Canadian Social Research Links

Nova Scotia

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Nouvelle-Écosse

Updated December 4, 2016
Page révisée le 4 décembre 2016

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]



Jump directly further down on the page you're now reading:

* Key Welfare Links in NS (scroll down to the grey box below in the right column)
* Latest NS Budget
- April 9, 2015 (See "NEW", just below this text box)
* Poverty reduction in NS
* Non-governmental sites in NS

* Latest provincial election


Minimum Wage:

Current and Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates for Adult Workers in Canada
- federal govt. site --- the best resource for info on current and upcoming minimum wage levels
Source :
Minimum Wage Database

NEW

Campaign 2000 releases 2016 Report Card
http://campaign2000.ca/490-2/
November 24, 2016
Campaign 2000 released its 2016 annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada on Thursday, November 24, in Ottawa. This date marks 27 years since the unanimous House of Commons’ resolution to end child poverty in Canada and seven years after the entire House of Commons voted “to develop an immediate plan to end poverty for all in Canada.”

Press Release (English)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016Campaign2000NationalMediaReleaseENGLISH.pdf

Communiqué - Français
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016Campaign2000NationalMediaReleaseFRENCH.pdf

---------------------------------

Complete report (English) (PDF - 1.9MB, 20 pages)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Campaign2000NationalReportCard2016Eng.pdf
The 2016 national report card, A Road Map to Eradicate Child & Family Poverty, highlights the compelling reasons why the federal government needs to adopt a child and family poverty reduction lens on all policy, program and spending decisions.
NOTE : The complete report is available in English only.)

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://campaign2000

-------------------------------

The national report card release corresponds with several Campaign 2000 partners releasing
provincial report cards on child and family poverty in the following cities:

Vancouver, British Columbia:

Regina, Saskatoon:

Winnipeg, Manitoba:

Toronto, Ontario:

Halifax, Nova Scotia
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/NovaScotiaReportCard2016.pdf

Saint John, New Brunswick:

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island:

----------------------

Campaign 2000 Infographic : Issues and Solutions (small PDF file)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/NationalC2000Infographic2016.pdf

NDP introduces legislation to require adequate services for low-income Nova Scotians
https://nsndp.ca/ns/ndp-introduces-legislation-to-require-adequate-services-for-low-income-nova-scotians
October 18, 2016

HALIFAX – The Nova Scotia NDP tabled legislation today that would amend the Human Rights Code to require that programs targeted at low-income people provide an adequate standard of living. Yesterday was the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

“As a result of this change, people in Nova Scotia will have legal recourse if their access to adequate food, water, housing, and access to healthcare or social services are threatened,” said Claire McNeil a lawyer with the Dalhousie Legal Aid Service in a statement. “The proposed change in the law represents a huge step forward in the protection of human rights.”

Since the Liberals took power in 2013, the number of people going to food banks has increased by 7540 people or 20 per cent.
More....

-------------------------------

Bill No. 24
(as introduced
)
http://nslegislature.ca/legc/bills/62nd_3rd/1st_read/b024.htm
3rd Session, 62nd General Assembly
Nova Scotia
65 Elizabeth II, 2016

Private Member's Bill
Human Rights Act
(amended)

Tabled by Marian Mancini
Dartmouth South

First Reading: October 18, 2016
Explanatory Note: This bill adds a substantive right to the Human Rights Act respecting an adequate standard of living.

Source:
Nova Scotia NDP

https://nsndp.ca/


Average Rent Prices for September 2016
with Data Provided for 20 Canadian Cities
- avg. rents for studio/bachelor - 1-2-3bedrooms

New report on rents in various communities across Canada
http://www.rentseeker.ca/blog/index.php/newly-updated-rental-data-shows-average-rents-for-20-canadian-cities/2917
News Release
September 14, 2016
By the RentSeeker Team
Canada’s Leading Real Estate Listing Website and Apartment Finder, published newly updated rental data in what’s become it’s [sic] highly popular Infographic format, which has become a popular resource for renters, landlords, economists, and journalists which shows Average Rent Prices for September 2016 with data provided for 20 Canadian cities. (Click the link above to select an apartment size and one of the 20 Canadian cities below, in no particular order.)

* Toronto : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Toronto.aspx * Lethbridge : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Lethbridge.aspx
   
* Ottawa : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Ottawa.aspx * Hamilton : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Hamilton.aspx
   

* Calgary : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Calgary.aspx

* Mississauga : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Mississauga.aspx
   
* Montreal : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Montreal.aspx

Niagara Falls : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Niagara_Falls.aspx

   
* Edmonton : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Edmonton.aspx

* Oshawa : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Oshawa.aspx

   

* Vancouver : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Vancouver.aspx

* Burnaby : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Burnaby.aspx

   

* Kingston : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Kingston.aspx

* Brampton : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Brampton.aspx

   

* London : http://www.rentseeker.ca/London.aspx

* St. Catharines : http://www.rentseeker.ca/St._Catharines.aspx

   

* Sarnia : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Sarnia.aspx

* Halifax : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Halifax.aspx

   

* Windsor : http://www.rentseeker.ca/Windsor.aspx

 

Source:
RentSeeker.ca
– Canada’s Leading Real Estate Listing Website and Apartment Finder
http://www.rentseeker.ca/



Campaign 2000 Report Card on
Child and Family Poverty in Canada, 2015

LET’S DO THIS – LET’S END CHILD POVERTY FOR GOOD:
Campaign 2000 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada, 2015
(PDF 1.2MB, 20 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/NationalReportCardEn2015.pdf

Provincial report:

The Campaign 2000 website [ http://www.campaign2000.ca/ ] features report cards from provincial partners in Nova Scotia, Manitoba and British Columbia, aas well as media releases from those provinces, and an infographic featuring key findings and recommendations. Report Cards from our other provincial partners, including Ontario, will be released in early 2016.

Nova Scotia 2015 Report Card: End it Now (PDF - 28 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/2015RepCards/NovaScoatia2015RepCard.pdf

Source:
Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/


Campaign to raise the minimum wage kicks off in Cape Breton
http://www.capebretonpost.com/News/Local-/2015-12-01/article-4361934/Campaign-to-raise-minimum-wage-kicks-off-in-Cape-Breton/1

* Province provides $1.2 million to fight child poverty in Cape Breton
http://thechronicleherald.ca-/novascotia/1325064-province-provides-1.2-million-to-fight-c.b.-child-poverty

* One in three kids in Cape Breton lives in poverty
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/-1324787-weekend-focus-one-in-3-cape-breton-children-lives-in-poverty

* Unacceptable poverty rates also face seniors in Cape Breton
http://www.capebretonpost.com/Opinion/Columnists/2015-11-25/article-4355385/Unacceptable-poverty-rates-affect-Cape-Breton-seniors/1

Nova Scotia promising widespread reform of social assistance:
The Department of Community Services says it wants to modernize social assistance programs
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/nova-scotia-promising-widespread-reform-of-social-assistance-1.3071895
By Yvonne Colbert
May 13, 2015

Source:
CBC News

http://www.cbc.ca/news/

Nova Scotia to revamp social welfare system
By Erin Pottie
October 28, 2015
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1319392-nova-scotia-to-revamp-social-welfare-system
SYDNEY — The provincial Community Services Department will spend $1 million to redesign what it calls a broken social welfare program. Community Services Minister Joanne Bernard put out a request for proposals Wednesday as her department looks to revamp a stagnant system that has remained unchanged for about 30 years.

“It’s the largest direct service provider in the province of Nova Scotia, and unfortunately none of the systems and none of the policies and the way we serve people has changed in many decades,” said Bernard, who once relied on income assistance for nine years as a single mother. “We know that chasing receipts and doctor’s notes, it overburdens the system on either side. We know that if somebody is in a wheelchair that they shouldn’t have to provide a doctor’s note each year, that they’re (not) going to get up and walk miraculously.”

More than 44,000 Nova Scotians receive income assistance, spending an average of about four years in the program, her department said. Community Services said it plans to spend another half a million dollars to update its child, youth and family supports programs, which are responsible for about 20,000 child-welfare investigations a year.

Source:
Chronicle-Herald
http://thechronicleherald.ca/

From Nova Scotia Finance:
[ http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/ ]

Budget 2015-16 Measures Reduce Spending, Restructure Government
http://novascotia.ca/News/Release/?id=20150409001
News Release
April 9, 2015
The 2015-16 budget holds the line on spending, restructures and reduces the size of government and continues to clear the way for private-sector growth.

Budget Highlights for Fiscal Year 2015-16
http://novascotia.ca/News/Release/?id=20150409002
News Release
April 9, 2015
Budget 2015-2016 holds the line on spending, restructures and reduces the size of government, and continues to clear the way for private-sector growth.

Nova Scotia 2015-2016 Budget
http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/en/home/budget/budgetdocuments/2014-2016.aspx
- main budget page, offers links to all budget papers including those copied below.

Budget Highlights (PDF)
http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2015/Budget_Highlights.pdf

Budget Address
http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2015/Budget_Address.pdf

---

Related links

From the CBC:

Nova Scotia Budget: Winners and losers
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/nova-scotia-budget-winners-and-losers-1.3026521
April 9, 2015
The Nova Scotia government is forecasting a deficit of $97.6 million for 2015-2016, which would cut the budget shortfall by more than half.

Nova Scotia government delivers hard-line budget, cuts 320 jobs
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/nova-scotia-government-delivers-hard-line-budget-cuts-320-jobs-1.3026488

---

- Go to the 2015 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2015.htm

From the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Social Assistance Summaries 2014 (PDF - 235KB, 49 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1062ENG.pdf
Anne Makhoul, March 2015

The informative Social Assistance Statistical Report [ http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/rhdcc-hrsdc/HS25-2-2008-eng.pdf ], published by the federal and provincial/territorial governments, was last released in 2010 and presented 2008 data. In its place, the Caledon Institute will publish a Social Assistance Summaries series as part of its web-based Canada Social Report, which will be operational in spring 2015. In the interim, this publication offers an advance viewing of 12 of Canada’s 13 provincial and territorial Social Assistance programs. Material from Nunavut was not available in time to be included in this paper.
A summary was prepared for each province and territory with input and feedback from government representatives in every jurisdiction. All reports include program descriptions and data on the number of social assistance cases and recipients dating, in most jurisdictions, from 1997 to 2014. The summaries will be updated annually.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

NEW


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Hotlinks
The links below will take you directly to the following
Nova Scotia government and non-governmental web pages:

Government Home Page
Government News Releases
Public Service Commission
Nova Scotia Legislature
Consolidated Public Statutes of Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia Regulations
Office of Policy and Priorities
Community Services

Health and Wellness
Finance
Environment and Labour
Justice
Advisory Council on the Status of Women
Office of the Auditor General
Nova Scotia Disabled Persons Commission
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Atlantic Institute for Market Studies

Child Care Connection
Halifax Regional Municipality Home Page
Legal Information Society of Nova Scotia
Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities
GPI Atlantic - Genuine Progress Index for Atlantic Canada

 


Nova Scotia
Provincial Election Resources

No set date for the next provincial election
Source:
Election Almanac
- complete coverage of federal, provincial and territorial elections in Canada including election results, public opinion polls, ridings and candidates, election news, electoral history, links, and more

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

 

 

Key welfare links

Department responsible for welfare
Community Services

Name of the welfare program
Employment Support and Income Assistance

Legislation
Employment Support and Income Assistance Act

- Employment Support and Income Assistance Regulations ===> main welfare regulations
- Assistance Appeal Regulations

Source:
- Consolidated Public Statutes of Nova Scotia
- Nova Scotia Regulations

Policy Manual
Employment Support and Income Assistance Policy
- incl. links to the latest version of the manual and to revision logs

Welfare Rights Guide : A Guide to Income Assistance in Nova Scotia (PDF - 908K, 58 pages) - July 2009 (by Dalhousie Legal Aid Service)

Welfare statistics
See Social Assistance caseload/beneficiary statistics and expenditure information, 1997 to 2014 - this link takes you to a section of the Key Welfare Links page of this site. UPDATED APRIL 1, 2015
Number of People on Welfare, March 1995 to March 2005 (PDF file - 133K, 1 page)
Source: National Council of Welfare

Welfare rates (benefits)
Basic Income Assistance Rates
Or
Appendix "A" of the Regulations

Latest search results on Google.ca for
"welfare, -child, -animal, Nova Scotia"

- Web search results
- News search results
- Blog search results

Related links
* Nova Scotia Department of Community Services Recent reports:
---
Dept of Community Services Statement of Mandate 2012-2013 (PDF - 620K, 16 pages)
--- Dept of Community Services Annual Accountability Report Fiscal Year 2011-2012 (PDF - 1.4MB, 26 pages)
--- Dept of Community Services Statement of Mandate 2011-2012 (PDF - 312K, 18 pages)

* The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia (PDF - 760K, 12 pages)
October 2010 (Source: CCPA Nova Scotia Office )
* Fast Facts: The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia (PDF - 400K, 2 pages) October 2010 (also from CCPA)
* Nova Scotia Poverty Reduction Strategy - April 2009
* Nova Scotia’s Poverty Reduction Strategy: Preventing Poverty, Promoting Prosperity (PDF - 1.4MB, 45 pages) - April 2009
* Report of the Nova Scotia Poverty Reduction Working Group (PDF - 129K, 41 pages) - June 26, 2008
* Government Seeks Public Input on Poverty Strategy - March 5, 2008
* Poverty Backgrounder (2008) - Research and statistics about poverty in Nova Scotia
*
Department of Community Services Annual Accountability Report 2007-2008 (PDF - 229K, 40 pages)
Reporting of outcomes against Community Services’ business plan information for the fiscal year 2007-2008.
* Department of Community Services Business Plan 2007 - 2008 (PDF - 262K, 25 pages)
Source: Department of Community Services Publications, Policies & Reports<===contains links to dozens of earlier reports, plans, strategies, etc.
* Report to the Community 2007 (PDF file - 415K, 2 pages) - May 18/07
* IMPACT! The effect of Nova Scotia's new income assistance system on people who need assistance (PDF file - 155K, 23 pages) November 2003 (from the Nova Scotia Association of Social Workers )


For more information about welfare in other Canadian jurisdictions,
see the
Canadian Social Research Links Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page



Nova Scotia Poverty Reduction Strategy
NOTE: this link takes you to the NS section of the
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

Since May 2010, ALL links to content concerning poverty reduction strategies and campaigns have been moved to the above page from the individual provincial/territorial pages, including government and NGO links.

Government Departments

Nova Scotia Government Home Page

Government News Releases
Directory of Government Employees
Nova Scotia Legislature
Consolidated Public Statutes of Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia Regulations

Office of Policy and Priorities

Addressing Nova Scotia's Fiscal Challenge
A report prepared by the Nova Scotia Economic Advisory Panel
(PDF - 1.2MB, 95 pages)
November 2009
Table of contents:
* Assessing the Fiscal Challenges Facing the New Government - by Tim O’Neill
* Delivering on “Making Life More Affordable for Nova Scotia Families”—an Economic Perspective - by Lars Osberg
* Reviewing the Expenditure Budget: Lessons Learned - by Donald J. Savoie
* Shaping a Path for Growth and Prosperity in Nova Scotia - by Elizabeth Beale

Executive summary (PDF - 213K, 12 pages)

Source:
Office of Policy and Priorities
[ Government of Nova Scotia ]

Related links:

No help for the poor
November 14, 2009
Blog entry posted by Bruce Wark
Friday November 13th was an unlucky day for poor Nova Scotians. That's the day four economists (three men and one woman) released their recommendations outlining the economic path the new NDP government should follow. The 94-page report had little to say about the perennial problem of poverty in Nova Scotia. It focussed instead on how the provincial government should balance its books --- not next year as the NDP promised during the spring election campaign --- but within the next four years.
Source:
Halifax Media Co-op
[ Dominion Newspaper Cooperative ]
The Dominion Newspaper Cooperative, a grassroots Canadian newspaper and website that has been publishing since May 2003, has entered into a new phase for the Co-op - and for journalism in Canada. In February 2009, we launched our first 'local' in Halifax. The Halifax Media Co-op is a member-funded media cooperative that aims to combine participatory, democratically produced media with professional standards.

---

Newshounds grill Dexter
November 16, 2009
Blog entry posted by Bruce Wark
Nova Scotia Premier Darrell Dexter and his Finance Minister, Graham Steele underwent a sustained grilling today at the hands of the Halifax media. Reporters demanded to know why the pair could consider raising taxes, cutting spending and not balancing next year's budget when only a few months ago during the provincial election campaign, they promised a balanced budget with no tax hikes or major spending reductions."We did not have the information that we have today," a grim-faced Dexter told his inquisitors. "Six months ago, no one would have believed what we're facing today."
Dexter and Steele were reacting to the report of the Nova Scotia Economic Advisory panel released on Friday. The panel warned that trying to balance next year's budget would wreak havoc on the economy as well as on public services that people need. It also warned that tax increases and spending reductions would be needed to balance the budget in four years. Without such measures, the province would face a budget shortfall of $1.3 billion by 2013.
Source:
Halifax Media Co-op

Tax hikes, spending cuts on table in N.S.
No balanced budget next year despite campaign promise
[dead link]
November 17, 2009
Nova Scotians can expect taxes to rise and programs to be cut as part of the NDP government's fiscal plan. Those two strategies, along with spurring economic development, must be considered because of the province's dire finances, Premier Darrell Dexter said Monday. Dexter also said he won't be able to balance the books next year, despite vowing to do so while on the campaign trail last spring. ("... But there are economic realities that we are faced with today that we did not know six months ago")*.
Dexter was responding to the recommendations of a panel of economic advisers, released last Friday. The four-person panel, which Dexter appointed in August, urged the government to forget about eliminating the deficit until 2012, saying that introducing a balanced budget next year would further damage a weak economy.
---
* Sounds like a page from Dalton McGuinty's lament when his Liberals took over from the Tories in Ontario in 2003...
[ In its first budget after that election, the McGuinty government broke a key Liberal campaign pledge not to raise taxes, and it justified the about-face by railing at every opportunity about the previous (Conservative) government's "hidden deficit" of $5.6 billion dollars.]

Community Services
- incl. links to:

Support for Children, Youth & Families
- adoption, fostering, child care, abuse, learning...

Services for Persons with Disabilities
- community-based and residential support...

Employment Support & Financial Assistance
- getting and keeping a job, income assistance...

Assistance with Housing & Repairs
- affordable housing, repair grants, loans...

About this Department
- minister, legislation, publications, jobs...

Selected reports:

Nova Scotia Department of Community Services
Statement of Mandate 2012-2013
(PDF - 620K, 16 pages)
http://www.gov.ns.ca/coms/department/documents/DCS-Statement_of_Mandate-2012-2013.pdf

---

Nova Scotia Department of Community Services
Annual Accountability Report Fiscal Year 2011-2012
(PDF - 1.4MB, 26 pages)
http://www.gov.ns.ca/coms/department/documents/Accountability_Report_2011-2012.pdf
The accountability report of the Department of Community Services for the year ended March 31, 2012 is prepared pursuant to the Finance Act and government policies and guidelines. These authorities require the reporting of outcomes against the Department of Community Services’ Statement of Mandate for the fiscal year 2011-2012. (See the link immediately below.) The reporting of the Department of Community Services outcomes necessarily includes estimates, judgments and opinions by Community Services’ management.

---

Nova Scotia Department of Community Services
Statement of Mandate 2011-2012
(PDF - 312K, 18 pages)
http://www.gov.ns.ca/coms/department/documents/Statement_of_Mandate_2011-2012.pdf

---

Source:
Publications, Policies & Reports:
http://www.gov.ns.ca/coms/department/Publications.html
- incl.
links to dozens of reports, plans, strategies, etc.
NOTE : business plans and accountability reports are valuable sources of program information and trends.
Recommended reading!

---------------------------------------------

Community Services is the Department responsible for welfare in Nova Scotia.
See the grey box above for key welfare links.


For detailed info on anti-poverty initiatives in Nova Scotia and elsewhere in Canada,
go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

Clear, Consistent Access to Special Needs
Funding for People on Income Assistance

August 8, 2011
Clearer regulations now make it easier for income assistance clients to understand what special needs funding they can receive, and ensure funding decisions are consistent and fair provincewide. The amended Employment Support and Income Assistance Regulations Around Special Needs funding take effect today, Aug. 8.
(...)
Over the years, the department has received special needs requests for items and services like hot tubs, gym memberships, and humming touch therapy. These were never intended to be covered under special needs, but because the regulations were not clear, about 20-25 of these requests were approved either by a caseworker or through an appeal. The department has also received a number of special needs requests for medications and substances, such as medical marijuana. The amendments now make it clear that Community Services can only cover medically related items and services that are covered by MSI or listed on the Nova Scotia Pharmacare Formulary. This is consistent with how other provinces handle requests for medical marijuana.
Source:
Government of Nova Scotia News Service

See also:

Changes to Special Needs Funding for ESIA
August 2011
On August 8, we amended the Employment Support and Income Assistance Regulations around Special Needs Funding to make them clear and fair for all income assistance clients. Because the old regulations weren't clear enough, in a few cases, the rules were applied differently in different parts of the province. (...) Income assistance recipients can still access funding for the same special needs as they did before.
Source:
Department of Community Services

Media coverage:

No medical marijuana for N.S. welfare recipients
August 9, 2011
Community Services won't cover medical marijuana because it's not covered by the provincial Pharmacare program. Nova Scotians on social assistance will no longer be able to get medical marijuana, gym memberships or hot tubs as a special need. The Department of Community Services is tightening the rules for its special needs funding.

[ 324 comments ]

Source:
CBC Nova Scotia

-------------------------

Something similar in Ontario:

NOTE : Check out some of the links in this Google.ca Web Search Results page using the terms "Ontario Special Diet Allowance" , to see some similarities between the two provinces' recent changes to their special allowance policies. The Ontario Coalition Against Poverty and the Income Security Advocacy Centre were heavily involved in that battle.
Below, you'll find a few related links :
* http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/social/special_diet_apply.aspx
* http://ocap.ca/search/node/special+diet
* http://www.incomesecurity.org/specialdietwhathappened.htm

---------------------------------------------

Our Kids Are Worth It: Strategy for Children and Youth
December 3, 2007

Our Framework for Social Prosperity - Weaving the Threads: A Lasting Social Fabric
November 30, 2007

Canada-Nova Scotia Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities
December 3, 2007

Department of Community Services
Annual Accountability Report, Fiscal Year 2006-2007
(PDF file -6. 2MB, 38 pages)
The Annual Accountability Report for the Department of Community Services reports on the progress achieved by the department towards the goals, priorities, performance measures and financial targets established in the Business Plan for the same year.
Business Plan 2006-2007 - Department of Community Services (PDF file - 550K, 33 pages)

Source:
Publications, Policies & Reports
[ Nova Scotia Department of Community Services ]

-----------------------------

Career Seek: Help [for welfare clients] to Attend Post-secondary Programs
Revised to December 5, 2007
(launched as a pilot project in October 2006)
--- Career Seek Frequently Asked Questions (
also revised to December 5, 2007)

-----------------------------

New Child and Youth Strategy Released
December 3, 2007
Nova Scotia's kids can now get more out of life, thanks to a new Child and Youth Strategy released today, Dec. 3. Community Services Minister Judy Streatch released the strategy titled Our Kids Are Worth It. (...) The strategy provides a range of services from prevention to intensive intervention. It is a combination of an expansion of existing services that work and an introduction of new services.
Some highlights include:
-- outreach and support for families raising children
-- shorter wait times and improved mental health services
-- co-ordination of professionals and programs
-- youth navigators, a partnership with Kids Help Phone and a new website for youth information and support
-- new programs for at-risk youth
-- provincial youth advisory network

Our Kids Are Worth It:
Strategy for Children and Youth

-----------------------------

Report to the Community 2007 (PDF file - 415K, 2 pages)
May 18, 2007
- this two-page pamphlet outlines Community Services work in the province --- Employment Support and Income Assistance (50,000 people assisted per year), family and children's services (23,000 children received protection services), services for people with disabilities (50,000 people benefited) and housing (20,000 Nova Scotians in social housing).

Business Plan 2007-2008 - Department of Community Services (PDF file - 250K, 25 pages)
March 23, 2007
"(...) The primary responsibility of the Department of Community Services is to ensure the basic needs of individuals and families are met by protecting children and adults at risk, and by providing financial support to persons in need. Most of the department’s expenditures are in the form of direct payments to clients in need of financial assistance or to service providers who provide residential, vocational, child care, housing, protection and other social services on behalf of the department.."

Source:
Publications and Reports
- links to over two dozen links to business plans, accountability reports and other reports dealing with housing and services for children and families

Income Assistance for Post-Secondary Education (Nova Scotia)
October 26, 2006
The Department of Community Services is creating opportunities for eligible income assistance recipients to get the education they need for a brighter future. Community Services Minister Judy Streatch announced today, Oct. 26, a new pilot program called Career Seek which will allow income assistance clients to attend university or a post-secondary education program of more than two years and still receive benefits from the income assistance program. (...) Individuals who have received income assistance for 12 months and have identified a post-secondary education as part of their employment plan, are eligible to apply for Career Seek. Over the next four years, 50 individuals each year will have an opportunity to participate in this program. The first participants could start their programs as early as January 2007.

Related Link:

Critics slam school assistance program [dead link]
October 26, 2006
A pilot program that will allow 50 people on social assistance to keep their money while attending university comes up short, critics charge.
"I would have thought this program would have been better thought out by the time we got here today," Liberal MLA Stephen MacNeil said Thursday as the program was announced. Community Services Minister Judy Streatch says Career Seek will help people on social assistance go to university or an educational program longer than two years. To qualify, applicants must have received assistance for a year and have chosen post-secondary education as part of their job plan. They also have to complete a career assessment to find the right courses to get a job. (...)Streatch says 200 people will take part in the program over the next four years, with the first participants starting class in January. The province has been cutting social assistance for people who want to go to university since 1999.
Source:
CBC.CA

New Job Opportunities for Income Assistance Recipients
News Release
September 22, 2006
Nova Scotians who receive income assistance now have more options to help them on their journey back to work and to earn some extra money, thanks to a new program from the Department of Community Services. Harvest Connection is a voluntary program that links income assistance recipients to job opportunities in rural communities during harvest season. Individuals who have received income assistance for six months can earn up to $3,000 a year, on top of their basic income assistance, by harvesting crops like apples, vegetables and Christmas trees.

Pharmacare for Children of Low-Income Families
August 30, 2006
Thousands of low-income families will receive help with the cost of prescription medications for their children when Low Income Pharmacare for Children begins, Oct. 1. Premier Rodney MacDonald and Community Services Minister Judy Streatch announced today, Aug. 30, that applications are now available for Low Income Pharmacare for Children. The program will help up to 35,000 children under the age of 18 whose families receive the Nova Scotia Child Benefit.

Minister Encourages Income Assistance Recipients to Receive Maximum Benefits
News Release
August 28, 2003
"Community Services Minister David Morse is encouraging all people who receive income assistance and have children under the age of 18 to file any outstanding income tax returns to ensure they receive the maximum benefits available to their children."

Helping Families on Assistance With Cost of School Supplies
August 25, 2003
"The Nova Scotia government is once again helping families on income assistance buy school supplies."

Nova Scotians Receiving Full National Child Benefit
December 13, 2002
"Nova Scotians are receiving the full amount of the National Child Benefit available to them," said Community Services Minister Peter Christie today, Dec. 13. "We told Nova Scotians we would end the clawback and we did," said Mr. Christie."
Source : Department of Department of Community Services

$500,000 for Child Care Resource and Referral Services
November 20, 2002

"Young Nova Scotians are growing up great through Early Childhood Development initiatives. The province announced the allocation of $500,000 to establish 10 Child Care Resource and Referral Services across the province today, Nov. 20, National Child Day."

Quality Child Care Through Quality People - June 3, 2002
Portable Child-Care Spaces - June 3, 2002

Province Announces Early Childhood Funding
Department of Community Services
November 27, 2001
The Department of Community Services will immediately begin allocating $7.6 million in federal funding to improve community-based services to young children and families and to stabilize the licensed child-care sector in the province. A further $1.5 million of the $9.1 million allocated for 2001 is earmarked for a comprehensive home-visiting program now being planned by the Department of Health for implementation at a later date

Family Assistance Program
Department of Community Services
August 27, 2001
The Family Assistance Program provides $250 to families that have a net income less than $16,500 and have one or more children under the age of 19. To be eligible, families must not have received any form of income assistance for more than three months in 2000.

New Assistance System Addresses Fairness
Department of Community Services
July 13, 2001
Nova Scotia is about to usher in a new social assistance system with a common rate structure for all social assistance recipients. On Aug. 1, the new Employment Support and Income Assistance Act comes into effect.

New Social Assistance Regulations
Department of Community Services 

March 23, 2001 

The Nova Scotia government has approved new social-assistance regulations to help people move toward self-sufficiency and to help reduce poverty -- especially child poverty.

Province Introduces Legislation to Redesign Social Assistance
Department of Community Services 
October 26, 2000 
The proposed Employment Support and Income Assistance Act will replace the existing Family Benefits Act and most provisions of the Social Assistance Act. The section of the Social Assistance Act that supports the Community Supports for Adults program and long-term care will remain in effect.

New Social Assistance System Promotes Self-reliance
Department of Community Services 
October 25, 2000 
The new program, to take effect August 1, 2001, will provide enhanced supports to help people secure employment by developing individual plans for gaining self-sufficiency skills. 

Integrated Child Benefit for Low-Income Nova Scotians
Department of Community Services 
October 23, 2000 

New Income Assistance System for Nova Scotia
June 12, 2000 
Nova Scotians are being asked to comment on the redesign of the province's income assistance system. The new system, which comes into effect in April of 2001, will help people become more self-reliant. People can make submissions on this final phase of income assistance reform to the department by July 31st, 2000.

Social Assistance Restructuring Updated 
May 18, 1999 
Press Release
(the report itselfis no longer available online)

Applications for Nova Scotia's new Family Assistance Program are now available
July 25, 2000 
Replaces the previous Direct Assistance Program, doubles the amount of money available to qualified families. 
Provides $250 annually to families that have a net income of $16,500 or less and have one or more children under the age of 19. 
Qualified families must not have received any form of income assistance for more than three months in 1999.

N.S. Launches National Family Support Program
May 11, 1999


 

Child Care Funding Review Released
Department of Community Services
June 22, 2001

Strategy for Early-Childhood Development Released
Press Release

Department of Community Services

May 9, 2001

Children and Families - Budget Bulletin (Nova Scotia Budget 2001-02)
March 29, 2001
- Early Childhood Development Program - Nova Scotia Child Benefit - Support for children with special needs

Department of Finance 
Increase in Nova Scotia Child Benefit
July 6, 2000 

More National Child Benefit links...



Family and Children's Services
- includes Adoption * Adoption Disclosure * Child Abuse Register * Child Protection Services * Children in Care * Early Childhood Development Services * Foster Care Services * Prevention and Family Violence * Secure Care


Health

- incl. links to : About the Department - Media Releases - Employment Information - Programs and Services - Links - Reports - FAQs - Key Health Initiatives - Site Map

Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations

Online interactive and information services of the Government of Nova Scotia


Finance

Home page/sitemap
Budget Documents (1995-96 to date, all on one page) 

Public Accounts - 1996 to date 
Economic Indicators

News Releases

Publications



Nova Scotia's 2014-15 Budget Lays Foundation for Work Ahead
http://novascotia.ca/news/smr/2014-04-03-Budget-2014/
News Release
April 3, 2014
Finance and Treasury Board Minister Diana Whalen tabled the 2014-15 provincial budget, clearing the way for private sector growth and reinvestment in education and health care. The 2014-15 budget projects a deficit of $279 million.

Budget documents 2014-2015
http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/en/home/budget/budgetdocuments/2014-2016.aspx
- includes links to the following documents:

* Budget Address (PDF - 60K, 18 pages)
http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Budget_Address.pdf

* Budget Assumptions and Schedules (PDF - 7.2MB, 82 pages)
http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Budget_Assumptions_And_Schedules.pdf

* Budget Bulletins (small PDF files):
--- Families and Communities : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Families_Bulletin.pdf
--- Health and Wellness : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Health_Bulletin.pdf
---
Post Secondary Education : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Post_Sec_Education_Bulletin.pdf
--- Economy : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Economy_Bulletin.pdf
--- Education : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Education_Bulletin.pdf
--- Tax Measures : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Tax_Measures_Bulletin.pdf
--- Highlights : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Budget_Highlights.pdf

--- Estimates and Supplementary Detail : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Estimates_and_Supplementary_Detail.pdf
--- Crown Corporation Business Plans : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Crown_Corp_Business_Plans.pdf
--- Government Business Plan : http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/site-finance/media/finance/budget2014/Government_Business_Plan.pdf

2014-2015 Budget Highlights
http://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20140403002

Budget at a Glance
http://novascotia.ca/budget/

Source:
Department of Finance and Treasury Board
http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/

---

From the
Chronicle-Herald:
http://thechronicleherald.ca/

Liberals stick to playbook with first $9.9-billion budget
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1197844-liberals-stick-to-playbook-with-first-99-billion-budget
By Michael Gorman
April 3, 2014
Finance Minister Diana Whalen said earlier this week that the provincial budget would contain few surprises and she lived up to that promise Thursday. Whalen introduced a $9.9-billion budget with a $279-million deficit. The document contains a collection of announcements from the Liberals’ election campaign platform, as well as some new initiatives, with about $80 million in new spending. Department spending increased overall by 5.4 per cent, or $455 million. The net debt is estimated to be $14.6 billion as of March 31. It’s projected to top $15 billion in the next fiscal year.

Budget Highlights
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1197855-nova-scotia-budget-highlights

More coverage of NS Budget 2015
from the Chronicle-Herald:
http://thechronicleherald.ca/tags/ns-budget-2014
[Click the link above to access any of the content below.]
* Budget’s lack of tax relief slammed by business groups
* Taxpayers may doubt Grits’ vow of balanced budget
* Whalen budget a sober start
* Diana Whalen : In her own words
* Political band has changed, but song...
* Liberals axe graduate tax rebate
* Grits pump up home-care funds
* N.S. budget features cash for class-size caps...
* Blog Replay : Nova Scotia budget

---

- Go to the 2014 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2014.htm


NOTE: On this page, you'll find information about the latest provincial budget only.

To avoid unnecessary duplication of budget links on multiple pages, I've moved links to all earlier budgets over to the pages below, organized by fiscal year. The pages below include links to media analysis and selected critique from NGOs on the budgets, and the amount of coverage varies across jurisdictions and over the years.

Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2013
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2012
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2011
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2010
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2009
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2008

Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2007
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2006
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2005
Go to Canadian Government Budgets 2004

Environment and Labour

 Nova Scotia Legislature

Consolidated Public Statutes of Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia Regulations


 Justice

Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission

Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women (NSACSW)
The Advisory Council was established in 1977 to educate the public and advise the provincial government on issues of interest and concern to women. Check out the home page (by clicking above) or go to the Council's Publications page - it offers an impressive choice of reports, fact sheets and media releases, including:

Employment Insurance Changes Needed
Status of Women
May 7, 2004
"Mothers need better support from the federal government to help care for their families, the chair of the Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women says in an open letter to Liza Frulla, Minister of Social Development, and Joseph Volpe, Minister of Human Resources Development."
- incl. a copy of the open letter
Source:
Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women
[ Government of Nova Scotia ]

Related Link:

Maternity benefits not available to those who need them most
Richard Shillington
May 2, 2004
"Canada's approach to Maternity Benefits illustrates two disturbing impediments to democracy and effective social policy. Those impediments are control by government officials of data and research to make governments look good, and the three tier nature of Maternity Benefits."

Source:
Straight Goods

Time for a New Royal Commission on the Status of Women?
News Release
October 22, 2002
"The national coalition of provincial and territorial advisory councils on the Status of Women is calling on the federal government to re-examine the state of women's equality in Canada."

Office of the Auditor General

 Nova Scotia Disabled Persons Commission

Other Nova Scotia Sites - Autres sites de Nouvelle-Écosse
(mostly in reverse chronological order)

------------------------------------------------------------------

When buying socks for the poor is no solution
http://halifax.mediacoop.ca/story/when-buying-socks-poor-no-solution/32727
January 4, 2015
By Judy Haiven
I cringed when I heard Michael Enright’s introduction to the Sunday Edition today (CBC-Radio One). I cringed because I heard similar arguments 33 years ago when food banks first opened in Canada. The idea was to help the poor by giving them either what we middle class people could afford to part with in our kitchen cupboards, or buying an extra tin or two of beans, tomatoes, or a jar of peanut butter, or a bag of pasta and leaving the groceries in the supermarket’s designated bin for the food bank.
(...)
I’m one of the ‘haves’. I say enough. I want to pay higher taxes so others can eat, rent an apartment and have a guaranteed decent annual income. Buying socks and extra packages of pasta will never make the changes we need as a society. But speaking out, demonstrating and holding our provincial and federal politicians accountable could help.

[ Judy Haiven teaches in the Management Dept at the Sobey School of Business at Saint Mary's University. She is chair of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia ]

Source:
Halifax Media Co-op --- News from Nova Scotia's Grassroots

http://halifax.mediacoop.ca/

A Generation of Broken Promises:
The 2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia
(PDF - 641KB, 26 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/NSRC2014.pdf
By Lesley Frank
November 2014
Despite both the federal and provincial government’s initiatives, the child poverty rate in Nova Scotia has marginally increased each year since 2009. Clearly piecemeal increases and marginal tax adjustments have not been robust enough to address inadequate welfare incomes that are thousands of dollars below poverty thresholds. Instead, the limited commitment to family policy to support parents in the workforce, rising housing and food prices, and increases in low-waged precarious employment remain in the way of child poverty eradication.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives | Nova Scotia Office
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/nova-scotia

Related links:

One-third of Cape Breton kids living in poverty, report says
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1252960-one-third-of-cape-breton-kids-living-in-poverty-report-says
November 24, 2014
About 32.6 per cent of children in Cape Breton live in poverty, compared with 22.2 per cent in Nova Scotia and 19 per cent across the country.

Source:
The Chronicle Herald
http://thechronicleherald.ca/

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The complete national child poverty report card:

Child Poverty 25 Years Later : We Can Fix This
2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 744KB, 12 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014EN.pdf
.
[ Version française :
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014FR.pdf ]

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada network of 120 national, provincial and community partner organizations committed to working to end child and family poverty.

---

- For similar reports from other participating jurisdictions,
go to the Campaign 2000 Child Poverty Report Card Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/campaign_2000_child_poverty.htm

Vital Signs Reports paint a stark picture of youth unemployment across Canada
http://rabble.ca/news/2014/10/vital-signs-reports-paint-stark-picture-youth-unemployment-across-canada
October 8, 2014
By Ella Bedard
Stability is not in the cards for Canadian workers, with young workers particularly affected, according to this year's Vital Signs Reports from the Community Foundations of Canada. The first Vital Signs was produced by the Toronto Community Foundation in 2001. It assembled local research and national data to paint a broad strokes picture of community health. Since its inception the Vitals project has expanded to include a total of 49 Canadian communities big and small, who have produced reports or are acting on findings from previous reports.

Source:
rabble.ca

http://rabble.ca

---

From
VitalSigns:

27 communities across Canada launch quality-of-life reports on October 7
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/blog-387-27-communities-across-canada-launch-quality
(Ottawa, ON) Sept. 30, 2014 – Community foundations in 27 communities across Canada are releasing their Vital Signs 2014 reports on Tuesday, October 7. Vital Signs is an annual community check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada that provides a comprehensive look at how our communities are faring in key quality-of-life areas.

Local Reports:
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/localreports
Here, you'll find links to all of the local reports released on October 7, 2014.
A total of 49 community foundations are involved in the Vital Signs program – either producing a report or acting on the findings of previous reports.
The communities releasing Vital Signs reports in 2014 are:

* British Columbia: Abbotsford, Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve Region, Golden, Nanaimo, Phoenix (Grand Forks), Shuswap, Squamish, Sunshine Coast, Surrey, Victoria
* Alberta: Calgary, Edmonton, Lethbridge and Southwestern Alberta, Southeastern Alberta
* Saskatchewan: Regina
* Manitoba: Winnipeg
* Ontario: Huronia (Simcoe County), Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Peterborough, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor
* Atlantic provinces: Fredericton, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia

Vital Signs
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/home
Vital Signs is a community check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada. Each Vital Signs report measures the vitality of its community in key areas, providing the community with critical information that can help set priorities and identify opportunities for action

Community Foundations of Canada
http://www.cfc-fcc.ca/

2013 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty- November 26
(From Campaign 2000)

Campaign 2000 and Its Regional Partners Release
New 2013 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
November 26, 2013
Campaign 2000’s annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada was released on Tuesday, November 26th in Ottawa. This year marks 24 years since the unanimous House of Commons’ resolution to end child poverty in Canada by 2000 and four years after the entire House of Commons voted “to develop an immediate plan to end poverty for all in Canada.”

National report card:

The 2013 national report card, entitled Canada’s REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication, highlights the compelling reasons why the federal government needs to take leadership. It presents the latest statistics on child and family poverty and makes recommendations for all political parties. Federal party leaders have been invited to respond to the report card.

Canada’s REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication:
2013 Report card on Child and Familkiuy Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 3MB, 22 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013C2000NATIONALREPORTCARDNOV26.pdf
[ Version française:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013NationalReportCardNov26French.pdf ]

----------------------------------

Provincial report cards:

On the same day as the national report card was released, several of Campaign 2000 regional partner organizations released their provincial report cards on child and family poverty as well, including:
* Vancouver, BC
* Edmonton, Alberta
* Calgary, Alberta
* Toronto, Ontario
* Saint John, New Brunswick
* Halifax, Nova Scotia (see link below)

---

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2013
1989-2011
(PDF - 638K, 26 pages)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Nova%20Scotia%20Office/2013/11/2013_NS_Child_Poverty_Report_Card.pdf
By Dr. Lesley Frank
November 2013
(...) Another concern with producing this report card is the erosion of data quality. Year after year, there is less and less to report, particularly for small provinces like Nova Scotia. Reporting the child poverty rates is still possible with available statistics; however statistics for sub-populations which we know experience higher rates of child poverty are increasingly non-existent due to reduced sampling. Changes made by the federal government to the long form census will further erode our ability to track child poverty.
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives | Nova Scotia

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/nova-scotia

---

NOTE : For links to the reports on child poverty from Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Toronto and Saint John (NB),
go to : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm#2013_report_card_child_poverty

---

Join us and take e-action to send a message to our Prime Minister and all the federal party leaders today.
Click here to send a letter : http://www.makepovertyhistory.ca/act/where-s-our-federal-poverty-eradication-plan

---

Related online resource:

A history of inaction (PDF infographic [English and French] - 19.7MB, 2 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013C2000INFOGRAPHIC_FULL%20COLOUR.pdf
- incl. timelines and potential outcomes
[HUMONGOUS FILE ALERT!]

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of more than 120 national, provincial and community organizations committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada, over 70 of which are from Ontario.

Welfare Rights Guide : A Guide
to Income Assistance in Nova Scotia
(PDF - 908K, 58 pages)
http://www.dal.ca/content/dam/dalhousie/pdf/law/DLAS/DLAS_Welfare_Rights_Guide.pdf
July 2009
Table of Contents:

* Introduction * How to Use this Guide * The Basics of the Law * Advocating for Yourself * Applying for Assistance * Basic Entitlements ( Personal allowance - Shelter allowance) * Special Needs (Health - Child related - Employment related - Housing - Other) * Pharmacare * Employment * Post Secondary Education * Assets * Overpayments * Youth and Assistance * Cohabitation * The Appeal Process * Resources * Appendices

Produced by Dalhousie Legal Aid Service [ http://www.dal.ca/faculty/law.html ]
with the generous support of Dalhousie University [ http://www.dal.ca/ ]
and the Law Foundation of Nova Scotia [ http://www.nslawfd.ca/ ]

Vital Signs
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/home
Vital Signs
is a community check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada. It measures the vitality of our communities, identifies major trends, and assigns grades in a range of areas critical to our quality of life. Vital Signs is coordinated nationally by Community Foundations of Canada. More than 30 community foundations are involved in Vital Signs program – either producing a report or acting on the findings of previous reports.

Indicators used in the report:
* Arts & culture * Belonging & engagement * Economy * Environmental sustainability * Health & Wellness * Housing * Learning * Safety * Sports & recreation * Standard of living * Transportation

Vital Signs 2012 : Local Reports
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/localreports
NOTE : Includes links to previous years' editions of Vital Signs (back to 2007)

The following cities and towns have released (or will release) Vital Signs reports in 2012:
* Victoria --- http://www.victoriafoundation.bc.ca/vital-signs/victoria
* Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve Region --- http://clayoquotbiosphere.org/web/vital-signs/
* Sunshine Coast --- http://sccfoundation.com/vitalsigns/
* Calgary
--- http://www.thecalgaryfoundation.org/initiatives/vital-signs/calgary-s-vital-signs
* Medicine Hat --- http://cfsea.ca/vital-signs/
* Winkler --- http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/local-19-winkler-s-vital-signs
* London --- http://www.lcf.on.ca/initiatives/london-vital-signs
* Waterloo Region --- http://www.kwcf.ca/vital_signs
* Toronto --- https://tcf.ca/torontos-vital-signs
* Hamilton --- http://hamiltonvitalsigns.ca/
* Burlington
--- http://www.burlingtonfoundation.org/vital-signs
* Sudbury
--- http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/local-18-greater-sudbury-s-vital-signs
* Kingston
--- http://www.cfka.org/vital-signs-2012
* Montreal --- http://www.signesvitauxmontreal.ca/en/
* Halifax --- http://www.cfns.ca
/

More information about Vital Signs:
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/about

Senior poverty rising in Halifax, says report
1 in 13 seniors living in poverty in the HRM

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2012/10/02/ns-senior-poverty.html
October 3, 2012

Poverty rates among seniors is on the rise in the Halifax Regional Municipality, according to a new report by the Community Foundation of Nova Scotia.

Halifax's Vital Signs 2012 [ https://charityvillage.com/Content.aspx?topic=Vital_Signs_2012_Halifax ] — a report released earlier this week — estimates about one in 13 of the city's seniors are living in poverty.
(...)
According to the report, the poverty rate among the Halifax Regional Municipality's elderly was 7.8 per cent in 2010 — the second highest it has been in a decade. The highest was 10.4 per cent in 2000. The report said the rate has been on the rise since hitting a 10-year low of 3.3 per cent in 2005. Over the past decade, the city's poverty rate among senior citizens has generally tracked below the provincial rate and above the national rate, said the Community Foundation of Nova Scotia.
(...)
The government has said it will gradually raise the age of eligibility for Old Age Security to 67 from 65, starting in 2023. While it maintains Canadians are choosing to work past age 65 anyway, the numbers show that for many seniors, it is not a choice. (...)
Seniors make up 13 per cent of the population of the Halifax Regional Municipality and the number is expected to increase as baby boomers age.

Source:
CBC News

http://www.cbc.ca/news/

Related link:

The Community Foundation of Nova Scotia
http://www.cfns.ca/
The Community Foundation of Nova Scotia is a member of Community Foundations of Canada [ http://www.cfns.ca/ ], which represents a network of 170+ community foundations nationally, and who together hold more than $3 billion in assets. In 2010, community foundations distributed $149.5 million to communities across Canada.

 

2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia: 1989-2009 (PDF - 690K, 11 pages)
November 2011
Clearly, the goal was not achieved; in fact, in 2000 the child poverty rate in Nova Scotia was higher than in 1989, the year the promise was made. Did nine additional years bring us any closer to the goal? While child poverty rates did show a steady decline after 2003, our most recent figures (regardless of the poverty measured used) now show a reversal of this trend. With 14,000 children living below the After-Tax Low-Income Cut Off (LICO-AT) in 2009, progress has stalled and we are far from realizing child poverty eradication.

Source:
Nova Scotia Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Related link
from Campaign 2000:

Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times:
2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 2.8MB, 16 pages)
[The national report]
November 2011
All we are asking is to give children a chance. Campaign 2000 is looking for a real commitment from this Parliament to reduce poverty by at least 50% by the year 2020, creating a pathway to eventual eradication. The federal government, in our view, must play a lead role.
Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations, committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada.

NOTE: If you wish to see 2011 child and family poverty reports for all participating Canadian provinces on one page (+ links to last year's reports), go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

From Food Banks Canada:

Hunger Count 2013
A comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in Canada, and recommendations for change

Selected HungerCount Information 1999-2011 (Microsoft Excel 2007 file - 626K)

Chart : Food bank use in Canada (March 2011)
Food Banks Canada has released data detailing how many Canadians used food banks across the country in March 2011. Hover over the chart to read how many people used food banks in each province that month, and what percentage of those people were children.

Source:
Food Banks Canada
Food Banks Canada is the national charitable organization representing and supporting the food bank community across Canada. Our Members and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing food banks and food programs nationwide. Our mission is to help food banks meet the short-term need for food, and to find long-term solutions to hunger.

---

Media coverage:

Food bank use stays high
November 1, 2011
Food bank use across Canada remained more than 25 per cent above pre-recession levels in March, the group representing food banks said Tuesday. Food Banks Canada said an annual survey of its members showed a slight decrease in the number of food recipients from the same month a year earlier — two per cent to 851,014 — but little change over all. The steady numbers show the effects of recession are still being felt across Canada, and the organization says that means economic recovery isn't working for everyone.
Source:
CBC News

---

Stretched food banks a measure of Canada’s frail recovery
By Tavia Grant
November 1, 2011
The number of Canadians using food banks has declined slightly, but persistent demand indicates many are struggling in a frail economic recovery. More than 851,000 individuals visited a food bank in March alone, a number that’s little changed from last year’s record and still 26 per cent above prerecession levels, Food Banks Canada’s annual survey, to be released Tuesday, shows.

[ 397 comments ]

Related Globe and Mail articles:

* Feed a student, feed the future
* Food bank use drops, but still higher than before recession
* It's time to close Canada's food banks

Source:
Globe and Mail

Young parents squeezed for time and money, report finds
A University of British Columbia study found that it's much more expensive to raise a family than it was a generation ago.
October 18, 2011
By Andrea Gordon
Canadian parents are raising children with far less money and time than their baby boomer predecessors, despite the doubling of the Canadian economy since 1976, says a report from the University of British Columbia. At the same time, Canadians approaching retirement are wealthier than ever before, setting up an intergenerational tension that threatens young families, according to the study, released Tuesday.
Source:
Toronto Star

The report:

Does Canada work for all generations?
By Paul Kershaw and Lynell Anderson
October 18, 2011

Excerpt from
the national summary report:
Canada is not currently working for all generations. There is a silent generational crisis occurring in homes across the country, one we neglect because Canadians are stuck in stale debates. My colleagues and I hope the 2011 Family Policy Reports for all provinces will refocus public dialogue on one of the most pressing social and economic issues of our time: Canada has become a far more difficult place to raise a family.

---

* New Deal for Families blog
* YouTube video "New Deal for Families"

Source:
Human Early Learning Partnership
The Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) is a collaborative, interdisciplinary research network, based at the University of British Columbia. HELP’s unique partnership brings together many scientific viewpoints to address complex early child development (ECD) issues. HELP connects researchers and practitioners from communities and institutions across B.C., Canada, and internationally.
[ University of British Columbia ]

From the Nova Scotia Office
of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

The Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Card 2010 : 1989–2008 (PDF - 816K, 27 pages)
by Lesley Frank
November 24, 2010
This year’s report card examines the period 1989 to 2008, the year for which the most recent data is available. It also reviews changes for a later period (1997 to 2008) to assess the impact of the 1998 National Child Benefit initiative, which is specifically aimed at preventing and reducing child poverty.

News Release:

14,000 children in Nova Scotia still living in poverty is 14,000 too many
November 24, 2010
HALIFAX, NS –Twenty-one years ago (in 1989), the government of Canada promised to end child poverty by the year 2000. In 2000, not only had they not kept the promise - the child poverty rate was even higher. Today, ten years after the goal date, the broken promise remains. This year’s annual report published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives –Nova Scotia and Campaign 2000 reports that 14,000 Nova Scotia children were living in poverty in 2008. Based on the most recent available data (for 2008), the report card shows that there has been some progress made, however.


NOTE:
This is one of a series of provincial reports all released under the Campaign 2000 banner on November 24 (2010), the anniversary of the 1989 unanimous House of Commons resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000. For links to the complete collection of federal and provincial reports and (selected) related media coverage, go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

Earlier related report
from the CCPA Nova Scotia Office:

The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia
October 26, 2010
Did you know that poverty costs Nova Scotia at least $1 billion per year?
A new report released by the CCPA-NS puts numbers to the cost of poverty in Nova Scotia for the very first time.
The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia, written by Angella MacEwan and Christine Saulnier, reveals that the cost of poverty in Nova Scotia is an estimated 5-7% of GDP, or $1400 to $1700 for each Nova Scotian household.

Complete report:

The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia (PDF - 760K, 12 pages)
The Nova Scotia Government’s 2009 Poverty Reduction Strategy sets out dual goals of reducing poverty and creating opportunities for prosperity. Inherent in this vision is an understanding that when we help those in need, we make Nova Scotia a better place to live for everyone. As has been so aptly demonstrated by the research of Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett in their book The Spirit Level [Facebook link], money spent on reducing poverty and inequality is an investment in all of our futures. [Excerpt from the Introduction]

News Release:
Poverty costs Nova Scotia over $1billion a year
October 16, 2010
HALIFAX- The total economic cost of poverty in Nova Scotia is at least $1.5 to $2.2 billion dollars per year, accounting for between 5% - 7% of Nova Scotia’s GDP in 2008. The portion of the total cost borne by society (the social cost) is at least $500 to $650 million dollars. This corresponds to 6% - 8% of Nova Scotia’s 2007/2008 budget, or around $1,400 to $1,700 for each Nova Scotian household

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - Nova Scotia Office
[ CCPA National Office ]
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.

Also from the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

Related materials:

Fast Facts: The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia (PDF - 400K, 2 pages)
October 2010
The estimated economic costs of poverty for 2008 are broken down as follows:
1. Health Care Costs: $241 million or 6.7% of the Nova Scotia government’s health care budget.
2. Crime Costs: between $30 and $60 million represents Nova Scotia’s costs as a per capita share of the national cost of crime.
3. Cycle of Poverty or Intergenerational transfer of poverty costs: between $12 and $21 million in social costs and $91 to $160 million/year after taxes in private costs.
4. Lost productivity – $135 to $200 million in lost government revenue (the social cost) and $930 million to $1.3 billion in lost market income (the private cost).

Source:
CCPA Nova Scotia Office
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

Nova Scotia
Provincial Election Resources

Source:
Election Almanac
- complete coverage of federal, provincial and territorial elections in Canada including election results, public opinion polls, ridings and candidates, election news, electoral history, links, and more

----------------------

Nova Scotia election sees Liberals take majority
http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/10/08/nova-scotia-liberals-projected-to-take-majority-in-nova-scotia-election/
By Melanie Patten
October 8, 2013
HALIFAX — Voters in Nova Scotia dumped the NDP on Tuesday after giving Darrell Dexter a historic election victory four years ago, turning this time to Liberal Stephen McNeil, who swept to power on promises to bring soaring electricity rates under control while putting an end to corporate handouts.

Source:
National Post
http://www.nationalpost.com/

---

From Elections Nova Scotia:

39th Provincial General Election 2013 Initial Results (clickable map)
http://results.electionsnovascotia.ca/

Summary of election results by party
http://results.electionsnovascotia.ca/Summary.aspx

Registered Parties:

Green Party of Nova Scotia
http://www.greenparty.ns.ca/

Nova Scotia New Democratic Party
http://www.ns.ndp.ca/

Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia
http://www.pcparty.ns.ca
/

Nova Scotia Liberal Party
http://www.liberal.ns.ca/

*** Liberal Party Platform:
HTML version :
http://www.liberal.ns.ca/platform/
PDF version
(600K, 30 pages) : https://www.liberal.ns.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/2013-Liberal-Platform.pdf
[SPOILER : the word "poverty" appears exactly zero times in the Liberal Platform.]

---

From the CBC:

Stephen McNeil leads Liberals to majority in Nova Scotia
Progressive Conservatives form Official Opposition while New Democrats trail in 3rd
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nsvotes2013/stephen-mcneil-leads-liberals-to-majority-in-nova-scotia-1.1929962
October 8, 2013
- includes links (in the right and left margins) to a dozen related articles

More media coverage of the
2013 Nova Scotia Provincial Election

https://www.google.ca/#q=nova+scotia+election&tbm=nws

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

Vital Signs
Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada that measures the vitality of our communities, identifies trends, and shares opportunities for action in at least ten areas critical to quality of life. Since Toronto's first Vital Signs publication, the Report has been adopted by 16 communities across Canada and is now conducted nationally by Community Foundations of Canada.

Related link:

Community Foundations of Canada
We are the Canadian movement for community vitality, representing 174 Community Foundations across the country. Together, we help Canadians invest in building strong and resilient places to live, work and play.


Nova Scotia Report Card on Child and Family Poverty 2009 (PDF - 214K, 23 pages)
November 2009
While Nova Scotia remains within the group of provinces with lower rates of child poverty, policymakers and elected representatives (those with the power to legislate the end of poverty) must act quickly and decisively to expand the progress achieved in recent years. Specific, targeted policies are needed to ensure that poverty rates and gaps are The Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Card 2009 Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives–Nova Scotia 18 reduced for particular groups where there is greater risk of children and their families being exposed to poverty and the potential harm it carries. Most notably, income assistance rates need to be increased to a level that will provide families with children, who depend on welfare income, an annual income that will raise families out of poverty.

Source:
Campaign 2000

--------------------------------------------------------------

Province of Nova Scotia Financial Review
Interim Report
7 August 2009
The people of Nova Scotia elected a new Government on 9th June 2009, and the newly appointed Executive Council was sworn in on 19th June, 2009. During the election campaign the new Government committed to an immediate review of the Province.s finances upon entering office. Deloitte & Touche LLP has been contracted to assist the new Government of Nova Scotia with an independent review and analysis of the Province of Nova Scotia.s current and future financial position.
Source:
Deloitte & Touche LLP

Cost and Affordability of a Nutritious Diet in Nova Scotia:
Report of 2007 Food Costing
(PDF - 1.3MB, 28 pages) [dead link]
A project of the Nova Scotia Food Security Networking partnership with community partners,
the Department of Health Promotion and Protection, and Mount Saint Vincent University
Released April 2008

"(...) The reasons for concern about income-related food insecurity can be understood when we examine the following statistics:
• 14.6% of Nova Scotians households (approximately 132,400 households) reported either moderate or severe income-related food insecurity in 2004. Nova Scotia is the only province with significantly higher levels than the national
average (9.2%).
• Although Nova Scotia has seen modest increases in minimum wage and Income Assistance rates in the past couple of years, these rates have consistently been shown to be inadequate to allow individuals and families to meet their basic needs.
• 18,417 Nova Scotia citizens accessed a food bank in March 2007.5 Research shows this represents only 1/4 to 1/3 of those experiencing food insecurity."

Source:
Nova Scotia Food Security Network

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

Homeless in Halifax: New report card
March 24, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
A total of 1,252 people stayed in homeless shelters in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 2008, according to the first-ever Halifax Report Card on Homelessness 2009, which was released today. The report, prepared by Community Action on Homelessness, provides a grim accounting of the poor health and terrible conditions facing people who are homeless in a community that is, for many Canadians, a picturesque port city on Canada's eastern coast. The report documents the meagre investments in affordable homes by federal and Nova Scotia governments, and sets out a series of practical and pragmatic actions to end homelessness in Halifax.
Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog:
[ Wellesley Institute ]

Related links:

Halifax Report Card on Homelessness 2009 (PDF - 10MB, 20 pages)

Community Action on Homelessness (Halifax)
Our mission - to work in partnerships within our community, to advance community solutions
that address homelessness, and the right to a home as a key to the 'quality of life' for everyone in our community.

Report on child poverty in NS (PDF - 110K, 2 pages)
November 2008
By Pauline Raven

Related links From Campaign 2000:

Family Security in Insecure Times:
The Case for a Poverty Reduction Strategy for Canada -
2008 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 167K, 6 pages)
[ version française:
Rapport 2008 sur la pauvreté des enfants et des familles au Canada (PDF - 565K, 8pages) ]

Poverty Reduction a Strategic Move in Downturn--Campaign 2000 Released New Report Card
Press Release
21 November 2008
OTTAWA – The federal government would make a timely strategic move if it invested now to reduce stubborn poverty rates in Canada, says a new report by Campaign 2000. The 2008 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada, available at www.campaign2000.ca, shows the nation’s child poverty rate is almost what it was in 1989 when Parliament unanimously resolved to end child poverty by the year 2000.

Provincial report cards
- includes links to the latest report and earlier years for : * British Columbia * Alberta * Saskatchewan * Manitoba * Ontario * New Brunswick * Nova Scotia

Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000.

11,000 Atlantic millionaires and 77,000 households
mired in debt: Rich-poor gap grows as region loses wealth

September 2008
Press Release
A new report entitled Financial Security and Debt in Atlantic Canada examines trends in household wealth since the 1980s—in Canada as a whole and in the Atlantic region. In particular, it looks at trends in wealth distribution, including Atlantic Canada’s share of national wealth and in the portion of wealth owned by the top, middle and lower wealth groups.

Financial Security and Debt in Atlantic Canada
September 2008
By Kimberley Tran and Ronald Colman
Complete report (PDF - 7.1MB, 136 pages)

Source:
GPI Atlantic
GPIAtlantic is an independent, non-profit research and education organization committed to the development of the Genuine Progress Index (GPI) – a new measure of sustainability, wellbeing and quality of life.

Related link:

Poverty issue still percolating
Editorial
September 8, 2008
The latest report from GPI Atlantic on poverty in the region reaches back 21?2 millennia to quote Aristotle’s observation that “revolutions arise from inequalities.” That’s followed with a more contemporary reference to 2005 riots in France, “a poignant reminder of the potential consequences of marginalizing the poorest households.”
Source:
The Cape Breton Post

Economic Security in Nova Scotia (PDF - 1.7MB, 66 pages)
July 16, 2008
The report uses an aggregate index, based on security from the economic risks imposed by four key factors – unemployment, illness, old age, and single parenthood – to examine trends in economic security in Nova Scotia from 1981 to 2007. It concludes that economic security in Nova Scotia decreased during the 1981-2007 period.
Source:
Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS)

Other CSLS reports - 50+ links to reports going back to 1997

Cost and Affordability of a Nutritious Diet in Nova Scotia:
Report of 2007 Food Costing
(PDF - 1.3MB, 28 pages)
http://novascotia.ca/dhw/healthy-communities/documents/Cost-and-Affordability-of-a-Nutritious-Diet-in-Nova-Scotia-Report-of-2007-Food-Costing.pdf
Released April/2008
A project of the Nova Scotia Food Security Network in partnership with community partners, the Department of Health Promotion and Protection, and Mount Saint Vincent University

Related link:

Rising food costs hitting home
Already many in Nova Scotia can’t afford to eat properly
[dead link]
June 11, 2008
"(...) The 2007 food costing research found that many households in our province, especially families who are getting by on low-wage incomes or social assistance, simply cannot afford to fill their cupboards and refrigerators with healthy foods.
(...) A woman raising two children on a minimum wage paycheque is at especially high risk for food insecurity, according to the project’s 2007 findings released this spring. Every month, after all the expenses of shelter, utilities, transportation, clothing and food are factored in, this young mother would be in a deficit of $8.31. She’d be even worse off when her little girl turned six and she no longer received the Universal Child Care Benefit of $100 a month. If that same woman were on welfare, she would have $127.96 a month to spend on "extras," but only if she were receiving additional financial assistance to go to school or look for work. Without that extra money, she would be even further behind...."
Source:
Halifax Chronicle-Herald

COMMENT : The Welfare Wall
[By Gilles]
The preceding paragraph comparing the financial situation of a woman with two kids on welfare vs minimum wage income is a good illustration of what is called "the welfare wall" in welfare reform parlance. All Canadian welfare programs offer some types of non-cash assistance assistance to their clients, such as coverage for prescription drugs, dental and vision care - although these types of aid are generally limited by restrictive terms and conditions (e.g., some provinces require an employable person to be in receipt of welfare for a specified time period before they qualify for non-emergency dental care).

In the above example, the household on welfare would have just under $130/month left after paying for shelter, utilities, transportation, clothing and food. If the head of that household gets a full-time job at minimum wage (which is not likely, since most minimum wage earners don't work for the full year), the family would be $8 in the hole each month --- hardly an incentive for someone to make the leap to the workforce. Recognizing this, several jurisdictions offer special work-related allowances for such things as transportation and work-appropriate clothing to encourage people to join or rejoin the labour force, and many also offer extended coverage for some non-cash health-related benefits. Note that these are not new options in the ongoing efforts to reform Canadian welfare programs --- the Canada Assistance Plan (federal legislation that enabled federal contributions to provincial welfare costs) shared in the cost of these incentives from 1966-67 until it was replaced in 1996 by the Canada Health and Social Transfer.

Child poverty in Nova Scotia: The facts (PDF file - 370K, 9 pages)
November 24, 2007
By Pauline Raven, Lesley Frank and Renee Ross

Related link:

Campaign 2000 Report on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
Main page - includes links to both the French and English media releases and reports, as well as links to national report cards for previous years and for selected Canadian provinces.
[ Campaign 2000 ]

How to reduce poverty? Begin by knocking down barriers
By Katherine Reed
Letters/Opinion
September 26, 2007
It won’t be difficult to identify the causes of poverty in this province and to lay out strategies for dealing with them. Just ask a few poor people what would turn their economic fortunes around. You’ll probably come away with a list like this: a higher minimum wage, more affordable housing, a better welfare system, reforms to the Employment Insurance system so that most (instead of less than half) of the unemployed can get benefits, a provincewide affordable and accessible public transportation system, affordable post-secondary education, affordable child care, and sustainable rural economic development.
Source:
The ChronicleHerald.ca - Halifax

Council of Atlantic Premiers
This web site provides information on:
* the Council of Atlantic Premiers (CAP),
* the Council of Maritime Premiers (CMP), and
* the Conference of New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers (NEG/ECP)
The website also provides convenient online access to Council publications, employee contact information, and to regional agencies and organizations as well as providing information on Working Together for Atlantic Canada: An Action Plan for Regional Co-operation (PDF- 492k, November 8, 2001).

Nova Scotia Public Interest Research Group (NSPIRG)
NSPIRG is a non-profit, non-partisan social and environmental justice research and resource centre. Our mandate is to empower, educate, and inspire action on social justice and environmental issues at Dalhousie University, as well as in the broader Halifax community and Nova Scotia generally. We are a student and volunteer-driven organization working within an anti-oppression framework, and providing a range of events, opportunities, working groups, and campaigns to community members.
- incl. links to: Home - About Us - Events Calendar - Working Groups - Library - Funding - Links - Media - Contact Us - Advanced Search - Single Mothers' Survival Guide

Single Mothers’ Survival Guide - (Nova Scotia focus)
2006
In 1989, single mom and activist Brenda Thompson, published the first Single Mothers’ Survival Guide. The guide recognized the economic, social, and political hardships experienced by single mothers and offered specific and practical information on how to cope when living in poverty in the metro-Halifax area. This is the online version of the fifth edition of the book.

- incl. links to : Introduction - Single Mothers and Poverty Laws in NS - Social Assistance - Attitudes Towards "Welfare" Mothers - Legal Aid - Maintenance and Child Support - Children's Aid and Child "Welfare" - Employment - Education - Daycare - Housing - Transition Houses - Food and Food Banks - Sex Lives of Single Moms! - How To Become Politcally Active - Single Mothers Speak - Numbers to Know in Nova Scotia

Workfare program fails women: report
May 25, 2006
"Provincial rules designed to get people off welfare and into the workforce are not working, according to a new study.The research project was done on behalf of women's centres in Antigonish, Sydney and Pictou County. The report, Struggling to Survive, was released Wednesday.Co-ordinator Rene Ross travelled to 11 communities last summer and spoke with 91 women who were on or had been on the Employment Support and Income Assistance (ESIA) program. (...) The report makes several recommendations, including abolishing the parental leave policy, raising the allowance rates by $75 a month, and letting women keep a greater share of their earnings."
Source:
CBC News Nova Scotia

Related Link:

Poverty group: Welfare system needs reform
Source:
The Chronicle Herald

Complete report and companion document:

Struggling to Survive: Women on Employment Support & Income Assistance (ESIA) in
Nova Scotia Provide Their Key Recommendations for Policy Reform
(PDF file - 406K, 30 pages)
January 2006

Survival Strategies: Women on Employment Support & Income Assistance (ESIA) in
Nova Scotia Provide Their Key Recommendations for Policy Reform
(PDF file - 250K, 21 pages)
May 2006

Partnering Women’s Centres:

Antigonish Women’s Resource Centre
Pictou County Women’s Centre
Every Woman’s Centre, Sydney

Funded by
Status of Women Canada, Women’s Program
May 2006

Nova Scotia Office - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives


Employment Support and Income Assistance Report Released - Nova Scotia (welfare)
"
The Community Advocates Network, an alliance of people on assistance, their organizations, advocates and allies, in partnership with the Nova Scotia Association of Social Workers, conducted a study of the effect of the Employment Support and Income Assistance program which has been in effect for more than two years. The report arising from this study was released at a press conference on December 16th, 2003."
Source:
Nova Scotia Association of Social Workers

IMPACT! The effect of Nova Scotia's new income assistance system on people who need assistance
Complete report (PDF file - 155K, 23 pages)
November 2003


Homelessness in Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM): A Portrait of Streets & Shelters
January 2004
"The Halifax Regional Municipality Planning and Development department has recently instituted a webpage devoted to housing and homelessness in the Halifax area. In PDF format the 89 page report The Portrait of Streets and Shelters represents the first effort of the Halifax Regional Municipality to support the need for base knowledge on homelessness and related social issues."
[ Halifax Regional Municipality ]
Source:
PovNet (BC-based poverty network)

Complete report:

The Portrait of Streets and Shelters (PDF file - 3.2MB, 89 pages)
January 2004

A Workbook on Food Security & Influencing Policy
Developed by the Food Security Projects
- incl. links to: Intro (Food for Thought) - What are we talking about? - Why care about food insecurity - What can we do about it? - What is policy? - How can we influence policy? - Strategies for Action - Resources and Tools - Fact Sheets and Handout - About this Workbook - How to use this Workbook - Questions Behind the Workbook - Acknowledgements - Bibliography

Bibliography and Useful Resources
- links to 50+ sites organized under the following headings : General Food Security Websites -
Defining Food Security - Food Security, Families & Children, Communities, & Health - Food Security, the Environment and the Economy - Addressing Food Security - The Policy Process, Implementing Policy & Influencing Public Policy - Provincial/Territorial Food Security Groups

Source:
Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre

Nova Scotia Government and General Employees Union (NSGEU)

GPI Atlantic - Genuine Progress Index for Atlantic Canada
"GPI Atlantic is a non-profit research group, founded in 1997, to develop an index of sustainable development and well being - the Genuine Progress Index. The Nova Scotia GPI consists of 22 social, economic and environmental components, including: Time Use - Natural Capital - Environment/Quality - Socioeconomic issues - Income Distribution - Social Capita"
- incl. links to : About Us | GPINews | Publications | Presentations | Articles/Press Releases | Media Clippings | Community GPI | Membership | Current Activities | Services | Directors/Researchers | Book Store | Search | Links | Environment | RealityCheck

 

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) 
ACOA  is a federal government agency headquartered in the Atlantic Region. ACOA's goal is to improve the economy of Atlantic Canadian communities through the successful development of business and job opportunities. 

Five year report to Parliament, 1998-2003 (PDF file - 1.7MB, 86 pages)



From the
National Council of Welfare (NCW):

---
*
NOTE : The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and shut down its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

The links to the three reports below are functional because the files are copied to my web server.
---

Over the years, the Council has produced many reports on poverty and welfare, but there are three that stand out in my mind as milestone reports on the history of welfare in Canada, at least since the 1980s.

1. 1987
Welfare in Canada: The Tangled Safety Net
(PDF - 2.7MB, 131 pages)
November 1987
Tangled Safety Net examines the following issues in Canadian social assistance network of programs:
* Complex rules * Needs-testing * Rates of assistance * Enforcement * Appeals * Recommendations
This report is the first comprehensive national analysis of social assistance programs operated by the provincial, territorial and municipal governments. These programs function as the safety net for Canadians and are better known by their everyday name ‘welfare’.

Version française :
Le bien-être social au Canada : Un filet de sécurité troué (PDF - 3Mo., 138 pages)
Novembre 1987
[ NOTA : Si vous trouvez un lien vers ce fichier en français, veuillez communiquer avec moi pour le partager.
Merci! gilseg@rogers.com ]

____________

2. 1992
Welfare Reform
(PDF - 2.8MB, 61 pages)
Summer 1992
This report is an update of the 1987 Tangled Safety Net, but it presents information by jurisdiction rather than by issue - covers all provinces and territories.

Version française:
Réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 3,5Mo., 63 pages)

____________

3. 1997
Another Look at Welfare Reform
(PDF - 6.75MB, 134 pages)
Autumn 1997
- an in-depth analysis of changes in Canadian welfare programs in the 1990s. The report focuses on the provincial and territorial reforms that preceded the repeal of the Canada Assistance Plan and those that followed the implementation of the Canada Health and Social Transfer in April 1996.
[Proactive disclosure : I did the research for, and wrote the provincial-territorial section of, this report while I was on a one-year secondment to the Council. Gilles ]

Version française:
Un autre regard sur la réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 8Mo., 148 pages)

---

Companion document to
Another Look:

Overview of Provincial (and Territorial)
Welfare Reforms in the 1990s

October 1998
Fifteen pages of research notes used in the production of Another Look at Welfare Reform.
HINT: There's a WEALTH of information on provincial-territorial welfare reforms in these pages that didn't make it to the final report!

-------------------------------------------------

Source:
National Council of Welfare
Established in 1969, the Council is an advisory group to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (originally the Minister of Health and Welfare Canada). The mandate of the Council is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

October 6 (2012)
The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and shut down its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

 

Atlantic Institute for Market Studies
- includes many reports and studies on CPP, transfer payments, UI reforms, pensions, the fishery, the welfare trap, etc.


Community Organization Network
"The Community Organization Network links people in Nova Scotia with disabilities and health challenges to resources and services that promote active healthy independent living"
Great resource for people with disabilities in Nova Scotia - hundreds of links to support organizations, and plenty of excellent content... 


List of issues to be taken up in connection with the consideration of the third periodic report of Canada : United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights - Implementation of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (June 10, 1998) 
Nova Scotia Government Response to the List of Issues - November 1998


Links to Sites Working for Positive Social Change and Social Justice (Chebucto Community Net) 

Nova Scotia Child Care Association

Halifax Regional Municipality Home Page
Legal Information Society of Nova Scotia
Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities

 


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