 2008
We Can Do Better outlines the most current statistics on child and family poverty in Alberta & offers solutions that would allow us to do better for our most vulnerable children and families.

It's Time to Make Alberta Poverty-Free:
Albertans Call on Governments to Work Together to
Establish a Poverty Elimination Strategy

Media Release
November 24, 2009
A provincial network of people and organizations is calling upon the provincial, federal and municipal governments to work together with community organizations and others to develop a plan to eliminate poverty in Alberta.
Source:
Public Interest Alberta
Edmonton Social Planning Council

Related link:
Campaign 2000

From Calgary's Poverty Talks (antipoverty coalition):

Action Plan to Eliminate Poverty in Calgary (PDF - 2MB, 4 pages) (dead link)
September 2009
On September 18, 2009, a coalition of community organizations in Calgary called "Poverty Talks" released a local Action to Plan to Eliminate Poverty. The plan is the result of a series of consultations with hundreds of low-income Calgarians over the past 18 months. It provides a street-level view of what needs to be done to end poverty as defined by those who are living in poverty, rather than by social workers, academics and politicians.
[ News Release - September 18 ]
Source:
Poverty Talks
- no website as such, but see:

* Poverty Talks Facebook page (current)
* Poverty Talks Blog (not updated since fall 2008)
Poverty Talks is the project of a Calgary-based non-profit coalition seeking to raise awareness of poverty ~ especially as an electoral issue ~ and to advance and support the democratic engagement of low-income Calgarians. So, we invite you to take this report, talk to politicians and decision makers, and become an influence for change.
Why? Because poverty can happen to anyone. And ending poverty benefits us all.

Related link from Poverty Talks:

Detailed Action Plan to Eliminate Poverty in Calgary (Word file - 210K, 23 pages) (dead link)
In over 45 community meetings between 2008 and 2010, several hundred people answered the following questions: As a low income person, what would make a difference in your life? and What would you like to see changed? This report outlines what low-income Calgarians and people living in poverty say we need to achieve to make our city and province a good place to live for everyone. Never before has there been such a need for an all-round poverty reduction plan and strategy to tackle the problem. The goal of Poverty Talks is to raise awareness of poverty issues, especially in the electoral process, and to advance and support the democratic engagement of low-income Calgarians. Each section of the report starts with a "We said" section which includes some of the words and/or ideas from the project participants. These are followed by recommendations based on participants’ ideas.

Related external links:

Women Together Ending poverty (WTEP) (dead link)
We are a Calgary-based diverse group of women working together to educate ourselves and other women about the root causes of poverty and to empower ourselves and other women to take action against poverty.
- incl. links to:
* Welcome * Our Principles * Our Platform * Our Regular Activities * Our Current Focus * Past Events * Future Events * Videos * Poverty Talks * Our Contact Info * Links

From Vibrant Communities Calgary:

* Cost of Living Factsheet - August 2009 (PDF - 1.2MB, 4 pages)
* Poverty Fact Sheet - August 2009 (PDF - 653K, 2 pages)
* Living Wage Fact Sheet - August 2009 (PDF - 1.8MB, 4 pages)
Source:
Vibrant Communities Calgary
Vibrant is a non-profit organization that works collaboratively, with various stakeholders and partners, seeking to engage Calgarians and to advocate for long-term strategies that address the root causes of poverty in Calgary.
---

Vibrant Communities - Calgary
(from the Tamarack Institute for Community Engagement)
- incl. * Calgary's Approach * Update * Contact Info * Key Documents
Source:
Vibrant Communities
Vibrant Communities is a community-driven effort to reduce poverty in Canada by creating partnerships that make use of our most valuable assets – people, organizations, businesses and governments. It’s a unique approach to poverty reduction that allows communities to learn from — and help — each other. Vibrant Communities links communities across Canada, from British Columbia to Newfoundland, in a collective effort to test the most effective ways to reduce poverty at the grassroots level.

The Vibrant Communities partnership includes the following communities from across Canada:
* Abbotsford * Calgary * Edmonton * Hamilton * Montreal * Saint John * St. John's * Surrey * Trois-Rivières * Victoria * Waterloo * Winnipeg
[ Tamarack Institute for Community Engagement:
Tamarack exists to build vibrant and engaged communities in Canada. Our work will result in more collaborative approaches and less poverty. ]



May 25, 2009
From the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Alberta:
Extending the Alberta Advantage (PDF - 393K, 29 pages)
- by Peter Faid, Community Services Consulting Ltd.

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership


Alberta poverty strategy sought
April 21, 2009
Canada’s richest province, Alberta, is trailing behind others in reducing poverty, says an advocacy group that wants to create a provincial strategy. “We think Alberta, of all provinces, should be a leader in this,” said Bill Moore-Kilgannon, executive director of Public Interest Alberta. The independent public advocacy group is planning meetings across the province — starting with a forum in Red Deer on April 29 — to examine what can be done to give more Albertans the tools to succeed.
Source:
Red Deer Advocate
[ See Public Interest Alberta ]

---

We can do better : Toward an Alberta Child Poverty Reduction
Strategy for Children and Families
(PDF - 2.9MB, 20 pages) [dead link]
November 2008
Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC)

[GO BACK TO THE TOP OF THIS PAGE]

British Columbia



NOTE : For the latest news and reports, scroll down past this yellow box.

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/
organizations, and social policy groups. We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness. We seek to improve the health and wellbeing of all British Columbians. We have over 40 Coalition Members and almost 400 supporting organizations with a collective membership of over 300,000 that have joined the call for a poverty reduction plan.

35 Member Organizations of the Coalition:
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/about-2/members/
(List only, no links)

375 supporting organizations that have
joined the call for a poverty reduction plan:
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/about-2/supporters/
(List only, no links)

Join the Call for a comprehensive and
accountable poverty reduction plan in British Columbia:
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/take-action-2/join-the-call/
Join others, including over 350 organizations with a collective membership of over 300,000 people throughout the province, who are asking for a poverty reduction plan. Together we can make a difference!

Recommended targets and timelines:
*
Reduce BC’s poverty rate by 30% within four years, and by 75% within 10 years.
* Ensure the poverty rate for children, lone-mother households, single senior women, Aboriginal people, people with disabilities and mental illness, and recent immigrants and refugees likewise declines by 30% in four years, and by 75% in ten years, in recognition that poverty is concentrated in these populations.
* Within two years, ensure that every British Columbian has an income that reaches at least 75% of the poverty line.
* Within two years, ensure no one has to sleep outside, and end all homelessness within eight years (ensuring all homeless people have good quality, appropriate housing).

Other Provincial Poverty Reduction Plans
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/poverty-reduction-in-canada/
Recommended reading
---- includes information and many links to related documents for all provinces and territories with a poverty reduction plan
---- breakdown of poverty plans across Canada, and highlights the fact that BC is one of the last provinces without one and BC still has the highest rate of poverty in Canada.
NOTE : You must click on each of the icons near the top of the page to access all provincial and territorial sections of this collection.

The Cost of Poverty
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/cost-of-poverty/
- includes : * Inequality * Health * Housing * Crime * Children
- outlines the cost of poverty BC faces as a province and emphasizes that poverty reduction is cheaper in the long-run than paying for all the negative consequences of poverty
NOTE : You must click on each of the icons near the top of the page to access all sections of this collection.

Reports and studies about poverty in BC (from various sources)
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/resources/
- links to key reports about the effects of poverty in BC

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/BCPovertyReductionCoalition

______________________________

The remaining BC links appear
below in reverse chronological order.

______________________________

Action on poverty long overdue : Opinion: B.C.’s all-party finance committee recommends poverty reduction strategy — again
http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Action+poverty+long+overdue/11532698/story.html
November 20, 2015
By Trish Garner and Adrienne Montani
Last Friday, the B.C. legislature’s Select Standing Committee on Finance and Government Services, which is made up of six Liberal and four NDP MLAs, released its report based on extensive community consultations on the next provincial budget. The report includes a recommendation to explore the development of “a comprehensive and integrated poverty reduction strategy, including legislated timelines and targets for the reduction of poverty (including child poverty) and homelessness in B.C.

The authors:

Trish Garner is the community organizer of the B.C. Poverty Reduction Coalition [ http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/ ] and Adrienne Montani is the provincial coordinator of First Call: B.C. Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition [ http://firstcallbc.org/ ]

Source:
Vancouver Sun

http://www.vancouversun.com/

NEW from the
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
:

BC Minimum Wage and Poverty : The Facts (PDF - 153KB, 2 pages)
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/2015-03_Fightfor15-poverty-factsheet.pdf
March 2015
* BC’s overall poverty rate is the second highest in Canada
* $10.25/hr leaves full-time workers $6,000 below the poverty line
* 169,420 BC children live in poverty
* more than half a million BC workers earn less than $15 per hour
*Poverty costs BC more than $8 billion per year
* A $15/hr minimum wage is a critical part of a poverty reduction plan

BC Minimum Wage and Students : The Facts (146K, 2 pages)
https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/wevotebc/pages/78/attachments/original/1421262905/Min_and_Students_v3.pdf
January 2015
* $10.25 per hour is not enough to help address student debt load. Join the fight to make BC’s minimum wage $15
* BC eliminated student grants in 2003
* Tuition fees have more than doubled since 2002
* 550 hours of minimum wage work just to pay for tuition

BC Minimum Wage and Women : The Facts (PDF - 397Kb, 2 pages)
https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/wevotebc/pages/68/attachments/original/1426108259/Min_and_women.pdf
February 2015
* 70 per centof minimum wage workers aged 25-54 are women.
* 310,200 women earn $15 per hour or less.
* In BC, women earn 81 cents on the dollar compared to men.
* 81 per cent of single parents are women.

Source:
Fight for $15. It's only fair

http://www.fightfor15bc.ca/
The Fight for $15 is a campaign sponsored by the BC Federation of Labour [ http://bcfed.ca/ ]. Our campaign is supported by a number of not-for-profits, community organizations and individuals who share our interest in combating poverty and income inequality.

See also:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition

http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/
We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour organizations, and social policy groups. We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness.

B.C. still has one of the highest poverty rates in Canada
http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/policynote/2014/12/bc-still-has-one-highest-poverty-rates-canada
By Trish Garner
December 17, 2014
The latest poverty statistics were released by Statistics Canada last Wednesday, and the data once again shows that British Columbia has one of the highest poverty rates in Canada. Using the Low Income Cut-Off – After Tax (LICO-AT) [ http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75f0002m/2012002/lico-sfr-eng.htm ] as the poverty line, 1 in 10 British Columbians are living in poverty. That's 469,000 people struggling to make ends meet. In relation to the rest of the country, B.C. is tied third with Quebec after Ontario and Manitoba.
As always, there's a two-year delay in the data from Statistics Canada so these numbers describe the situation from 2012. However, this year there's also another challenge with the data -- it's produced from a new survey so we cannot compare to previous years.
(...)
While the LICO-AT is a useful measure, in part because it gives us one of the most conservative estimates of poverty and because the government themselves have begun to use it, it has some big problems . (...) So let's look at the Market Basket Measure (MBM) [ http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75f0002m/2013002/mbm-mpc-eng.htm ], which is based on up-to-date costs of an adequate standard of living and reflects regional differences in living costs. (...) Using the MBM as a poverty line, we find over 1 in 7 British Columbians living in poverty. That's a shocking 670,000 people. B.C. now has the second-highest poverty rate in Canada after Nova Scotia.

[ Trish Garner is the Community Organizer with the BC Poverty Reduction Coalition, a broad-based network of over 400 organizations throughout B.C. calling on the government to implement a poverty reduction plan. ]

Source:
rabble.ca

http://rabble.ca

---

Also by Trish Garner:

B.C. needs a poverty-reduction plan:
Evidence of the extent of poverty cannot be ignored

http://www.vancouversun.com/business/needs+poverty+reduction+plan/10420565/story.html
By Trish Garner
November 27, 2014
And then there was one. B.C. is now last province without a plan to tackle poverty. Saskatchewan announced Oct. 22 in its throne speech it would commit to the development of a poverty reduction strategy, making British Columbia the last province in Canada without a plan to tackle poverty.
This despite the fact B.C. has the highest or second-highest poverty rate in the country, depending on the poverty measure.
(...)
Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, B.C.’s Representative for Children and Youth, chastises the government for failing to act on her recommendation for a “provincial strategy and action to reduce child poverty” in Not Fully Invested: A Follow-up Report on the Representative’s Past Recommendations to Help Vulnerable Children in B.C. [ http://goo.gl/vudmw (PDF) ]
, which was released in early October. [

Source:
Vancouver Sun
http://www.vancouversun.com/

B.C. NDP introduces poverty reduction act, seeks to make poverty history in B.C. [dead link]
May 6, 2014
VICTORIA - British Columbia is one of two (SK is the other) remaining Canadian provinces without a legislated poverty-reduction plan, a failing the Opposition New Democrats say needs to change. NDP social development critic Michelle Mungall introduced in the legislature on Tuesday a private members bill that she said aims to fight poverty and improve economic realities for needy people.
(...)
Mungall said B.C. has had the highest overall poverty rate in Canada for the past 13 years and in the last decade has had the highest child poverty rate.

Source:
Victoria Times Colonist
http://www.timescolonist.com/

See also:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

And then there was one!
BC is now dead last in Canada when it comes to fighting poverty!

http://goo.gl/gwDGc6
November 13, 2014
On October 22 (2014), the Government of Saskatchewan announced in their Throne Speech that it would commit to the development of a poverty reduction strategy, making British Columbia the very last province in Canada without a plan to tackle poverty. And we still have the highest poverty rate in the country!

Congratulations to our friends at Upstream [ http://www.thinkupstream.net/ ] in Saskatchewan who were a big part in making this happen through their collaboration in the Poverty Costs campaign [ http://www.povertycosts.ca/ ]!

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/
We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour organizations, and social policy groups. We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness

From
Canada Without Poverty:

Where’s the Plan British Columbia and Saskatchewan?
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2014/08/wheres-the-plan-british-columbia-and-saskatchewan/
August 11, 2014
Canada Without Poverty has long been discussing the need for a Federal Anti-Poverty Plan to address the needs of people living in poverty from coast-to-coast. But in reality provincial and municipal governments also have a responsibility to address poverty. Eleven out of thirteen provinces and territories have completed the first step in doing this by drafting and implementing anti-poverty plans. So, who are the two provinces lagging behind? British Columbia and Saskatchewan.
(...)
While Saskatchewan has the lowest unemployment rate in the country, 64% of First Nations Children living in the province live below the poverty line. Saskatchewan has no plan to address the needs of these individuals. In BC, one of the richest provinces in Canada, 10.7% of the population, or 476,000 British Columbians, still live in poverty. How can a provincial government claim to represent their constituents when they are not addressing the needs of more than 1 in 10?
The good news is that change is coming. Community activists in both provinces are stepping up to demand their provincial governments establish a plan to address poverty!

To learn more, visit:

http://www.thinkupstream.net/

http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/SK-Poverty-Progress-Profile-FINAL.pdf

http://www.povertycosts.ca/

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/SK-Poverty-Progress-Profile-FINAL.pdf

Source:
Canada Without Poverty

http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

Where’s the fanfare for tackling poverty effectively?
Connecting the dots between three political moments over three months

http://www.straight.com/news/696061/trish-garner-wheres-fanfare-tackling-poverty-effectively
By Trish Garner
July 29, 2014
On June 16, I attended the B.C. government’s Disability Summit, the culmination of a three-month public consultation process on disability in B.C. I watched Minister of Social Development and Social Innovation Don McRae lead the audience through the event. I felt the flurry of excitement as Premier Christy Clark took to the stage to launch the government’s new action plan, Accessibility 2024 [ http://engage.gov.bc.ca/disabilitywhitepaper/accessibility-2024/ ], and then watched as she left as quickly as she had arrived. I heard business leaders talk about the benefits of meaningful inclusion. And I saw cameras and reporters focused on the front while the most important message came from protestors on the outside.
(...)
On May 6, Opposition MLA Michelle Mungall introduced a member’s bill, the Poverty Reduction and Economic Inclusion Act [ https://www.leg.bc.ca/40th2nd/1st_read/m212-1.htm ]. Since then, the premier has received hundreds of emails and letters from organizations throughout B.C. asking her to support the proposed act.

B.C. has had the highest poverty rate in Canada for the last 13 years and is now one of only two provinces without a poverty reduction plan. Bill M 212 includes government responsibility, targets and timelines, and strong accountability measures—features that are critical to the success of any plan, as the government has recognized in its disability action plan. However, a comprehensive poverty reduction plan would have much more impact and truly make B.C. the most “progressive” province in Canada with no one left behind. I’d like to see some fanfare about that!

[ Author Trish Garner is the community organizer for the B.C. Poverty Reduction Coalition. ]

Source:
Straight.com - Vancouver's Online Source

http://www.straight.com/

B.C. NDP introduces poverty reduction act, seeks to make poverty history in B.C.
http://www.timescolonist.com/news/b-c/b-c-ndp-introduces-poverty-reduction-act-seeks-to-make-poverty-history-in-b-c-1.1023244
May 6, 2014
VICTORIA - British Columbia is one of two (SK is the other) remaining Canadian provinces without a legislated poverty-reduction plan, a failing the Opposition New Democrats say needs to change. NDP social development critic Michelle Mungall introduced in the legislature on Tuesday a private members bill that she said aims to fight poverty and improve economic realities for needy people.
(...)
Mungall said B.C. has had the highest overall poverty rate in Canada for the past 13 years and in the last decade has had the highest child poverty rate.

Source:
Victoria Times Colonist
http://www.timescolonist.com/

From the
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

Opposition propose BC Poverty Reduction and Economic Inclusion Act:
Now is the time for bi-partisan collaboration in addressing the root causes of poverty
(small PDF file)
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/140506-BCPRC_PREI-act-press-release.pdf
Press Release
May 6, 2014
Today in the BC Legislature, the Official Opposition (MLA Michelle Mungall) introduced a private member’s Bill proposing a BC Poverty Reduction and Economic Inclusion Act. The Act, were it to be enacted, would see the government develop a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy within one year, and legislate specific targets and timelines to reduce the breadth and depth of poverty.

Join the call for a Poverty Reduction Plan for BC
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/take-action/join-the-call/
BC has the highest poverty rate in Canada and no plan to tackle itdirectly.
Here are five quick and easy ways to make a difference today!

Join the newsletter!
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/157-2/
Sign up for our newsletter to get the latest news and to stay involved in upcoming campaigns.

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/
We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour

A tale of two provinces: a case for action against poverty
http://www.cpj.ca/content/tale-two-provinces-case-action-against-poverty-0
July 18, 2012
By Simon Lewchuk
British Columbia & Newfoundland and Labrador have more in common than being our country’s coastal bookends. Twelve years ago, they shared the distinction of having some of the highest poverty rates in the country: BC’s was the highest at 15.1 per cent while Newfoundland was a not too distant fourth place at 13.2 per cent (Low-Income Cut Off – After Tax).
Fast forward ten years, however, and a much different picture emerges. As the recently released Statistics Canada low-income data for 2010 reveals, Newfoundland now has one of the lowest poverty rates amongst the provinces, with 6.5 per cent of the population living in poverty. BC, on the other hand, still has the distinction of having, by far, the highest poverty rate amongst the provinces at 11.5 per cent. The rate in BC dropped, but less than it did in Canada as a whole over the same period (and certainly far less than in Newfoundland, which led the way with a 50.8% decrease).
So what made the difference?

Source:
Citizens for Public Justice

http://www.cpj.ca/

Donating isn’t a long-term solution for poverty and hunger
http://www.straight.com/news/564271/trish-garner-donating-isnt-long-term-solution-poverty-and-hunger
By Trish Garne
January , 2014
(...)
... giving to charity is necessary in this time of great need in order to address the immediate needs of people living in poverty. However, charities can only provide short-term relief that addresses the “downstream” symptoms, and we need long-term solutions that go “upstream” to fix the root causes.
(...)
Here’s an idea to take to our provincial government. Most other places in Canada have a poverty reduction plan and they are already saving lives and money. B.C. needs a comprehensive poverty reduction plan with legislated targets and timelines to really make a difference for families, communities, and our province.

[Author Trish Garner is a parent of three young children and the community organizer for the
B.C. Poverty Reduction Coalition : http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/ ]

Source:
The Straight.com (Vancouver)
http://www.straight.com/

From the
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition:

October 2013
Five Things You Should Know
About Poverty in British Columbia
(PDF - 628K, 1 page)
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/2013_prc_5-things-to-know.pdf
1. We are very generous.
2. BC has had the highest poverty rate in Canada for the last 13 years.
3. Most poor people are working.
4. BC is one of the last provinces without a Poverty Reduction Plan.
5. We can afford this!
You and your MLA have an important role to play in making it happen. The decisions MLAs make for our province affect what’s happening in your local community. In most places that have established poverty reduction plans, it was community pressure that convinced their government to take action. You can be part of this effort to make BC’s government take action against poverty.

Please meet with your MLA and ask them to commit to tackling poverty directly through a strong poverty reduction plan with legislated targets and timelines.
For more information and to take action visit the Meet Your MLA Campaign page : http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/mla/

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour organizations, and social policy groups. We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness. We seek to improve the health and wellbeing of all British Columbians.

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/BCPovertyReductionCoalition

-------------------------------------

June 2013 E-Newsletter
http://goo.gl/ztncb

Contents:
* Doctors prescribe raising income;
* Child labour is no accident;
* Nunavut passes Collaboration for Poverty Reduction Act;
* Calgary endorses poverty reduction strategy
* Surrey Poverty Reduction Coalition.

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition

http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/
We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour organizations, and social policy groups. (...) We seek to improve the health and wellbeing of all British Columbians. We have 35 Coalition Members and over 375 supporting organizations that have joined the call for a poverty reduction plan.

-------------------------------------

Where is BC’s Poverty Reduction Plan?

Watch the 95-minute webinar [ http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/videos/ ] held on March 19, 2013,
or download the PDF slideshow [ 34MB, 79 pages - http://goo.gl/WtpJ7 ]
to get informed and energized to make poverty reduction an election issue. Listen to community experts on the pillars of a poverty reduction plan, the cost of poverty, the impact of community events, and how to take action in this critical time.

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition

http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/
We are a coalition that includes 30 Coalition Members and over 350 supporting organizations with a collective membership of over 300,000 that have joined the call for a poverty reduction plan. (...) We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness. We seek to improve the health and wellbeing of all British Columbians.

From Campaign 2000 and BC First Call:

High child poverty rate and growing inequality threaten BC's future prosperity (small PDF file)
http://goo.gl/s9eea
News Release
November 21, 2012
The Child Poverty Report Card released today by First Call, the BC partner in Campaign 2000, shows that British Columbia remains near the bottom of the heap when it comes to most major measures of poverty. It also shows a growing gap between families at the top and the bottom of the income scale. BC’s child poverty rate dropped to 14.3 percent in 2010, still the worst rate of any province except Manitoba, and higher than the Canadian average of 13.7 percent, according to the latest figures published by Statistics Canada.

British Columbia 2012 BC Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 3MB, 31 pages)
http://goo.gl/natdU
November 2012
This BC Child Poverty Report Card includes an introduction, ten fact sheets on child poverty, and recommendations.
Fact Sheet #1 BC’s Dismal Poverty Rates
Fact Sheet #2 Child Poverty Over the Years
Fact Sheet #3 Child Poverty by Family Type
Fact Sheet #4 The Depth of Poverty
Fact Sheet #5 Child Poverty and Working Parents
Fact Sheet #6 Families With Children on Welfare
Fact Sheet #7 The Ins and Outs of Child Poverty
Fact Sheet #8 Incomes of Families With Children – Growing Inequality
Fact Sheet #9 The Importance of Government Help
Fact Sheet #10 The Poverty Gap in British Columbia
BC Campaign 2000 Recommendations
Appendix 1: Measures of Poverty
Appendix 2: Further Changes in the Minimum Wage

Report Highlights
(Excerpt from page 2 of the report)
* BC had an overall poverty rate of 15.5 percent – the worst rate of any province in Canada using the before-tax low income cut-offs of Statistics Canada as the measure of poverty.
* BC had the second worst child poverty rate at 14.3 percent – the worst rate of any province except Manitoba.
* BC had the worst poverty rate of any province at 11.6 percent for children living in two-parent families.
* BC had the most unequal distribution of income among rich and poor families with children. The ratio of the average incomes of the richest ten percent compared to the poorest ten percent was the worst of any province at 13.8 to one.

Earlier editions opf the BC Child Poverty Report Card
http://www.firstcallbc.org/economicequality-whatsnew.html
- back to 2005

Source:
First Call: BC Child and
Youth Advocacy Coalition
http://www.firstcallbc.org/
First Call is a cross-sectoral, non-partisan coalition of provincial and regional organizations, engaged communities and individuals whose aim is to raise public awareness and mobilize communities around the importance of public policy and social investments that support the well-being of children, youth and families.

Enough with Child Poverty 'Band-aids': BC Teachers' Union
http://thetyee.ca/News/2012/11/21/Child-Poverty-BandAids/
By Katie Hyslop, TheTyee.ca, Nov 21, 2012

Child poverty a troubling sign of the times
http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/article/20121121/PRINCEGEORGE0101/311219997/-1/princegeorge/child-poverty-a-troubling-sign-of-the-times
Ted Clarke, Prince George Citizen, Nov 21, 2012

Child poverty rates in B.C. blasted by advocates
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/11/21/bc-child-poverty.html
Nov 21, 2012

126 comments about this article (not too many from the BC Liberal Fan Club...)
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/11/21/bc-child-poverty.html#socialcomments

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/

---

Related link:

2012 Report Card on Child Poverty in Canada : Campaign 2000

Government of Canada Missing in Action on child poverty: Report (PDF - 196K, 1 page)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/2012ReportCardPressRelease.pdf
News Release
November 21, 2012
TORONTO – More Canadian children live in poverty today than in 1989 and the federal government is missing in action, says Laurel Rothman, National Coordinator for Campaign 2000. Twenty-three years after the House of Commons unanimously voted to work together to eliminate child poverty, the crisis is worse. Today, one in seven Canadian children live in poverty – one in four in First Nation’s communities – a reality that threatens our country’s future through higher healthcare costs, lost productivity and limited opportunities.

The 2012 report, entitled Needed: A Federal Action Plan to Eradicate Child and Family Poverty in Canada calls on the Federal Government to take a lead role in child and family poverty reduction. Policy recommendations are offered to all political parties to redress the persistence of child and family poverty in Canada.

Complete national report:

Needed: A Federal Action Plan to Eradicate Child and Family Poverty in Canada
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/C2000ReportCardNov2012.pdf
November 2012
[ Version française : http://www.campaign2000.ca/2012ReportCardFr.pdf ]
Without a national anti-poverty strategy, child and family poverty in Canada will continue to grow, compromising the success of future generations and threatening Canada’s economic stability. Today, there are poverty reduction strategies in seven of the ten provinces and even in some municipalities. When it comes to eradicating child poverty, the Federal government is currently an absentee partner. A coordinated federal action plan that sets significant goals for poverty eradication, dedicates adequate financial and human resources and mandates reporting of progress is vital for Canada’s future. It is also long overdue.

Source:
Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations, committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada. Visit the Campaign 2000 website for a complete list of partner organizations.

First Call critiques 'alleged' BC poverty strategy
http://thetyee.ca/Blogs/TheHook/BC-Politics/2012/08/01/First-Call-critiques-alleged-BC-poverty-strategy/
By Katie Hyslop
August 1, 2012
A child and youth advocacy organization is calling out the provincial government for creating a poverty strategy without money for new programs and policies.The provincial government's community-based poverty reduction strategy, announced this past spring, will begin this fall in seven B.C. communities: Surrey, New West Minster, Kamloops, Cranbrook, Prince George, Stewart, and Port Hardy. If successful they plan to spread to 20 communities by the end of 2012, and 47 by 2015.

Organized around the idea there is no "one size fits all" strategy for reducing poverty -- as distinct from the 11 province and territory-wide strategies that exist or are in development -- government officials will begin to work with 10 to 15 impoverished families in these communities in September.

That's not enough to make a substantial dent in poverty in B.C., let alone eradicate it, according to First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition. In BC's "Alleged" Poverty Reduction Strategies report released by First Call today, the organization says the strategy is pointless without money and province-wide policies.

August 2012
BC’S “alleged” poverty reductions strategies:
When is a strategy not a strategy?
(PDF - 168K, 19 pages)
http://goo.gl/hQ0Pv
(...)
If the BC government wants to be taken seriously on poverty reduction, it has to give top priority to income and barriers to earning income, such as the lack of affordable child care. Regional strategies and community involvement are important, but only if they complement action to boost the incomes of poor families.

Our first recommendation to the province over the years has been to enact a full-fledged poverty reduction strategy with specific targets for reducing the poverty rate over time. All provincial and territorial governments in Canada except for British Columbia and Saskatchewan have endorsed this approach.

Source:
First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition

http://www.firstcallbc.org/

New from the
Disability Without Poverty Network:

Overdue : The Case for Increasing the
Persons with Disabilities Benefit in BC
(PDF - 776K, 19 pages)
http://www.bccpd.bc.ca/docs/overdueincreasepwd.pdf
July 2012
Key proposals:
--- Increase the PWD ("Person with disabilities") benefit to $1,200 per month
--- Index the PWD benefit
--- Establish a shelter assistance program for people with disabilities
This paper makes a strong case that these changes are needed to help ensure that PWD recipients are not living in poverty.

Source:
Disability Without Poverty Network

http://www.bccpd.bc.ca/dwpnetwork.htm
In April 2011, the BC Coalition of People With Disabilities (BCCPD) formed the Disability Without Poverty Network. In addition to the BCCPD, the Network’s members are the BC Association for Community Living (BCACL), Canadian Mental Health Association - BC and Yukon Division (CMHA), Social Planning and Research Council (SPARC) and the Community Legal Assistance Society (CLAS).
The goal of our network is to develop positive recommendations for change so that British Columbians who have a disability and who receive the Persons with Disabilities Benefit (PWD) are not living in poverty,
- includes an abstract of the above paper and related links.

Member organizations:

* BC Coalition of People With Disabilities
http://www.bccpd.bc.ca/

* BC Association for Community Living
http://www.bcacl.org/

* Canadian Mental Health Association - BC and Yukon Division
http://northwestvancouver.cmha.bc.ca/ [no YK Division website]

* Social Planning and Research Council
http://www.sparc.bc.ca/

* Community Legal Assistance Society
http://www.clasbc.net/

A tale of two provinces: a case for action against poverty
http://www.cpj.ca/content/tale-two-provinces-case-action-against-poverty-0
July 18, 2012
By Simon Lewchuk
British Columbia & Newfoundland and Labrador have more in common than being our country’s coastal bookends. Twelve years ago, they shared the distinction of having some of the highest poverty rates in the country: BC’s was the highest at 15.1 per cent while Newfoundland was a not too distant fourth place at 13.2 per cent (Low-Income Cut Off – After Tax).
Fast forward ten years, however, and a much different picture emerges. As the recently released Statistics Canada low-income data for 2010 reveals, Newfoundland now has one of the lowest poverty rates amongst the provinces, with 6.5 per cent of the population living in poverty. BC, on the other hand, still has the distinction of having, by far, the highest poverty rate amongst the provinces at 11.5 per cent. The rate in BC dropped, but less than it did in Canada as a whole over the same period (and certainly far less than in Newfoundland, which led the way with a 50.8% decrease).
So what made the difference?

Source:
Citizens for Public Justice

http://www.cpj.ca/

Cost of Poverty in BC: Huge Human Suffering and at least $4 Billion
http://raisetherates.org/2012/06/28/cost-of-poverty-in-bc-huge-human-suffering-and-at-least-4-billion/
June 28, 2012
Poverty in BC is the worst in Canada with 1 in 9 people in poverty and 1 in 5 children under the age of 6 living in poverty. BC also has the worst inequality gap between the richest and poorest 20% of the population. Poverty and inequality cause immense human suffering and harms individuals, families and society.
(...)
On Tuesday, June 26, over 130 people crowded into a meeting to discuss the Cost of Poverty in BC, which was hosted by Raise the Rates. A panel of experts, both from life and research, movingly outlined some of the many costs.
- includes contributions by the following:
* Harold Lavender, a person living on disability
* Colleen Boudreau, a mother on disability
* Carol Martin, an Aboriginal women working with the Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre
* Charan Gill, of Progressive Intercultural Community Services Society
* Fraser Stuart, living on welfare
* Robin Loxton, with the BC Coalition of People with Disabilities
* Colleen McGuire, author of the Cost of Eating in BC
* Ted Bruce, an expert on public health
* Adrienne Montani of First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition
* Iglika Ivanova, an economist with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
* Seth Klein, Director of CCPA's BC Office
The total package of raising income, providing universal child care, building houses, etc would cost around $4 billion dollars which is half the cost of poverty. Ending poverty in BC is sound economic policy and good social policy; it would make BC a better place to live and a province to be proud of.

Source:
Raise the Rates

http://raisetherates.org/
Raise the Rates is a coalition of community groups and organizations concerned with the level of poverty and homelessness in British Columbia.

Child poverty rate drops in British Columbia,
rates for all persons still the worst in Canada

http://firstcallbc.org/pdfs/CurrentIssues/NR%20poverty%20stats.pdf
June 18, 2012
News Release
The child poverty rate in British Columbia dropped from 11.8 percent in 2009 to 10.5 percent in 2010, Statistics Canada reported today.
The latest BC rate was the second worst in Canada after the rate of 11.1 percent in Manitoba. Previously, the child poverty rate in BC was the worst of any province in Canada for eight consecutive years.

The number of poor children was down from 98,000 in 2009 to 87,000 in 2010. Meanwhile, the poverty rate for persons of all ages in BC fell slightly from 12.0 percent in 2009 to 11.5 percent in 2010. It was the worst poverty rate in Canada for 12 consecutive years. The number of poor persons dropped from 523,000 to 510,000. “The latest statistics show – once again – the need for a comprehensive anti-poverty program in British Columbia, supported by every political party,” said Adrienne Montani, provincial coordinator of First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition. “Poverty is costing children their health and limiting their ability to reach their full potential.”

The current BC government has proposed modest local anti-poverty initiatives in seven BC communities, but has made it clear it will not make significant investments to fight poverty prior to the 2013 provincial election. (...)

Source:
First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition

http://firstcallbc.org/

---

From the
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition:
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

June 2012 E-Newsletter : BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://goo.gl/ZLrms
Contents:
* BC Welfare Changes
* BC still has the Highest Poverty Rate in Canada
* Cost of Poverty Panel, June 26
* Queer and Transgender Poverty
* Other News and Resources: Fair Taxation - New Poverty Progress Profiles - Federal Good News

---

Only BC and SK without a poverty reduction plan!
April 30, 2012

Surprising many, Alberta re-elected the Progressive Conservative party last Monday (April 23), and consequently voted in a Plan for Poverty Reduction that Leader Alison Redford had announced just two weeks before the election. This now leaves only us and Saskatchewan without a provincial poverty reduction plan. The day after Redford's announcement, the BC government launched its "community poverty-reduction plans," a lackluster approach that features no new policies, no new priorities and no new money to address the crisis of poverty we are facing in this province. With input from supporters within the selected communities, we have released the following response:

And then there were two: Alberta voters promised a poverty
reduction plan, leaving only BC and Saskatchewan without one now.
http://goo.gl/EB3jG
April 27, 2012

Source:
BC Poverty reduction update
http://goo.gl/yuyF2
[Click the above link to select any of the items below.]
* Alberta voters promised a provincial poverty reduction plan
* BC government announces "community poverty-reduction strategies"
* Living Wage for Metro Vancouver rises to $19.14 in 2012
* Welfare rates need to be raised immediately
* Recent poll shows that Canadians want higher taxes for more public goods
* Federal budget hangover
* Updates from supporters

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

B.C. welfare recipients need immediate relief
http://goo.gl/kHLM8
April 19, 2012
ByAdrienne Montani, Seth Klein and Lorraine Copas
Two recent events highlight the need for emergency relief for B.C. welfare recipients and make clear that people simply cannot meet basic needs on a welfare income.
The first event was in January, when NDP MLA Jagrup Brar spent a month living on $610, the basic welfare income for a single person. He lost 26 pounds, wound up $7 in debt and had to sell his backpack to pay for a SkyTrain ride home to Surrey. The second was the publication of the report from B.C. members of the Dietitians of Canada comparing the cost of a nutritious basket of food to the support allowance available to welfare recipients. Every one of the five welfare family types studied in the report would have been in the red after paying for food and shelter. Their welfare budgets didn’t allow even one cent for a tube of toothpaste, a bus ticket or a new pair of socks. The revelations from Brar and the dietitians’ report shocked many British Columbians, but were not news to government, welfare recipients and anti-poverty advocates.
---
Adrienne Montani is provincial co-ordinator of First Call: B.C. Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition.
Seth Klein is B.C. director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
Lorraine Copas is executive director of the Social Planning and Research Council of B.C.
---

Source:
Blogs : The Province (Vancouver)
http://www.theprovince.com/opinion/blogs/index.html

Related links:

British Columbia MLA Welfare Challenge Update
http://mlaonwelfare.com/

---

The Cost of Eating in British Columbia, 2011 (PDF - 4.7MB, 16 pages)
http://goo.gl/U7CGh
Source:
Dietitians of Canada:
http://www.dietitians.ca/

From The Province (Vancouver):

Housing and food are still out of reach for too many people in British Columbia
http://goo.gl/ihpBK
February 29, 2012
By Trish Garner
Two significant reports were released this week that shine a light on the crisis of poverty we face as a province. Cost of Eating in B.C. 2011 found that healthy food is unaffordable for the poorest people in B.C. And the final Metro Vancouver Homeless Count report reveals that 2,650 people were homeless in 2011. Together, they paint a picture that shows that the basic necessities of housing and food are out of reach to many in our province.
[Links to both reports appear below.]
(...)
The most significant theme emerging from the two reports released yesterday is the issue of health. According to Cost of Eating, lack of healthy food can lead to “poor growth and development in children, learning deficits, poor school performance, [and] increased illness and susceptibility to disease for people of all ages.” The homeless-count report reveals that nearly all of the homeless have health problems, with the vast majority (62 per cent) reporting multiple health conditions. (...) The homeless-count report recommends action to address this crisis and the Cost of Eating proposes a poverty reduction strategy.

Source:
The Province - home page
http://www.theprovince.com/index.html

------------------------------

From the
Dietitians of Canada:

The Cost of Eating in British Columbia, 2011
http://www.dietitians.ca/Dietitians-Views/Food-Security/Individual-and-Household-Food-Insecurity/The-Cost-of-Eating-in-British-Columbia.aspx
On February 28, 2012, Dietitians of Canada, BC Region released the report The Cost of Eating in BC 2011.Dietitians publish the report to bring attention to the fact that many British Columbians don’t have enough money to buy healthy food.
And, it’s not getting any better.

TIP : Click the link above and scroll down the page for links to earlier editions of this report for 2009, 2007, 2006 and 2005.

2011 Cost of Eating in BC Report Released: Nothing is Improving
http://www.dietitians.ca/News-Releases/2012/Cost-of-Eating-report.aspx
News Release
February 28, 2012

The complete report:

The Cost of Eating in British Columbia, 2011 (PDF - 4.7MB, 16 pages)
http://goo.gl/U7CGh
Ensuring that individuals and families are food secure is more than addressing the immediate need to feed our hungry citizens. The solution rests in addressing the underlying factors that cause food insecurity, specifically poverty and the food system.
Recommendations for change outlined in this report:
1. Establish a provincial poverty reduction strategy
2. Build affordable housing
3. Update income assistance to reflect the cost of living
4. Enact a living wage policy
5. Work toward sustainable food systems that no longer require food banks

Source:

Dietitians of Canada:
http://www.dietitians.ca/
Dietitians of Canada (DC) is the national professional association for dietitians, representing almost 6000 members at the local, provincial and national levels. DC is one of the largest organizations of dietetic professionals in the world.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

---

From the
Greater Vancouver Regional
Steering Committee on Homelessness:
http://stophomelessness.ca/

One Step Forward…
Results of 2011 Metro Vancouver Homeless Count
(PDF - 1.8MB, 79 pages)
http://goo.gl/volvi
The 2011 Metro Vancouver Homeless Count was commissioned by the Greater Vancouver Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH) to update the number of homeless people in the region, the demographic profile of those surveyed or enumerated on Count Day, and trends on the nature and character of homelessness with reference to the three previous Counts in 2002, 2005 and 2008. (Source : Executive Summary - p.8)

Media backgrounder (PDF - 32K, 2 pages)
http://goo.gl/rpO4P
February 28, 2012
- includes Key Findings and About the Homeless Count

Source:
Greater Vancouver Regional
Steering Committee on Homelessness:
http://stophomelessness.ca/
The Greater Vancouver Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH) is a coalition of community organizations and all levels of government.
Our Vision is to eliminate homelessness in Greater Vancouver through the full implementation of the Regional Homelessness Plan: Three Ways to Home. you'll find a link to that plan on the "Homelessness in Vancouver" page [ http://vancouver.ca/commsvcs/housing/homelessness.htm ] on the Vancouver (city) website, along with links to over a dozen related reports.

British Columbia Update (below):
--- MLA Welfare Challenge Update and Fact Sheet (Raise the Rates) - January 2012
--- Five Myths About Welfare
--- Inequality Facts
--- B.C. poverty reduction plan could reduce costs, advocates argue (The Straight.com) - January 30
--- B.C. welfare payments are adequate, says the Fraser Institute (Vancouver Sun) - January 26
--- Rebuttals to the Jan. 26 Vancouver Sun article (from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, the BC Association of Social workers, a Vancouver pediatrician and the Canadian Social Research Links Guy)

From Raise the Rates:

BC MLA Welfare Challenge Update
http://mlaonwelfare.com/
Tuesday, February 1, after a last night ‘couch surfing’ in Surrey, BC MLA Jagrup Brar ended his month of living on the welfare rate of $610. He lost 26 pounds in weight, ended up $7 in debt and had to sell his backpack to have enough money to take the Skytrain back to his home in Surrey.

Jagrup’s latest blog posts
http://mlaonwelfare.com/jagrups-blog-2/

Jean Swanson of Raise the Rates interviews Jagrup Brar (PDF - 52K, 4 pages)
http://mlaonwelfare.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/interview.pdf

British ColumbiaWelfare Fact Sheet (140K, 12 pages)
http://mlaonwelfare.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/welfarefactsheet1.pdf
PDF file date: January 16, 2012
At the end of May 2011 Raise the Rates launched the ‘MLA Welfare Challenge’. This challenged one or more of BC's MLAs to live on welfare for a month to gain real life experience of living on welfare. For the month of January, 2012, Jagrup Brar (MLA Surrey Fleetwood) will live on the single person’s welfare rate of $610 for everything. Raise the Rates’ experience is that people cannot live a healthy life on welfare. A key part of any poverty reduction strategy, a policy aim that all BC MLAs say they support, is raising welfare. This fact sheet provides information on the position of people on welfare in BC in November 2011.
- twelve pages of BC welfare information including :
* Who Gets Welfare ("In November 2011 a total of 178,128 people in BC live on welfare")
* Recession Hits (impacts of the 2008-2009 recession)
* Welfare Rates and Poverty (average wages, poverty lines and welfare incomes)
* The Maze and Obstacle Course of Welfare (Who can qualify? - Barriers to Welfare and Getting Back to Work)
* Welfare and Housing
* Support Payments and Other Necessities
* Single Parent Families cannot afford to Live or raise Healthy Children
* Welfare Doesn’t cover cost of Living and Housing
* Cost of Food and Living
* Punishing Children (Welfare lone parents not allowed child support from former partners
* Historic Welfare rates since 1980 (BC's welfare rate for a single person in 2012 is $610 monthly; if this amount were adjusted for inflation, the same person would receive $930 monthly)

Five Myths About Welfare
http://mlaonwelfare.com/5-myths-about-welfare/
1. It is easy to get on welfare
2. Life on welfare is easy
3. People on welfare don’t want to work
4. Lots of people are defrauding the system
5. It costs too much to fix poverty

Raise the Rates
Raise the Rates is a coalition of community groups and organisations concerned with the level of poverty and homelessness in British Columbia.
MLA Welfare Challenge was a project of Raise the Rates.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

B.C. poverty reduction plan could reduce costs, advocates argue [dead link]
January 30, 2012
By Yolande Cole
As Surrey-Fleetwood MLA Jagrup Brar completes his 31 days of living on the monthly welfare rate of $610 , advocates are calling for a plan that they argue would cost less than half of what is currently spent on poverty. “Poverty’s costing our province between $8 and $9 billion a year— that’s a conservative estimate,” said Seth Klein, B.C. director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), at a press conference in the Downtown Eastside today (January 30). “The cost of actually fully implementing a bold, comprehensive poverty reduction plan is less than half of that.” (...) According to the CCPA’s calculation, annual costs of poverty in B.C. include $1.2 billion in health care, $745 million in crime costs, and an estimated $6.2 billion in lost productivity.
Source:
The Straight.com - Vancouver's Online Source
http://www.straight.com/

Related links:

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

* British Columbia Office:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc
The CCPA BC Office works with a team of over 60 staff and volunteer researchers to investigate major problems in our province—the high rate of poverty, the extreme concentration of wealth, the serious environmental challenges. But we don’t stop there: we propose real, workable solutions to these problems. Our goal: social, economic and environmental justice.

* National Office:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca
We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour organizations, and social policy groups. We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness. We have 25 Coalition Members and over 350 supporting organizations with a collective membership of over 300,000 that have joined the call for a poverty reduction plan.

Reports and studies about poverty in BC (from various sources)
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/resources/
- links to key reports about the effects of poverty in BC

B.C. welfare payments are adequate
For the most part, they line up with basic needs;
where they don't, for employable singles, there is a reason

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/welfare+payments+adequate/6054331/story.html
January 26, 2012
By Niels Veldhuis, Amela Karabegovic, and Milagros Palacios
The authors are economists with the Fraser Institute - http://www.fraserinstitute.org/

Source:
Vancouver Sun
http://www.vancouversun.com/

---

Rebuttals:

---

From the
BC Office
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc
of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives CCPA:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Congratulations to Jagrup Brar: Time to raise welfare rates
http://www.policynote.ca/congratulations-to-jagrup-brar-time-to-raise-welfare-rates/
February 3, 2012
By Seth Klein
On Tuesday, BC MLA Jagrup Brar wrapped up his month living on a basic welfare income of $610. He has returned to his family and a comfortable home. But we owe him great thanks. And kudos as well to the folks at Raise the Rates, who issued the challenge that MLAs try living on welfare themselves (Brar was the only MLA to accept the challenge), and who organized near daily activities during Brar’s month-long challenge.
(...)
While most of the coverage of Brar’s month was sympathetic, a few negative voices were heard. In particular, the Minister responsible (Stephanie Cadieux) and the Fraser Institute made a number of media interventions in defense of BC’s abysmally low welfare benefit rates. Their comments indicate they truly need to get out of the office more — they simply have no understanding of what life on welfare is actually like.

Among the key points made by the Minister and Fraser economists was that we needn’t worry about the $610 basic rate, because a majority of welfare recipients receive more (either because they have children or a recognized disability), an amount they deem “adequate.” It’s true that most welfare recipients get more than the basic rate, but calling those rates “adequate” is way off the mark.

As the National Council of Welfare notes, those on welfare with children and those with a disability still live thousands of dollars below the poverty line. And extensive research conducted by the CCPA (a study I co-authored called Living on Welfare in BC [see the next link below], which followed real people on welfare over a two year period, rather than just pondering numbers as the Fraser folks have) found that even those in receipt of the higher (supposedly “adequate”) rates were still frequently reliant on food banks and other charities to meet basic needs.

Source:
Policy Note (CCPA)
http://www.policynote.ca/

Related CCPA study:

Living on Welfare in BC:
Experiences of Longer-Term “Expected to Work” Recipients
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/living-welfare-bc
By Seth Klein, Jane Pulkingham, et al
April 22, 2008

---

From the
BC Association of Social workers
http://www.bcasw.org/

---

From Barbara Fitzgerald, Vancouver pediatrician
in the Vancouver Sun:

Hardships of welfare poverty harm children and families [dead link]
February 3, 2012
The economists at the Fraser Institute tell us that welfare payments are adequate. I am not an economist; I am a pediatrician in the inner city. I would like them to see the children I see on a daily basis and tell me that is true. (...) Children on welfare come to school hungry, ill-clothed and tired from sleeping with bed bugs. They are not ready to learn and they are not ready to succeed. If we want to make a difference, if we want the next generation of children to succeed, we will boost welfare rates to allow them to grow up with their families, finish school and seek employment. Let's start thinking about the children.

---

Gilles' two cents' worth:

Just as the broken old mantle clock in our living room is correct twice a day, the folks at the Fraser were bang on when they suggest in their Sun article that the B.C. government "should allow those on welfare to work and keep a certain amount of what they earn without a reduction in their welfare benefits."
Hear, hear!

To that I would add:
SHAME ON YOU, BC GOVERNMENT --- yours is the only jurisdiction in Canada that claws back 100% of any earnings declared by a welfare recipient.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

NDP Proposes Poverty Reduction Strategy While Liberals Continue Failing
http://thelinkpaper.ca/?p=11972
November 26, 2011
VICTORIA – Following First Call’s [ http://www.firstcallbc.org ] 2011 Child Poverty Report Card that shows the Liberal government has failed over half a million British Columbians living in poverty, the New Democrats renewed their call for the province to move forward and support the Poverty Reduction Act . (...) New Democrat critic for social development Shane Simpson reintroduced the Poverty Reduction Act in the Legislature Wednesday, calling on the Liberal government to address the urgent need for a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
The Link - Leading Indo-Canadian Newspaper
http://thelinkpaper.ca/

The text of the bill:

MR. SHANE SIMPSON:
BILL M 209 - 2011
POVERTY REDUCTION ACT, 2011
November 23, 2011
http://www.leg.bc.ca/39th4th/1st_read/m209-1.htm
Source:
Progress of Bills
http://www.leg.bc.ca/39th4th/votes/progress-of-bills.htm

This is the second time around for this Bill.

NDP propose BC Poverty Reduction Act
http://www.policynote.ca/ndp-propose-bc-poverty-reduction-act/
June 2, 2011
Source:
Policy Note
http://www.policynote.ca/
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/ ]

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition --- solely dedicated to the establishment of a provincial poverty plan

Editorial: [Welfare] Assistance rates shame our province
August 30, 2011
(...) Benefit levels are set by the government to ensure a life of desperate poverty. A single disabled person receives up to $375 a month for shelter. (MLAs can claim up to $1,580 a month for a second home in the capital.) Imagine what kind of accommodation is available for that amount in this region, and living in those conditions with terminal cancer.
The government provides $531 a month for all other expenses - food, non-prescription medications, utilities, clothes and everything else. That is, at most, $18 a day. (...) For a parent with one child, the province provides $570 for accommodation and $672 for everything else. (...) Certainly, income assistance rates should encourage people to seek employment. Some might argue that those on welfare are paying the price for bad choices. But people do not choose to become disabled. Children do not choose to be born into poverty. And B.C.'s assistance rates are so inadequate as to be destructive. The rates have been increased once since 1994, in 2007. That is also a mark of government indifference to the plight of some of the province's poorest people.
Source:
Victoria Times-Colonist

Related link:

Raise the Rates
Raise the Rates is a coalition of over 20 organizations from around BC concerned with the level of poverty and homelessness in British Columbia and campaigns for policies that will end poverty.

Lack of action on poverty costs BC $8-$9 billion annually:
study calculates healthcare, justice and productivity costs

News Release
July 14, 2011
(Vancouver) Governments frequently claim that they can’t afford to take action on poverty, but a new study shows that it’s much more costly to allow poverty to continue and pay for the consequences.Poverty is consistently linked to poor health, lower literacy, poor school performance for children, more crime, and greater stress. Now, for the first time, actual dollar figures have been calculated for the cost of poverty to government and society as a whole, including higher public health care costs, increased policing and crime costs, lost productivity, and foregone economic activity.

The Cost of Poverty in BC (PDF - 1.6MB, 45 pages)
By Iglika Ivanova
July 2011
The estimated cost of a comprehensive poverty reduction plan in BC, per year : $3 to $4 billion
The estimated yearly cost of doing nothing : $8.1 to $9.2 billion

 

What is poverty costing us in BC? (YouTube video, duration 3:02)
Study author Iglika Ivanova explains how *not* doing anything about poverty in BC can cost the province over $9 billion a year
[ Links to more CCPA videos on YouTube ]

Source:
BC Office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Co-published with:
* Public Health Association of BC
* Social Planning and Research Council of BC (SPARC).

Poverty Act Introduced in the BC Legislature
June 3, 2011
Yesterday, the official opposition in BC presented a private members anti-poverty Bill for the province. NDP MLA Shane Simpson introduced the “BC Poverty Reduction Act”, which proposes the establishment of poverty targets and measures, and most importantly, government accountability. Within one year, the Act will push the province to reduce the depth and breadth of poverty. It will also appoint a Minister to oversee the plan and produce annual reports on progress. This Bill comes after years of campaigning by social justice groups – including the BC Poverty Reduction Coalition that is solely dedicated to the establishment of a provincial poverty plan.
Source:
Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ)

Thousands of disabled denied legislated benefit, anti-poverty activists charge
By Brennan Clarke
July 5, 2011
Thousands of B.C. disability-assistance recipients are being denied the right to an extra $100 a month for volunteering in the community even though provincial legislation guarantees the benefit to all eligible applicants, a Victoria-based anti-poverty agency says.
Under the B.C. Employment and Assistance Act, welfare recipients who qualify as “persons with disabilities” are entitled to the extra $100 if they perform a minimum of 10 hours of volunteer work a month. Kelly Newhook, executive director of Together Against Poverty Society, said 5,000 people receive the $100 top-up on their benefits, but another 7,000 have applied and are on a waiting list because the province refuses to provide the funds to make the payments. Some applicants have been on the list for two years or more.

[ 27 comments ]

Source:
Globe and Mail

Poverty Plans
By David Schreck
February 22, 2011
In preparation for the BC Liberal leadership vote on February 26, the BC Poverty Reduction Coalition asked each of the five leadership candidates some questions around poverty reduction. On the Coalition website's home page, you'll find a link to those questions, a brief summary of each would-be leader's responses and a link to each of their websites. Pundit David Schreck offers his views (with a special focus on poverty plans) concerning a recent Shaw Cable BC Liberal leadership debate, along with some observations about the poverty reduction initiatives underway in New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador.

Source:
StrategicThoughts.com
This is the personal website of David Schreck - political pundit, former MLA and former Special Advisor to the (NDP) Premier, among other accomplishments.

BC Campaign 2000 : 2010 Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 2.4MB, 22 pages)
BC Campaign 2000 Recommendations:
Campaign 2000 calls on all provinces and the federal government to commit themselves to a 50 percent reduction in poverty among all canadians by 2020. bc supporters of campaign 2000 hope to see a provincial child poverty rate before taxes of seven percent or less by 2020. We are also calling for the appointment of a bc cabinet minister with the authority and responsibility to ensure that a poverty reduction plan is developed and implemented and that the province is on track for achieving its poverty reduction targets and meeting its timelines.

A Time for Leadership in Fighting Child Poverty (PDF - 2 pages)
Media Release
November 24, 2010
Children need the political leaders of British Columbia to step forward and commit themselves to fighting poverty, BC Campaign 2000 said today in its latest annual report on child poverty. (...) The child poverty rate in British Columbia dropped to 14.5 percent in 2008, according to the latest figures published by Statistics Canada. The number of poor children was 121,000 - or about one of every seven BC children. Alarmingly, the poverty rate for children under age six was 19.6%, or one in five young children.

Source:
First Call : BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition
First call is a cross-sectoral, non-partisan coalition of provincial and regional organizations, engaged communities and individuals whose aim is to raise public awareness and mobilize communities around the importance of public policy and social investments that support the well-being of children, youth and families.


NOTE:
This is one of a series of provincial reports all released under the Campaign 2000 banner on November 24 (2010), the anniversary of the 1989 unanimous House of Commons resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000. For links to the complete collection of federal and provincial reports and (selected) related media coverage, go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

---

Media coverage of
the release of the BC report:

Putting a face on poverty
By Mark Hume
November 24, 2010
VANCOUVER
(...) The [child poverty] report, with a focus on the provincial situation, was released by First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition. Relying on 2008 Statistics Canada data, the most recently available, it shows one in ten children nationally live in poverty; in B.C. it is one in seven. The rates are the lowest in a decade, but a spike is expected when the 2009 data is released next spring because of the economic crisis that began in the fall of 2008.
[ 178 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

---

1 in 7 B.C. children live in poverty
NOVEMBER 24, 2010
An anti-poverty group says the recession will likely make B.C. child poverty rates worse.
Source:
Toronto Star

Action needed on child poverty [dead link]
Editorial
June 22, 2010
The political reaction to the latest child poverty statistics was predictably disheartening. The government's public affairs bureau quickly sent out a news release headlined "Child poverty rate continues its decline," which failed to include the fact that B.C. still has the highest child poverty rate in the country. The New Democrats followed with a news release headlined "Reality Check: B.C. ranks highest in Canada for child poverty," which didn't note the province had made progress between 2007 and 2008. Politics as usual. But surely some issues call for a less partisan approach -- from the government side, an acknowledgment that far too many children live in poverty, from the Opposition, a recognition that progress has been made. The situation in B.C. remains grim. About one in 10 B.C. children lived in poverty in 2008. Statistics Canada reported B.C. has had the worst child poverty rate among provinces for seven straight years. And the number of children living in poverty today is almost certainly higher, given the economic downturn. (...)
The most obvious first step is to develop a plan to reduce child poverty, rather than relying on a series of ad hoc measures or hoping broad economic growth will lift families out of poverty. Six other provinces have done that, introducing detailed plans with specific targets, actions and deadlines. They ensure accountability and a co-ordinated effort across government, rather than leaving ministries to act -- or not act -- in isolation.
The B.C. government has refused to take that first step.
Source:
Victoria Times Colonist

Related links:

From the
British Columbia
Ministry of Children and Family Development:

Child Poverty Continues its Decline
Factsheet
June 17, 2010
VICTORIA – Statistics Canada released figures (June 2010) showing that child poverty levels in BC have declined for the fifth year in a row and are now at a nearly 30-year record low for the province:
· Child Poverty in B.C. has declined for the fifth year in a row, according to figures released today by Statistics Canada.
· The most recently-released child poverty rate is 10.4 per cent. That is a 20 per cent decline from 13 per cent the year previous and a 46 per cent drop since 2003.
· The child poverty level (LICO after tax) is now at its lowest level since 1980.
· The child poverty rate in B.C. fell by 46 per cent between 2003 and 2008.
· Provincially, the median after tax income for families for two or more people rose 5.7 per cent in B.C.

Poverty ideas abound --- will is the issue [dead link]
By Les Leyne
May 27, 2010
Expectations rose so high so fast after a legislature committee agreed to hold a public meeting on poverty that the chair felt the need to dampen the anticipation. Liberal MLA Joan McIntyre told participants at a day-long thinkfest last Friday that the session was just to foster awareness. "I wanted to also clarify that developing a strategy or even providing a written analysis does go beyond our terms of reference and crosses over into the realm of government policy-making," she said.
(...)
Steve Kerstetter, a researcher for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, told MLAs: "If the goal is to redirect other money to fight poverty, it's just not going to work. There's just not enough money you can redirect that's going to make a difference." By one estimate, there's a $2-billion poverty gap that needs to be filled by society as a whole, he said. And government redistribution just won't get it done.
Source:
Victoria Times-Colonist

Twenty Years Later - A Second Look (PDF - 15K, 2 pages)
January 11, 2010
This is the first in a series of monthly reports by First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition on child poverty in British Columbia. The series is a continuing call to the BC government to start getting serious about fighting child and family poverty. The provincial government has spent the last several years trying to explain away the poverty statistics.
The latest shots came on November 24 on the government web site:
[ http://www.gov.bc.ca/fortherecord/childpoverty/cp_poverty.html ]
None of the figures were incorrect, but they gave the misleading impression that BC is a leader in fighting poverty.
The technique is what statisticians call “cherry picking,” using selected figures that seem to reinforce the argument you’re trying to make...
Source:
First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition
First Call is a cross-sectoral, non-partisan coalition of provincial and regional organizations, engaged communities and individuals whose aim is to raise public awareness and mobilize communities around the importance of public policy and social investments that support the well-being of children, youth and families.
First Call grew out of the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. When Canada ratified that Convention in 1991, its advocates gathered in a National Conference and agreed that it is time to give children a first call on our resources and on our advocacy efforts. The BC representatives were drawn from a variety of sectors: education, health, justice, social services, and others.

Related links:

British Columbia Report Card on Child and Family Poverty (PDF - 886K, 23 pages)
November 2009
- includes nine fact sheets that analyze various aspects of child poverty in BC. and Measures of Poverty (Appendix)
Source:
First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition

Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000. Campaign 2000 began in 1991 out of concern about the lack of government progress in addressing child poverty. Campaign 2000 is non-partisan in urging all Canadian elected officials to keep their promise to Canada's children.

---

British Columbia Report Card on Child and Family Poverty (PDF - 886K, 23 pages)
November 2009
The BC Child Poverty Report Card includes nine fact sheets that analyze various aspects of child poverty in BC.:
1. BC Had the Worst Record – Six Years in a Row
2. Child Poverty Over the Years
3. Child Poverty by Family Type
4. Persistence of Poverty
5. Child Poverty and Working Parents
6. Families with Children on Welfare
7. I ncomes of Families with Children
8. Child Poverty and the Importance of Government Help
9. What Needs to Happen
Melanie’s Story – The Human Face of Child Poverty
Appendix : Measures of Poverty
Source:
First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition
Relate link:
Campaign 2000

BC Child poverty rate still the worst in Canada:
when will the provincial government take action?
(PDF - 79K, 2 pages)
News Release
November 24, 2009
For six years in a row, British Columbia has had the highest child poverty rate in Canada tied only with Manitoba in 2007. Figures released today by First Call, the BC partner in Campaign 2000, show BC at a rate of 18.8 percent of children living in poverty in 2007. The Canadian average in that same year was 15 percent.



May 25, 2009
From the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

British Columbia:
The Best Place on Earth? Contemporary and Historical Perspectives
on Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in British Columbia
(PDF - 410K, 38 pages)
By Scott Graham, Jill Atkey, Crystal Reeves, and Michael Goldberg

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership

 

From the BC Office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

The Time is Now
A Poverty Reduction Plan for BC
(video slideshow) [dead link]
by Goh Iromoto, Shannon Daub & Seth Klein
March 27, 2009

Poverty Amid Plenty:
A Slideshow About Welfare in BC
(video slideshow) [dead link]
by Goh Iromoto, Shannon Daub & Seth Klein
March 27, 2009

Source:
BC Office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (BC-CCPA)
[ CCPA National Office ]

A Poverty Reduction Plan for BC
December 2008
Complete report (PDF File, 752K, 65 pages)
Summary (PDF - 711K, 12 pages)

"(...) Five provinces in Canada have either adopted poverty-reduction plans, or are in the process of developing them. With the highest poverty rates in Canada, now is the time for BC to set clear goals, with concrete targets and a system of transparency. That way, the public can measure the results, even when the government changes hands."

Related links:

Poverty reduction commitment needed from all BC political parties
Concrete plan more important than ever in economic downturn: report

Press Release
December 11, 2008
VANCOUVER - As the provincial election draws closer, a new report calls on BC’s political parties to commit to legislated targets and timelines to dramatically reduce poverty and homelessness. British Columbia has the highest poverty rate in Canada, and has had the highest child poverty rate for five years running, despite years of strong economic growth and record low unemployment.

BC Poverty Poll Results: British Columbians Want Action (PDF - 63K, 1 page)
December 11, 2008
"(...) Over 90 per cent of British Columbians believe that, if other counties can reduce poverty, so can Canada"

Source:
CCPA BC Office
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - CCPA]

Related link:

Premier says B.C. making progress but still has 'long way to go' on helping children in need
December 27, 2008
VICTORIA, B.C. — B.C. Premier Gordon Campbell says social groups and the Opposition New Democrats may not believe it, but helping the province's children is his top political priority. In a year-end interview with The Canadian Press, Campbell said his Liberal government can do better when it comes to helping children, but its main focus is on giving programs time to develop and take root. British Columbia has consistently ranked near the bottom in Canada when it comes to child poverty levels, despite having one of the strongest economies in the country. (...) Recently, the left-leaning B.C. Centre for Policy Alternatives released a study (see "Related link", below) that concluded one in six children in British Columbia lives in poverty. The report called for a 50 per cent increase in welfare rates, a jump in the minimum wage, more social housing and a universal child-care plan.
Source:
Canadian Press

Northwest Territories

New from
NWT Health and Social Services:

Northwest Territories Anti-Poverty Action Plan Released
http://www.yhssa.org/news/news-release-anti-poverty-action-plan-released
News Release
February 11, 2014
The Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) Anti-Poverty Action Plan, tabled yesterday in the Legislative Assembly, describes the commitments the GNWT has made to address the needs of those NWT residents most vulnerable and those at risk of falling into poverty. The Action Plan identifies investments of $2.6 million and outlines actions the GNWT is taking now, or is committed to take, to address poverty, including supporting day shelter programs in Yellowknife and Inuvik, building new housing in small communities and providing nutritious food directly to children and youth through established programs.

Report : Government of the Northwest Territories Anti-Poverty Action Plan
February 2014
Complete report (PDF - 936K, 11 pages):
http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/gnwt-anti-poverty-action-plan.pdf
Summary (PDF - 432K, 3 pages)
http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/gnwt-anti-poverty-action-plan-summary.pdf

Related earlier reports:

Building on the Strengths of Northerners:
A Strategic Framework toward the Elimination of Poverty in the NWT
(PDF - 3.8MB, 48 pages)
http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/anti-poverty_report.pdf
June 2013
Building on the Strengths of Northerners is a strategic policy framework, the first step in a long-term plan to eliminate poverty in the NWT. It provides an overview of what we are doing now and what we need to do in the future to realize our vision of a poverty-free NWT.

Three Ways Poverty Costs Us:
1. Direct costs : Social programs such as income support and services for people living in poverty.
2. Indirect costs : The burden of poverty is felt in emergency wards, law enforcement, the criminal justice system and other public services.
3, Social costs : Lost potential, poor health, diminished contribution to community life.

---

Summary of the NWT Anti-Poverty Strategic Framework (PDF - 3.2MB, 24 pages)
http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/anti-poverty_summary.pdf
November 2013

---

A Charter for Working Together Toward the Elimination of Poverty in the NWT (PDF - 400K, 4 pages)
http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/anti-poverty_accord.pdf
November 29, 2013

Source:
Health and Social Services

http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/
Government of the Northwest Territories


May 25, 2009
New resource from the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Northwest Territories:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in the Northwest Territories
(PDF - 333K, 27 pages)
By Jeffrey Wilson, Alternatives North

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership

From the
Government of the Northwest Territories:

Poverty in the Northwest Territories
Premier Floyd K. Roland
May 19, 2010
16th Legislative Assembly
"Mr. Speaker, in February this House passed a motion calling on the government to develop a comprehensive anti-poverty strategy for the Northwest Territories. This motion also noted the need to work with key stakeholders, to develop a definition of poverty, and to include measureable targets and mechanisms for cross-departmental coordination. (...) Mr. Speaker, we are prepared to undertake the work required to develop an overarching discussion paper that would address issues of defining and measuring progress on poverty, summarize current programs and strategic direction related to reducing poverty, and identify areas for further action."

Northwest Territories Supplementary Health Benefits
Hon. Sandy Lee
Wednesday, March 24, 2010
16th Legislative Assembly
"Mr. Speaker as we begin our public meetings on Supplementary Health Benefits, I would like to take this opportunity to reiterate the substance of the changes being proposed. (...) During last Session, Members of this House passed a unanimous motion calling on the Government to come up with an Anti-Poverty Strategy. The changes being proposed under Supplementary Health Benefits are a step forward in poverty reduction and addressing the cost of living issue in our Territory."

Earlier Income Security Reforms:

--- Community Voices - April 2006 (PDF - 930.81 K)

--- Breaking Down the Barriers - July 2007 (PDF - 1.26 MB)

--- News Release - Income Security Reform - August 2007 (PDF - 18.88 K)

--- Backgrounder – Income Security Changes - August 2007 (PDF - 54.4 K)

--- Backgrounder – Income Assistance Changes - August 2007 (PDF - 224.89 K)

--- Income Security Review Changes 2007-2008 - Q&A - August 2007(PDF - 69.31 K)

Yukon


Yukon Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy
- incl. links to : Updates | Links | About Us | Contact | Newsletters | Forum | Symposium 2010 Videos
"(...) From increasing social assistance rates by over 25 per cent, doubling and indexing the Yukon Seniors Income Supplement, increasing and indexing the Pioneer Utility Grant, increasing Child Care Subsidies, increasing the Yukon Child Benefit, constructing a residence for Single Parents—each and every day that promise is renewed—a promise which ultimately is about ending poverty and social exclusion."
[Excerpt from the Minister's Message]
The Yukon Department of Health and Social Services established the Office of Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction (link contains contact info only) in order to guide the development, implementation and on-going management of YG's Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy. Working in partnership with other YG departments, the Business and NGO Community, the Office serves as YG's central resource and lead on issues related to social inclusion and poverty reduction.
Source:
Yukon Department of Health and Social Services

---

Yukon Anti-Poverty Coalition (YAPC)
The Yukon Anti-Poverty Coalition facilitates the elimination of poverty in the Yukon through awareness, advocacy and action. Our members are an action-based team who partner with other community members on issues involving food, shelter and access to services.
- incl. links to : News and Events * About Us * Make a Difference * Contact Us

YAPC NEWS - links to over dozens of related articles from YAPC

Yukon Territory unveils poverty-fighting plan
http://www.yukon-news.com/news/31457/
December 12, 2012
By Josh Kerr

The Yukon government released its long-awaited social inclusion strategy Monday.
The poverty-reduction strategy includes six key principles to guide government policy decisions and help poor and socially-isolated Yukoners access services, said Health Minister Doug Graham.
(...)
In the report, the government touts many of the things it has done to promote social inclusion and reduce poverty, like the 10 new long-term care beds in the Thomson Centre and the development of a Yukon literacy strategy. However, there were no new projects or money announced on Monday.

Source:
Yukon News

http://www.yukon-news.com/

---

The official strategy from the
Government of Yukon:

A Better Yukon for All:
Government of Yukon's Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy
(PDF - 1.9MB, 44 pages)
http://www.abetteryukon.ca//files/social_inclusion_strategy.pdf
December 2012
Contents (partial list):
Part 1: Executive Summary
Part 2: Introduction
Part 3: Developing the strategy
Part 4: Research
Part 5: Goals, Objectives and Initiatives
--- Goal: Improve Access to Services
--- Goal: Reduce Inequities
--- Goal: Strengthen Community Vitality
Part 6: Measuring Success
Part 7: Moving Forward
Appendix A: Social Inclusion Indicators
Appendix B: Yukon Snapshot

---

Related links:

Yukon Government Releases Poverty Reduction Strategy
http://www.gov.yk.ca/news/12-245.html
December 10, 2012
News Release
WHITEHORSE—A strategy to change how government does business to support social inclusion and poverty reduction was released today by Health and Social Services Minister Doug Graham. (...) The strategy, A Better Yukon for All, the Government of Yukon’s Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy, includes a number of concrete initiatives that will improve the lives of Yukon’s vulnerable populations, including the expansion of the Dawson City women’s shelter and the Downtown Outreach Clinic in Whitehorse, which provides home care services to homeless people.

Source:
Yukon Health and Social Services
http://www.hss.gov.yk.ca/

---

Minister Graham Interviewed by CBC Radio About Strategy's Release (video, duration 5:33)
http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/ID/2314429138/

---

Yukon Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy
http://www.abetteryukon.ca//
- incl. links to : Updates | Links | About Us | Contact | Newsletters | Forum | Symposium 2010 Videos
"(...) From increasing social assistance rates by over 25 per cent, doubling and indexing the Yukon Seniors Income Supplement, increasing and indexing the Pioneer Utility Grant, increasing Child Care Subsidies, increasing the Yukon Child Benefit, constructing a residence for Single Parents—each and every day that promise is renewed—a promise which ultimately is about ending poverty and social exclusion."
[Excerpt from the Minister's Message ]
The Yukon Department of Health and Social Services established the Office of Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction [ http://www.abetteryukon.ca/contact.php ] in order to guide the development, implementation and on-going management of YG's Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy. Working in partnership with other YG departments, the Business and NGO Community, the Office serves as YG's central resource and lead on issues related to social inclusion and poverty reduction.

Source:
Yukon Health and Social Services

http://www.hss.gov.yk.ca/

---

Poverty Amongst Plenty:
Waiting for the Yukon Government to Adopt a Poverty Reduction Strategy
(PDF - 5.2MB, 45 pages)
http://www.homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Final_Yukon_22052012_0.pdf
By Nick Falvo
May 24, 2012
Abstract:
Poverty is bad for the economy, leads to higher health care costs and takes a serious toll on human lives. Most Canadian jurisdictions have developed poverty reduction strategies in the past decade, but Yukon has not. This policy report will provide an overview of poverty indicators in Yukon. It will discuss child apprehensions, housing, land development and homelessness. The report will then provide an overview of the Yukon Child Benefit, social assistance and Yukon seniors’ benefits. This will be followed by a consideration of education, literacy, early child education, child care and at-risk youth. Yukon’s fiscal situation will then be discussed, followed by a look at initial steps taken by the Yukon Government towards the development of a poverty reduction strategy. The report concludes with five recommendations for the Yukon Government.

Executive Summary (PDF - 1.3MB, 3 pages)
http://www.homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Yukon_execsummary_0.pdf
http://homelesshub.ca/ResourceFiles/Yukon_execsummary.pdf

---

Poverty Amongst Plenty:
Waiting for the Yukon Government to Adopt a Poverty Reduction Strategy

http://goo.gl/4hMqn
May 17, 2012
On May 24, Nick Falvo, a doctoral candidate at Carleton University’s School of Public Policy and Administration, will deliver the report, Poverty Amongst Plenty: Waiting for the Yukon Government to Adopt a Poverty Reduction Strategy, in Whitehorse. The report examines how the Yukon government helps the poor and makes recommendations for change. The study touches on important issues of health, strategy, food, shelter, child care, education and relations with the federal government.
[Click the link above for more information on the location and time of this presentation.]

Video (duration 2:14):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ilOdLcosKc
Nick Falvo speaks about poverty in Yukon and the need for a poverty reduction strategy.

---

Social inclusion and poverty reduction reports released
News Release
December 22, 2010
WHITEHORSE – The Yukon government today released two reports: the Whitehorse Housing Adequacy Study and the Dimensions of Social Inclusion and Social Exclusion in Yukon 2010 report, as part of the creation of the Yukon Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy. 

The 2010 Whitehorse Housing Adequacy Study (PDF - 611K, 88 pages) was designed to address a long-standing need for statistical information on homelessness and housing challenges in the Whitehorse area. While it is not intended to be representative of the whole Whitehorse population, it provides a snapshot of a vulnerable sub-population during a specific time period. (...) The survey was created by the Department of Health and Social Services in partnership with the Yukon Bureau of Statistics and the Yukon Anti-Poverty Coalition. (...)

Dimensions of Social Inclusion and Social Exclusion in Yukon 2010 (PDF - 1.3MB, 216 pages) is a rich compilation of data using social indicators such as personal and community assets, access to necessities and participation in society. These documents are the foundation that will provide the information and evidence needed to develop the strategy.

Source:
Yukon Health and Social Services

---

April 8, 2010

Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Symposium 2010 - Symposium videos (YouTube)
Thirty-six videos, most of which are 8-9 minutes in duration, cover the Symposium held by Yukon Health and Social Services on April 8, 2010.
- includes presentations by Hugh Segal and Audrey McLaughlin, among others, and discussion panels that accompanied each speaker.
Topics covered in the videos include:
* Opening of Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction symposium
* Making poverty eradication job number 1: why it matters (excellent presentation by Hugh Segal)
* Personal story on poverty
* Personal look at barriers

---

A social inclusion symposium to discuss reduction of poverty
News Release
March 23, 2010
WHITEHORSE – Senator Hugh Segal will be one of the keynote speakers at an April 9 symposium where interested Yukoners will gather to discuss reduction of poverty and social inclusion in Yukon. The symposium is the first of two, planned by the Office of Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction, which was established by Health and Social Services Minister Glenn Hart last October. It follows a day of workshops in which frontline government and non-government workers who help Yukoners, join members of the public to discuss how to improve access to government services, and break down the barriers preventing some Yukoners from fully participating in Yukon society. (...) The symposium is one tool the Office of Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction will use in reaching its goal of creating a Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy by March 31, 2011. A follow-up symposium is slated for fall 2010.

---

Social Inclusion Strategy to Address Poverty Issues
News Release
October 14, 2009
WHITEHORSE – Health and Social Services Minister Glenn Hart announced today the development of a social inclusion strategy for the territory. “A social inclusion strategy is a significant advancement in social policy in Yukon. Social inclusion ensures that services target those in need and are accessible for all members of society,” Hart said. “Social inclusion is a measure of any government on how it deals with those citizens in need of support.”
(...) There will be four phases in developing the strategy:
• Creating a collaborative process.
• Collecting data and consulting.
• Developing a strategy to address priorities from the data and consultations.
• Reviewing and reporting annually.
Source:
Yukon Health and Social Services

---


May 25, 2009
New resource from the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Yukon:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in the Yukon
(PDF - 1.7MB, 33 pages)
By Natalie Edelson

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership

-------------------------------------------------

Government to end poverty through collaboration
October 16, 2009
Wednesday was a red letter day for the Yukon Anti-Poverty Coalition.
That’s when the Yukon Party government announced that it would be creating a Yukon Social Inclusion Strategy. The concept is very similar to the anti-poverty strategy that the coalition has been championing since 2002.

-------------------------------------------------

Yukon Legislative Assembly
Motion #438 Mr. Cardiff
:
May 1, 2008
" THAT this House urges the Yukon Government and the Government of Canada to address
the widening gap between rich and poor through arrange of measures including progressive
tax changes, introduction of an Annual Guaranteed Income, and creation of a comprehensive
Anti-Poverty Strategy."
Source:
Page 28,
Motions Other than Government Motions
Yukon Legislative Assembly
(First Session, 32nd Legislative Assembly) [dead link]

Nunavut



May 25, 2009
New resource from the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Nunavut
Understanding Poverty in Nunavut
(PDF - 1.7MB, 77 pages)
By Impact Economics
August 2012

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership

Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat [dead link]
The Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat, in partnership with the Nunavut Roundtable for Poverty Reduction, is responsible for developing and implementing The Makimaniq Plan: A Shared Approach to Poverty Reduction through public engagement; and for overseeing the implementation of comprehensive community initiatives to address poverty.

The Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat is part of the
Department of Economic Development & Transportation [dead link]

--------

Nunavut Roundtable for Poverty Reduction:
http://www.makiliqta.ca/
The Makimaniq Plan was created by individuals, community organizations, Inuit organizations, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., and the Government of Nunavut.
Its development involved four stages of activity:
1. Community Dialogues on Poverty Reduction (Winter 2011)
2. Regional Roundtables for Poverty Reduction (May to June 2011)
3. Poverty Summit (November 2011)
4. Taking Action!

--------------------------------------------------

Welfare plays too big a role in Nunavut’s income security system: report
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674welfare_plays_for_too_prominent_a_role_in_nunavuts_income_security_sys/
December 11, 2013
A report on poverty in Nunavut suggests the territory must gradually wean its residents off social assistance, and at the same time beef up income programs and child tax benefits to eventually replace welfare with a new concept called “basic income.” Those recommendations come from a November report [see link below] prepared by the Caledon Institute of Social Policy, commissioned by Nunavut’s Anti-Poverty Secretariat to look at the Nunavut social policies aimed at low-income people. The good news, according to the report, is that Nunavut already has a range of income security programs in place. The bad news: too many Nunavummiut rely on it.

Source:
Nunatsiaq Online
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/
TIP : For more coverage by Nunatsiaq Online about welfare and poverty,
go to the home page and enter the word poverty or welfare in the Search box on that page.

-----------------------------------------------

From the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Poverty and Prosperity in Nunavut (PDF - 196K, 58 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1027ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
November 2013
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy was engaged by the Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat, which provides oversight and leadership to support the Nunavut Roundtable for Poverty Reduction in the implementation of Nunavut’s poverty reduction strategy. We were asked to comment on Nunavut’s social safety net and to consider a ‘made-in-Nunavut’ social policy inspired by Nunavut’s unique history and values, and geared to its social, demographic, economic and political characteristics. This paper is intended to launch an exchange of ideas on a new social vision for Nunavut. Our emphasis is on reforming Nunavut’s income security system, one of the principal objectives of Nunavut’s poverty reduction strategy.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

--------------------------------------------------

Nunavut to move on welfare reform, child-rearing, healing
Five-year poverty reduction plan to be unveiled this fall
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nunavut_to_move_on_welfare_reform_child-rearing_healing/
June 13, 2013
After a three-day consultation meeting in Iqaluit, Nunavut officials declared June 12 that a five-year poverty reduction plan for the territory will focus on three big items: healing and well-being, child development and parenting skills, and a “progressive” change within the income support system. The Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. will unveil that plan in the fall of this year and aim to start carrying it out in 2014.

Source:
Nunatsiaq Online
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/

--------------------------------------------

Qikiqtani Regional Gathering Report:
Implementing The Makimaniq Plan
(PDF - 1.3MB, 21 pages)
http://makiliqta.ca/sites/default/files/qik_report_final.pdf
September 20, 2012
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
* ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
* IMPLEMENTING THE MAKIMANIQ PLAN
* FEATURED EXPERIENCE: TUKISIGIARVIK SOCIETY
* MANAGING INFORMATION: HOW ARE WE COMMUNICATING?
--- Involving our Elders
--- Internet and Inter-agency committees
--- Youth
* NEXT STEPS
--- Promoting The Makimaniq Plan in our communities
* PARTICIPANTS

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Nunavut
Poverty Reduction Action Plan:

The Makimaniq Plan: A Shared Approach to Poverty Reduction (PDF - 528K, 12 pages)
http://www.makiliqta.ca/sites/default/files/the_makimaniq_plan_final_eng_20.12.11.pdf
Poverty Summit
November 30, 2011
Iqaluit, Nunavut

NOTE : The Makimaniq Plan was actually announced at the close of Nunavut’s first territory-wide poverty summit on December 1, 2011. However, the Poverty Reduction Action Plan itself was made public on Feb. 24, 2012. The Dec. 1 article from Nunatsiaq Online (below) offers some contextual information.

December 1, 2011
Nunavut poverty summit produces “a shared approach to poverty reduction:”
But Makimaniq action plan isn't public yet
(dead link)
Nunavut’s first territory-wide poverty summit [ http://goo.gl/XEfac ] wrapped up in Iqaluit Nov. 30, delivering a vision to cut poverty with the help of all Nunavummiut. The Poverty Reduction Action Plan produced by the summit is still a few weeks away from release, although the plan has a name – Makimaniq, Inuktitut for "empowerment.” (...) The 45 participants at the three-day summit finalized a draft of the plan Nov. 30, which summit hosts says must first be approved before it goes public. But Aariak’s government has already committed to meet certain objectives by the end of its mandate in 2013...

Source:
Nunatsiaq Online
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/

Related link:

Memo to the Prime Minister: Overcoming Poverty in Nunavut
http://goo.gl/ZY3Vv
February 27, 2012
By Don Lenihan
(...) In 2009, a major review of the government’s performance surveyed 2,100 people from 25 communities and found that: "Often people described governance in Nunavut as a vision not yet realized and, at times, a vision derailed. Without doubt, the expectations most people had of Nunavut at its inception have not yet been met." Premier Eva Aariak has staked her government’s credibility on turning this around. A major step was the Poverty Reduction Process [ http://www.makiliqta.ca/ ], a year-long initiative that directly engaged some 800 people in 22 communities across the territory.
(...) In Nunavut, life expectancy is 10 years below the national average for men and 12 years for women. Infant mortality rates are two and a half times the national average. Unemployment is chronic. People live in over-crowded, public housing. Nunavut has, by far, the highest suicide rate in the country, sometimes reaching nine times the national average. Only a few years ago, the suicide rate for Inuit youth was 11 times the national average.

Source:
iPolitics

http://www.ipolitics.ca/


From the
Nunavut Roundtable for Poverty Reduction:
http://www.makiliqta.ca/

Nunavut Poverty Summit Produces
Broad Agreement on Plan of Action
(PDF - 160K, 2 pages)
http://www.makiliqta.ca/uploads/newsrelease/2011-60-C-Communique-Poverty-Summit_Eng.pdf
November 30, 2011
Communiqué
IQALUIT, Nunavut — Nunavut Premier Eva Aariak and Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. Vice-President Jack Anawak today announced The Makimaniq Plan: A Shared Approach to Poverty Reduction. The plan outlines a common agenda for poverty reduction in Nunavut, developed by the 45 participants in the territory’s first poverty summit.

---

According to Rob Rainer,
Executive Director of
Canada Without Poverty:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

When the plan is public and under implementation, Nunavut will be the seventh of the provinces and territories to at least have made a start with a more comprehensive approach on poverty, following (in order) QC (2004), NL (2006), NS (2008), ON (2008), NB (2009) and MB (2009). (Like MB, NB and ON, Nunavut also intends to enshrine its commitment for action within legislation.) While these plans vary enormously in breadth, depth, delivery and impact, their existence at the least reflects public awareness/concern about poverty and political recognition of the need for something better than a piecemeal approach. Continued civil society pressure on senior governments to address poverty and be better accountable for results will be needed.
(January 5, 2012)

May 5, 2011
Government of Nunavut Announces Poverty Reduction Initiatives [dead link]
IQALUIT, Nunavut (May 9, 2011) – The Government of Nunavut’s commitment to support Nunavummiut in the fight against poverty continues with the announcement of several new initiatives --- enhancements to the Community Breakfast Program and Parenting Support Programming, increases to the Social Assistance Program’s food and clothing allowances, and a new Country Food Distribution Program to improve the availability of country food in communities.
Source:
Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat [dead link]
The Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat, part of the Nunavut Department of Economic Development & Transportation, is responsible for developing and implementing Nunavut’s Poverty Reduction Action Plan through public engagement, and for overseeing the implementation of comprehensive community initiatives to address poverty.
Source:
Department of Economic Development & Transportation
[dead link]

Govt. of Nunavut, Inuit orgs launch Nunavut anti-poverty effort
Government, NTI, business, non-profits to work together
October 18, 2010
By Chris Windeyer
The Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. announced Oct. 18 the launch of a massive, Nunavut-wide “public engagement process” they hope will culminate in the creation of the territory’s first anti-poverty strategy. The process will include government, Inuit organizations, business groups, municipalities, the non-profit sector and Nunavummiut. The strategy is expected within a year.
Source:
Nunatsiaq Online

---

Towards a poverty reduction strategy for Nunavut - YouTube video (Duration: 9.5 minutes)
Presentation by Economic Development Minister Peter Taptuna
October 18, 2010

Government of Nunavut, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.,
call on Nunavummiut to help reduce poverty

News Release
October 18, 2010
IQALUIT, Nunavut – The Honourable Eva Aariak, Premier of Nunavut, and James Eetoolook, Acting President, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., today announced they have joined forces to combat poverty in Nunavut. They are inviting all Nunavummiut to get involved. (...) The poverty reduction strategy will be completed by the end of 2011. It will be prepared in three stages: a community dialogue in every community; regional roundtables; and, a final poverty summit in Iqaluit. The result will be the preparation and implementation of a poverty reduction strategy for Nunavut.

Nunavut unveils 'prudent' $1.3B budget (dead link)
March 8, 2010
Nunavut Finance Minister Keith Peterson has tabled a budget that aims to balance the territory's books. (...) The budget's expenditures top $1.3 billion, with only a two per cent increase in spending. Some of the new spending proposals include:
...
... $500,000 towards developing a poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
CBC North

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