Canadian Social Research Links

Education

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

L'éducation

Updated November 20, 2016
Page révisée le 20 novembre 2016


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NOTE: this page is arranged in reverse chronological order, for the most part...

Taylor Mali: What teachers make (video, duration 3:02)
Ever heard the phrase "Those who can't do, teach"? At the Bowery Poetry Club, slam poet Taylor Mali begs to differ, and delivers a powerful, three-minute response on behalf of educators everywhere.
Source:
TED - Ideas worth spreading [Technology, Entertainment, Design]

From Statistics Canada:

November 18, 2016
Elementary–Secondary Education Survey for Canada, the provinces and territories, 2014/2015
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/161118/dq161118d-eng.htm
Just over 5 million students in Canada were enrolled in public elementary and secondary school programs in 2014/2015. Close to 350,000 students graduated from public high schools in the 2014/2015 school year.
Enrolments in French immersion programs reached more than 400,000, up 4.5% compared with 2013/2014.
*** Number of public school students stays stable
*** Enrolments in French immersion programs continue to rise
*** Enrolments in French immersion programs totalled 409,893 in 2014/2015, up 4.5%
*** Number of public school graduates declines

May 3, 2016
Elementary and secondary education expenditures, 2013/2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/160503/dq160503b-eng.htm
Data for 2013/2014 are now available for elementary and secondary education expenditures by type and by direct source. The objective of this annual release is to disseminate financial information on elementary and secondary education in Canada. These financial statistics are collected for each province and territory and are converted to a standard classification of financial accounts and to a fiscal year.

Education at a glance 2015: OECD indicators
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/15/12/education-glance-2015-oecd-indicators
9 Dec 2015 | Europe
The 2015 edition of Education at a glance has been released by the OECD. The report notes that while progress has been made to tackle inequalities in education, these inequalities still persist with serious consequences for labour markets and economies. Of note, the report finds that in a majority of OECD countries, education now begins for most children well before they are 5 years old. Some 74% of 3-year-olds are enrolled in early childhood education across OECD countries; among OECD countries that are part of the European Union, 80% of 3-year-olds are enrolled. It is also interesting to note that Canadian data is lacking in a number of areas.

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

From Statistics Canada:

October 26, 2015
Education Indicators in Canada, October 2015

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/151026/dq151026g-eng.htm
This report presents education indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

March 25, 2015
Education Indicators in Canada, 2014/2015

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150325/dq150325e-eng.htm
The publication Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program is now available. This report presents education indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

December 17, 2014
13 jurisdictions, one perspective
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/eng/blog-blogue/cs-sc/13j
StatCan Blog
December 17, 2014
How do you consolidate data from 13 different jurisdictions and produce a national educational profile that supports international comparison?

Related link:

Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective 2014
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?objId=81-604-X&objType=2&lang=en&limit=0

---

November 21, 2014
Elementary–Secondary Education Survey for Canada, the provinces and territories, 2012/2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141121/dq141121b-eng.htm
Just over 5 million students were enrolled in elementary and secondary public school programs in Canada during the 2012/2013 school year, virtually unchanged from the previous year. From 2008/2009 to 2012/2013, the number of Canadian students enrolled in an elementary or secondary public school decreased annually, with a total reduction of 1.1% over the five-year period.

---

January 7, 2014
Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective, 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140107/dq140107b-eng.htm
Almost 9 out of 10 people (89%) aged 25 to 64 had completed at least high school in 2011 in Canada, substantially higher than the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) average of 75%. Among reporting countries, only the Czech Republic (92%) and the Slovak Republic (91%) posted higher proportions.

---

January 7, 2014
Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective, 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140107/dq140107b-eng.htm
Almost 9 out of 10 people (89%) aged 25 to 64 had completed at least high school in 2011 in Canada, substantially higher than the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) average of 75%. Among reporting countries, only the Czech Republic (92%) and the Slovak Republic (91%) posted higher proportions.

---

December 16, 2013
Financial information of community colleges and vocational schools, 2011/2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131216/dq131216f-eng.htm
Data for the 2011/2012 academic year from the Financial Information of Community Colleges and Vocational Schools Survey are now available. The survey provides financial information (income and expenditures) on all community colleges and public vocational schools in Canada.

---

Programme for International Student Assessment, 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131203/dq131203e-eng.htm
December 3, 2013
Canadian data from the Programme for International Student Assessment are now available for 2012.

An international public use microdata file, which includes data for all participating Programme for International Student Assessment countries, is available on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) website [ http://www.oecd.org/pisa/ ] . The International Report published by the OECD is also available on the OECD website. A Pan-Canadian report is also available on the website of the Council of Ministers of Education
[ http://www.cmec.ca/ ] in Canada.

About PISA
http://www.oecd.org/pisa/aboutpisa/
The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a triennial international survey which aims to evaluate education systems worldwide by testing the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students

Related subjects:

Education, training and learning
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=1821&id=1821&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Students
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=1821&id=1756&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

August 27, 2013
Harper Government Providing Families With Back-to-School Tax Relief
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n13/13-107-eng.asp
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, and the Honourable Kerry-Lynne D. Findlay, Minister of National Revenue, marked the start of the back-to-school season by highlighting tax relief that is helping Canadian families save more of their hard-earned money.
(...)
Examples of this tax relief include:
* Children’s Fitness Tax Credit: * Children’s Arts Tax Credit * Public Transit Tax Credit * Tuition, Education and Textbook Tax Credits * Tax Exemption for Scholarships, Fellowships and Bursaries * Student Loan Interest Tax Credit * Registered Education Savings Plan.
[Click the link above for access to information about each of these examples.]

Source:
Finance Canada
http://www.fin.gc.ca/

---

For more information on the benefits available for families and students, please visit the
Canada Revenue Agency’s
Child and Family Benefits web page:

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/bnfts/menu-eng.html
... and its Students web page:
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/students/

Source:
Canada Revenue Agency

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/

From
Statistics Canada :

June 2013
Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program, May 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-582-x/81-582-x2013001-eng.htm
The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) provides a statistical portrait of the elementary, secondary and postsecondary education systems through the following products:

Tables
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-582-x/2013001/t-c-g-eng.htm
– These tables update or add to those published in previous issues of Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program.

Fact sheets
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=81-599-X&chropg=1&lang=eng
– This series provides an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarizes key data trends in selected tables.

An International Perspective
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=81-604-X
– This annual report combines international statistics from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) with comparable provincial and territorial figures. The first report was published in September 2009.

Handbook for the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=81-582-g&lang=eng
– This handbook provides brief, general descriptions of the data sources and methodology behind the indicators.

June 18, 2013
2011 National Household Survey announcement: Education and Labour
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130618/dq130618f-eng.htm
On Wednesday, June 26, 2013, Statistics Canada will release the second set of data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The release focuses on education, labour, place of work and language of work. It also features two analytical reports.

The first report will provide a descriptive profile of education in Canada including level of educational attainment, field of study and location of study. The report will examine post-secondary educational achievement across a spectrum of variables such as gender, age and geography.

The second report will provide a descriptive portrait of the Canadian labour force. It will feature an industry profile, the most common occupations for men and women, as well as an overview of employment by level of educational attainment. The report will briefly touch on workers aged 55 and over and interprovincial mobility.

Three companion reports will also be available. They will analyze the educational attainment of Aboriginal peoples, commuting to work and language used in the workplace.

National Household Survey Home page
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/index-eng.cfm

June 5, 2013
Summary elementary and secondary school indicators for Canada, the provinces and territories, 2001 to 2011 (final)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130605/dq130605f-eng.htm
New detailed tables from the Elementary-Secondary Education Survey are now available on CANSIM for the 2001 to 2011 period. These tables cover enrolments in regular programs for youth, by age and sex; headcount enrolments in public school for special needs education; and headcount enrolments in public school aboriginal language programs.

Available in CANSIM:
Tables CANSIM table477-0037 to 477-0039:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=477-0037..477-0039&p2=31

Related subjects:

Education, training and learning
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=1821&id=1821&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Education indicators
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=1821&id=1822&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

New from
John Stapleton, Open Policy:

http://www.openpolicyontario.com/

Stop wondering about under-subscription of benefits:
Getting the Learning Bond and Education Savings Grants is really hard for low-income parents
http://openpolicyontario.com/stop-wondering-about-under-subscription-of-benefits/
By John Stapleton - Open Policy Ontario
January 22, 2013
A blog about why it is hard for low-income parents to receive the benefits of an RESP, Education Saving Grant or Canada Learning Bond for their children's education.
---
In this blog post, John encounters, along with four single parents, eight of the significant barriers facing low-income parents in the course of the application process for these education-related assistance programs.

From Statistics Canada:

September 11, 2012
Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective, 2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120911/dq120911b-eng.htm
In 2010, 92% of Canadian adults aged 25 to 34 had completed at least a high school education, compared with 82% for those aged 55 to 64. These rates were higher than the average for the 34 member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), where 82% of adults aged 25 to 34 and 62% of those aged 55 to 64 had attained at least a secondary school education.

Related report:

Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective 2012
HTML version: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-604-x/81-604-x2012001-eng.htm
PDF version (4.1MB, 143 pages): http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-604-x/81-604-x2012001-eng.pdf

---

June 21, 2012
Study: Economic downturn and educational attainment, 2008 to 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120621/dq120621c-eng.htm
During the economic downturn in 2008 and 2009, the decline in employment at the Canada level reflected mostly net employment losses among individuals with less than a high school diploma. From 2008 to 2009, the number of individuals without a high school diploma who held a job decreased 10.2%. Among those with a high school diploma or some non-completed postsecondary education as their highest level of education, net employment fell 3.6%.

Education Indicators in Canada: Fact Sheets
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-599-x/81-599-x2012009-eng.htm

Related subjects:

Children and youth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Labour market activities
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20006&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Education, training and learning
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=1821&id=1821&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Outcomes of education
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=1821&id=3073&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

More education fact sheets:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=81-599-X&chropg=1&lang=eng

----------------------------

May 23, 2012
Study: Youth neither enrolled in school nor employed, 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120523/dq120523b-eng.htm
In 2011, 13%, or 904,000, of the 6.8 million Canadians aged 15 to 29 were neither in school nor did they have a job. This proportion, which has changed little during the past decade, has been among the lowest of all G7 nations. (...) Those 904,000 young people in 2011 consisted of 391,000 who were looking for work and 513,000 not looking for work. The remaining 5.9 million youth (87%) were equally split into those in school and those with a job.

Highlights:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2012002/article/11675/11675hl-fs-eng.htm

Full article:
HTML
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2012002/article/11675-eng.htm
PDF (172K, 15 pages)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2012002/article/11675-eng.pdf

Source:
Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=75-001-X&lang=eng
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

November 30, 2011
Elementary and secondary public school indicators, 2009/2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/111130/dq111130e-eng.htm
Just under 5.1 million students were enrolled in publicly funded elementary and secondary schools in Canada during the academic year 2009/2010, down 0.2% from the previous academic year. This was the lowest level since 1997/1998, when data for the Elementary–Secondary Education Survey were first collected. Enrolment peaked at nearly 5.4 million students in 1999/2000.

Summary Public School Indicators for Canada, the Provinces and Territories, 2005/2006 to 2009/2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-595-m/81-595-m2011095-eng.htm
PDF version (423K, 58 pages):
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-595-m/81-595-m2011095-eng.pdf
This report provides elementary and secondary school public data at the provincial, territorial and Canada-wide levels for key education statistics, such as enrolment, graduates, finance, and educator.

Related subjects:

* Education, training and learning
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=1821&lang=eng&more=0
* Education finance
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=1821&id=1828&lang=eng&more=0
* Students
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=1821&id=1756&lang=eng&more=0
* Teachers and educators
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=1821&id=1831&lang=eng&more=0

June 27, 2011
Study: Life-path outcomes associated with reading ability, 2010

Related links from StatCan::

* Education, training and learning
* Fields of study
* Outcomes of education

* Educational attainment
* Ethnic diversity and immigration
* Education, training and skills
* Families, households and housing
* Family history

Canada Learning Bond helps low-income families
By Louise Brown
June 26, 2011
"(...) in Toronto, some 78,000 eligible families don’t claim the Canada Learning Bond, even though it is open to any child born since 2004 whose net family income is no more than $41,000 a year. Across Ontario, an alarming 405,000 eligible families don’t apply..."
Source:
Moneyville.ca - Toronto Star

---

Canada Learning Bond
The Canada Learning Bond (CLB) is a grant offered by the Government of Canada to help parents, friends, and family members save early for the post-secondary education of children in modest-income families. (...) The Government of Canada will make a one-time payment of $500 into the RESP of children who qualify for the Canada Learning Bond and a $100 deposit each subsequent year the child’s primary caregiver receives the National Child Benefit Supplement, to a maximum of $2,000.
Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Canlearn.ca offers more detailed information regarding the Canada Learning Bond.

War on public schools rages
By Donald Gutstein
May 17, 2010
The Fraser Institute's school report-card program is merely the opening salvo in a campaign to strip public education of its funding and direct the resources to the private and nonprofit sectors. Every year the institute spends hundreds of thousands of dollars to compile and disseminate its rankings of elementary and secondary schools. It has undreamed-of support from corporate media, which turn over dozens of pages each year for school rankings in the Vancouver Sun, Calgary Herald, Edmonton Sun, Toronto Sun, Ottawa Citizen, Windsor Star, and Quebec newsmagazine L'Actualité.

Every year teachers-union executives and education experts write op-ed pieces pointing out the serious deficiencies in the rankings. And every year the media play the rankers and their critics as a debate between two equally valid viewpoints. Lost in the debate are the goals of universally accessible, publicly funded education, such as preparing children for citizenship, cultivating a skilled work force, and developing critical-thinking skills.
Source:
rabble.ca

Related link:

CompareSchoolRankings.org
Rankings for schools in Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Québec
Source:
The Fraser Institute

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

Education Matters:
Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada
- main product page*
This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers [ This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

The May 2011 issue of Education Matters
contains the two following articles:

Competing Priorities – Education and Retirement Saving Behaviours of Canadian Families
[Full article in HTML]
Most Canadian families are confronted with a number of competing savings priorities. Despite these challenges, it is clear that parents place a high value on savings for postsecondary education. Even among the lowest household income group, the percentage saving for their children’s postsecondary education only was greater than the share preparing financially for retirement only ...

Public School Indicators for Canada, the Provinces and Territories, 2000/2001 to 2008/2009
[Full article in HTML]
Despite an overall decrease in enrolment numbers in Canadian publicly–funded elementary and secondary schools since 2000/2001, enrolments in second-language immersion programs have increased. British Columbia and Alberta have seen the largest gains in this respect, whereas enrolments in these programs have decreased in New Brunswick. Overall, Ontario accounted for the largest number of second-language immersion students in 2008/2009 ...

Related products:

* Learning Resources at Statistics Canada - For Teachers - For Students - For Kids - Postsecondary
* Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program
* Education Indicators in Canada: Fact Sheets
* Statistics by Subject : Education, Training and Learning
* Education finance

IMPACT Newsletter - Spring 2011 issue (PDF - 1.6MB, 14 pages)
Table of contents:
* At Home / Chez Soi : Une étude pancanadienne sur l’itinérance et la santé mentale (available in French only)
* International Program for Development Evaluation Training : Summary of Evaluation of Program Impact
* Associations Among Child Care, Family, and Behavior Outcomes in a Nation Wide Sample of Pre-school-Aged Children
* Delivering Information on Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs) to Families Across Canada
* A profile of Dr. Jill Chouinard
*The Differentiated Instruction Professional Learning Strategy comes to the Centre for Research on Educational & Community Services!
* Transitional Rehabilitation Housing
* Les dernières nouvelles et événements/ Recent News and Events
* Événements à venir/Upcoming Events
Source:
IMPACT Newsletter - includes links to 16 issues of IMPACT going back to 2001
[ Centre for Research on Educational & Community Services : The Centre for Research on Educational and Community Services (CRECS) collaborates in research, evaluation, and training with organizations in the educational, social service, and health sectors to improve social programs and policies for citizens, especially those facing social exclusion. ]
[ Co-sponsoring CRECS faculties : Social Sciences --- Education ]
[ University of Ottawa ]

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

April 29, 2011
Education Indicators in Canada:
Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program

April 2011
The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) provides a statistical portrait of the elementary, secondary and postsecondary education systems through the following products:
* Tables
* Fact sheets
* Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective
* Handbook for the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program - April 2011

Source:
Education Matters
- main product page*
This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers [ This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related products:

* Learning Resources at Statistics Canada - For Teachers - For Students - For Kids - Postsecondary
* Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program
* Education Indicators in Canada: Fact Sheets
* Statistics by Subject : Education, Training and Learning
* Education finance

Canadian Education Association (CEA)
The Canadian Education Association (CEA) is a cross-Canada network with a strong membership base of leaders in the education, research and policy, not for profit and business sectors. We are committed to education that leads to greater student engagement; teaching that inspires students and teachers and that causes all students to learn; and schools that ensure both equity and excellence in pursuit of the optimal development of all students.
- incl. links to : * About Us * Video * Blog * Bulletin * Awards * Events * Education Canada *
Transforming Education * Programs & Initiatives * Research & Publications * Get Involved

United States:

From the
Economic Policy Institute:

Education is not the cure for
high unemployment or for income inequality
(PDF - 287K, 26 pages)
EPI Briefing Paper #286
By Lawrence Mishel
January 12, 2011
With signs pointing to persistent high unemployment and a recovery even weaker than those of the early 1990s and 2000s, it is becoming common to hear in the media and among some policy makers the claim that lingering unemployment is not cyclical but “structural.” In this story, the jobs problem is not a lack of demand for workers but rather a mismatch between workers’ skills and employers’ needs. Another version of the skills mismatch is also being told about the future: we face an impending skills shortage, particularly a shortfall of college graduates, after the economy returns to full employment.
Source:
Economic Policy Institute

Related link:

Degrees and Dollars
By Paul Krugman
March 6, 2011
It is a truth universally acknowledged that education is the key to economic success. Everyone knows that the jobs of the future will require ever higher levels of skill. That’s why, in an appearance Friday with former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, President Obama declared that “If we want more good news on the jobs front then we’ve got to make more investments in education.” But what everyone knows is wrong. (...) The fact is that since 1990 or so the U.S. job market has been characterized not by a general rise in the demand for skill, but by “hollowing out”: both high-wage and low-wage employment have grown rapidly, but medium-wage jobs — the kinds of jobs we count on to support a strong middle class — have lagged behind. And the hole in the middle has been getting wider.
(...)
So if we want a society of broadly shared prosperity, education isn’t the answer — we’ll have to go about building that society directly. We need to restore the bargaining power that labor has lost over the last 30 years, so that ordinary workers as well as superstars have the power to bargain for good wages. We need to guarantee the essentials, above all health care, to every citizen. What we can’t do is get where we need to go just by giving workers college degrees, which may be no more than tickets to jobs that don’t exist or don’t pay middle-class wages.
Source:
New York Times

From Statistics Canada:

December 20, 2010
Public school indicators for Canada, the provinces and territories, 2008-2009
Just under 5.1 million students were enrolled in publicly funded elementary and secondary schools in Canada during the academic year 2008/2009, down 0.5% from the previous year. This was the lowest level since 1998/1999 when data for the Elementary-Secondary Education Survey were first collected. Enrolment peaked at nearly 5.4 million students in 2001/2002.
- includes one table:
* Enrolment (headcount)

Related subjects:

* Education, training and learning

From the
Canadian Index of Wellbeing:

Canadians are More Educated But Warning Signs Appear
October 26, 2010
Canadians are more educated than ever before, but there are warning signs that performance is declining according to the new CIW Education Report. The report finds that the percentage of spaces for early childcare has increased, as have high school completion rates and university participation and completion rates. There is also good news as the student-educator ratio in public school has been improving – except in British Columbia. But developmental health in kindergarten has plateaued after a period of steady growth, social and emotional competencies in pupils age 12-13 are declining, and while Canadian basic education scores in Grades 8 and 9 are still above the international average, the margin is dropping.

Complete report:

Education : A Report of the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (PDF - 939K, 84 pages)
October 2010

Report Highlights (PDF - 357K, 11 pages)
In a nutshell:
* Childcare Spaces are Up (although there was considerable variation among provinces.)
* Developmental Health in Kindergarten has Levelled off
* Student-Educator Ratio is Improving – Except in British Columbia
* Social and Emotional Competencies are Declining in Middle Childhood
* Canadian Basic Education Scores are Above the International Average – But the Margin is Dropping
* Parental Socio-economic Status is Becoming Less Important to Student Performance
* High School Completion Rates are Up
* University Participation and Completion Rates are Up

Source:
Canadian Index of Wellbeing
The Institute is independent, non-partisan, with a newly forming affiliation with the University of Waterloo, and operates under the leadership of an advisory board of accomplished Canadians and international experts. Its mission is to report on the quality of life of Canadians, and promote a dialogue on how to improve it through evidence-based policies that are responsive to the needs and values of Canadians.

For more CIW site content, see:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm#wellbeing

From Statistics Canada:

September 7, 2010
Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective

In 2008, 20% of Canadian teenagers aged 15 to 19 were no longer pursuing a formal education. This was higher than the average of 15% across the 31 member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). While this OECD proportion was down from 20% in 1998, in Canada, it remained stable at 20%.

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September 7, 2010
Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective, 2010
This report, the second in an annual series, places certain aspects of the educational systems of Canada’s provinces and territories into an international context. Ten international indicators are presented in this edition, capturing information on educational attainment and graduation, labour market outcomes by educational attainment, spending on education, international students, and participation in adult learning.
[ Highlights ]

Source:
Education Matters: Insights on Education,
Learning and Training in Canada- September 2010 issue

Teachers and students of primary and secondary level can access free learning resources through Statistics Canada’s Education Outreach Program. Its goal is to ensure timely information for learning whether for history, geography, mathematics, family studies or other subjects. From grades 4 to 12, Census at school gives students hands-on experience with surveys and data analysis. The E-STAT database allows educational users to choose, graph, map and download a wealth of data.


Education Matters - main product page
*
This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers [ This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related products:

* Learning Resources at Statistics Canada - For Teachers - For Students - For Kids - Postsecondary
* Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program
* Education Indicators in Canada: Fact Sheets
* Statistics by Subject : Education, Training and Learning
* Education finance
Source:
Statistics Canada

Related international link:

Education at a glance 2010: OECD indicators
9 September 2010
Main page - includes links to news releases, the complete report, dozens of Excel tables on various indicators and other related material

Complete report (PDF - 4.5MB, 472 pages)
- includes Canada

Report highlights

Source:
OECD Directorate for Education
[ Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) ]

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June 15, 2010
Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada, June 2010
The June 2010 issue of Statistics Canada's free online publication Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada contains one article: Completion and Discontinuation Rates of Registered Apprentices: Does Program Duration Matter?
Click the above link to access this article.

---

June 15, 2010
Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program
The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes. PCEIP products include tables and charts, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.
[Click View to read the latest edition of this report; click Chronological index for earlier editions]

New from
The Laidlaw Foundation:

Benefits for Children in Ontario Incomplete and Unfair
News Release
May 17, 2010
A new report says children not living with their parents are denied financial benefits that other children get. Not so Easy to Navigate, a report written by social policy experts John Stapleton and Anne Tweddle for the Laidlaw Foundation, reveals that the most vulnerable children in Ontario - those living in state care - don’t benefit from federal programs like the Canada Learning Bond and Canada Education Savings Grant the same way that children living with their families do.

Complete report:

‘Not so Easy to Navigate’:
A Report on the Complex Array of Income
Security Programs and Educational Planning for
Children in Care in Ontario
(PDF - 511K, 40 pages)
By John Stapleton & Anne Tweddle
Toronto
May 2010
Young people who have been taken into state care report that the most difficult issue they faced when leaving care was the lack of emotional, financial, and educational support. This paper describes the major financial supports currently available in Ontario and proposes ways to improve the financial and educational well-being of youth once they leave care.

Two pamphlets by the same authors
released with the above report:

* 7 Things you Should Know (PDF - 291K, 14 pages)
May 2010
Do you know a child who is in the care of a Children’s Aid Society?
Are you concerned about their financial and educational future?
This fact sheet tells you about financial benefits from the government for children in Ontario, with special emphasis on programs that build savings for a child in care. It also explains some of the changes that happen to benefits when a child goes into care.

* A message to all mothers in Ontario:
March 2010
Collect child benefits of up to $8,400 and more every year!

There are four things you should do when you give birth
in order to obtain the benefits that you are entitled to:

1. Go to Service Ontario to get a birth certificate and a Social Insurance Number for your child.
2. Apply for Canada Child Tax Benefits (CCTB).
3. Fill out a tax return and send it in.
4. Go to any bank and setup a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP)
- includes links to online resources

Source:
The Laidlaw Foundation
The Laidlaw Foundation promotes positive youth development through inclusive youth engagement in the arts, environment and in community.

Related earlier report
from The Laidlaw Foundation:

Youth Leaving Care – How Do They Fare?
Briefing Paper
(PDF file - 242K, 31 pages)
September 2005
By Anne Tweddle

[ More reports from The Laidlaw Foundation - click "Resources" in the left margin for links to all Laidlaw Foundation reports by theme.]

Related links from
Human Resources and Social Development Canada:

* Canada Learning Bond
The Canada Learning Bond (CLB) is a grant offered by the Government of Canada to help parents, friends, and family members save early for the post-secondary education of children in modest-income families. (...)
The Government of Canada will make a one-time payment of $500 into the RESP of children who qualify for the Canada Learning Bond and a $100 deposit each subsequent year the child’s primary caregiver receives the National Child Benefit Supplement, to a maximum of $2,000.
Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Canlearn.ca offers more detailed information regarding the CLB.

* Canada Education Savings Grant
When you, as a parent, friend or family member, open a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) on behalf of a child and apply for the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG), the Government of Canada will deposit a percentage of your own contribution directly into the RESP. To date, more than three million children have benefited from the Canada Education Savings Grant.

Related link:

Open Policy - John Stapleton's website

---------------------------------------

From CBC Toronto:

Ont. youth in state care need RESPs: foundation
May 17, 2010
An Ontario youth foundation is calling on Ottawa to set up education savings accounts for the 18,000 Ontario children in state care. The Laidlaw Foundation has released a new report that suggests Ontario children living in foster care don't benefit from federal programs like the Canada Learning Bond and the Canada Education Savings Grant the same way that children living with their families do.

---

From The Toronto Star:

Youth in state care need RESPs
By Laurie Monsebraaten
May 17, 2010
Ontario should press Ottawa to give children in foster care the same educational support as children who live with their families. A report being released Monday says it would cost the federal government about $8 million a year to set up educational savings accounts for the approximately 18,000 Ontario children in state care. “Parents with children living at home often use their federal child benefits to open Registered Education Savings Plans for their children,” said social policy expert John Stapleton, co-author of report by the Laidlaw Foundation. The investments trigger the $2,000 federal learning bond and the education savings grant, which matches parental contributions to a maximum of $7,200. (...) Ontario should press for a change in federal policy so that all children in care can have access to the federal money to use toward a post-secondary education, says the report. The province should also extend financial support to youth in care to age 25 says the report entitled Not So Easy to Navigate.
Source:
The Toronto Star

Hazardous passage for at-risk youth
Foster children should be allowed to stay at home until they are 21
Virginia Rowden
May 21, 2010
This is a story told in numbers. There are nearly 4,700 young people — aged 16 to 20 — in the care of Children’s Aid Societies in Ontario. Fewer than 600 are enrolled in college, trade schools or university — less than 13 per cent compared with 60 per cent of young people who have grown up with their own families
[ Virginia Rowden is director, social policy, and mentor for the YouthCAN program, Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies. ]

A better idea for foster kids
May 23, 2010
Editorial
(...) By [Ontario] provincial law, children in the care of the state must move out of their foster or group homes before their 18th birthday, whether they have finished high school or not. They are given financial assistance to live on their own, but that is cut off at 21, regardless of their circumstances. (...) Last week, a report by the Laidlaw Foundation urged Ottawa to establish registered education savings plans (RESPs) for children in foster care, similar to those that parents set up for their own children. The report rightly identifies the transforming effect that making college financially possible could have on Crown wards. (...) Children's aid agencies have long urged the province to let children stay in their foster or group homes until they are 21. The Laidlaw Foundation's report argues that financial assistance should be extended to 25. Both measures would provide a more supportive and gradual transition into adulthood – similar to what most children get from their parents.

Source:
The Toronto Star

--------------------------------------------

The U.S. Perspective
_________________________

Recent release from
Human Rights Watch:

California: From Foster Children to Homeless Adults
State Fails to Prepare Foster Youth for Adulthood
News Release
May 12, 2010
(LosAngeles) - California is creating homeless adults by failing to ensure that youth in foster care are given the support to live independently as adults and by ending state support abruptly, Human Rights Watch said in a new report. Human Rights Watch said that the state should provide financial support, connections with adults, shelter, and other safety nets for young people as they make the transition towards independence.

The 70-page report, My So-Called Emancipation: From Foster Care to Homelessness for California Youth (PDF - 1.3MB), documents the struggles of foster care youth who become homeless after turning 18, or "aging out" of the state's care, without sufficient preparation or support for adulthood. California's foster care system serves 65,000 children and youth, far more than any other single state. Of the 4,000 who age out of the system each year, research suggests, 20 per cent or more become homeless.

Source:
Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes.

From Statistics Canada:

May 20, 2010
Public school indicators for Canada,
the provinces and territories, 2001/2002 to 2007-2008

Summary
Just over 5.1 million students were enrolled in publicly funded elementary and secondary schools in Canada during the academic year 2007/2008, down 0.9% from the previous year. This was the lowest level since 1998/1999 when data for the Elementary-Secondary Education Statistics Project were first collected. Enrolment peaked at nearly 5.4 million students in 2001/2002. Since then, it has declined in every year, as larger cohorts of graduating students were replaced by smaller cohorts of grade 1 students.

Summary Public School Indicators for Canada,
the Provinces and Territories, 2001/2002 to 2007/2008

by Riley Brockington
Indicators include : * Enrolments * Graduates * Graduation rates * Educators * Student-educator ratio * Total expenditures * Total expenditures per student * Average remuneration of educators
- includes nine charts on the above topics

Related subjects

* Education, training and learning

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April 29, 2010
Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada
April 2010
The April 2010 issue of Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada contains two articles:

1. Women in Non-traditional Occupations and Fields of Study takes stock of changes that have taken place over time in the occupations held by women in the labour market and in the fields of study they are choosing at the postsecondary level.

2. New Perspectives on Access to Postsecondary Education summarizes new research that points to the need to take a broad perspective on factors affecting participation in postsecondary education, taking into account the roles of factors such as aspirations, motivations, engagement with school, study habits, and high school outcomes.

Also in this issue of Education Matters:

Education Indicators in Canada:
Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program

April 2010
- fact sheet, entitled "Interrupting High School and Returning to Education," part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program.

[ earlier issues of this report - more free education-related articles]

Child poverty: The Canadian Teachers’ Federation urges federal government to take action
April 20, 2010
(CTF News Service – Ottawa) Teacher leaders from across the country are adding their voices to the national call for action to end child poverty when they meet with Parliamentarians today as part of the Canadian Teachers’ Federation’s (CTF) annual Hill Day.

“Our task is to remind federal politicians that social issues are just as important as economic ones,” explains CTF President Mary-Lou Donnelly. “It is shameful that child poverty is a tragic fact of life in a nation as wealthy as ours. Among the most vulnerable groups affected by child poverty are Aboriginal children, children of new immigrants and children with disabilities.

The report card:

Child Poverty Progress Report Card for Canada (PDF - 269K, 2 pages)

Resources:

Assembly of First Nations
www.afn.ca

Campaign 2000
www.campaign2000.ca

Canada Without Poverty
www.cwp-csp.ca

Education International
www.ei-ie.org

Global Campaign for Education
www.campaignforeducation.org

Make Poverty History
www.makepovertyhistory.ca

National Alliance for Children and Youth
www.nationalchildrensalliance.com

Save the Children Canada / Aide à l’enfance Canada
www.savethechildren.ca

UNICEF / UNICEF
www.unicef.ca

Related link:

TAKING ACTION AGAINST POVERTY
Supporting Education and Building Canada
through the Elimination of Child Poverty
(PDF - 291K, 8 pages)
Background Material for
Parliamentarians and Staff
Canadian Teachers' Federation Hill Day 2010 - April 20, 2010
The Canadian Teachers’ Federation urges all Parliamentarians to support a coordinated effort to reduce and eliminate child poverty in Canada.
This coordinated effort should be focussed along three main areas of action:
• Family Income
• Housing
• Educational Opportunity

Source:
Canadian Teachers' Federation
The Canadian Teachers’ Federation (CTF) speaks for approximately 200,000 teachers in Canada as their national voice on education and related social issues.

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

February 25, 2010
Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada
The February 2010 issue of Education Matters: Insights
on Education, Learning and Training in Canada
contains two articles:
[Click the above link for summaries of the articles; click below for the actual articles.]
* Trends in the trades: Registered apprenticeship total registrations, completions and certification, 1991 to 2007
* Changes in participation in adult education and training, 2002 and 2008
Bonus in this issue:
Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP)
New Tables and Charts
(February 2010)

[ earlier issues of this report ]

Related subjects:
* Education, training and learning
* Fields of study
* Outcomes of education
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household assets, debts and wealth
* Household, family and personal income
* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Students

---

September 25, 2009
Study: Canadian nine-year-olds at school, 2006/2007
At the age of 9, children varied widely in their school achievement. Some of these variations were linked to their gender, the income level of their household and the province of residence. There were also marked differences in the "education environment" of the child. These differences were linked to levels of household income.
Report:
HTML
PDF
(523K, 68 pages)
Source:
Children and Youth Research Paper Series
[ links to six reports in this series ]

Related subjects:
o Children and youth
o Child development and behaviour
o Education
o Education, training and learning

o Fields of study
o Outcomes of education
o Students

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Back to school – September 2009
It's that time of year again – back to school for tens of thousands of students from kindergarten to college and university, for their teachers and principals and for their families who are busy preparing for another school year. In honour of this annual ritual, we have put together a few facts and figures relating to education.
Source:
Education Matters: Insights on
Education, Learning and Training in Canada (Sept. 2009)

---

September 8, 2009
Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective
Canada surpassed 23 of the 30 member nations of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in 2007 regarding the proportion of its population aged 25 to 64 that had a university degree. In Canada, as in other countries, employment rates were consistently higher among people with postsecondary education than among those without. Canada was also among the countries that allocated the highest proportions of gross domestic product (GDP) to education, placing it seventh highest among the OECD countries.

---

July 13, 2009
University degrees, diplomas and certificates awarded, 2007
About 241,600 students received a degree, diploma or certificate qualification from a Canadian university in 2007, a 6.9% increase from 2006. Over 80% of the increase occurred in Ontario. Nearly 61% of qualifications, or 146,700, were awarded to women, continuing a long-term trend in which female graduates outnumber their male counterparts and their proportion continues to increase.
- includes two tables:
* University qualifications awarded by program level and gender
* University qualifications awarded by field of study and gender

---

April 22, 2009
National Graduates Survey, 2007
More than 80% of college and university students who graduated in 2005 and did not pursue further studies had found full-time employment by 2007. In general, earnings increased by level of study. In 2007, two years after graduation, just over one-quarter of those who owed student debt at the time they graduated had paid it off.
[ Graduating in Canada:
Profile, Labour Market Outcomes and Student Debt of the Class of 2005
]

February 12, 2009
Study: Persistence in postsecondary education in Atlantic Canada, 2001/2002 to 2004/2005
Not all postsecondary students in Atlantic Canada remained at the same university or college until they graduated. Many of these students moved between institutions, and many others appeared to have temporarily suspended their postsecondary education for short periods.

Moving Through, Moving On: Persistence
in Postsecondary Education in Atlantic
Canada, Evidence from the PSIS

Executive summary (HTML)
Complete report (PDF - 604K, 91 pages)
By Ross Finnie and Theresa Qiu
February 2009
This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on Postsecondary Education (PSE) pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the Postsecondary Student Information System (“PSIS”).

Canada Education Savings Grant
"The Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) is a grant from the Government of Canada paid directly into a beneficiary's Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP). It adds 20 percent to the first $2,000 in contributions made into an RESP on behalf of an eligible beneficiary each year. This means the Grant can be as much as $400 each year per beneficiary and over the years could amount to a total of $7,200.
- incl. links to : E-Services * Frequently Asked Questions * General Information * Publications * Related Links

Registered Education Savings Plans (Canada Revenue Agency)
* Topics for RESPs * Who can be a subscriber? * Who can become a beneficiary? * Canada Education Savings Programs Provincial Education Savings Programs * Contributing to an RESP Payments from an RESP * How an RESP works * Special rules

Canadian Scholarship Trust Foundation

Canada Learning Bond


Learning to Save, Saving to Learn: Early Impacts of the learn$ave Individual Development Accounts Project, a new report released by SRDC, presents the 18-month results of learn$ave, a project designed to demonstrate how Individual Development Accounts can encourage low-income adults to save in order to increase their human capital by participating in education or training, or starting a small business.

Download the full report (PDF file - 525K, 115 pages)
January 2008
Download the executive summary (PDF file - 1.9MB, 12 pages)

Early results show low-income Canadians can save for their education
News Release
January 25, 2008
A new report released by SRDC presents the 18-month results of the Individual Development Accounts project learn$ave. The program has so far yielded positive effects on saving and budgeting, as well as participants’ attitudes towards education.

Find out more about learn$ave
The learn$ave project was conceived and implemented in 2000 by Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI), and is being funded by Human Resources and Social Development Canada. The evaluation of learn$ave is being conducted by SRDC.

Source:
Social Research and Demonstration Corporation (SRDC)
SRDC’s two-part mission is to help policy-makers and practitioners identify social policies and programs that improve the well-being of all Canadians, with a special concern for the effects on the disadvantaged, and to raise the standards of evidence that are used in assessing social policies and programs.


Maclean's Ranking of Canadian Universities
"How grads grade their schools
More than 12,000 recent graduates delivered a report card on their university experience for our new survey."
- incl. overall rankings, profiles, graduate survey, helpful tools (University planner, RESP calculator, financial goal calculator), articles and utilities (RESPs, etc.)
Source:
Macleans on Campus
[ Maclean's Magazine ]

The Government of Canada tables Canada Education Savings Act, creating the Canada Learning Bond
News Release
October 8, 2004
"OTTAWA, ONTARIO—The Honourable Joe Volpe, Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development, tabled legislation in the House of Commons today to create the Canada Education Savings Act. The savings programs contained in the Act will help low- and middle-income families to begin saving for their children’s post-secondary education."
- incl. a backgrounder with more detailed info

Related Links:

Canada Education Savings Grant
"The Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) program underscores government recognition that post secondary education is a national priority, and that learning through full and part-time study, and in a variety of settings, such as, universities, community colleges, vocational and technical institutes, and CEGEPs is vital in providing all Canadian children with an equal opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the challenges of an evolving workforce and a changing economy."

Source:
Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Canada Learning Bond (from the 2004 Federal Budget)

From Human Resources and Social Development Canada:

Returns to college education: evidence from the 1990, 1995, and 2000 National Graduates Survey
September 2006
Using data from the National Graduates Survey ant the Census, this research paper examines earnings of recent college graduates by field of study as well as estimates the internal rates of return to college education.
Table of Contents:
* Title Page * Executive Summary * Introduction * Literature Review * Data * Profile of College Graduates * An Overview of Earnings Trends * Earnings by Field of Study * College vs. University Earnings * Conclusions * References
* Appendix Tables

Returns to University Level Education: Variations Within Disciplines, Occupations and Employment Sectors
September 2006
Using data from the National Graduates Survey ant the Census, this research paper examines earnings of recent college graduates by field of study as well as estimates the internal rates of return to college education.
Table of Contents:
* Title Page * Abstract * Introduction * Data * Methodology * Results * Comparison to Previous Literature * Summary and Policy Implications * References

Third Actuarial Report on the Canada Student Loans Program
established under the Canada Student Loans Act and
the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act

As at July 31, 2003
Posted 22 June 2004
Complete Report (PDF format, 871 KB)
Executive Summary (PDF format, 93 KB)

Source:
Actuarial Reports - read actuarial reports on the following subjects: Canada Pension Plan - Old Age Security - Canada Student Loans Program -
Canadian Forces - Federally Appointed Judges - Members of Parliament - Public Service of Canada
[ Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) ]
"The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) is the primary regulator of federally chartered financial institutions and federally administered pension plans."

Related Link:

Canada Student Loans Program
"The Canada Student Loans Program promotes accessibility to post-secondary education by lowering financial barriers through the provision of loans and grants for Canadians with a demonstrated financial need."
Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Federal Loans and Grants for Post-Secondary Education—Human Resources
and Social Development Canada and Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation

(Chapter 2 of the
May 2007 Report of the Auditor General of Canada
)
(Excerpts)
"The federal government has said that Canada's international competitiveness depends on having an educated and skilled labour force. To improve access to higher education is the main objective of both the Canada Student Loans Program and the Foundation. To this end, HRSDC loaned $1.9 billion to some 350,000 post-secondary students in 2005–06 and awarded 78,500 grants amounting to about $129 million. In 2006 the Foundation awarded about $298 million in Millennium Bursaries to some 100,000 students and over $40 million in Access Bursaries to more than 20,000 students. "
"Financial assistance programs for post-secondary students are managed well"
Source:
Office of the Auditor General of Canada

CanLearn Interactive
CanLearn is the only online post-secondary education resource that provides Canadians with the information and services they need to decide what and where to study and how to cover the costs. The CanLearn site was developed by the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada in collaboration with provincial and territorial governments and Canadian learning and career development organizations.
- incl. links to:
* Education Savings for Your Child * Planning for Post Secondary Education * Student Loans, Grants and Scholarships * After Post Secondary Education * Continuing Education - Lifelong Learning * National Student Loans Service Centre * much more
Site Map


Canada Student Loans Program
"The Canada Student Loans Program promotes accessibility to post-secondary education by lowering financial barriers through the provision of loans and grants for Canadians with a demonstrated financial need."
Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Canada Education Savings Grant

 

Canadian Education Links, including universities

Ministères de l'Éducation au Canada

Canadian Education on the Web - Everything from soup to nuts about education in Canada, including: Boards of Education, Canada-Wide Organizations, Commercial Education Sites, Community Colleges, including Cégeps in Quebec Databases, Clearinghouses and Directories, Distance Education, Education Journals,Education Libraries, Educational Networks, Educators and Education Resources, Elementary and Secondary Schools, Faculties of Education, Independent Institutions, Jobs in Education, Ministries of Education, Private School Organizations, Provincial Organizations, School Board Organizations, Student Newspapers, Student Organizations, Teachers' Organizations, Universities and Colleges, and Other Canadian Education Internet Lists.

CanadaStudentDebt.ca
A site providing support for student loan problems!
"Student loans are meant to be paid back. Help should be available for those who have an unmanageable debt burden. A higher level of service should be provided by administrators. Bankruptcy is not the answer to student debt! If you are seeking ways to avoid paying back your loan, please do not post on this site. If you have good intentions of paying your loan and are experiencing hardship and need help, you are most welcome to post here."

\Federal cuts to literacy programs add to Canada’s low-literacy dilemma, says ABC CANADA
TORONTO
September 26, 2006 – As part of the Conservative government’s spending cuts announced yesterday, $17.7 million, otherwise available to literacy organizations through Human Resources and Social Development (HRSD), will be slashed over the next two years. “ABC CANADA is disappointed that the resources available to literacy programs across this country have been significantly reduced,” says Margaret Eaton, ABC CANADA President. “At a time when there is an unprecedented need for funding to facilitate literacy skills upgrading in Canada, this is most unfortunate.” The cuts -- $5.8 million in 2006-2007, and $11.9 million in 2007-2008 – mean that local and regional literacy programs will no longer be funded by HRSD. The department’s new mandate is to concentrate on national and federal programs alone. This change jeopardizes the delivery of programs to many learners whose literacy challenges hinder their ability to function fully at home, in the community and in the workplace.
Source:
ABC CANADA Literacy Foundation
ABC CANADA Literacy Foundation is a national charity committed to promoting literacy to the general public and to the private sector.
We are a partnership of business, labour, educators and government. We focus on public awareness programs, the development and execution of national literacy awareness campaigns; provide promotional support to local literacy groups; and conduct research to further the development of a fully literate Canadian population.

Media Awareness Network
The Media Awareness Network offers practical support for media education in the home, school and community and provides Canadians and others with information and "food for thought" on our fast-evolving media culture. It's also a place where educators, parents, students and community workers can share resources and explore ways to make media a more positive force in children's lives.

Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC) - large U.S. site

National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
"The primary federal entity for collecting and analysing data that are related to education in the United States and other nations"
See the NCES Site Map for an overview of this large site that is rich in content. Here's a sample...

International Comparisons in Education
The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), through the International Activities Program and the Annual Reports Program, collects, analyzes, and disseminates "statistics and other data related to education in the United States and other nations." The site includes education indicators and trends in mathematics and science, reading, civic education, and adult literacy. Data also available relating to primary, secondary, and higher education.

Longitudinal Surveys :
- High School and Beyond
- National Ed Longitudinal Study, 1988
- National Longitudinal Study, HS Class of 72
- Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS) Program

"The ECLS Program has both descriptive and analytic purposes.  The descriptive purposes are to provide national data on (1) children's status at birth and at various points thereafter; (2) children's transitions to nonparental care, early education programs, and school; and (3) children's experiences and growth through the fifth grade.  The analytic purpose of the program is to provide data to test hypotheses about the effects of a wide range of family, school, community, and individual variables on children's development, early learning, and early performance in school."

The Condition of Education, 2002
June 2002
"The 2002 edition of the Condition of Education report has recently been released by the US Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Produced annually, the report highlights significant educational developments and progress made within the past year. This year’s report is available in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) and contains 44 indicators in six main areas: enrollment trends and student characteristics; student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; student effort and rates of progress among different population groups; the quality of elementary and secondary education; the context of post-secondary education; and societal support for learning. Additionally, this report also provides analysis on the environment, climate, student outcomes at private schools, and the enrollment and persistence of nontraditional undergraduates. For anyone interested in education and its future, the report can be viewed in its entirety or by individual sections."
Reviewed by The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2001
Related Links:
National Center for Education Statistics
U.S. Department of Education

TeAch-nology.com (U.S.)
TeAch-nology.com offers teachers FREE access to lesson plans, printable worksheets, over 150,000 reviewed web sites, rubrics, educational games, teaching / technology tips, advice from expert teachers, current education news, teacher downloads, teacher finance help, web quests, and teacher resources for creating just about anything a teacher could need. We continue to support the education of children by providing daily content to over 130 countries.

World Data on Education
UNESCO

(See also Canadian Universities and Colleges)
(See also Children, Families and Youth)


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