Canadian Social Research Links

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance
Coverage in the United States

2009 - 2010 - 2011 - 2012 - 2013
Archive


Updated October 31, 2015


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F
rom the
United States Census Bureau:

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2014
https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2015/cb15-157.html
September 16, 2015
The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that in 2014, there was no statistically significant change from 2013 in either real median household income or the official poverty rate. At the same time, the percentage of people without health insurance coverage declined. Unless otherwise noted, the following results for the nation were compiled from information collected in the 2015 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

The nation’s official poverty rate in 2014 was 14.8 percent, which means there were 46.7 million people in poverty. Neither the poverty rate nor the number of people in poverty were statistically different from 2013 estimates. This marks the fourth consecutive year in which the number of people in poverty was not statistically different from the previous year’s estimate.

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau

https://www.census.gov/en.html

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2013
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2014/cb14-169.html
September 16, 2014
News Release
The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that in 2013, the poverty rate declined from the previous year for the first time since 2006, while there was no statistically significant change in either the number of people living in poverty or real median household income. In addition, the poverty rate for children under 18 declined from the previous year for the first time since 2000. The results for the nation were compiled from information collected in the 2014 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement [ http://goo.gl/oCZyGf ].

The nation’s official poverty rate in 2013 was 14.5 percent, down from 15.0 percent in 2012. The 45.3 million people living at or below the poverty line in 2013, for the third consecutive year, did not represent a statistically significant change from the previous year’s estimate. Median household income in the United States in 2013 was $51,939; the change in real terms from the 2012 median of $51,759 was not statistically significant. This is the second consecutive year that the annual change was not statistically significant, following two consecutive annual declines.

The percentage of people without health insurance coverage for the entire 2013 calendar year was 13.4 percent; this amounted to 42.0 million people.

These findings are contained in two reports (see links below):
* Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013,
and
* Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2013.

---

Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013
Current Population Reports
(PDF - 1.7MB, 72 pages)
https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2014/demo/p60-249.pdf
September 2014
Summary of findings:
• Real median household income in 2013 was not statistically different from the 2012 median income.
• The official poverty rate decreased between 2012 and 2013, while the number in poverty in 2013 was not statistically different from 2012.

---

Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2013
Poulation reports
(PDF - 1.1MB, 28 pages)
http://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2014/demo/p60-250.pdf
September 16, 2014
Health insurance is a means for financing a person’s health care expenses. While the majority of people have private health insurance coverage, primarily through an employer, many others obtain health insurance through programs offered by the government. Other individuals do not have health insurance at all. This report presents statistics on health insurance coverage in the United States based on information collected in the 2014 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement [ http://goo.gl/oCZyGf ] and the 2013 American Community Survey (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/). Estimates from both surveys, conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, reflect health insurance coverage during the year 2013.

Selected Highlights:
• In 2013, the percentage of people without health insurance coverage for the entire calendar year was 13.4 percent, or 42.0 million.
• The percentage of people with health insurance for all or part of 2013 was 86.6 percent.
• In 2013, the majority of individuals, 64.2 percent, were covered by private health insurance.

The largest single type of health insurance in 2013 was employment-based health insurance, which covered 53.9 percent of the population.

Source:
United States Census Bureau

http://www.census.gov/

---

From The White House:

Five Key points in Today's
Report from the Census Bureau:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/09/16/income-poverty-and-health-insurance-united-states-2013
September 16, 2014
1. The overall poverty rate declined to 14.5 percent in 2013 due to the largest one-year drop in child poverty since 1966.
2. Real median income for family households rose by $603 in 2013 but remains below pre-crisis levels.
3. While still too wide, the gender pay gap narrowed slightly in 2013, with the female-to-male earnings ratio climbing above 78 percent for the first time on record.
4. Children and the elderly were much more likely than non-elderly adults to have health insurance coverage in 2013, reflecting the contributions of public programs like Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).
5. The data released today by the Census Bureau cover the calendar year 2013, and so do not reflect the notable improvement in the labor market seen over the first eight months of 2014.

Source: The White House
http://www.whitehouse.gov/

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From Huffington Post.com:

2013 Census Data on Poverty, Income Tells a Story About Our Priorities
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tiziana-dearing/2013-census-data-on-pover_b_5830404.html
September 17, 2014
So where should we invest? In training for the knowledge economy, small scale manufacturing in cities and a "green" workforce that puts people in jobs while turning our country energy independent. Protect non-cash programs like SNAP and EITC, scale them up and model other interventions after them. Create public policies that build assets for non-stock holders, using mechanisms like matched savings, other tax credits and asset-based welfare.

Source:
Huffington Post

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From CLASP:

New Census Data Tell Us That Poverty Fell in 2013:
Children and Young Adults Still Face the Greatest Risks
http://www.clasp.org/resources-and-publications/publication-1/2014.09.16-Census-Bureau-Poverty-Data-Report-FINAL.pdf
September 16, 2014
According to 2013 Census data released today, the overall poverty rate fell by half a percentage point, to 14.5 percent. Poverty for children fell by nearly 2 percentage points. Yet children (especially young children) once again experienced the highest rates of poverty in the United States. Young adults were close behind. Four years after the Great Recession officially ended, nearly one in five children and young adults lived in poverty.
NOTE : Skip to the bottom of the article for links to 25+ related resources.

Also from CLASP:

2013 Poverty Data: A Glimpse of Good News for Children, But We Can Do Better
http://www.clasp.org/issues/child-care-and-early-education/in-focus/2013-poverty-data-a-glimpse-of-good-news-for-children-but-we-can-do-better
September 16, 2014
By Hannah Matthews
For the first time since 2000, the overall child poverty rate fell, according to U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey (CPS) data released today on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage in the year 2013. This is good news. The numbers indicate a return from the extraordinarily high child poverty rates experienced during the depths of the recession. But these decreases don’t diminish the unacceptably high number of children still living in poor families, particularly our youngest children and Black and Hispanic children

Source:
CLASP - Solutions that work for low-income people
http://www.clasp.org/
Since 1969, CLASP has been a trusted resource, a creative architect for systems change, and one of the country's most effective voices for low income people.

---

From Poverty Dispatch:

September 16, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/09/16/
Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013 (6 articles)
Source:
Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch

 

---------------------------------------------------

Note : for a similar extensive collection of links to this report for 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, go to:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/income_poverty_health_archive.htm




Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2012
September 17, 2013

On September 17, 2013, the U.S. Census Bureau [ http://www.census.gov/ ] released the 2012 edition of its annual report entitled
Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States.

From the
U.S. Census Bureau:

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2012
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb13-165.html
September 17, 2013
News Release
The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that in 2012, real median household income and the poverty rate were not statistically different from the previous year, while the percentage of people without health insurance coverage decreased.
- includes detailed highlights of the report

The report:

Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance
Coverage in the United States: 2012
(PDF - 1MB, 88 pages)
http://www.census.gov/prod/2013pubs/p60-245.pdf

---

Related links:

Income data
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/income/

Poverty data
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/

Health insurance data
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/hlthins/

---

From Random Samplings:
the official Census Bureau blog

http://blogs.census.gov/

Medicare and Medicaid, Age and Income
http://blogs.census.gov/2013/09/17/medicare-and-medicaid-age-and-income-2/

---

Earlier editions of
Income, Poverty and Health Insurance in the United States
- back to 1985
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/incpovhlth/index.html

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau
http://www.census.gov/

-----------------------------------------------------------

Selected NGO analysis

-----------------------------------------------------------

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:
[ http://www.cbpp.org/ ]

What the new Census figures demonstrate
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=4017

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
Lifted 4 Million People Out of Poverty in 2012 and Reduced Hardship for Millions More.

http://www.offthechartsblog.org/census-snap-lifted-4-million-people-out-of-poverty-in-2012-and-reduced-hardship-for-millions-more/

---

From the
Economic Policy Institute (EPI)
[ http://www.epi.org/ ]

Recovery Has Only Benefited the Top 5 Percent
http://www.epi.org/blog/numbers-income-poverty-health-insurance/

-----------------------------------------------------------

Selected media coverage

-----------------------------------------------------------

From the
New York Times:
[
http://www.nytimes.com/ ]

The Mismeasure of Poverty
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/18/opinion/the-mismeasure-of-poverty.html
By Sheldon H. Danziger
September 17, 2013

The Census Bureau reported yesterday that the poverty rate in America held stable between 2011 and 2012, at about 15 percent. According to the official measure, poverty today is higher than it was in 1973, when it reached a historical low of 11.1 percent. To many, this dismaying fact suggests that taxpayers waste billions of dollars a year fighting a war on poverty that has been largely lost.

---
NOTE : The next eight links below were copied from the University of Wisconsin's Poverty Dispatch for September 17, 2013:
[ http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/09/17/ ]
---

From the
Minneapolis Star-Tribune:

[ http://www.startribune.com/ ]

Poor in America: A record 46.5 million below poverty line; rate remains stuck at 15 percent
http://www.startribune.com/politics/national/224022371.html

---

From the
New York Times:
[ http://www.nytimes.com/ ]

Median income and poverty rate hold steady, Census Bureau finds
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/18/us/median-income-and-poverty-rate-hold-steady-census-bureau-finds.html

Percentage of Americans lacking health coverage falls again
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/18/us/percentage-of-americans-lacking-health-coverage-falls-again.html

---

From the
Cleveland Plain Dealer:

[ http://www.cleveland.com/ ]

Census Bureau reports no change in income and poverty nationally; drop in uninsured rate
http://www.cleveland.com/datacentral/index.ssf/2013/09/census_bureau_reports_no_chang.html

---

From
CNNMoney:

[ http://money.cnn.com ]

15% of Americans Living in Poverty
http://money.cnn.com/2013/09/17/news/economy/poverty-income/

---

From the
Los Angeles Times:
[ http://www.latimes.com/ ]

Poverty rates, median income unchanged in 2012, despite recovery
http://www.latimes.com/business/money/la-fi-mo-census-poverty-income-20130917,0,5330409.story

---

From USA Today:
[ http://www.usatoday.com/ ]

Census: Household incomes holding steady
[ http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/09/17/census-median-household-income/2825129/ ]

---

From the
Wall Street Journal:
[ http://online.wsj.com/ ]

Racked by recession and soft recovery, U.S. incomes finally stabilize
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323981304579081042445314788.html

---

From the
Poverty Dispatch:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/09/17/
Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the US: 2012
- 8 articles from American media




Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/news_conferences/20120912_ip_newsconf.html
September 12, 2012

------------

On September 12, 2012, the U.S. Census Bureau [ http://www.census.gov/ ] released the 2011 edition of its annual report entitled
Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States.

From the U.S. Census Bureau:

Complete report and related
Census Bureau resources:

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb12-172.html
News Release
September 12, 2012
- includes detailed highlights of the report

The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that in 2011, median household income declined, the poverty rate was not statistically different from the previous year and the percentage of people without health insurance coverage decreased. Real median household income in the United States in 2011 was $50,054, a 1.5 percent decline from the 2010 median and the second consecutive annual drop. The nation's official poverty rate in 2011 was 15.0 percent, with 46.2 million people in poverty. After three consecutive years of increases, neither the poverty rate nor the number of people in poverty were statistically different from the 2010 estimates. The number of people without health insurance coverage declined from 50.0 million in 2010 to 48.6 million in 2011, as did the percentage without coverage - from 16.3 percent in 2010 to 15.7 percent in 2011. These findings are contained in the report Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011.

The report:

Income, Poverty, and
Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011
(PDF - 2.2MB, 89 pages)
http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p60-243.pdf
Released September 12, 2012

Income data
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/income/
---
State data (xls format)
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/income/data/historical/household/2011/H08_2011.xls

Poverty data
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/
--- State data (xls format)
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/historical/hstpov21.xls

Health insurance data
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/hlthins/

---

Fact Sheets:

Fact Sheet: Health Insurance 2011 [PDF]
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/pdf/healthinsfactsheet2011.pdf

Fact Sheet: Income and Poverty 2011 [PDF]
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/pdf/ipfactsheet2011.pdf

Income and Poverty Estimates: Guidance on When to Use Each Survey [PDF]
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/pdf/ipguidance2011.pdf

---

How We Measure Poverty and Income
http://blogs.census.gov/2012/09/06/how-we-measure-poverty-and-income/
Posted on September 6, 2012
B
y: David Johnson
Income, poverty and health insurance estimates for 2011 from the Current Population Survey (CPS) will be released Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. One-year estimates from the 2011 American Community Survey (ACS) will be released on Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012. In all likelihood, the national estimates from these two sources will not be identical. Why not? Which is correct? Well, it’s complicated...

Source:
Random Samplings:
the official Census Bureau blog

http://blogs.census.gov/censusblog/

---

Earlier editions of
Income, Poverty and Health Insurance in the United States
- back to 1985
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/incpovhlth/index.html

Source:
Census Bureau
http://www.census.gov/

------------------------------------
NGO and media analysis
------------------------------------

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP):

Statement: Greenstein on Census’ 2011 Poverty, Income, & Health Insurance Data
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3832
September 12, 2012
[The new] Census data contained the good, the fair, and the ugly. The good news is that the number of uninsured Americans dropped by 1.3 million and the share of Americans without insurance fell by more than in any year since 1999; the fair news is that the poverty rate stayed flat after rising in the previous three years and seven of the previous 10; and the ugly news is that median household income fell by 1.5 percent after adjusting for inflation while income inequality widened significantly.

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Economic Policy Institute (EPI):

Already more than a lost decade:
Poverty and income trends continue to paint a bleak picture

http://www.epi.org/publication/lost-decade-poverty-income-trends-continue-2/
September 12, 2012
The 2011 poverty and income data released this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau are yet another reminder of the continued weight of the Great Recession on U.S. families.

NOTE : For a comprehensive examination of how we got to where we are today, including additional details on income, poverty, economic mobility, wages, jobs, and wealth, see EPI’s The State of Working America, 12th Edition [ http://stateofworkingamerica.org/ ], released on September 11.

Source:
Economic Policy Institute

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP):

When a Headline Isn't News: Child Poverty Persists
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hannah-matthews/when-a-headline-isnt-news_b_1877626.html
September 12, 2012
By Hannah Matthews
One in four young children under age 6 in the U.S. lives in poverty. But this fact, from today's U.S. Census report on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage in 2011, is not breaking news. In fact, perhaps one of the most troubling things about today's report is just how predictable these statistics are.
(...)
Policymakers have a choice.
We can tell more than 5 million children: you are on your own.
Or, we can offer them a hand and open up doors of opportunity for them.

[ Hannah Matthews is Director of Child Care and Early Education at CLASP.]

Found in:
Huffington Post
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the University of Wisconsin's
Poverty Dispatch:

Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the US: 2011
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/09/12/
September 12, 2012
Selected media coverage of the release of this report.
- incl. links to related articles in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune, CNN Money and the Los Angeles Times

Source:
Poverty Dispatch
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the Washington Post:

Number of uninsured Americans drops by 1.3 million, census report shows
http://goo.gl/2BDba
By N.C. Aizenman
September 12
One spot of good news in the census data released Wednesday was on the health-care front: For the first time in three years, the share of Americans without health insurance declined, with the number of uninsured dropping by 1.3 million people from 2010 to 2011.
A major factor was an influx of newly insured young adults, many of whom benefitted from a provision in the 2010 health-care law requiring insurers to let parents keep adult children on their plans up to age 26.
But for most other age groups, the numbers largely reflected the continuation of a long-running shift away from private insurance toward government coverage — with Medicare and Medicaid picking up much of the slack left by the steady erosion of employment-based insurance

Source:
Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the New York Times:

Fewer Uninsured People
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/13/opinion/fewer-uninsured-people.html
September 12, 2012
The number of Americans who lack health insurance declined last year, the first drop since 2007. This is, in large part, the result of the health care reform law and better coverage under public programs like Medicaid. This also shows why repealing the health care law or revamping and shrinking Medicaid, as many Republicans want to do, would be disastrous moves. The Census Bureau reported on Wednesday that the number of people without health coverage fell to 48.6 million in 2011, or 15.7 percent of the population, down from 49.9 million, or 16.3 percent of the population, in 2010. Health experts attributed a big chunk of the drop to a provision in the health care reform law that allows children to remain on their parents’ policies until age 26. Some three million young adults took advantage of that provision, other surveys show.

Source:
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/




Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010

____________________________

From the U.S. Census Bureau:

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010
News Release and Summary of Key Findings
September 13, 2011
The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that in 2010, median household income declined, the poverty rate increased and the percentage without health insurance coverage was not statistically different from the previous year. Real median household income in the United States in 2010 was $49,445, a 2.3 percent decline from the 2009 median.

The nation's official poverty rate in 2010 was 15.1 percent, up from 14.3 percent in 2009 - the third consecutive annual increase in the poverty rate. There were 46.2 million people in poverty in 2010, up from 43.6 million in 2009 - the fourth consecutive annual increase and the largest number in the 52 years for which poverty estimates have been published.

The number of people without health insurance coverage rose from 49.0 million in 2009 to 49.9 million in 2010, while the percentage without coverage -16.3 percent - was not statistically different from the rate in 2009.

This information covers the first full calendar year after the December 2007-June 2009 recession.

These findings are contained in the report Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010. The results for the nation were compiled from information collected in the 2011 Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC).

-----------------------------------------
Complete report and related
Census Bureau resources
-----------------------------------------

Income, Poverty, and
Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010
(PDF - 4.9MB, 95 pages)
Issued September 2011

* Fact Sheet: Health Insurance 2010 [PDF - 29K, 3 pages]
* Fact Sheet: Income and Poverty 2010 [PDF- 31K, 2 pages]
* Income and Poverty Estimates: Guidance on When to Use Each Survey [PDF - 51K, 2 pages]

* Highlights
* Tables & Figures
* Detailed Tables
* Historical Tables
* Source and Accuracy
[PDF - 1.4MB]

------------

Census Blog Entry:

Households Doubling Up
September 13, 2011
By David Johnson, US Census Bureau
In coping with economic challenges over the past few years, many of us have combined households with other family members or individuals. These “doubled-up” households are defined as those that include at least one “additional” adult – in other words, a person 18 or older who is not enrolled in school and is not the householder, spouse or cohabiting partner of the householder. The Census Bureau reported today that the number and share of doubled-up households and adults sharing households across the country increased over the course of the recession, which began in December 2007 and ended in June 2009. In spring 2007, there were 19.7 million doubled-up households, amounting to 17.0 percent of all households. Four years later, in spring 2011, the number of such households had climbed to 21.8 million, or 18.3 percent. All in all, 61.7 million adults, or 27.7 percent, were doubled-up in 2007, rising to 69.2 million, or 30.0 percent, in 2011.

Source:
Random Samplings:
the official Census Bureau blog

------------

Earlier editions of
Income, Poverty and Health Insurance in the United States
- back to 1985

-------------

Related Census Bureau links:

Income
- incl. links to : * Income Statistics * Guidance about Sources * Income Inequality * State Median Income * Local Area Data * Historical Data

Poverty
- incl. links to : * Overview / Highlights * Definitions * Poverty Data Sources * Microdata Access * Poverty Thresholds

Health Insurance
- incl. links to : * Help for CPS Users * Revised CPS ASEC Health Insurance Data - * Help for ACS Users - * Help for SIPP Users
----
* CPS ASEC =Annual Social and Economic Supplement [ part of the Current Population Survey ]
* ACS = American Community Survey
* SIPP = Survey of Income and Program Participation

Source:
Census Bureau

------------------------------------
NGO and media Analysis
------------------------------------

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Understanding the New Census Poverty & Health Data:
* Poverty Rate Second-Highest In 45 Years; Record Numbers Lacked Health Insurance, Lived In Deep Poverty
* Greenstein Statement on Census’ 2010 Poverty, Income, & Health Insurance Data
Off the Charts Blog Post: Tuesday’s Census Report in Pictures
Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

---

From the
Economic Policy Institute:
*
A lost decade: Poverty and income trends continue to paint a bleak picture for working families - September 14, 2011
* 2010 marks another year of decline for employer-sponsored health insurance coverage - September 13, 2011
* 2010 marks another year of decline for employer-sponsored health insurance coverage - September 13, 2011
Source:
Economic Policy Institute

---

From the
Center for Law and Social Policy:
*
How Many More Have to Fall into Poverty Before We Say Enough? - September 13, 2011
* Poverty Reduction: The Invisible Hand of Government - September 13, 2011
* Why the New Poverty Numbers Should be a Wake Up Call - September 13, 2011
* To Grow the Economy, We Must Pay Attention to Child Poverty - September 13, 2011
Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy

-------------------------------------------------------

From the University of Wisconsin's
Poverty Dispatch :
Click a date below to access all links to articles for that date.

September 13, 2011:
* U.S. Poverty rate up, household income down, By Arlette Saenz, September 13, 2011, ABC News
* Household income falls, poverty rate rises, By Conor Dougherty, September 13, 2011, Wall Street Journal
* Nearly 1 in 6 Americans in poverty, Census says, By Hope Yen (AP), September 13, 2011, Houston Chronicle
* Poverty rate rises in America, By Annalyn Censky, September 13, 2011, CNNMoney.com
* No change in number of uninsured Americans, By Kirsten Stewart, September 13, 2011, Salt Lake Tribune

September 14, 2011:
* U.S. poverty totals hit a 50-year high, By Don Lee, Noam Levey and Alejandro Lazo, September 14, 2011, Los Angeles Times
* Young people hit hard as U.S. poverty rate increases to 15.1 percent, By Matt O’Brien, September 13, 2011, San Jose Mercury News
* Census figures show record numbers of Americans in poverty, By Alfred Lubrano, September 14, 2011, Philadelphia Inquirer
* Government aid keeps millions out of poverty, By Tami Luhby, September 14, 2011, CNNMoney.com
* Rising poverty rate shows holes in safety net, By John W. Schoen, September 13, 2011, MSNBC.com
* Poverty rate rises, especially for Hispanics, By Schuyler Velasco, September 13, 2011, Christian Science Monitor

September 15, 2011
* Census finds more people than ever living in poverty, By William Mullen, Ryan Haggerty and John Keilman, September 14, 2011, Chicago Tribune
* California poverty rate rises in 2010 for fourth year in a row, By Alana Semuels and Duke Helfand, September 13, 2011, Los Angeles Times
* State poverty hits 10.8%, incomes slide, By Warren Wolfe and Jeremy Olson, September 13, 2011, Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune
* Poverty hitting harder in Indiana, By Bill McCleery, September 13, 2011, Indianapolis Star
* Median income in Ohio hits 27-year low, By Bill Bush, September 14, 2011, Columbus Dispatch
* Poverty at new heights in Georgia, nation, By Carrie Teegardin and Craig Schneider, September 13, 2011, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

September 16, 2011
* Poor are still getting poorer, but downturn’s punch varies, Census data show, By Jason DeParle and Sabrina Tavernise, September 15, 2011, New York Times
* Health insurance, poverty: Numbers of poor, uninsured increase, census figures show, By Jeff Kunerth and Kate Santich, September 13, 2011, Orlando Sentinel
* State Medicaid Programs - North Dakota, Utah, California
* Unemployment and Jobless Benefits
* State Minimum Wage - Oregon
* SAT Scores and Academic Achievement

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Nearly one in six in poverty in the U.S.; children hit hard, Census says
September 13

By Michael A. Fletcher
Nearly one in six Americans was living in poverty last year, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday, a development that is ensnaring growing numbers of children and offering vivid proof of the recession’s devastating impact. The report portrays a nation where many people are slipping backward in the wake of a downturn that left 14 million people out of work and pushed unemployment rates to levels not seen in decades.

[ Comments (3000+) ]

Source:
Washington Post

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Soaring Poverty Casts Spotlight on ‘Lost Decade’
By Sabrina Tavernise

September 13, 2011
WASHINGTON — Another 2.6 million people slipped into poverty in the United States last year, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday, and the number of Americans living below the official poverty line, 46.2 million people, was the highest number in the 52 years the bureau has been publishing figures on it. And in new signs of distress among the middle class, median household incomes fell last year to levels last seen in 1996

[ Comments (800) ]

Graphics : Income and Poverty Rate at 1990s Levels

Source:
New York Times

[ Related NY Times articles and interactive features ]

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Counterpoint:

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Understanding Poverty in the United States: Surprising Facts About America's Poor
By Robert Rector and Rachel Sheffield
September 13, 2011
The Census Bureau’s annual poverty report presents a misleading picture of poverty in the United States. Few of the 46.2 million people identified by the Census Bureau as being “in poverty” are what most Americans would consider poor—lacking nutritious food, adequate warm housing, or clothing. The typical “poor” American lives in an air-conditioned house or apartment and has cable TV, a car, multiple color TVs, a DVD player, and a VCR among other conveniences. (...) Congress should reorient the massive welfare state to promote self-sufficient prosperity rather than expanded dependence. As the recession ends, able-bodied recipients should be required to work or prepare for work as a condition of receiving aid.
Source:
Issues : Poverty and Inequality
[ The Heritage Foundation]
The Heritage Foundation is a research and educational institution—a think tank—whose mission is to formulate and promote conservative public policies based on the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional American values, and a strong national defense.

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How Rich Are Poor People?
The Census Bureau says there are more Americans in poverty than ever.
Are the poor better off today than they used to be?
By Brian Palmer
September 14, 2011
How many amenities do people below the poverty line tend to have?
More than 46 million Americans are now living below the poverty threshold, according to numbers released by the Census Bureau on Tuesday. That's the highest number since the Bureau started keeping track of the statistic in 1959. Are poor people better off now than they were 52 years ago?
Much better, in absolute material terms. Robert Rector of the Heritage Foundation recently published an analysis of the lifestyle of people below the poverty line in 21st-century America. He found that many poor people have amenities that were available only to the wealthy (if they existed at all) in 1959.
Source:
Slate Magazine

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Counter-counterpoint:

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Study dismisses poverty, but try telling that to the poor
By Courtland Milloy
September 13, 2011
As the fortunes of middle-class Americans continue to dwindle, some might be wondering what it’s like to be poor. A study released this year by the Heritage Foundation argues that living in poverty isn’t as bad as most of us imagine. Indeed, from the way poverty is portrayed by the conservative think tank, you’d think that the average poor person was actually living large.
Source:
Washington Post




Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009

September 16, 2010

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009
News Release
and
Summary of Key Findings
September 16, 2010
The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that real median household income in the United States in 2009 was $49,777, not statistically different from the 2008 median. The nation's official poverty rate in 2009 was 14.3 percent, up from 13.2 percent in 2008 — the second statistically significant annual increase in the poverty rate since 2004. There were 43.6 million people in poverty in 2009, up from 39.8 million in 2008 — the third consecutive annual increase. Meanwhile, the number of people without health insurance coverage rose from 46.3 million in 2008 to 50.7 million in 2009, while the percentage increased from 15.4 percent to 16.7 percent over the same period.

These findings are contained in the report Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009. The results for the nation were compiled from information collected in the 2010 Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC).

-----------------------------------------
Complete report and related
Census Bureaus resources
-----------------------------------------

Income, Poverty, and
Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009
(PDF - 1.1MB, 88 pages)
Issued September 2010

* Highlights
* Tables & Graphs
* Detailed Tables
* Historical Tables

------------

Fact Sheets
* Income and Poverty Fact Sheet
(PDF - 25K, 3 pages)
* Health Insurance Fact Sheet (PDF - 29K, 3 pages)

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Census Blog Entry
Income, Poverty and Health Insurance
September 16, 2010
The number of people in poverty in 2009 – 43.6 million – is the largest number ever recorded in this 51-year period. Partly this is because our population is much larger. The poverty rate in 2009 was the highest since 1994, but is 8 percentage points lower than it was in 1959.
Source:
Random Samplings:
the official Census Bureau blog

------------

Earlier editions of
Income, Poverty and Health Insurance in the United States
- back to 1985

-------------

Related Census Bureau links:

Income
- incl. links to : * Income Statistics * Guidance about Sources * Income Inequality * State Median Income * Local Area Data * Historical Data

Poverty
- incl. links to : * Overview / Highlights * Definitions * Poverty Data Sources * Microdata Access * Poverty Thresholds

Health Insurance
- incl. links to : * Help for CPS Users * Revised CPS ASEC Health Insurance Data - * Help for ACS Users - * Help for SIPP Users
----
* CPS ASEC =Annual Social and Economic Supplement [ part of the Current Population Survey ]
* ACS = American Community Survey
* SIPP = Survey of Income and Program Participation

Source:
Census Bureau

------------------------------------
Media and NGO Analysis
------------------------------------

From the
Washington Post:

Poverty rate at highest level in half-century, data show
By Carol Morello
September 16, 2010; 1:14 PM
One in seven Americans is living in poverty, the highest number in the half-century that the government has kept such statistics, the Census Bureau announced Thursday. Last year was the third consecutive year that the poverty rate climbed, in part because of the recession, rising from 13.2 percent in 2008 to 14.3 percent, or 43.6 million people, last year.

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From the
New York Times:

Recession Raises Poverty Rate to a 15-Year High
By ERIK ECKHOLM
September 16, 2010
The percentage of Americans struggling below the poverty line in 2009 was the highest it has been in 15 years, the Census Bureau reported Thursday, and interviews with poverty experts and aid groups said the increase appeared to be continuing this year. With the country in its worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, four million additional Americans found themselves in poverty in 2009, with the total reaching 44 million, or one in seven residents. Millions more were surviving only because of expanded unemployment insurance and other assistance.

------------

From
Poverty Dispatch
:

Fifteen related articles from various media sources - September 17
- Click the link above to access all of the articles below:
* Poverty rise stirs debate over aid programs, By Corey Dade, September 16, 2010, National Public Radio
* Poverty rate hits 15-year high, U.S. figures show, By Alfred Lubrano, September 17, 2010, Philadelphia Inquirer:
* ‘The new poor’: Poverty reaches historic levels, By Tony Pugh, September 16, 2010, Miami Herald
* 1 in 7 in U.S. lives below poverty line, By Don Lee and Alana Semuels, September 17, 2010, Los Angeles Times
* The new poor and the almost-poor: Will poverty rate climb more?, By Patrik Jonsson, September 16, 2010, Christian Science Monitor
* US adds 3.8 million more to ranks of the poor as poverty rate jumps, By Ron Scherer, September 16, 2010, Christian Science Monitor
* Despite recession, seniors see income gains, By Dennis Cauchon and Richard Wolf, September 17, 2010, USA Today
* Not quite poor, but struggling: Do seniors need their own poverty index?, By Matt O’Brien, September 16, 2010, Contra Costa Times
* Poverty rise reflects toll of recession, By Bill Bush and Rita Price, September 17, 2010, Columbus Dispatch
* A descent into poverty for millions, By Warren Wolfe and Jeremy Olson, Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune
* Poverty in Hawaii highest since ‘97, By Mary Vorsino, September 17, 2010, Honolulu Star-Advertiser
* Michigan’s poverty rate hits 14%, highest level in 16 years, By Mike Wilkinson and Catherine Jun, September 17, 2010, Detroit News
* Poverty at a 51-year high in the U.S., By Renée C. Lee, September 17, 2010, Houston Chronicle
* Texas seeks answers to rising poverty rate, By Robert T. Garrett and Kim Horner, September 17, 2010, Dallas Morning News
* One-time working men now the ‘fresh face of poverty’, By Rick Montgomery, September 16, 2010, Kansas City Star

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From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Statement: Robert Greenstein, Executive Director,
on Census’ 2009 Poverty and Health Insurance Data

By Robert Greenstein
September 14, 2010
The Census Bureau data for 2009 reflect the severity of the recent recession, as poverty rose sharply and the number of uninsured spiked. The new figures somewhat overstate the rise in poverty, however, because they do not count the bulk of direct assistance that the 2009 Recovery Act provided to households, which kept millions of Americans from falling into — or deeper into — poverty (as a broader measure of poverty that Census will release later this year is sure to show).

View the full statement:
HTML version
PDF version
(2 pages)

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From the
Economic Policy Institute:

Economic Policy Institute experts
respond to new data on income, poverty and health insurance

September 16, 2010
This morning’s release by the U.S. Census Bureau of the 2009 income and poverty numbers is yet another reminder of the severity of the Great Recession that began in December 2007.

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From the
Center for Law and Social Policy :

September 16, 2010
*
Statement Regarding Census Poverty Numbers by Alan W. Houseman : 'We Should Collectively Be Appalled'
* Will We Let a Generation Grow Up Poor? by Danielle Ewen and Hannah Matthews
* Make Kids' Brains "Too Big to Fail" by Jodie Levin-Epstein
* Record Number in Poverty Hits African Americans Hardest by Rhonda Tsoi-A-Fatt

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Related links (preceding
the release of the report):

Record gains for US poverty with elections looming
By HOPE YEN and LIZ SIDOTI
The Associated Press
September 12, 2010
WASHINGTON -- The number of people in the U.S. who are in poverty is on track for a record increase on President Barack Obama's watch, with the ranks of working-age poor approaching 1960s levels that led to the national war on poverty. Census figures for 2009 - the recession-ravaged first year of the Democrat's presidency - are to be released in the coming week, and demographers expect grim findings.(...) Beginning next year, the government plans to publish new, supplemental poverty figures that are expected to show even higher numbers of people in poverty than previously known. The figures will take into account rising costs of medical care, transportation and child care, a change analysts believe will add to the ranks of both seniors and working-age people in poverty.
[ includes non-government, unofficial speculation about what the poverty numbers are likely to look like.]
Source:
Washington Post

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Understanding the Census Bureau’s Upcoming Report on Poverty
Official Figures Will Miss Majority of Recovery Act's Assistance to Households
By Arloc Sherman
September 14, 2010
On September 16, the Census Bureau will release official figures on poverty in 2009.
Below are three facts to keep in mind when reviewing the new data:
1. The Official Poverty Measure May Increase by a Record Amount in 2009
2. Official Figures Omit the Impact of Large Parts of the Recovery Act
3. Poverty is Likely to Rise Even Higher Next Year if Key Recovery Provisions Are Allowed to Expire
Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities



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