Canadian Social Research Links

Manitoba

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Manitoba

Updated October 6, 2016
Page révisée le 6 octobre 2016

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* Key Welfare Links in Manitoba (scroll down to the grey box below, right column)
* Latest Manitoba Budget
- April 30, 2015 (see"NEW" below)
* Poverty reduction in Manitoba
* The Manitoba Mincome Experiment
* Non-governmental sites in Manitoba

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NEW

Campaign 2000 releases 2016 Report Card
http://campaign2000.ca/490-2/
November 24, 2016
Campaign 2000 released its 2016 annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada on Thursday, November 24, in Ottawa. This date marks 27 years since the unanimous House of Commons’ resolution to end child poverty in Canada and seven years after the entire House of Commons voted “to develop an immediate plan to end poverty for all in Canada.”

Press Release (English)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016Campaign2000NationalMediaReleaseENGLISH.pdf

Communiqué - Français
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016Campaign2000NationalMediaReleaseFRENCH.pdf

---------------------------------

Complete report (English) (PDF - 1.9MB, 20 pages)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Campaign2000NationalReportCard2016Eng.pdf
The 2016 national report card, A Road Map to Eradicate Child & Family Poverty, highlights the compelling reasons why the federal government needs to adopt a child and family poverty reduction lens on all policy, program and spending decisions.
NOTE : The complete report is available in English only.)

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://campaign2000

-------------------------------

The national report card release corresponds with several Campaign 2000 partners releasing
provincial report cards on child and family poverty in the following cities:

Vancouver, British Columbia:

Regina, Saskatoon:

Winnipeg, Manitoba:
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/MBChildFamilyReportCard2016.pdf

Toronto, Ontario:

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Saint John, New Brunswick:

http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/PEIReportCard2016.pdf

-- --------------------

Campaign 2000 Infographic : Issues and Solutions (small PDF file)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/NationalC2000Infographic2016.pdf


Average Rent Prices for September 2016
with Data Provided for 20 Canadian Cities
- avg. rents for studio/bachelor - 1-2-3bedrooms

New report on rents in various communities across Canada
http://www.rentseeker.ca/blog/index.php/newly-updated-rental-data-shows-average-rents-for-20-canadian-cities/2917
News Release
September 14, 2016
By the RentSeeker Team
Canada’s Leading Real Estate Listing Website and Apartment Finder, published newly updated rental data in what’s become it’s [sic] highly popular Infographic format, which has become a popular resource for renters, landlords, economists, and journalists which shows Average Rent Prices for September 2016 with data provided for 20 Canadian cities. (Click the link above to select an apartment size and one of the 20 Canadian cities below, in no particular order.)

* Toronto : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Toronto.aspx * Lethbridge : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Lethbridge.aspx
   
* Ottawa : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Ottawa.aspx * Hamilton : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Hamilton.aspx
   

* Calgary : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Calgary.aspx

* Mississauga : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Mississauga.aspx
   
* Montreal : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Montreal.aspx

Niagara Falls : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Niagara_Falls.aspx

   
* Edmonton : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Edmonton.aspx

* Oshawa : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Oshawa.aspx

   

* Vancouver : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Vancouver.aspx

* Burnaby : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Burnaby.aspx

   

* Kingston : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Kingston.aspx

* Brampton : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Brampton.aspx

   

* London : http://www.rentseeker.ca/London.aspx

* St. Catharines : http://www.rentseeker.ca/St._Catharines.aspx

   

* Sarnia : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Sarnia.aspx

* Halifax : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Halifax.aspx

   

* Windsor : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Windsor.aspx

 

Source:
RentSeeker.ca
– Canada’s Leading Real Estate Listing Website and Apartment Finder
http://www.rentseeker.ca/

 


Campaign 2000 Report Card on
Child and Family Poverty in Canada, 2015

LET’S DO THIS – LET’S END CHILD POVERTY FOR GOOD:
Campaign 2000 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada, 2015
(PDF 1.2MB, 20 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/NationalReportCardEn2015.pdf

Provincial report:

The Campaign 2000 website [ http://www.campaign2000.ca/ ] features report cards from provincial partners in Nova Scotia, Manitoba and British Columbia, aas well as media releases from those provinces, and an infographic featuring key findings and recommendations. Report Cards from our other provincial partners, including Ontario, will be released in early 2016.

Manitoba Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2015 (PDF - 10 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/Manitoba2015RepCard.pdf

Source:
Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/

Manitoba Budget 2015 (April 30, 2015)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/index.html
- main budget page, incl. links to all budget papers, some of which appear below

Version française des documents budgétaires:
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/index.fr.html
[NOTA : Certains documents budgétaires sont disponibles en anglais seulement ]

Steady growth, even more good jobs : Budget 2015 keeps building
Record Infrastructure Investments Create Jobs, Protect Services: Minister Dewar
http://news.gov.mb.ca/news/index.html?archive=&item=34730
News release
April 30, 2015
Budget 2015 is a plan to deliver on the priorities of Manitoba families – more jobs, better roads and stronger services, Finance Minister Greg Dewar said today.

THE BUDGET (PDF - 397KB, 48 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/papers/summary.pdf
April 30, 2015

The 2015 Manitoba Budget Address (PDF - 127K, 12 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/papers/speech15.pdf
Honourable Greg Dewar
Minister of Finance
April 30, 2015

Economic Review and Outlook (PDF)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/papers/economy.pdf

Supplementary Financial Information (PDF)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/papers/finstats.pdf

The Manitoba Advantage (PDF)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/papers/advantage.pdf

Update on Fiscal Arrangements (PDF)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/papers/fiscal_arrangements.pdf

Reducing Poverty and Promoting Social Inclusion (PDF - 195KB, 24 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/papers/poverty.pdf
[Excerpt]
ALL ABOARD: MANITOBA’S POVERTY REDUCTION AND SOCIAL INCLUSION STRATEGY
In 2009, Manitoba launched All Aboard, the province’s Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion Strategy. Two years later, in 2011, The Poverty Reduction Strategy Act was passed. Manitoba is one of four provinces and one territory with poverty reduction legislation. However, Manitoba is the only province that requires the government to table a budget paper linking the Poverty Reduction Strategy to the annual budget.

----------------------------------------------

Related links:

All Aboard: Manitoba's Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion Strategy
http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/index.html

All Aboard Newsletter - Winter 2015 (PDF - 886 KB)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/pubs/newsletter_winter_15.pdf
[ Earlier All Aboard newsletters : http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/pub_archive.html ]

All Aboard Publications and Resources
http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/resources_publications.html
- includes links to annual reports, action plans, budget papers, legislation, strategy and public consultations

----------------------------------------------

Related media
coverage from CBCNews:

Manitoba budget highlights: tax credits, minimum wage increase and more:
Province pledges to expand seniors' school tax rebate and tax credit for caregivers
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-budget-highlights-tax-credits-minimum-wage-increase-and-more-1.3056145
April 30, 2015

Manitoba's budget focuses on infrastructure, but maintains deficit
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-s-budget-focuses-on-infrastructure-but-maintains-deficit-1.3056133

Manitoba budget sets aside $1.26B for infrastructure
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-budget-sets-aside-1-26b-for-infrastructure-1.3054983

Manitoba's finance minister says budget won't to be balanced until 2018
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-s-finance-minister-says-budget-won-t-to-be-balanced-until-2018-1.3048165

------------------------------------------------------

More coverage of the Manitoba Budget 2015
From Make Poverty History Manitoba (MPHM)
and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Manitoba Office

Manitoba Budget 2015:
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget15/index.html
(April 30, 2015)

A poverty reduction budget for Manitoba
http://makepovertyhistorymb.com/2015/05/04/a-poverty-reduction-budget-for-manitoba/
May 4, 2015
The provincial government has responded to your calls to invest in housing in Budget 2015!
MPHM partnered with Right to Housing on a campaign focused on two requests to the provincial government.

The Province responded positively on both:

Budget 2015 commits to fully implementing Rent Assist this year – that means Manitobans on Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) who live in private rental housing will receive a shelter benefit that is equal to 75% of median market rent (MMR) beginning in December 2015. Click the link above to see a table for exact dollar amounts. Low-income Manitobans who are not on EIA may also be eligible to receive a shelter benefit through Rent Assist that is as high as 75% of MMR.

Budget 2015 also allocates an additional $10 million for Manitoba Housing and Community Development. This budget will be sufficient to fund existing commitments to increase the housing supply without reducing other important housing initiatives.

Source:
Make Poverty History Manitoba (MPHM)

http://makepovertyhistorymb.com/
MPHM ks a multi-sectoral collaborative coalition representing business, education, student, youth, Aboriginal, newcomer, labour, women’s, disability, urban, rural, and northern communities. The coalition’s efforts are directed primarily at the provincial level. However, its work contributes toward the achievement of Make Poverty History’s national campaign objectives.

---

Related links:

The View From Here 2015:
Manitobans call for a renewed poverty reduction plan
(PDF - 1.76MB, 92 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Manitoba%20Office/2015/01/View%20from%20here%20v8%20low-res.pdf
January 30, 2015
More than 95 organizations from across Manitoba, including Make Poverty History Manitoba, endorsed the 50 policy recommendations in The View from Here – a comprehensive community-based poverty reduction plan for Manitoba. Premier Greg Selinger has expressed his support for many of its recommendations. Budget 2015 includes many initiatives that directly respond to the recommendations in the plan...

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Manitoba Office : https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - National Office : http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

Battling child poverty : It takes political will
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/analysis/battling-child-poverty-302382351.html
By Sid Frankel
May 4, 2015
Why does Manitoba have such a high rate of children in care of the child welfare system, the highest rate of infant mortality and a youth crime severity index more than twice the Canadian average? There are a lot of reasons, but one of the prime drivers of all of these problems is child poverty.
In 2012, 83,990 Manitoba children lived in poverty (low income measure, after tax). This is almost three in 10 children (29 per cent), and is second only to Nunavut among Canadian provinces and territories. Did the province do enough about this serious situation in the 2015 budget? Not nearly.
There are four essential actions that it could have taken, but chose not to:
* First, it did not set targets and timelines for child poverty reduction.
* Second, Manitoba's income support programs must be improved.
* Third, the government did continue to expand child care spaces.
* Fourth, the provincial government should demand that the federal government use its constitutional spending power to support the provinces in child poverty reduction.

Sid Frankel is a professor of social work at the University of Manitoba.

Source:
Winnipeg Free Press
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/

From the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Social Assistance Summaries 2014 (PDF - 235KB, 49 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1062ENG.pdf
Anne Makhoul, March 2015

The informative Social Assistance Statistical Report [ http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/rhdcc-hrsdc/HS25-2-2008-eng.pdf ], published by the federal and provincial/territorial governments, was last released in 2010 and presented 2008 data. In its place, the Caledon Institute will publish a Social Assistance Summaries series as part of its web-based Canada Social Report, which will be operational in spring 2015. In the interim, this publication offers an advance viewing of 12 of Canada’s 13 provincial and territorial Social Assistance programs. Material from Nunavut was not available in time to be included in this paper.
A summary was prepared for each province and territory with input and feedback from government representatives in every jurisdiction. All reports include program descriptions and data on the number of social assistance cases and recipients dating, in most jurisdictions, from 1997 to 2014. The summaries will be updated annually.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

NEW



Minimum Wage:

Current and Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates for Adult Workers in Canada
- federal govt. site --- the best resource for info on current and upcoming minimum wage levels
Source : Minimum Wage Database


Hotlinks
The links below will take you directly to the following
Manitoba government and non-governmental web pages:

Government of Manitoba Home Page
Departmental Index
Daily News Releases
Disabilities Issues Office
Housing and Community Development
Finance
Jobs and the Economy
Family Services
Labour and Immigration
Status of Women
Education and Literacy
Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives

Status of Women
Health
Legislative Library of Manitoba
Manitoba Human Rights Commission
Manitoba Seniors and Healthy Aging Secretariat
Manitoba WorkInfoNet (MBWIN)
Laws and Regulations of Manitoba

Winnipeg Free Press
Winnipeg Harvest
City of Winnipeg
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy



Manitoba Provincial Election Resources
- October 4, 2011
Source:
Election Almanac
- complete coverage of federal, provincial and territorial elections in Canada including election results, public opinion polls, ridings and candidates, election news, electoral history, links, and more

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

 

Key welfare links

Department responsible for welfare
Jobs and the Economy
In January 2012, the EIA program transferred from Family Services and Labour to Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade (later renamed Jobs and the Economy) to improve access for income assistance recipients to services and programs that will enhance skills and opportunities for workforce attachment.

Name of the welfare program
Employment and Income Assistance (EIA)

Legislation
The Manitoba Assistance Act
(C.C.S.M. c. A150)
NOTE : The Manitoba Assistance Act replaced the Employment and Income Assistance Act on July 01, 2014.
- Assistance Regulation (PDF)
Source:
Laws and Regulations of Manitoba

Policy Manual
EIA Administrative Manual Online
- online welfare policy manual, includes legislation

Welfare statistics
See Social Assistance caseload/beneficiary statistics and expenditure information, 1997 to 2014 - this link takes you to a section of the Key Welfare Links page of this site. UPDATED APRIL 1, 2015
Go to the latest Departmental. annual report - welfare stats are under "Employment and Income Assistance Division"
See also:
Number of People on Welfare, March 1995 to March 2005
(PDF file - 133K, 1 page)
Source: National Council of Welfare

Welfare rates (benefits)
Click the welfare program link above, then select a client category (single parents, persons with a disability or general assistance category) to access an EIA brochure that includes benefit levels for that category.
OR
Click the Employment and Income Assistance Regulation link above. The benefit levels appear in Schedule "A" of the Regulation.

Latest search results on Google.ca for
"welfare, -child, -animal, Manitoba"
- Web search results
- News search results
- Blog search results

Related Links
From Jobs and the Economy (Dept. responsible for
Employment and Income Assistance [EIA] since January 2012):

*** Annual Report 2013 – 2014 (PDF - 1.23MB)
*** Annual Report 2012 – 2013 (PDF - 1.23MB)
*** Annual Report 2011 – 2012 (PDF - 1.23MB)
Annual Reports - Manitoba Family Services and Housing (2001-2002 to 2013-2014) [Family Services was the Dept. responsible for Employment and Income Assistance before Jobs and the Economy.]


For more information about welfare in other Canadian jurisdictions,
see the Canadian Social Research Links Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page

Government of Manitoba Home Page

Page d'accueil du Gouvernement
NOTA: Certains ministères offrent une version en français de leur page. Cliquez sur "version française" pour y accéder.
Répertoire des ministères

Daily News Releases
Departmental Index
Statutory Publications

Laws and Regulations of Manitoba - Manitoba provincial laws and regulations are available online for free.
This online service makes laws and regulations accessible for reference, research and private use
.



All ABoard : Manitoba's Poverty Reduction Strategy
NOTE: this link takes you to the Manitoba section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

Since May 2010, ALL links to content concerning poverty reduction strategies and campaigns have been moved to the above page from the individual provincial/territorial pages, including government and NGO links.


Government Departments

Department responsible for welfare:
Jobs and the Economy

The Department of Jobs and the Economy is the ministry
responsible for Employment and Income Assistance (welfare) in Manitoba

Statutory responsibility and funding for income supports for Employment and Income Assistance have transferred to the Department of Jobs and the Economy (formerly Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade). The Community Service Delivery Division of Manitoba Family Services continues to deliver these benefits (including child welfare services provided by the Winnipeg Services, and Rural and Northern Services Branches, and the Province’s income assistance programs for eligible citizens. The two Departments work together closely to maximize training and employment opportunities for all Manitobans as well as ensure appropriate financial and social supports for those who need them.

Source:
Page 23 of the
Manitoba Family Services Annual Report 2013 – 2014
(PDF - 2.7MB, 111 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/fs/about/pubs/fs_ar_2013-2014.pdf

Earlier Family Services annual reports:
http://www.gov.mb.ca/fs/about/annual_reports.html
(incl. Employment and Income Assistance)

---

From Jobs and the Economy (Dept. responsible for
Employment and Income Assistance [EIA] since January 2012):

*** Annual Report 2013 – 2014 (PDF - 1.23MB)
*** Annual Report 2012 – 2013 (PDF - 1.23MB)
*** Annual Report 2011 – 2012 (PDF - 1.23MB)

Annual Reports - Manitoba Family Services and Housing (2001-2002 to 2013-2014)
Family Services was the Dept. responsible for Employment and Income Assistance before Jobs and the Economy.

---

Manitoba Government introduces new programs to help
Employment and Income Assistance participants to find good jobs
http://news.gov.mb.ca/news/index.html?archive=&item=31446
News Release
June 19, 2014
The Manitoba government is introducing two new programs that will help employment and income assistance participants find good jobs while continuing to grow the province’s skilled workforce, Jobs and the Economy Minister Theresa Oswald announced today.

Through the Manitoba Works! Co-operative Work Experience Program, community-based organizations will help more than 250 employment and income assistance (EIA) participants to overcome barriers to employment and the challenges in finding and keeping good jobs.
(...)
Minister Oswald also announced details on Manitoba’s Rent Assist program, a new financial benefit available to both social assistance recipients and other low-income Manitobans. Rent Assist will replace the current EIA shelter allowance and RentAid programs. Individuals on EIA living in private rental accommodations will receive increases of between $50 and $70 per month for shelter costs. Single individuals, for example, will now receive $435 dollars per month, compared to the previous $365 per month.

Minister Oswald also reiterated the government’s commitment that rates will increase over a four-year period to 75 per cent of Median Market Rent (MMR) for EIA participants.

Manitoba Works! and Rent Assist are part of Manitoba’s Strategy for Sustainable Employment and a Stronger Labour Market (PDF - 413K, 8 pages):
http://www.gov.mb.ca/tce/eia/pubs/public_strategy_workforce_development.pdf

For more information, visit:
http://www.gov.mb.ca/allaboard/employment_strategy.html

Department responsible for
Employment and Income Assistance:

Jobs and the Economy
http://www.gov.mb.ca/jec/index.html

-------------------------------------------------------------

From
CBC News Manitoba:

Manitoba boosts rental allowance, introduces work program
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-boosts-rental-allowance-introduces-work-program-1.2680741
June 19, 2014
Rental allowance is increasing in Manitoba after years of being stagnant and falling far behind the soaring costs of rent. People on employment and income assistance (EIA) and living in private rental accommodations will receive increases of between $50 and $70 per month for shelter costs. That means single individuals, for example, will receive $435 per month, compared to the previous $365. It is part of a larger overhaul to the rental allowance program. Oswald introduced Rent Assist, a new program for both social assistance recipients and other low-income earners, which will replace the current EIA shelter allowance and RentAid programs.

See also:
Manitoba 2014 budget tackles jobs, education and poverty

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-2014-budget-tackles-jobs-education-and-poverty-1.2562858
March 6, 2014

Source:
CBC News Manitoba
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba

Manitoba Family Services


NOTE : In January 2012, the Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) program, the marketAbilities Program, the Supported Employment and income supplement programs [55 Plus, the Manitoba Child Benefit (MCB), and RentAid] transferred from Family Services and Labour to Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade. The move was made to improve access for income assistance recipients to services and programs that will enhance skills and opportunities for workforce attachment.

Source:
Excerpt from the
2011-2012 Annual Report (PDF - 1.2MB, 114 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/jec/pdfs/11_12_ett_ar.pdf
of the Department of Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade
http://www.gov.mb.ca/jec/


NOTE: For key welfare links in Manitoba,
scroll back up to the grey text box on the page you're now reading.
--------------------

For more information about welfare in other Canadian jurisdictions,
see the Canadian Social Research Links Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page


From the Manitoba Ombudsman:

Manitoba Ombudsman releases her Report on
Manitoba's Employment and Income Assistance Program
(PDF - 234K, 9 pages) (dead link)
News Release
(incl. Executive Summary + Ombudsman’s recommendations)
May 26, 2010
Manitoba Ombudsman Irene Hamilton released a report on the Employment and Income Assistance Program of Family Services and Consumer Affairs. The report contains 68 recommendations for administrative improvement. (...) In its initial response to the report, the department noted that the collaborative undertaking "resulted in a well-balanced and informed report." The department added, "these reviews help programs determine strengths and identify ways to improve service delivery to increase efficiency and effectiveness."

--------------------------------------

The complete report:

Report on Manitoba's
Employment and Income Assistance Program
(PDF - 1MB, 134 pages) (dead link)
Prepared by Irene A. Hamilton, Manitoba Ombudsman
May 2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
* Executive Summary and Recommendations
* Introduction
* Employment and Income Assistance Program
--- Application for Employment and Income Assistance
--- Inadequate Disclosure of EIA Entitlements, Benefits, Rights and Responsibilities
--- The Right to Apply and Receive EIA Benefits
--- Application for Disability Category
--- Categorical Eligibility
--- Participants with Work Expectations
--- Participants with Multiple Persistent Barriers
--- Disability Category Participants
--- A Non-Categorical System
--- Rate Setting
--- Program Policy
--- Common-Law Relationships
--- Code of Conduct and Complaints
--- EIA Appeal Process
--- Staffing and Workload
--- Discretionary Decision Making
* Departmental Response

Bonus for welfare history buffs:

"The Employment and Income Assistance program was last reviewed externally in 1982/83 by the Manitoba Task Force on Social Assistance, chaired by Dr. Joseph C. Ryant. The report of the task force (the Ryant report) was issued publicly on August 11, 1983. The most significant change in the ensuing 25 years has been the abolition of the “two-tier” system, whereby people with disabilities and single parents were served by the province and people who were deemed employable were the responsibility of municipalities. This change occurred in 1999 in Winnipeg and elsewhere in the province in 2004. The program is now administered solely by the province." (Report, page 14)

Source:
Manitoba Ombudsman

Related links:

Ombudsman's report slams social assistance program
By Larry Kusch
May 27, 2010
The province's goal of moving people off welfare and into the workforce is undermined by poorly communicated policies, overwhelming staff caseloads and a failure, in some instances, to provide such basic job-searching tools as a telephone. Provincial ombudsman Irene Hamilton Wednesday released the first outside review of the province's social assistance programs since the early 1980s. Her probe arose out of complaints from 12 community organizations, many of which have clients on Manitoba's Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) program. According to Hamilton's report, very few caseworkers describe their workload as manageable, and many spoke of working in "crisis response mode."
Source:
Winnipeg Free Press

-------------------------------------

Welfare rules unfairly applied: Ombudsman
May 26, 2010
Manitoba's Ombudsman is recommending a slew of changes to improve the provincial welfare system and how clients are treated after finding that the rules of the system are sometimes unevenly applied, resulting in the possibility some people are getting more benefits than others. In a report into her findings released on Wednesday, Irene Hamilton has recommended the Employment and Income Assistance Program make 68 separate changes to make the social-assistance system better.
Source:
CBC Manitoba

--------------------------------------

Manitoba looks at debit cards for welfare recipients:
Plan would circumvent cheque-cashing companies’ fees
By Steve Lambert
May 12, 2010
Winnipeg — The Manitoba government is looking at giving welfare recipients special debit cards to get around the stigma, fees and hurdles that can come with cashing monthly cheques. The cards would be attached to an account where money would be deposited every month. People on social assistance would no longer have to wait for cheques to arrive in the mail and then find a place to cash them. They could spend money by swiping their card at any retail outlet, and the card would be automatically reloaded every month. (...) The government prefers to use direct deposit for welfare payments, but less than two-thirds of recipients have signed up. Many don’t have bank accounts and must pay fees at cheque-cashing companies to get their money. It’s why poverty-rights groups are encouraging the government to set up the debit cards.
Source:
Globe and Mail

--------------------------------------

Welfare conditions spur complaint to province
March 26, 2010
The quality of life on social assistance in Manitoba has triggered an ombudsman complaint against the Manitoba government. "There were a number of items on the complaint, such as people not getting information about what they're eligible for," said Paula Keirstead, spokesperson for the Community Employment and Income Assistance Education Program. "[And] people being detracted from applying for EIA, when everyone has the right." Keirstead was one of the signatories of the complaint.
Source:
CBC Manitoba

$30-Million strategy opening doors for Manitobans with Disability
New Investments Kick-start Consultations to Build Foundation for Comprehensive Strategy
June 4, 2009
News Release
The province is renewing its commitment to a long-term strategy for Manitobans who have disabilities with a $30-million down payment on more accessible housing, enhanced access to public buildings, more support for children with disabilities in child care, better employment services and improved supports for caregivers, Family Services and Housing Minister Gord Mackintosh, minister responsible for persons with disabilities, announced today. (...) As a basis for consultations, Mackintosh released a document that focuses on 10 priorities for action as the province seeks to build on its 2001 strategy: Full Citizenship: A Manitoba Strategy on Disability.

The new discussion paper:

Opening Doors: Manitoba's Commitment to Persons with Disabilities (PDF 1.83MB, 46 pages)
June 2009
(...) In 2001, the Manitoba Government released Full Citizenship: A Manitoba Provincial Strategy on Disability – a policy document detailing the province’s vision for the full participation and inclusion of persons with disabilities in Manitoba. Over the past eight years, this strategy has guided the province’s approach to disability. We have made significant strides in each of the strategy’s four building blocks: income support, access to government, disability supports and employment for persons with disabilities. (...) The goal of this discussion paper is to expand on the vision for persons with disabilities that was outlined in the 2001 strategy.

Manitoba's 2001 strategy:

Full Citizenship: A Manitoba Strategy on Disability (2001)
The White Paper, Full Citizenship: A Manitoba Strategy on Disability, proposes a comprehensive Provincial strategy on disability. It responds to recommendations from the disabilities community in the areas of access to government, employment, disability supports, services to Aboriginal persons with disabilities and income supports. It further proposes measures to enhance government accountability for access and inclusion of persons with disabilities.

Source:
Manitoba Disabilities Issues Office
[ Manitoba Family Services and Housing ]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

May 21, 2009
Province launches homeless strategy with focus on mental-health housing
Up to 2,000 Manitobans to Benefit from 285 More Mental-health Housing Units, 600 to Benefit from New Portable Housing Benefit: Ministers
A new strategy to reduce and prevent homelessness will connect homeless people and those with mental-health challenges to stable, secure housing and support services, Healthy Living Minister Kerri Irvin-Ross and Family Services and Housing Minister Gord Mackintosh said today.
The HOMEWorks! homeless strategy includes 10 new initiatives in the following program areas:
* Emergency Shelters * Outreach * Housing with Services * Prevention

For more information on Manitoba's HOMEWorks! Homeless Strategy homeless strategy, go to the
ALL Aboard: Manitoba’s Poverty Reduction Strategy
home page, where you'll find links (in the right-hand margin) to:
* Homeless Shelters * Emergency Homeless Shelter Standards * The Salvation Army Project * Cold Weather Strategy * Homeless Outreach Team * Project Breakaway * Housing with Services * Portable Housing Benefit * Community Wellness Initiative * Homelessness Prevention Summit * Housing First * The Mental Health Commission of Canada * Housing and Supports for People with Mental Illness * Contacts

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Province Announces $1.8-million Boost For Manitobans Receiving 55 Plus Income Supplement
Changes Mean More Money For Low-income Older Manitobans: Irvin-Ross
April 30, 2008
Low-income Manitobans 55 and over will see increases of up to 45 per cent in their provincial income supplement to assist with living expenses, Healthy Living Minister Kerri Irvin-Ross, minister responsible for seniors, announced today.
Source:
Manitoba Family Services and Housing

Low-income Families in the North Get Increased Assistance to Address High Cost of Food and Essentials
March 15, 2007
Employment and income assistance (EIA) for residents of Manitoba’s northern and remote communities will increase effective April 1 to help residents buy expensive essential goods and nutritious food, Family Services and Housing Minister Gord Mackintosh announced today.

2002/03 - 2003/04 Employability Assistance for People with Disabilities (EAPD) Report
May 18, 2005
"This Canada-Manitoba Agreement on Employability Assistance for People with Disabilities (EAPD) Report describes activities that were cost-shared under the EAPD Agreement during the 2002/03 and 2003/04 fiscal years. The EAPD Agreement provides for the transfer of federal funding to provinces and territories for a range of programs and services that enhance the economic participation of working age adults with disabilities in the labour market. Programs and services eligible for funding under the EAPD Agreement must provide the skills, experience and supports necessary to assist persons with disabilities prepare for, attain and retain employment. Funding is also provided for programs and services for individuals who are experiencing vocational crisis."

Related Links:

Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPD)
Baseline Report 2004-2005

November 2004
"This Canada-Manitoba Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPD) Baseline Report describes objectives, services, target populations and planned expenditures for programs and services to be cost-shared under the LMAPD Multilateral Framework for the 2004/05 fiscal year. Societal indicators of labour market participation from Statistics Canada.s Participation Activity Limitation Survey for Canada and Manitoba are also included. The LMAPD provides for the transfer of federal funding to provinces and territories for a range of programs and services that enhance the economic participation of working age adults with disabilities in the labour market. Programs and services eligible for funding under the LMAPD must recognize the unique labour market challenges faced by persons with disabilities and consider the distinct needs of each individual with a disability in determining the set of interventions required to prepare for, attain and retain employment."

Legislation in effect today creates single income assistance system
June 01, 2004
"Legislation creating a single system of income assistance in Manitoba and ensuring services are more consistent and effective becomes effective today, Family Services and Housing Minister Christine Melnick has announced. The Employment and Income Assistance Amendment Act makes the province responsible for administering all provincial income assistance in rural and northern Manitoba. The change to the single system was requested by the Association of Manitoba Municipalities (AMM) after the province began delivering all provincial income assistance in Winnipeg in 1999."
Source:
Department of Family Services and Housing

Municipal Assistance Program
"Prior to June 1, 2004, non-disabled single people, childless couples and two-parent families with children received assistance from their local municipality under the municipal assistance program."

Source:
Department of Family Services and Housing

..............................................................................................................................

Improvements to Exemptions for People with Disabilities Receiving Employment and Income Assistance Announced
April 14, 2003
"Manitobans with disabilities living in the community can now use certain lump-sum payments to improve their quality of life, without affecting their Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) benefits (...) The new exemptions for EIA were developed with the community and allow people to obtain enhanced disability supports."

Manitoba Announces New Support For Families And Children
April 28, 2003
"More for Day Care and Children with Disabilities, Legislation to Improve Collection of Child Support Payments"
Related Links:
Health Child Manitoba
Source: Department of Family Services and Housing

Social Services Appeal Process Improved By New Legislation
News Release
February 19, 2002
"The new Social Services Appeal Board Act, which ensures Manitobans have a fair and impartial appeal process for a variety of social services programs, has been proclaimed."

Sale announces initiatives to improve housing
Family Services and Housing
October 11, 2000
The provincial government has introduced the Neighbourhood Housing Assistance Program (NHA) to help communities improve housing stock and has taken over
administration of the Residential Rehabilitation Assistance Program (RRAP) from the federal government. As well, a more generous heating allowance is being used
to calculate rental payments for public housing accommodations. More...

Government Restores Increase to the National Child Benefit Supplement
July 27, 2000

Building Independence : Lowering Barriers to Employment
Initiatives Designed to Help People Looking for Meaningful Work

$9.1 Million Increase In Funding For Manitoba’s Child Care System
Family Services Minister Announces New Direction For Employment Income Assistance Recipients

Manitoba Ministers Critical of Federal Homelessness Announcement

December 17, 1999

Family Services and Housing Minister to Chair Ministerial Council

Increased Spending to Enhance Programs, Services for Children and Youth

National Child Benefit Reinvestments Support Lower-income Families
Manitoba Government Introduces New Legislation to Support New Welfare Reform Initiatives
July 5, 1999
Learnfare: Providing Young Parents And Their Children With The Keys To Success Parents Under 18 on Welfare Required to Stay in School, Take Parenting Courses
June 18, 1999
Work Requirements for Able-bodied Recipients : New Policy Initiatives Build on Successful 1996 Welfare Reform Strategies
June 17, 1999
Province Looks To Improve Income Program For Disabled
June 1999

Provincial and City Social Assistance Merge
March 1999
New One-tier System to Improve Service For Manitobans in Need: Minister Bonnie Mitchelson 
$1.5 Million More Announced for Training
October 1998
Program to Assist Lower Income And Income Assistance Families (NCB Reinvestment) 
Manitoba Invests in Children and Families
June 17, 1998 
Manitoba to Invest in Children and Youth: Province Surpasses the National Child Benefit To Invest in Manitoba's Future
March 1998 
Investing in Children and Youth a Priority
March 1998 
Manitoba Reaffirms Commitment to National Child Benefit
January 1997 




Early Learning and Child Care


Healthy Child Manitoba
Click on either of the two links above to go directly to the respective pages on the Manitoba Government website, or browse through a selection of Manitoba ECD links on the Canadian Social Research Links Early Learning and Child Care Links page; click on "Provincial-Territorial Government ECD Links" near the top of that page and then scroll down to Manitoba.

Governments of Canada and Manitoba sign funding agreement on Early Learning and Child Care (dead link)
November 18, 2005
"Social Development Minister Ken Dryden today signed a funding agreement with Manitoba on early learning and child care. Under the new initiative, Manitoba will receive $174.4 million over five years to support its early learning and child care goals. Manitoba signed an Agreement-in-Principle on April 29, 2005, in which it committed to release an action plan identifying its priorities and how it intends to meet them."

Google Web Search Results : "Manitoba, early learning and child care agreement"
Google News search Results : "Manitoba, early learning and child care agreement"
Source:
Google.ca

For more info concerning the federal-provincial ELCC agreements signed in the spring of 2005, go to the Government Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd.htm

----------------------------------------

From Manitoba Family Services and Housing:

Moving Forward on Early Learning and Child Care - Manitoba's Action Plan - Next Steps
July 15, 2005
- includes the full text of the Agreement-in-Principle between the Government of Canada and the Government of Manitoba as well as the joint Canada-Manitoba news release announcing the agreement on April 29/05

Related Links:

Manitoba Child Care Program

Moving Forward on Early Learning and Child Care:
Agreement-in-Principle between the Government of Canada and the Government of Manitoba
(PDF file - 200K, 10 pages)
April 29, 2005

Related links:

Manitoba Child Day Care

Manitoba's Five-Year Plan For Child Care
April 2002

Early Learning and Child Care Services in Manitoba
May 6, 2005
Source:
Manitoba Family Services and Housing

Child Care Online

----------------------------------------

Google.ca News Search Results : "Canada, Manitoba, child care agreement"
Google.ca Web Search Results : "Canada, Manitoba, child care agreement"
Source:
Google.ca

For related links, go to the Government Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd.htm

New Directions in Child and Family Services (July 1996) 
Statement of Government Policy on Manitoba Children and Youth 
March 1998 
Province Releases ChildrenFirst Status Report
May 31, 1999
$9.1 Million Increase In Funding For Manitoba’s Child Care System


Department of Finance ------------------ version française

From the
Government of Manitoba:

Budget 2014: A Focused Plan to Create Good Jobs, Grow the Economy, Protect Front-line Services for Families
http://news.gov.mb.ca/news/index.html?item=30100&posted=2014-03-06
News Release
March 6, 2014
Budget 2014 is a balanced plan to create good jobs and more opportunities for young people to build their futures in Manitoba, while keeping life affordable and protecting the front-line services families count on, Finance Minister Jennifer Howard announced today.

Manitoba Budget 2014 - main budget page
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/index.html
- incl. links to budget documents (some of which appear below) + some budget highlights under the following headings:
* More opportunities for young people
* Strong infrastructure and a growing economy
* An even better place to live
* More efficient government, better services

-------------------------------------
Version française de la page d'accueil du budget 2014 du Manitoba:
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/index.fr.html
(Vous y trouverez des liens vers la version française de tous les documents pertinents...)
-------------------------------------

2014 Manitoba Budget Address (PDF - 336K, 18 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/papers/speech14.pdf

Manitoba Budget 2014 (PDF - 344K, 46 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/papers/summary.pdf
Legislation requires government to include a summary of core government expenditure and projected revenue as part of the Financial Management Strategy. This is consistent with the main estimates of expenditure and revenue for the fiscal year.

Budget Papers
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/papers.html
Click this link to access the following budget papers.
* Economic Review and Outlook
* Supplementary Financial Information
* The Manitoba Advantage
* Update on Fiscal Arrangements

Of special interest:
* Reducing Poverty and Promoting Social Inclusion (PDF - 208K, 19 pages)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/papers/poverty.pdf
Contents:
--- All Aboard : Manitoba's Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion Strategy
--- Measuring Progress
--- Provincial Investments : Creating Opportunities for All Manitobans
--- Key All Aboard Initiatives in Budget 2014
--- Making Progress on Employment and Income Assistance
---- Introducing the New Manitoba Rent Assist Program
--- Appendix 1: Manitoba's indicators of poverty reduction and social inclusion
--- Appendix 2: Reporting on commitments

Source:
Government of Manitoba
http://www.gov.mb.ca/

------------------------------------

Media coverage:

From PolicyFix.ca:
http://policyfix.ca/

Manitoba Budget a Leap Forward for Poverty Reduction
http://policyfix.ca/2014/03/07/manitoba-budget-a-leap-forward-for-poverty-reduction/
By Lynne Fernandez and Molly McCracken
By substantially raising Employment and Income Assistance shelter rates and increasing child care spaces, new apprenticeship programs and support to social enterprises, the province is taking action to provide marginalized people with the assistance low income people need to overcome barriers to education and employment.

Source:
PolicyFix.ca:
http://policyfix.ca/
Manitoba Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba

---

From
CBC News:

Manitoba 2014 budget tackles jobs, education and poverty:
Province invests $5.5 billion in infrastructure, puts remaining focus on students, middle class

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-2014-budget-tackles-jobs-education-and-poverty-1.2562858
By Teghan Beaudette
March 6, 2014
There were few surprises in Manitoba's Thursday release of the provincial budget, with the big winners being students, people looking for work and those living below the poverty line. The other big area of spending for the province was infrastructure. Officials had already revealed on Wednesday that $5.5 billion was slated for infrastructure projects across the province [ http://goo.gl/ULUj5S ].

Manitoba budget to include $5.5M for more child-care spaces
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-budget-to-include-5-5m-for-more-child-care-spaces-1.2561916

Source:
CBC News

http://www.cbc.ca/news/

---

From the
Winnipeg Free press:

[ http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/ ]

Budget Highlights
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/special/budget/Budget-highlights-203277531.html

Infographic: Manitoba budget 2014
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/special/budget/Infographic-Manitoba-budget-2014-248908581.html
By Wendy Sawatzky
March 6, 2014
Revenues, expenditures and key figures in Manitoba's 2014 budget


NOTE: On this page, you'll find information about the latest provincial budget only.

To avoid unnecessary duplication of budget links on multiple pages, I've moved links to all earlier budgets over to the pages below, organized by fiscal year. The pages below include links to media analysis and selected critique from NGOs on the budgets, and the amount of coverage varies across jurisdictions and over the years.

Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2013
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2012
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2011
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2010
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2009
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2008

Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2007
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2006
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2005
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2004

Status of Women
http://www.gov.mb.ca/msw/index.html

Department of Labour and Immigration

Minimum wage to increase to $9.50 per hour Oct. 1
Province Balancing Needs of 28,000 Minimum Wage Earners with Needs of Manitoba Businesses: Howard
April 8, 2010
The province will increase the minimum wage by 50 cents to $9.50 an hour on Oct. 1, Labour and Immigration Minister Jennifer Howard announced today. (...) The minimum wage rate last increased by 25 cents to $9 per hour on Oct. 1, 2009, following an additional 25-cent increase on May 1, 2009. (...) With this increase to the minimum wage, Manitoba will maintain its position near the middle of Canadian rates. Regular increases to the minimum wage are an important factor in reducing poverty and are part of ALL Aboard, Manitoba’s poverty reduction strategy, said the minister.

Disabilities Issues Office
In 2002, the Government of Manitoba established the Disabilities Issues Office (DIO) to support and report to the Minister responsible for Persons with Disabilities. The DIO works independently across government and acts as a centerpiece for coordinating policy and programs for persons with disabilities.

Full Citizenship: A Manitoba Strategy on Disability (PDF - 8.1MB, 47 pages)
May 4, 2001
The White Paper, Full Citizenship: A Manitoba Strategy on Disability, proposes a comprehensive provincial strategy on disability. It responds to recommendations from the disabilities community in the areas of access to government, employment, disability supports, services to Aboriginal persons with disabilities and income supports. It further proposes measures to enhance government accountability for access and inclusion of persons with disabilities.
Source:

Housing and Community Development


Department of Education and Literacy
......................version française


 Department of Health ..................................version française

Insured Health Benefits
Drug Benefits
Pharmacare
Annual Reports

Legislative Library of Manitoba.

 Manitoba Human Rights Commission

Manitoba Seniors and Healthy Aging Secretariat

.Other Manitoba Sites - Autres sites du Manitoba
- links below are organized (mostly) in reverse chronological order...

 

Moving to the City : Housing and
Aboriginal Migration to Winnipeg
(PDF - 2.2MB, 46 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Manitoba%20Office/2014/12/Aboriginal_Migration.pdf
By Josh Brandon Evelyn Peters
December 9, 2014
Winnipeg is home to Canada’s largest Aboriginal population. Aboriginal people, however, are among the most likely to experience homelessness and are also over-represented in housing that is unaffordable, overcrowded or in poor condition. Finding housing has become a wall preventing many Aboriginal people from successfully making Winnipeg home. Moving to the City: Housing and Aboriginal Migration to Winnipeg documents the housing experiences of Aboriginal people moving to Winnipeg.

Table of Contents:

Executive Summary
Introduction
Methodology
First Nations Urbanization
Eagle Urban Transition Centre (EUTC)
Navigating Systems
Challenges First Nations Migrants Face in Finding Housing in Urban Areas
The Importance of Aboriginal Culture and Service Provision
Aboriginal Youth
EUTC and Housing First Strategies
Conclusion
Recommendations
Bibliography

Executive summary (blog posting)
http://policyfix.ca/2014/12/10/meeting-the-housing-needs-of-aboriginal-people-moving-to-winnipeg/
December 10, 2014

Source:
Policy Fix (CCPA MB Blog):

http://policyfix.ca/

---

Fast Facts : Meeting the housing needs
of Aboriginal people moving to Winnipeg

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/fast-facts-meeting-housing-needs-aboriginal-people-moving-winnipeg
By Josh Brandon
December 5, 2014
"...we made 16 recommendations in five key areas: Increasing access to social housing; intergovernmental cooperation; increasing settlement and transitional supports; decentralizing transitional services; and increasing financial resources available to migrants."

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Manitoba Office
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba

Community, Research and Social Change: 10th annual State of the Inner City Report
http://policyfix.ca/2014/12/16/community-research-and-social-change-10th-annual-state-of-the-inner-city-report/
The State of the Inner City Report is an annual research collaboration between the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Manitoba and community organizations based in the inner city of Winnipeg. This year marks its tenth year anniversary. Since the beginning, the State of the Inner City Reports have celebrated community-based development and advanced progressive policy alternatives put forward by those working and living directly in the community.
NOTE : Special focus on children in care and child welfare.

Complete report (PDF - 2.7MB, 52 pages):
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Manitoba%20Office/2014/12/Inner%20City%202014%20low-res.pdf

--------------------------

NEW from
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Manitoba Office:

Moving to the City : Housing and
Aboriginal Migration to Winnipeg
(PDF - 2.2MB, 46 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Manitoba%20Office/2014/12/Aboriginal_Migration.pdf
By Josh Brandon Evelyn Peters
December 9, 2014
Winnipeg is home to Canada’s largest Aboriginal population. Aboriginal people, however, are among the most likely to experience homelessness and are also over-represented in housing that is unaffordable, overcrowded or in poor condition. Finding housing has become a wall preventing many Aboriginal people from successfully making Winnipeg home. Moving to the City: Housing and Aboriginal Migration to Winnipeg documents the housing experiences of Aboriginal people moving to Winnipeg.

Table of Contents:

Executive Summary
Introduction
Methodology
First Nations Urbanization
Eagle Urban Transition Centre (EUTC)
Navigating Systems
Challenges First Nations Migrants Face in Finding Housing in Urban Areas
The Importance of Aboriginal Culture and Service Provision
Aboriginal Youth
EUTC and Housing First Strategies
Conclusion
Recommendations
Bibliography

Executive summary (blog posting)
http://policyfix.ca/2014/12/10/meeting-the-housing-needs-of-aboriginal-people-moving-to-winnipeg/
December 10, 2014

Source:
Policy Fix (CCPA MB Blog):

http://policyfix.ca/

---

Fast Facts : Meeting the housing needs
of Aboriginal people moving to Winnipeg

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/fast-facts-meeting-housing-needs-aboriginal-people-moving-winnipeg
By Josh Brandon
December 5, 2014
"...we made 16 recommendations in five key areas: Increasing access to social housing; intergovernmental cooperation; increasing settlement and transitional supports; decentralizing transitional services; and increasing financial resources available to migrants."

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Manitoba Office
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba

------------------------------------------------------------

Community, Research and Social Change: 10th annual State of the Inner City Report
http://policyfix.ca/2014/12/16/community-research-and-social-change-10th-annual-state-of-the-inner-city-report/
The State of the Inner City Report is an annual research collaboration between the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Manitoba and community organizations based in the inner city of Winnipeg. This year marks its tenth year anniversary. Since the beginning, the State of the Inner City Reports have celebrated community-based development and advanced progressive policy alternatives put forward by those working and living directly in the community.
NOTE : Special focus on children in care and child welfare.

Complete report (PDF - 2.7MB, 52 pages):
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Manitoba%20Office/2014/12/Inner%20City%202014%20low-res.pdf

Manitoba Child and Family Poverty
Report Card 2014

25 years and Children are no better off:
Manitoba Child and Family Poverty
Report Card 2014
(PDF - 480KB, 8 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/MBRC2014.pdf
November 24, 2014
Canada is now far overdue on its pledge to eliminate child poverty. Not only did Canada fail to meet the target, many believe that as a country we’ve fallen back. One in five children in Canada and 40% of Indigenous children living off-reserve live in poverty. In Winnipeg, food banks provide nourishment for about 20,000 children a month.

Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

http://www.spcw.mb.ca/

---

NDP record on child poverty is poor
http://www.winnipegsun.com/2014/11/24/ndp-record-on-child-poverty-is-poor

---

From CBC.ca:

Manitoba's child poverty rate 2nd-highest in Canada: report
Almost 3 in 10 children live in poverty, says Social Planning Council of Winnipeg report

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-s-child-poverty-rate-2nd-highest-in-canada-report-1.2847331
November 24, 2014

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The complete national child poverty report card:

Child Poverty 25 Years Later : We Can Fix This
2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 744KB, 12 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014EN.pdf
.
[ Version française :
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014FR.pdf ]

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada network of 120 national, provincial and community partner organizations committed to working to end child and family poverty.

---

- For similar reports from other participating jurisdictions,
go to the Campaign 2000 Child Poverty Report Card Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/campaign_2000_child_poverty.htm

Vital Signs Reports paint a stark picture of youth unemployment across Canada
http://rabble.ca/news/2014/10/vital-signs-reports-paint-stark-picture-youth-unemployment-across-canada
October 8, 2014
By Ella Bedard
Stability is not in the cards for Canadian workers, with young workers particularly affected, according to this year's Vital Signs Reports from the Community Foundations of Canada. The first Vital Signs was produced by the Toronto Community Foundation in 2001. It assembled local research and national data to paint a broad strokes picture of community health. Since its inception the Vitals project has expanded to include a total of 49 Canadian communities big and small, who have produced reports or are acting on findings from previous reports.

Source:
rabble.ca

http://rabble.ca

---

From
VitalSigns:

27 communities across Canada launch quality-of-life reports on October 7
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/blog-387-27-communities-across-canada-launch-quality
(Ottawa, ON) Sept. 30, 2014 – Community foundations in 27 communities across Canada are releasing their Vital Signs 2014 reports on Tuesday, October 7. Vital Signs is an annual community check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada that provides a comprehensive look at how our communities are faring in key quality-of-life areas.

Local Reports:
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/localreports
Here, you'll find links to all of the local reports released on October 7, 2014.
A total of 49 community foundations are involved in the Vital Signs program – either producing a report or acting on the findings of previous reports.
The communities releasing Vital Signs reports in 2014 are:

* British Columbia: Abbotsford, Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve Region, Golden, Nanaimo, Phoenix (Grand Forks), Shuswap, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Surrey, Victoria
* Alberta: Calgary, Edmonton, Lethbridge and Southwestern Alberta, Southeastern Alberta
* Saskatchewan: Regina
* Manitoba: Winnipeg
* Ontario: Huronia (Simcoe County), Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Peterborough, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor
* Atlantic provinces: Fredericton, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia

Vital Signs
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/home
Vital Signs is a community check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada. Each Vital Signs report measures the vitality of its community in key areas, providing the community with critical information that can help set priorities and identify opportunities for action

Community Foundations of Canada
http://www.cfc-fcc.ca/

From PolicyFix.ca:

Province introduces online calculator for low-income renters
http://policyfix.ca/2014/07/30/province-introduces-online-calculator-for-low-income-renters/
By Josh Brandon
July 30, 2014
If you are a renter in Manitoba paying more than 25 percent of your income in rent, you may be eligible for a benefit of between $20 and $270 per month, thanks to recent changes to a provincial program called Rent Assist.

The Province has just introduced an online calculator on which low-income renters may determine how much of a Rent Assist benefit they are entitled to receive. Starting July 1, 2014, this program provides a benefit up to $270 dollars per month. It replaces an earlier program called RentAid that provided a maximum benefit of up to $230.

The changes in the program were introduced in parallel with recent increases to the Employment and Income Assistance (EIA) shelter benefit.

---

Province introduces online calculator for low-income renters
http://policyfix.ca/2014/07/30/province-introduces-online-calculator-for-low-income-renters/

Policy Fix
http://policyfix.ca/

Policy Fix is the blog of the Manitoba Office
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba
of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

The Living Wage: An Idea Whose Time Has Come
http://policyfix.ca/2013/11/27/the-living-wage-an-idea-whose-time-has-come/
November 27, 2013
(...)
A living wage is different from the minimum wage, being the legal minimum employers must pay. A living wage is based on the principle that fulltime work should provide families with a basic level of economic security. It allows a family of four with two parents working fulltime to pay for necessities, support the healthy development of their children, escape financial stress, and participate in the social, civic and cultural lives of their communities. We have estimated the family living wage for 2013 in Winnipeg at $14.07/hour.

---

A Living Wage for Manitoba Families : 2013 Update
(PDF - 12 pages)https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Manitoba%20Office/2013/11/Living_Wage_2013.pdf
November 27, 2013
News Release
The report explains how a combination of government policy and employer benefits can lower the minimum wage; in fact since 2009, government tax and Rent Aid policy has lowered the living wage for 1-parent families. It’s time for public and private sector employers to do their part: A Family Living Wage for Manitoba 2013 Update explains why and how.

Source:
Policy Fix
http://policyfix.ca/
Policy Fix is a blog for progressive Canadians by the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Manitoba Office
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba

Recent releases from the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Manitoba Office:

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba

Rent Aid changes in 2013:
Province increases aid to low-income families
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/node/11834
By Josh Brandon
September 19, 2013
In August 2013, the Province of Manitoba introduced changes to its RentAid program [ http://www.gov.mb.ca/fs/assistance/shelterbenefit-families.html ] benefiting many low-income households as well as individuals on Employment and Income Assistance (EIA). The changes increased levels of benefits and improved access to the program. This report analyses the effects of these changes and makes recommendations for how the program could be improved further.

The complete report:

Rent Aid changes in 2013:
Province increases aid to low-income families
(PDF - 668K, 4 pages)
http://goo.gl/NN84ux
Last month, the Province of Manitoba quietly amended its RentAid regulations. The changes will increase benefits and widen eligibility for thousands of low-income families, seniors, persons with disabilities and single persons living on Employment Income Assistance (EIA). RentAid benefits received by persons on EIA and by other recipients were increased by $20 and eligible income levels were raised by about 14%. The changes are part of a $6.3 million commitment by the Provincial government in its 2013 Budget to increase RentAid benefits.

---

Keeping them at bay : Practices of municipal exclusion (PDF - 920K, 36 pages)
http://goo.gl/trMM8
By Ian Skelton
September 2012 (Posted online October 26, 2012)
(...)
This study examines literature concerning municipal uses of zoning in the exclusion of particular groups. The first section focuses on zoning requiring high standards for housing in designated areas of municipalities, a practice termed exclusionary zoning, and the second on zoning in relation to community-based facilities for people with disabilities.

[Author Ian Skelton is a professor in the Department of City Planning at the University of Manitoba. He is a research associate with CCPA-Mb and a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners.]

Also by Ian Skelton in the
Manitoba CCPA Blog, PolicyFix.ca:

Keeping them at bay: Executive Summary
http://policyfix.ca/2012/10/26/keeping-them-at-bay-practices-of-municipal-exclusion/

Related link:

PolicyFix.ca:
http://policyfix.ca/
A blog for progressive Canadians by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Manitoba Office.
(Blog entries go back to June 2011)

Source:
Manitoba Office

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/manitoba
of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Vital Signs
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/home
Vital Signs
is a community check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada. It measures the vitality of our communities, identifies major trends, and assigns grades in a range of areas critical to our quality of life. Vital Signs is coordinated nationally by Community Foundations of Canada. More than 30 community foundations are involved in Vital Signs program – either producing a report or acting on the findings of previous reports.

Indicators used in the report:
* Arts & culture * Belonging & engagement * Economy * Environmental sustainability * Health & Wellness * Housing * Learning * Safety * Sports & recreation * Standard of living * Transportation

Vital Signs 2012 : Local Reports
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/localreports
NOTE : Includes links to previous years' editions of Vital Signs (back to 2007)

The following cities and towns have released (or will release) Vital Signs reports in 2012:
* Victoria --- http://www.victoriafoundation.bc.ca/vital-signs/victoria
* Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve Region --- http://clayoquotbiosphere.org/web/vital-signs/
* Sunshine Coast --- http://sccfoundation.com/vitalsigns/
* Calgary
--- http://www.thecalgaryfoundation.org/initiatives/vital-signs/calgary-s-vital-signs
* Medicine Hat --- http://cfsea.ca/vital-signs/
* Winkler --- http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/local-19-winkler-s-vital-signs
* London --- http://www.lcf.on.ca/initiatives/london-vital-signs
* Waterloo Region --- http://www.kwcf.ca/vital_signs
* Toronto --- https://tcf.ca/torontos-vital-signs
* Hamilton --- http://hamiltonvitalsigns.ca/
* Burlington
--- http://www.burlingtonfoundation.org/vital-signs
* Sudbury
--- http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/local-18-greater-sudbury-s-vital-signs
* Kingston
--- http://www.cfka.org/vital-signs-2012
* Montreal
--- http://www.signesvitauxmontreal.ca/en/
* Halifax
--- http://www.cfns.ca

More information about Vital Signs:
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/about

Raise the (welfare) rent, inner-city advocates say:
Monthly rate province pays same since 1992

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/raise-the-welfare-rent-inner-city-advocates-say-168110666.html
By Mary Agnes Welch
August 31, 2012
This fall, housing activists want the Manitoba government to do something it hasn't done since the New Kids on the Block topped the charts [1002]: Boost what welfare pays for rent. (...) That rate stands at $285 a month, an amount largely unchanged since 1992 and only a fraction of what it costs to secure a decent apartment in Winnipeg's tight rental market. (...) About 35,000 Manitobans are on income assistance and roughly 60 per cent of those are part of the disability program and are unable to work. Most of the rest are single mothers. Advocates want the province to return to its pre-1992 policy of pegging welfare's housing allocation to 75 per cent of average rents. In Winnipeg, that would boost the basic monthly amount to $522 from $285 for a one-bedroom. That increase would cost taxpayers about $19 million more a year. The welfare allocation would still be about $200 below average rents, but it's a practical, politically doable improvement, advocates say.

Source:
Winnipeg Free Press
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/

2012 Acceptable Living Level (ALL) Report (small PDF file)
http://winnipegharvest.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/ALL-REPORT-media-release-February-16-2012.pdf
News Release
February 16, 2012
WINNIPEG-Low-income parents in Winnipeg -- whether they are working or on welfare -- do not have enough money to adequately feed, shelter and clothe themselves and their children. More than a dozen Winnipeg Harvest clients, acting as consultants, today released the 2012 Acceptable Living Level (ALL) for four family types. The 2012 Acceptable Living Level Report sets out how much disposable income is needed in the marketplace to buy a basket of goods and services that can sustain a fair, modest and acceptable living level.

The report demonstrates that current welfare rates, even when federal child benefits are taken into account, fall far short of meeting the 2012 Acceptable Living Level. Even two parents working fulltime at minimum wage jobs have incomes far below the 2012 Acceptable Living Level.

Complete report:

A More Inclusive and Generous Canada:
The 2012 Acceptable Living Level
(PDF - 896K, 95 pages)
http://winnipegharvest.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/2012-A.L.L.-REPORT.pdf

Prepared by:

Winnipeg Harvest
http://winnipegharvest.org/

Social Planning Council of Winnipeg
http://www.spcw.mb.ca/

Welfare fills gap as jobless wait for EI
Federal government to blame for tardy processing, advocate says
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/welfare-fills-gap-as-jobless-wait-for-ei-136420573.html
By Bruce Owen
December 30, 2011
More Manitobans are collecting welfare despite the province having one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country, the most recent provincial numbers say.
And experts say one reason is due to the unemployed being forced to apply for provincial social assistance because of increasing delays in processing federal Employment Insurance claims. (...) Neil Cohen, executive director of Winnipeg's Community Unemployed Help Centre, said it's becoming more common for jobless Manitobans to collect provincial assistance because of the length of time it takes to get Employment Insurance claims processed. In some cases, it takes up to six weeks or longer.
Source:
Winnipeg Free Press
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/

Related links:

Community Unemployed Help Centre (CUHC)
http://www.cuhc.mb.ca/
CUHC is a non-profit organization primarily dedicated to providing information, advice and representation to unemployed workers in Manitoba experiencing Employment Insurance problems. We also engage in broader social policy issues related to unemployment.
- incl. links to:
* Home * About Us * What You Need to Know Before You Apply * UI/EI Information * Appeals Information * Making EI Better * Help Centres in Other Provinces * Links
TIP : CUHC's roots are in the Manitoba labour movement, but Employment Insurance is a federal program, so the information on the CUHC website applies to all jurisdictions. Recommended reading!

HungerCount 2012
October 30, 2012

From
Food Banks Canada:

Food Banks Canada reports record number of Canadians using food banks; 38% are children
HungerCount 2012 provides essential information on levels of food bank use in Canada, profiles communities hit by economic change
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/Media/News-Releases/Un-nombre-record-de-Canadiens-se-tournent-vers-les.aspx
October 30, 2012
News Release
– The number of Canadians turning to food banks for help is at an all-time high, according to the HungerCount 2012 national study released today by Food Banks Canada. After dipping slightly in 2011, food bank use in Canada increased by 2.4% this year, and is now a staggering 31% higher than before the 2008-2009 recession.

Complete report:

HungerCount 2012 : A Comprehensive Report on Hunger and
Food Bank Use in Canada, and Recommendations for Change
(PDF - 2.6MB, 36 pages)
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/getmedia/3b946e67-fbe2-490e-90dc-4a313dfb97e5/HungerCount2012.pdf

---

Media coverage:

Recession’s legacy has food-bank usage soaring in Canada
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/recessions-legacy-has-food-bank-usage-soaring-in-canada/article4748510/
By Tavia Grant
October 30 2012
A record number of Canadians visited a food bank this year, an indication the recession’s legacy continues to bite. More than 882,000 people used a food bank this March, a 2.4-per-cent increase from last year. Demand is now 31-per-cent higher than before the recession, a study to be released Tuesday says. Food banks were never supposed to be a permanent part of Canada’s landscape. They sprang up during tough economic times in the early 1980s as a temporary way to alleviate hunger. Thirty years later, more than three quarters of a million Canadians are using food banks each month.

48 comments about this article
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/recessions-legacy-has-food-bank-usage-soaring-in-canada/article4748510/comments/

Source of the article:

The Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

Source of the report:

Food Banks Canada
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/
Food Banks Canada is the national charitable organization representing and supporting the food bank community across Canada. Our membership and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing essential food programs nationwide.

Young parents squeezed for time and money, report finds
A University of British Columbia study found that it's much more expensive to raise a family than it was a generation ago.
October 18, 2011
By Andrea Gordon
Canadian parents are raising children with far less money and time than their baby boomer predecessors, despite the doubling of the Canadian economy since 1976, says a report from the University of British Columbia. At the same time, Canadians approaching retirement are wealthier than ever before, setting up an intergenerational tension that threatens young families, according to the study, released Tuesday.
Source:
Toronto Star

The report:

Does Canada work for all generations?
By Paul Kershaw and Lynell Anderson
October 18, 2011

Related resources:

* New Deal for Families blog
* YouTube video "New Deal for Families"

Source:
Human Early Learning Partnership
The Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) is a collaborative, interdisciplinary research network, based at the University of British Columbia. HELP’s unique partnership brings together many scientific viewpoints to address complex early child development (ECD) issues. HELP connects researchers and practitioners from communities and institutions across B.C., Canada, and internationally.
[ University of British Columbia ]

Time to give the poor a break
By Floyd Perras
April 26, 2011
Have you ever gone 18 straight years without a single cent increase in income?
Some of Manitoba’s poorest families and individuals have.
That’s because welfare rates for basic needs in Manitoba haven’t changed one bit since 1993. Taking inflation into consideration, people relying on social assistance today have only 65% of the money they did back then.
And it’s only getting worse for those on the bottom rung of the ladder.
[ Author Floyd Perras is Executive Director of Siloam Mission in Winnipeg. ]
Source:
Winnipeg Sun

Winnipeg Street Health Report 2011 (PDF - 4.6MB, 48 pages) (dead link)
By Suzanne Gessler and Christina Maes
Released April 5, 2011
The Winnipeg Street Health Report presents the results of a survey on the health status of homeless people in Winnipeg conducted in the summer of 2010. The report provides an analysis of survey participants’ responses, seeking to help build an overview of homelessness in Winnipeg and contributing to an understanding of the daily living conditions of people experiencing this devastating social problem. The fndings focus on the physical and mental health status of homeless people, how they use health care and social services, and their experiences of accessing these systems. (...) The Winnipeg Street Health Report has been modeled on similar reports conducted in other major Canadian cities. The ability to compare and contrast the Winnipeg fndings with other jurisdictions can contribute to our further understanding of homelessness in general and in particular contexts.
Source:
Main Street Project - Supporting individuals in need since 1972
The Main Street Project has been serving the needs of Winnipeg's most vulnerable residents since 1972. By providing emergency shelter and food services, a drug and alcohol detoxification unit, on-site counseling, transitional housing, and a range of other critical services, we work to support our clients' basic needs, while ensuring their opportunity to make real choices and have meaningful progress, each and every day

-------------------------------

From
CBC News:

Study highlights lives of Winnipeg homeless
60 per cent of Winnipeg's homeless are aboriginal, report states

April 5, 2011
The report took a survey of 300 homeless Winnipeggers. The stark day-to-day realities of hundreds of Winnipeg’s homeless have been documented in an in-depth study highlighting its many causes. The Winnipeg Street Health Report also looks at ways of preventing homelessness.
Source:
CBC News

---

From the
Winnipeg Free Press:

Unique report outlines perils of living on street
April 6, 2011
One out of every five homeless women said she's been sexually assaulted in the past year, according to a first-of-its-kind report looking into the lives of 300 of Winnipeg's homeless people. The Winnipeg Street Health Report, which was released Tuesday, contains insight based on interviews with 90 homeless women and 210 men. Interviews for the 48-page report took place last summer, after researchers contacted people through the city's social-service organizations. The study explores different problems homeless people deal with on a daily basis, from bedbugs in shelters to difficulties for some women to afford sanitary pads and tampons.

---

Homeless persons point way
Editorial
April 6, 2011
A Winnipeg survey billed as the first specifically designed for the homeless reveals that emergency shelters are used sporadically. The city's reliance on charity-based shelters means the root of the problem goes unaddressed.
The Winnipeg Street Health Report, conducted for the Main Street Project, makes a strong case for a new strategy -- public investment in a "housing first" model used in other jurisdictions. In a pilot project, the concept saw 78 homeless Winnipeggers with identified mental illnesses set up in supported, stable housing in December.
The idea is to deal first with the dysfunction bred by homelessness so that underlying causes can be addressed amid stability

---

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

Manitoba Provincial Election Resources
Manitoba will go to the polls on Tuesday, October 4, 2011.
Source:
Election Almanac
- complete coverage of federal, provincial and territorial elections in Canada including election results, public opinion polls, ridings and candidates, election news, electoral history, links, and more

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

From CBC Manitoba:

Not Enough Money
Baby food or a bus pass? A TV or a telephone?
About 100,000 Manitobans make these decisions every day. They live below the poverty line. Some are the poorest of the poor in the country. Who they are and where they live will surprise you.

From March 22-26, CBC Television, Radio and cbc.ca will explore why so many Manitobans struggle with poverty and how they survive with Not Enough Money.

------------------------------------------------
NOTE: if you click the link above and scroll to the bottom of the page that opens, you'll find "Poverty by Area", a map of the City of Winnipeg showing family income by neighbourhood throughout the city. I *should* say "...a map of Winnipeg that's SUPPOSED to show family income by neighbourhood..." because that's what a Geographic Information System can do, according to Wikipedia. The Winnipeg map on the Not Enough Money page should be called "How NOT to do a GIS Map."
------------------------------------------------

Making Ends Meet
You don't have much money, but you do have a lot of choices.

Live Chat: Who's accountable?
A round table on poverty.
March 26, 2010

Fighting poverty
What stakeholders and anti-poverty activists say.

Measuring Poverty
Who's to say I am poor?
Looking at the three low-income measures.

Profiles
* Newcomers
- Refugees have a particularly hard time making ends meet.
* Single Parents - Single parents are poorer than their married counterparts.
* The Working Poor - You can work and still be poor.
* The Disabled - Earn about $10,000 a year less than those without a disability.
* Seniors - For many older Manitobans on fixed incomes the "golden years" aren't exactly brilliant.
* Aboriginal people - Manitoba has the largest per capita Aboriginal population in Canada.

Source:
CBC Manitoba

Poverty statistics misleading
By Harvey Stevens
December 5, 2009
The recently released November 2009 Manitoba Child and Family Poverty Report Card 2009 (PDF - 458K, 25 pages) states that "Manitoba is once again the Child Poverty Capital of Canada, tied with British Columbia for having the highest number of citizens under the age of 18 living in poverty." It goes on to show how Manitoba has held that highest ranking for eight of the last 19 years and second highest ranking for an additional five of those years. Unfortunately, these are very misleading statistics which are extremely unfair to Manitoba because they are based on a faulty yardstick -- the pre-tax low income cutoffs (LICOs) developed by Statistics Canada more 40 years ago.
Source:
Winnipeg Free
[ Harvey Stevens is a retired civil servant who worked for 18 years as a senior policy analyst with Family Services and Housing. His area of expertise is poverty measurement and income assistance policy. He tried championing the use of the MBM for setting welfare rates while in government but was unsuccessful. ]

20 Years Lost: The Poverty Generation
Manitoba Report Card on Child and Family Poverty
(PDF - 458K, 25 pages)
November 2009
All of the children living in poverty in Manitoba today were born since the members of the House of Commons passed the resolution to eliminate child poverty in 1989. (...) In Manitoba, 47,000 children live in poverty. That’s 18.8 per cent of all children, nearly one in five. Manitoba is once again the Child Poverty Capital of Canada, tied with British Columbia for having the highest number of citizens under the age of 18 living in poverty. That’s almost four percentage points above the national average.
Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

Related link:

Campaign 2000

NOTE: In order to avoid duplication of links as much as possible, I've moved links to information about
Manitoba's antipoverty strategy to the Antipoverty Links page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm



Mincome Manitoba

An end to the perpetual welfare trap?
Guaranteed incomes debated

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/an-end-to-the-perpetual-welfare-trap-167004295.html
By: Mary Agnes Welch
August 22, 2012

Bringing back a discarded government program could save taxpayers millions in health-care and bureaucracy costs and dramatically shrink poverty, just as it did in Dauphin almost 40 years ago. The problem is, even the province's left-leaning NDP government likely doesn't have the political will to use it.
That was the feeling Tuesday at a standing-room-only lecture about a hot public-policy idea -- a guaranteed annual income that would replace welfare.
It's an idea with roots in Manitoba. Nearly 40 years ago, Dauphin was the site of an experiment on the effects of a guaranteed income. Every low-income person in town, including the working poor and people not eligible for welfare, got a top-up to ensure a basic level of income.
At a discussion hosted by Winnipeg Harvest, University of Manitoba researcher Evelyn Forget said the results were remarkable: People had much better health, far more children graduated from high school and people didn't stop working just because they were guaranteed an income.
(...)
Guaranteed annual income had a rebirth as an interesting, if seemingly radical, policy alternative to the confusing, expensive hodge-podge of welfare systems in Canada. We've already adopted some targeted elements of a GAI, such as the national child benefit and the guaranteed income supplement for seniors. Yukon toyed with a version of the GAI in 2007, and there was an international conference focused on the idea in Toronto in May of this year.
- includes an overview of the Mincome Manitoba experiment of the mid-1970s, specifically in Dauphin Manitoba.

Source:
Winnipeg Free Press

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/

The Manitoba Mincome Experiment
http://legalcheckpoint.blogspot.com/2007/11/social-policy-manitoba-mincome.html
November 15, 2007
By M. L'Heureux
The Mincome Project, also called the Manitoba Basic Guaranteed Annual Income Experiment, was the “first large scale social experiment in Canada and was designed to evaluate the economic and social consequences of an alternative social welfare system based on the concept of negative income tax (NIT)”. The experiment took place between 1975 and 1979 in Winnipeg and Dauphin, Manitoba. The research project was jointly funded by the Federal Government of Canada and the Manitoba Government. Little is known about the experiment as the federal government chose to shelve the report for reasons still unknown to the public. The raw data that was accumulated during the experiment is still relevant to today’s Guaranteed Income debates and is available in some academic libraries and in all provincial legislatures.
Source:
Legal Checkpoint Blog

http://legalcheckpoint.blogspot.com/

Related link:

Dauphin's great experiment: Mincome,
nearly forgotten child of the '70s, was a noble experiment

By Lindor Reynolds
November 28, 2009
DAUPHIN — Thirty-five years ago, this pretty town surrounded by farm land and far from big cities was the site of a revolutionary social experiment. For five years, Mincome ensured there would be no poverty in Dauphin. Wages were topped up and the working poor given a boost. The experiment, a collaboration between Ed Schreyer's provincial NDP and the Liberal government of Pierre Trudeau, would cost millions before the plug was pulled. The program saw one-third of Dauphin's poorest families get monthly cheques. In 1971, at a federal-provincial conference held in Victoria, Manitoba expressed interest in being the testing ground for a guaranteed income project. The Schreyer government applied for funding. In June, 1974, Mincome was approved...
Source:
Winnipeg Free Press

------------------------

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

NOTE: When I checked the links on this page (below) in the Spring of 2010, all of the links to Panhandling in Winnipeg were dead.
However, this is such an excellent report that I left the text below in case you wish to do some further digging.
Sadly, the link to the Institute of Urban Studies (at the University of Winnipeg) is now dead. Try doing a Google search on the titles below.
Gilles

---

Panhandling In Winnipeg: Legislation versus Support Services
by Tom Carter - Canada Research Chair in Urban Change and Adaptation -
with Anita Friesen, Chesya Polevychok, John Osborne
May 2007
In June 2005, The City of Winnipeg passed an amendment to By-Law 7700/2000 prohibiting some methods of panhandling, and placing restrictions on some aspects of panhandling activity, particularly related to specific types of services or locations. This project addresses the following questions regarding the need for, and the effectiveness of, this legislation:
- Given the nature, number and activity of panhandlers in the city, is this legislation an appropriate response to the circumstances?
- Is the legislation likely to be effective? and,
- Are there more effective means of addressing the issues of panhandling? Is legislation the answer or should the focus be on services and programs to address systemic problems that lead to panhandling in the first place?

The report is available in four volumes:

(scroll to the bottom of the list of journals for a brief summary of the content of each of the four volumes whose links appear below)

Volume 1: Executive Summary (PDF file - 300K, 8 pages)
This volume presents an overview of Volume 2, 3 and 4, and summarizes the findings of the Panhandling in Winnipeg research project.

Volume 2: Literature and Legislation Review (PDF file - 598K, 55 pages)
Academic literature provides valuable insights into who panhandles and why they are on the streets of North American cities. The studies reviewed here document the increasing diversity and overall growth in the numbers of people panhandling. Negative reactions to panhandling have prompted many municipal governments to attempt to control panhandling through legislation and/or program approaches that assist panhandlers to “get off the street”. The main legislative/program approaches to addressing panhandling are reviewed here.

Volume 3: Mapping of Panhandling Activity (PDF file - 10.2MB, 76 pages)
This volume presents the results of field observation of panhandling activity in central Winnipeg. It focuses on the mapping of panhandling locations and panhandling methods, including distribution of panhandlers throughout the study area, priority or high traffic locations for panhandling activity, and proximity to “sensitive services.” The types of panhandling methods used, and the distribution and frequency of occurrences of different methods was also recorded and mapped.

Volume 4: Interviews with Panhandlers (PDF file - 403K, 83 pages)

If you have any comments or questions about the report, please direct them to Tom Carter at t.carter@uwinnipeg.ca .

Source:
Journal articles, research reports ===> See also : * Research Highlights * Background and Resource Documents * Community Briefs
[Institute of Urban Studies (University of Winnipeg)]

Also from the Institute for Urban Studies:

Twelve recent reports on panhandling (special focus on Winnipeg)
Click the link above to access 20 reports of the Canada Research Chair in Urban Change and Adaptation at the Institute of Urban Studies (University of Winnipeg).
The titles of the 12 most recent reports appear below; click the link above to access these studies and more...
* Why Panhandlers are on the Streets of North American Cities (June 2007)
* Who Panhandles in Winnipeg? (June 2007)
* Panhandling in Winnipeg Project: Mapping Methodology (June 2007)
* Location of Panhandling Activity in Winnipeg (June 2007)
* Panhandling Alone or in Groups: What is the Approach in Winnipeg? (June 2007)
* When Panhandlers are Active in Downtown Winnipeg (June 2007)
* Different Groups' Perception of Panhandling in Winnipeg (June 2007)
* Legislative Approaches to Panhandling (June 2007)
* Program Approaches to Panhandling (July 2007)
* Housing Circumstances of Panhandlers in Winnipeg (July 2007)
* Does Panhandling Provide a Living (July 2007)
* Why do Panhandlers Panhandle in Winnipeg? (September 2007)

Source:
Publications / Research Highlights
[ Journal articles, research reports ] ===> See also : Background and Resource Documents * Community Briefs
[ Canada Research Chair in Urban Change and Adaptation ]
[ Institute of Urban Studies, University of Winnipeg ]

Society for Manitobans with Disabilities

Manitoba Office - CCPA
- Publications
Related Link:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - National Office
"The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates. By combining solid research with extensive outreach, we work to enrich democratic dialogue and ensure Canadians know there are workable solutions to the issues we face. "

Recent reports:

The Expressive Liberty of Beggars:
Why it matters to them, and to us
(PDF file - 282K, 28 pages)
(dead link)

FastFacts: Manitoba's Minimum Wage? Be Realistic! - PDF file - 32K, 2 pages) (dead link)
August 4, 2005
"A job at $10.00 per hour, with benefits and opportunities for advancement, would draw many into the labour force. Such jobs provide dignity and respect. A wage of $7.25 does not. Nor does it make economic sense."

In for the Long Haul: Women’s Organizations in Manitoba - PDF File - 199 K, 24 pages) (dead link)
August 16, 2005
"Just as women in Manitoba have done for decades past, feminist and women’s organizing for cultural, economic, political, and social change continues unabated. Indeed, many of the issues remain the same as during the second wave women’s movement. Although there may not be a province-wide group mobilizing women under one banner, this study has demonstrated that there is a substantial amount of activity taking place across a wide range of issues emanating from diverse perspectives and experiences."

Surviving on Hope is not Enough:
Women's Health, Poverty, Justice and Income Support in Manitoba
May 28, 2004
Executive Summary
" Women are more likely to live in poverty than men. Women with disabilities, Aboriginal women, and single mothers have higher rates of poverty. Women who live in poverty have poorer physical and mental health than those with higher incomes."
Complete report (PDF file - 725K, 56 pages)

Policy-Related PWHCE Projects
- incl. links to research in the following areas:
Aboriginal Women's Health - Health Reform and Policy - Immigrant / Refugee Women's Health - Informal Caregivers' Health - Lesbian Health - Literature Reviews - Women, Poverty and Health - Older Women's Health - Rural Women's Health - Women's Mental Health - Women, Violence and Abuse - Women-centred Health Programs and Services

Source:
Prairie Women's Health Centre of Excellence (PWHCE)
Related Links:
Centres of Excellence for Women's Health (Health Canada)

- "The Women’s Health Contribution Program supports policy research and education on women’s health issues. Managed by the Women's Health Bureau, Health Canada, the Program is a partnership between community and academic researchers."
Women's Health Bureau
[ Health Canada Online ]

Also from PWHCE:

Women and Social Assistance Policy in Saskatchewan and Manitoba
May 2005
By Josephine Savarese, Department of Justice Studies, University of Regina and
Bonnie Morton, Regina Anti-Poverty Ministry
"The Prairie Women's Health Centre of Excellence (PWHCE) Research Program on Poverty and Women's Health has supported several studies that examine the links between public policy, women's poverty and women's health. In 2003, PWHCE initiated three research projects designed to examine income assistance policies in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and their effects on women's health. Reports from two of these projects were published in 2004: Don't We Count As People: Saskatchewan Social Welfare Policy and Women's Health and Surviving on Hope is Not Enough: Women's Health, Poverty, Justice and Income Support in Manitoba. These two studies were based on several focus groups held in each province and were designed to bring forward the voices and perspectives of those most directly affected by income assistance policies. As Wharf and MacKenzie have noted, 'the knowledge and experience gap between those who make policy and those who must live with the consequences is enormous.' The research helps bridge that gap by providing an important critique of income assistance policies from the perspectives of women living on welfare. The women's descriptions of their experiences reveal the inadequacy of income assistance benefits and the harmful effects on their physical and emotional health."

Complete report (PDF file - 927K, 62 pages)
NOTE: the complete report includes both studies noted above.

Just Income Coalition
The Just Income Coalition formed in the fall of 2002 when a group of representatives from labour, human services, faith, women's, and Aboriginal organizations came together out of a shared concern over the inadequate minimum wage and its impact on low income Manitobans. They recognized that low wages are a major source of poverty in our province and organized around the idea that a strong minimum wage can be an effective tool for promoting economic justice.
- incl. links to : News - Take Action - Just Income Facts - Coalition Partners - Other Organizations - Contact Info

Child Care Coalition of Manitoba
"The Child Care Coalition of Manitoba (est. 1993) is a broadly-based and unincorporated coalition of groups and individuals. The Coalition currently has nearly 50 group memberships. Our members include parents, the labour movement, women's groups, the childcare community, educators and researchers and organizations committed to social justice, among others."

Child care sector has huge economic and social impact for Winnipeg: Time for action, say leading Winnipeggers
News Alert
May 20, 2004
Winnipeg Project
"Child care is an essential element in urban infra-structure. Yet, childcare in Winnipeg is characterized by serious inequities: some neighourhoods have much worse access and service than others."

Frontier Centre for Public Policy
"The Frontier Centre for Public Policy is an independent public policy think tank whose mission is "to broaden the debate on our future through public policy research and education and to explore positive changes within our public institutions that support economic growth and opportunity."

Aboriginal Justice Inquiry - Child Welfare Initiative (AJI-CWI)
The AJI-CWI is focused on restructuring the child and family services system in Manitoba to make it a system of concurrent jurisdiction in which the responsibility for CFS services will be based on a person's culture not where they live. Through this First Nations and Metis CFS agencies will serve members no matter where they live in the province. The AJI-CWI recently (August 9th) released a vision paper describing the proposed plan and has launched a public feedback process that will be underway until the end of September. The AJI-CWI represents a joint initiative among four parties: The Province of Manitoba - The Manitoba Metis Federation - The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs - The Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak. The purpose of the joint initiative is to work together through a common process to develop and subsequently oversee the implementation of a plan to restructure the child welfare system in Manitoba.

Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation
University of Manitoba
The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation is a research unit in the Faculty of Medicine at the U. of Manitoba. MCHPE conducts research on the way health care services are used by Manitobans. It examines patterns of illness in the population, and studies how people use health care services. It also researches the factors that affect health, since there is considerable evidence that many factors influence our physical well-being, including income, education, employment and social status, as well as nutrition, early childhood programs and even highway safety.
This site contains a raft of studies and reports on a variety of health issues.

Women, Poverty and Health in Manitoba : An Overview and Ideas for Action
Prepared for the Women's Health Clinic, Winnipeg
Revised January 2002
Source:
The Canadian Women's Health Network

Winnipeg Free Press

Winnipeg Harvest (Food Bank)

City of Winnipeg

Social Planning Council of Winnipeg (SPCW)
- incl. links to : About Us - Happenings - Resources - Links - Media - Guestbook - Join SPC - Photo Gallery - Contact Us.


Community Legal Education Association (CLEA) 

Canadian Union of Public Employees Manitoba (CUPE) 

CUPE Manitoba Local 500

Manitoba WORKink - "The Virtual Employment Resource Centre"
Career and Employment Resources for Persons with Disabilities 
- Links to a wide range of information for people with disabilities and those who support them. 
Source:
Canadian Council on Rehabilitation and Work

Manitoba WorkInfoNet (MBWIN) - "An Internet directory that provides information on different aspects of the Manitoba labour market and helps Manitobans connect to the information and resources they need for success in the changing job market."
Incl. links to information in the following areas: Financial Help and Issues - Jobs, Work and Recruiting - Labour Market Information and Outlook - Learning,
Education and Training - Self Employment - At Work and In the Community - Occupations and Careers


List of issues to be taken up in connection with the consideration of the third periodic report of Canada : United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights 
- Implementation of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (June 10, 1998) 
Manitoba Government Response to the List of U.N. Issues


From the
National Council of Welfare (NCW):

---
*
NOTE : The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and shut down its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

The links to the three reports below are functional because the files are copied to my web server.
---

Over the years, the Council has produced many reports on poverty and welfare, but there are three that stand out in my mind as milestone reports on the history of welfare in Canada, at least since the 1980s.

1. 1987
Welfare in Canada: The Tangled Safety Net
(PDF - 2.7MB, 131 pages)
November 1987
Tangled Safety Net examines the following issues in Canadian social assistance network of programs:
* Complex rules * Needs-testing * Rates of assistance * Enforcement * Appeals * Recommendations
This report is the first comprehensive national analysis of social assistance programs operated by the provincial, territorial and municipal governments. These programs function as the safety net for Canadians and are better known by their everyday name ‘welfare’.

Version française :
Le bien-être social au Canada : Un filet de sécurité troué (PDF - 3Mo., 138 pages)
Novembre 1987
[ NOTA : Si vous trouvez un lien vers ce fichier en français, veuillez communiquer avec moi pour le partager.
Merci! gilseg@rogers.com ]

____________

2. 1992
Welfare Reform
(PDF - 2.8MB, 61 pages)
Summer 1992
This report is an update of the 1987 Tangled Safety Net, but it presents information by jurisdiction rather than by issue - covers all provinces and territories.

Version française:
Réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 3,5Mo., 63 pages)

____________

3. 1997
Another Look at Welfare Reform
(PDF - 6.75MB, 134 pages)
Autumn 1997
- an in-depth analysis of changes in Canadian welfare programs in the 1990s. The report focuses on the provincial and territorial reforms that preceded the repeal of the Canada Assistance Plan and those that followed the implementation of the Canada Health and Social Transfer in April 1996.
[Proactive disclosure : I did the research for, and wrote the provincial-territorial section of, this report while I was on a one-year secondment to the Council. Gilles ]

Version française:
Un autre regard sur la réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 8Mo., 148 pages)

---

Companion document to
Another Look:

Overview of Provincial (and Territorial)
Welfare Reforms in the 1990s

October 1998
Fifteen pages of research notes used in the production of Another Look at Welfare Reform.
HINT: There's a WEALTH of information on provincial-territorial welfare reforms in these pages that didn't make it to the final report!

-------------------------------------------------

Source:
National Council of Welfare
Established in 1969, the Council is an advisory group to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (originally the Minister of Health and Welfare Canada). The mandate of the Council is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

October 6 (2012)
The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and shut down its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm


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