Canadian Social Research Links
Non-Governmental and
Municipal Government Sites in Ontario
A-C

Updated March 16, 2017
Page révisée le 16 mars 2017

version française


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See these related Canadian Social Research Links pages:

--- Guide to welfare in Ontario
--- Provincial government
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [A-C]
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [D-N]
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [O-Z]
--- Review of social assistance in Ontario
--- The Ontario Special Diet Allowance
--- The Drummond Commission report
--- Drug testing people who apply for or receive welfare
--- Spouse-in-the-house (54) (welfare cohabitation rules for single people & single parents) 
--- Government Budget Links page - incl. Ontario budget links
--- Federal, provincial and territorial budgets - incl. Ontario budgets +analysis & critiques
--- Ontario anti-poverty strategies and poverty reduction
--- Early Learning and Child Care (for all Ontario ECD links)
--- Case Law / Court Decisions / Inquests - incl. information on the Kimberly Rogers inquest.
--- Provincial-Territorial Political Parties and Elections in Canada - incl. Ontario election links
--- Drug Testing for Welfare Recipients in Ontario

--- Gouvernement de l'Ontario - page d'accueil (version française)


Current Welfare benefit levels in Ontario and much more:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm#rates
Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates
Updated quarterly
This factsheet contains current rate information (benefit levels) for 15 federal and Ontario financial assistance programs.
[NOTE : Clicking the link above will take you partway down the Ontario Government Links page of this website.]

Prepared by the
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services
[ http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/mcss/english/ ]

--------------------------------------------

Weekly Media Scan page (Income Security Advocacy Centre)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/isac_media_scan.htm

[ Toronto - Ontario - Canada - (some) international ]
- dozens of new links in each issue

UPDATED TO 06 JANUARY, 2017

--------------------------------------------

Links to Ontario municipalities' websites
- from the Association of Municipalities of Ontario


NOTE : for links to all Ontario social assistance review resources,
go to the Canadian Social Research Links Review of social assistance in Ontario links page.


NEW

New from CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario):

Taking time off work: Pregnancy and parental leaves and benefits (in Ontario)
http://www.cleo.on.ca/en/publications/pregparnt
Updated to February 2017

Part One: Leaves of absence:
http://www.cleo.on.ca/en/publications/pregparnt/introduction

Any new parent who has worked at least 13 weeks for their employer can take parental leave. This includes all new parents, not just birth mothers. It also includes anyone who is in what the law calls a “relationship of some permanence” with a parent of a child, and who is going to treat the child as their own.
Each parent can take a full parental leave, either at the same time as the other parent or at different times. Birth mothers can take both pregnancy leave and parental leave.
Only a birth mother can take pregnancy leave. Pregnancy leave is sometimes called maternity leave. It can be taken during pregnancy, after the birth of the baby, or a combination of both.

Part Two: Employment Insurance benefits:
http://www.cleo.on.ca/en/publications/pregparnt/part-two-employment-insurance-benefits

While you are on pregnancy or parental leave, you might be able to get Employment Insurance (EI) pregnancy or parental benefits.
If you are self-employed, you can apply for these benefits if you have paid EI premiums for at least 12 months.

---

More CLEO Resources and Publications:
http://www.cleo.on.ca/en/resources-and-publications/pubs?language=en

---

Related link
from the Globe and Mail:

Liberals should consider overhaul of EI parental leave benefits
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/study-urges-liberals-to-overhaul-parental-leave-benefits/article34308782/

---

Source:
CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario)
http://www.cleo.on.ca/en
Since 1974, CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario / Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario) has developed clear, accurate, and practical legal rights education and information to help people understand and exercise their legal rights. Our work focuses on providing information to people who face barriers to accessing the justice system, including income, disability, literacy, and language. As a community legal clinic and part of Ontario's legal aid system, we work in partnership with other legal clinics and community organizations across the province. Our work includes an extensive collection of legal information resources and publications available in a variety of languages and formats.

Also from CLEO:

Steps to Justice
http://stepstojustice.ca/
"Your guide to law in Ontario"
Steps to Justice is a first-of-its-kind initiative that empowers people in Ontario to understand and take action to deal with their legal problems. It gives comprehensive online information on common legal problems that people experience in family, housing, employment and other areas of law.

Steps to Justice is led by Community Legal Education Ontario [ http://www.cleo.on.ca/en ] as part of a unique collaboration of Ontario's leading justice sector organizations. CLEO produces clear, accurate and practical legal information to help people understand and exercise their legal rights.

Legal topics comprise the following:
* Abuse and Family Violence * Consumer Law * Criminal Law * Employment and Work * Family Law * Housing Law * Human Rights *
Social Assistance

Campaign 2000 releases 2016 Report Card
http://campaign2000.ca/490-2/
November 24, 2016
Campaign 2000 released its 2016 annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada on Thursday, November 24, in Ottawa. This date marks 27 years since the unanimous House of Commons’ resolution to end child poverty in Canada and seven years after the entire House of Commons voted “to develop an immediate plan to end poverty for all in Canada.”

Press Release (English)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016Campaign2000NationalMediaReleaseENGLISH.pdf

Communiqué - Français
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016Campaign2000NationalMediaReleaseFRENCH.pdf

---------------------------------

Complete report (English) (PDF - 1.9MB, 20 pages)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Campaign2000NationalReportCard2016Eng.pdf
The 2016 national report card, A Road Map to Eradicate Child & Family Poverty, highlights the compelling reasons why the federal government needs to adopt a child and family poverty reduction lens on all policy, program and spending decisions.
NOTE : The complete report is available in English only.)

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://campaign2000

-------------------------------

The national report card release corresponds with several Campaign 2000 partners releasing
provincial report cards on child and family poverty in the following cities:

Vancouver, British Columbia:

Regina, Saskatoon:

Winnipeg, Manitoba:

Toronto, Ontario:
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/ReportCardOntarioNov182016.pdf
French version : http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/FrenchOntRepCardNov232016.pdf

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Saint John, New Brunswick:

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island:

----------------------

Campaign 2000 Infographic : Issues and Solutions (small PDF file)
http://campaign2000.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/NationalC2000Infographic2016.pdf

CPJ Justice ENews : September 2016
http://us5.campaign-archive1.com/?u=a90945b6cbae71eebd4485b0b&id=015f09ccd8&e=[UNIQID]
[Click the link below to access the following newsletter articles.]
--- Caring for our Climate
--- UN Summit on Refugees
--- Upcoming Events in Vancouver, Toronto, & Ottawa
--- Welcome Asha and Bolu!
--- Ending Poverty in Canada is Possible.
Working to end poverty in Canada requires a great deal of persistence and effort. That is why it is encouraging that so many people in communities and organizations across Canada are working to raise awareness about the complex reality of poverty and pushing for policy that will make a difference.

Right now there is an important opportunity to engage with each other and the federal government in working to end poverty in Canada. Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Jean-Yves Duclos, has initiated both a National Housing Strategy consultation process [ https://www.letstalkhousing.ca/ ] and a six city study [ http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/tackling-poverty-reduction-federal-saint-john-1.3746319 ] that will inform the development of the Canadian Poverty Reduction Strategy. As well, the HUMA Parliamentary Committee is about to begin an extensive study on poverty reduction strategies. CPJ will submit briefs outlining our recommendations for policy that will make a difference for those living in poverty.

Our fourth annual ChewOnThis! event [ https://www.cpj.ca/chew ] will involve over 50 communities across Canada. We will be calling for meaningful consultations that give priority to the voices of people with lived experience of poverty and reflect the human rights framework and policy recommendations outlined in the Dignity for All model national anti-poverty plan [ http://cpj.ca/national-anti-poverty-plan-canada].

Source:
Citizens for Public Justice
https://www.cpj.ca/

OnPolicy: Ontario's Working Poor
Summer 2016

Abstract:
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/onpolicy-ontarios-working-poor

Complete report (PDF - 9.5MB, 60 pages):
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Ontario%20Office/2016/06/CCPA%20Ontario%20OnPolicy%20Summer%202016.pdf
(July 5, 2016)
This issue of OnPolicy gives you a road map to working poverty in nine Ontario cities: Ottawa, London, Toronto, Thunder Bay, Kingston, Waterloo Region, Sudbury, Windsor and Hamilton. The Summer 2016 issue of OnPolicy also offers some solutions to the problems of working poverty, such as improving food security and providing dental benefits for the working poor, raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour, tackling precarity in the workplace and improving working conditions for low-wage work.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Ontario Office
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/ontario

National Office:
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Ontario's Social Assistance Poverty Gap
By Kaylie Tiessen
May 9, 2016
This report drills down on one key but complex policy file that is essential to the province meeting its commitment to reduce poverty and to improve income security for both children and adults: social assistance. The poverty gap for single individuals who qualify for Ontario Works or its equivalent has increased by almost 200% since 1993, and people receiving benefits from Ontario’s social assistance programs are living in a greater depth of poverty now than a generation ago.

Abstract and News Release:
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/ontarios-social-assistance-poverty-gap

Complete report (PDF - 548KB, 20 pages):
https://goo.gl/zJ2A0W

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

Related link:

Ontario’s poverty gap puts the lie to Wynne’s social justice pretensions
http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/michael-laxer/2016/05/ontarios-poverty-gap-puts-lie-to-wynnes-social-justice-pretensi

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

Miscellaneous (mostly from Jennefer Laidley's work - thanks, Jennefer!!)
April 2016

Report: One in eight households in Toronto are hungry
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2016/04/07/hunger-a-problem-for-one-in-eight-people-in-toronto-census-metropolitan-area-says-new-report.html

Cities Reducing Poverty conference in Edmonton has mayors discussing innovative solutions to poverty:
http://www.calgarysun.com/2016/04/05/nenshi-urges-innovative-solutions-to-poverty

Hundreds rally and groups unite in Vancouver for increases to BC social assistance rates:
http://themainlander.com/2016/04/04/groups-unite-to-call-for-higher-welfare-and-disability-rates/

Rogers to offer $9.99 internet to low-income housing organization tenants
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/rogers-cheap-internet-1.3523584

Public Interest Advocacy Centre along with other groups wants CRTC to mandate a basic internet service available and affordable to all Canadians https://www.piac.ca/our-specialities/the-basic-service-objective-hearings/

Ottawa advocates say Rogers should offer low-cost internet to all low-income people
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/rogers-10-dollar-internet-pilot-expands-1.3526165

Report: Household food insecurity in Canada: Problem definition and potential solutions in the public policy domain
http://proof.utoronto.ca/new-publication-household-food-insecurity-in-canada-problem-definition-and-potential-solutions-in-the-public-policy-domain/

Ontario’s $15 minimum wage campaign just got a boost
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2016/04/04/ontarios-15-minimum-wage-campaign-just-got-a-boost/#.VwJzS13D114.twitter

Ontario is at the back of the pack on the Big Mac minimum wage index
http://www.thestar.com/business/2016/04/04/stuck-at-the-back-of-the-big-mac-pack-wells.html

The Living Wage movement goes global, finally catching hold in Canada
https://www.opencanada.org/features/the-living-wage-movement-goes-global/

Ontario is ready to test a basic income
http://www.basicincome.org/news/2016/04/canada-ontario-is-ready-to-test-a-basic-income/

From the
City of Toronto:

SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]

This Bulletin is a quick inventory of current social research information.
Its purpose is to promptly disseminate to interested staff recently produced
research materials and initiatives relevant to social policy.

---

Latest issues of SPARmonitor:
(small PDF files, 3 pages each)

SPARmonitor October 7 (2015) - issue 164
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_164.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Toronto's Vital Signs Report: One Peace Toronto
Ø Behind the Bargains: How the Sharing Economy Impacts Health
Ø Implementing Housing First – Lessons from Toronto, Part #1
Ø Minimum Wage Rates in Canada: 1965-2015
Ø Leaving Some Behind: What Happens When Workers Get Sick

---

SPARmonitor September 9 (2015) - issue 162
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_162.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Price of Public Health Care Insurance
Ø Low Earnings, Unfilled Prescriptions: Employer-Provided Health Benefit Coverage in Canada
Ø The Future of Public Housing: Trends in Public Housing Internationally
Ø Housing Trends and Affordability
Ø Money in Motion: Modernizing Canada’s Payment System

---

SPARmonitor : August 5 (2015) - issue 160 (PDF - 378KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_160.pdf
August 5, 2015

This issue covers the following:

Ø Compulsory Government Pensions vs. Private Savings: The Effect of Previous Expansion to the Canada Pension Plan
Ø Our Communities Our Youth: The Health of Homeless and Street-Involved Youth in BC
Ø Memory Disabilities among Canadians Aged 15 Years and Older, 2012
Ø The Recession’s Impact on Canada’s Labour Market
Ø Facing FAQS: H1N1 and Homelessness in Toronto

---

SPARmonitor : June 03 (2015) - issue 156 (PDF - 375KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_156.pdf
June 03, 2015

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Use of Research-Based Evidence in Public Policy in Canada
Ø Architecture Disability Supports: Missing On the Policy Radar
Ø The Structure and Presentation of Provincial Budgets
Ø What to Do about Canada’s Declining Math Scores
Ø Mental Health and Contact with Police in Canada, 2012

-----------------------------------------------

SPARmonitor : May 20 (2015) - issue 155 (PDF - 375KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_155.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Contracting Out At the City: Effects on Workers’ Health
Ø Measuring Tax Complexity in Canada
Ø The Impacts of Affordable Housing on Health
Ø Renewing Canada’s Social Architecture Employment Skills Training
Ø Sources of Debt Accumulation in Resource-Dependent Provinces

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Selected earlier issues of the SPARmonitor - INCLUDING the table of contents for each issue
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm#spar
(This link will take you partway down the page you're now reading, where you'll find links to over three dozen earlier issues of the SPARmonitor going back to June 2011.)

"Official" SPARmonitor archives
http://goo.gl/NT0JPA
- NOT including the table of contents for each issue

- links to SPAR Monitor Issue #1 (Oct 7, 2009) to SPAR Monitor Issue #141 (October 29, 2014)

Source:
SPARmonitor
- Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
http://goo.gl/NT0JPA
.

[ Social Development, Finance & Administration
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/index.htm ]
[ City of Toronto
http://www.toronto.ca/ ]

Getting the Design Right on the Ontario Retirement Pension Plan (ORPP)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/getting-design-right-ontario-retirement-pension-plan-orpp
Ontario Ministry of Finance consultation
February 13, 2015
By Sheila Block and Hugh Mackenzie
The Ontario government has been consulting on how to design the province's proposed Ontario Retirement Pension Plan (ORPP). This submission to the Ontario Ministry of Finance, by CCPA-Ontario Senior Economist Sheila Block and CCPA-Research Associate Hugh Mackenzie, details how the government can get the pension plan design right for all workers in Ontario.

Complete CCPA-ON Submission (PDF - 860KB, 7 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Ontario%20Office/2015/02/Getting_the_Design_Right.pdf

Source:
Ontario Office
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/ontario
of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Related link:

Ontario Ministry of Finance
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/

A tough month for job seekers in Ontario
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2014/12/05/a-tough-month-for-job-seekers-in-ontario/
December 5, 2014
By Kaylie Tiessen
After a gain of 37,000 jobs in October, Ontario posted a loss of 33,900 jobs in November.
Unfortunately, 80% of those losses were in full-time work. Ontario’s year-to-date unemployment rate is now 7.3%. The province’s employment rate, which provides a snapshot of how many people are actually working in paid employment, nudged down a bit: year-to-date, Ontario’s employment rate is 61.2%. To put that into perspective, the employment rate in 2012, post-recession, was 61.3% and in 2013 it was 61.4%

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Ontario Office :
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/ontario
National Office : https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Ontario Child Poverty Report Card 2014
November 2014

Child Poverty, 25 Years Later : We Can Fix This
2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Ontario
(PDF - 482KB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/ONRC2014EN.pdf
.
Version française:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/ONRC2014FR.pdf
.
November 2014
In November 2014, the unanimous, federal all-party resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000 turns 25. An entire generation has lived in the shadow of this 1989 commitment, now fourteen years overdue. Over 1.3 million children in Canada and over 550,000 in Ontario live in poverty today. Even as Canada’s economy has more than doubled in size, child and family poverty is worse in 2014 than it was in 1989 at both the national and the provincial level.
(Source : Report intro)

Source:
Ontario Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/Ontario/

---

Ontario falling behind its own poverty reduction goals
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2014/11/24/ontario_falling_behind_its_own_poverty_reduction_goals.html
November 24, 2014
Campaign 2000’s annual report card shows province not meeting goal it set in 2008 to reduce child poverty by 25 per cent over five years.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The complete national child poverty report card:

Child Poverty 25 Years Later : We Can Fix This
2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 744KB, 12 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014EN.pdf
.
[ Version française :
http://www.campaign2000.ca/anniversaryreport/CanadaRC2014FR.pdf ]

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada network of 120 national, provincial and community partner organizations committed to working to end child and family poverty.

---

- For similar reports from other participating jurisdictions,
go to the Campaign 2000 Child Poverty Report Card Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/campaign_2000_child_poverty.htm

NEW from the
Children's Aid Society of Toronto
:

Toronto tops Canada in child poverty rates: report
Almost 146,000 children growing up in low-income families in Toronto
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/toronto-tops-canada-in-child-poverty-rates-report-1.2835604
November 14, 2014
A report released Friday says Toronto has the highest rate of child poverty in the country, a situation its authors call "the hidden epidemic." The report says almost 30 per cent of children in Toronto are now from low-income families, a situation that leaves them less likely to graduate from high school and more likely to be sick. Co-authored by the Children's Aid Society of Toronto, the report also finds there are almost 146,000 children growing up in low-income families in Toronto — a number that grew by 10,000 between 2010 and 2012.

Complete report:

The Hidden Epidemic : A Report on
Child and Family Poverty in Toronto
November 2014
To read this report online in e-Pub format, click the link above and then scroll halfway down on the next page.
TIP #1 : If you prefer to read the online version, be sure to click the "Enlarge" symbol in the lower left corner of the first page of the e-Pub

PDF version of this report (3.9MB, 40 pages):
http://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1361178/the-hidden-epidemic-a-report-on-child-and-family.pdf
TIP #2 : You can download the PDF version to your computer to read later, but you can't download the e-Pub version.

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/

This report was co-authored by the three agencies below:

Children's Aid Society of Toronto
http://www.torontocas.ca/

Family Service Toronto
http://www.familyservicetoronto.org/

Colour of Poverty
Website :
http://accessalliance.ca/community/advocacy/colourofpoverty
Facebook page : https://www.facebook.com/groups/colourofpoverty.colourofchange/

October 25, 2014
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne a social justice premier?
http://www.thecanadiancharger.com/page.php?id=5&a=1794
By
Reuel S. Amdur
In her post-election publicity, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne promised, among other things, "better support" for those on social assistance. "We will increase Ontario Works and Ontario Disability Support Program rates. . . by one per cent in 2014-15. We will also increase benefits for single Ontario Works clients without children, giving them a total benefit increase of $30 per month in 2014, for a total increase over two years of $50."
(...)
If Wynne can’t do any better than she has on the poverty envelope, she is little more than a Mike Harris (former Ontario Premier) in a skirt. As pointed out, in constant dollars Ontario Works recipients were actually better off under Harris!

Source:
The Canadian Charger

http://www.thecanadiancharger.com/

What's wrong with Ontario Works
http://www.cupe2544.ca/whats-wrong-with-ontario-works/
By Mike Bryck
July 13, 2014
...this is an inside opinion on what needs to change if our province is to attempt to eliminate poverty its my opinion and mine alone.
First off Ontario Works (OW) is a misnomer. The first line in the act states that is an “employment focused short term financial support program” In four years I have seen lots of attempts at the employment portion but to say the program is employment focused is just false more staff are devoted to financial eligibility and to compliance than are to employment and the province continues to attempt to push the employment portion out the door to outside agencies harming the service clients get.
OW is not short term.
(...)
OW ignores the working poor.
(...)
The rates are wrong. Harris cut them on the premise that if you make assistance uncomfortable people will get off of it…. this premise is absolutely nuts. Our rates need to be hiked at least 55% NOW; the current rates do not encourage fraud - they make it a requirement of life.

Source:
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Local 2544
http://www.cupe2544.ca/

---

Comment by Gilles:

Since September 2003, the Canadian Union of Public Employees has allowed me to use their mailing list program to manage the list of to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter and to disseminate the newsletter to those subscribers each week. I wish to thank CUPE for its unwavering support of my work, AND to state that while I am beholding to CUPE, the union has *never* attempted to influence the content of my website and newsletter. All opinions expressed on the site and in the newsletter are mine and mine alone (except, of course, when I'm quoting or paraphrasing someone).

Can Kathleen Wynne change the conversation on poverty?
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2014/07/12/can_kathleen_wynne_change_the_conversation_on_poverty.html
The premier has said refreshingly bold things about the role of government in fighting poverty. Will she make good on her promises? In her recent throne speech, Kathleen Wynne said that "government should be a force for good in people’s lives and it should be active where it is appropriate.”
By Leilani Farha
July 12, 2014
These are tough times in Ontario.
Once an economic giant, Ontario now has one of the largest debt-loads of any sub-national government in the world. And on a day-to-day basis for many, Ontario is a province in crisis.
(...)
In her throne speech, Wynne promised a poverty reduction strategy. If she is serious about this, she must look at the wise and concrete recommendations of the United Nations human rights system. Specifically, the UN calls on governments in Canada to strive to eliminate poverty by developing and implementing a plan in consultation with poor people, and including measurable goals and timelines, accountability mechanisms and a means by which poor people can claim their rights such as courts, tribunals, parliamentary proceedings, local councils or ombudsmen.
(...)
Wynne once said she wanted to be remembered as the “social justice premier.”
This is her chance.

[The author of this article, Leilani Farha, is the Executive Director of Canada Without Poverty.]

Source:
The Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

Related links:

Canada Without Poverty
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/
Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization dedicated to the elimination of poverty in Canada. [formerly known as the National Anti-Poverty Organization]

Ontario Throne Speech Details
http://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2014/07/03/liberal_government_throne_speech_details_leftleaning_agenda.html

The latest general election in Ontario took place on June 12, 2014.
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm#on

Alliance to End Homelessness releases 2013 Report Card on Ending Homelessness
& 10-year progress report on homelessness in Ottawa

http://endhomelessnessottawa.ca/alliance-to-end-homelessness-releases-2013-report-card-on-ending-homelessness-10-year-progress-report-on-homelessness-in-ottawa/
Media Release
April 15, 2014
[ (La version française suit l'anglais dans le communiqué.]

The 10th annual Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa was released by the Alliance to End Homelessness (ATEH) Ottawa on April 15, 2014. For the third year in a row, grades range from “A” to “F” — measuring yearly change in four areas affecting homelessness in Ottawa during 2013.

* An “A” was given for the reduction in the total number of homeless individuals and family members who stayed in an emergency shelter.
* An “F” was awarded for the average amount of time spent in an emergency shelter before housing is found.
* A “D” was given for an increase in new affordable units, with special mention given to the City of Ottawa for rescuing 344 housing allowances that would have been lost as provincial funding ended.
* Another “F” was given regarding the affordability of housing.

Complete report card:

2013 Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa
HTML version :
http://endhomelessnessottawa.ca/annual-report-card-2013/
PDF version ( 4.2MB, 16 pages) : http://endhomelessnessottawa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/alliance-to-end-homelessness-en.pdf
Contents:
* Community Success Stories
* 10-Year Retrospective
* Families First: 2 ½ years later
* A plan to end chronic homelessness!
* The Policy Landscape

Source:
Alliance to End Homelessness

http://endhomelessnessottawa.ca/
The Alliance to End Homelessness Ottawa (ATEH) is a provincially incorporated non-profit organization which seeks to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its member organizations [ http://endhomelessnessottawa.ca/about-ateh/list-of-members/ ].

Related link:

From the
Ottawa Citizen:

Homeless in Ottawa: Fewer people using shelters, but length of stays increasing, report finds
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Homelessness+Ottawa+Fewer+people+using+shelters+length+stays+increasing+report+finds/9740632/story.html
By Carys Mills
April 15, 2014

Weekly Media Scan page (Income Security Advocacy Centre)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/isac_media_scan.htm

[ Toronto - Ontario - Canada - (some) international ]
- dozens of new links in each issue

NEW


From CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario /
Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario:

Your Legal Rights Rights here. Rights now.
November 15, 2011
CLEO announces launch of Your Legal Rights website, a new online source of legal information for people across Ontario. Your Legal Rights is the new face of CLEONet, CLEO's highly successful legal information portal.

Legal topics covered:
* Abuse and Family Violence * Employment and Work * Housing Law * Social Assistance and Pensions * Consumer Law * Environmental Law * Human Rights * Wills and Estates * Criminal Law * Family Law * Immigration and Refugee Law * Education Law * Health and Disability * Legal System * Legal topics A-Z

The Your Legal Rights site contains the following features:

* Resources: Legal information covering a wide range of legal topics, in a variety of formats, and available in dozens of languages
* Common Questions: Questions and answers to everyday legal problems
* Find Services: Interactive map of key legal and social services across Ontario
* Training: Public legal education training webinars for service providers
* News & Events: The latest headlines and community events about the law and access to justice

Your Legal Rights is a project of CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario / Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario) and is funded by the Law Foundation of Ontario.

 



Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy

On December 4, 2008, the Government of Ontario committed itself to reducing the number of children living in poverty by 25 per cent over the next 5 years.
For a large (200+) and current collection of links to up-to-date online resources about the Ontario strategy from the Ontario government and from NGOs, go to the Canadian Social Research Links Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

(click on "Ontario" in the list of provinces at the top of the page.)

OR...

Go directly to the websites of:

(1) the Ontario Government poverty reduction strategy:

Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy
(Government of Ontario)
- incl. links to :
* Why It Matters * What's Happening Now * Where We Want to Be * Research * Meet the Team * Chair's Update (Deb Matthews) * Ontario Child Benefit * Ontario Disability Support Program * Ontario Works Program, and

(2) the NGO partners who are monitoring the government's implementation of its strategy:

Poverty Free Ontario - successor to Poverty Watch Ontario

Poverty Watch Ontario - "To monitor and inform on cross-Ontario activity on the poverty reduction agenda"
Poverty Watch Ontario is keeping an eye on the provincial poverty reduction consultations and poverty reduction events in Ontario.
Poverty Watch Ontario is a joint venture of the Social Planning Network of Ontario, Ontario Campaign 2000, and the Income Security Advocacy Centre.
[ Poverty Watch Resources - links to websites and reports ]


Current Welfare benefit levels in Ontario and much more:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm#rates
Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates
This factsheet contains current rate information (benefit levels) for 15 federal and Ontario financial assistance programs.
[NOTE : Clicking the link above will take you partway down the Ontario Government Links page of this website.]

Prepared by the
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services
[ http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/mcss/english/ ]


Ontario non-governmental links (in alphabetical order)

211Toronto.ca - your free online companion to 211, Toronto's 24/7 information line
- incl. links to Toronto (and Ontario-wide) resources in the following areas :Find Services by Topic
Aboriginal Peoples - Abuse/Assault - Child / Family Services - Community Programs - Emergency / Crisis Services - Employment / Training - Food - Francophones -
Government / Legal - Health Care - Homelessness - Housing - Income Support - Mental Health - Newcomers - Older Adults - Transportation - Youth

[ version française du site 211Toronto.ca ]

25-in-5: Network for Poverty Reduction
This is a multi-sectoral network comprised of more than 100 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working on eliminating poverty. We have organized ourselves around the call for a Poverty Reduction Plan with a goal to reduce poverty in Ontario by 25% in 5 years and 50% in 10 years.
- incl. links to : About Us - Events - News/Media - Resources - Contact Us - FAQ


NOTE: For links to info about the 25-in-5 Network's involvement in Ontario's anti-poverty reduction strategy, go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site [ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm ] and click the Ontario link.

Resources page
- incl. 60+ links to info about poverty reduction strategies in Canada (NL, QC) and internationally (U.K., Italy), community proposals for poverty reduction, housing and homelessness resources, links to non-governmental organizations working with disadvantaged populations and much more

-------

Selected site content:

Meeting the Poverty Reduction Target:Strong Leadership and Good Policy Required
Fourth Annual Progress Report on Poverty Reduction in Ontario
(PDF - 299K, 18 pages)
http://25in5.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Meeting-the-Poverty-Reduction-Target-Dec-4-2012.pdf
December 4, 2012

Anti-poverty target in peril: Ontario’s aspiring political leaders called to action
Toronto (Dec 4, 2012) – Ontario’s political leadership hopefuls are being warned that the province will fall short of its goal to reduce child and family poverty by 25% in 2013 unless urgent action is taken. As the Ontario Liberals choose a new leader and Opposition parties eye a spring election, a progress report by the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction is calling for immediate investments to support those who are struggling.

Source:
25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction

http://25in5.ca/
The 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction is a multi-sectoral network comprised of more than 100 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working on eliminating poverty in Ontario.

---------------------------------------------

Related links:

From the
Wellesley Institute:

Time for Ontario to make some tough choices: poverty and inequality are not inevitable
http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/news/time-for-ontario-to-make-some-tough-choices-poverty-and-inequality-are-not-inevitable/
December 4, 2012
By Steve Barnes
In 2008, the Ontario government committed to reduce child poverty by 25 percent in 5 years. 2013 marks the final year in the province’s first Poverty Reduction Strategy, and a new report by the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction shows that we have a long way to go to meet our target.

25 in 5 sets out key investments that we need to make now to ensure that we meet our target, including:
1) Fully implement the Ontario Child Benefit in 2013.
2) $100 increase for single adults on Ontario Works.
3) Restore the Community Start-Up and Maintenance Benefit
4) Updating Ontario’s minimum wage

Source:
Wellesley Institute

http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com
The Wellesley Institute is a Toronto-based non-profit and non-partisan research and policy institute. We focus on developing research, policy and community mobilization to advance population health.

---

From the
Toronto Star:

Ontario risks missing anti-poverty pledge
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1297127
December 4, 2012
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Without a promised hike to Ontario’s child benefit, Queen’s Park will not meet its pledge to lift 90,000 children out of poverty by 2013, anti-poverty advocates warn.
“With one year and one final budget remaining in Ontario’s historic first poverty reduction strategy, we call on all … political parties to commit to fulfilling the first poverty reduction target,” they say in their fourth annual progress report being released Tuesday.

The provincial strategy, released in 2008, promised a broad range of measures to cut Ontario’s child poverty rate by 25 per cent within five years. They included an annual child benefit of up to $1,310 per child by next December. More than one million Ontarians live in poverty, including about one in every seven children and teens.

11 comments about this article
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1297127#comments

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

25 in 5 welcomes Ontario’s Social Assistance review news
November 30, 2010
TORONTO -The 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction welcomes the news that Ontario’s long awaited Social Assistance review will start in January and be led by two very able commissioners: Frances Lankin and Dr. Munir Sheikh.
“We’re very pleased with the broad terms of reference for this review. It will provide recommendations not only on how to transform social assistance but on how it should connect to other income security programs that many of us need to rely on at some point in our lives, such as disability support programs and Employment Insurance,” said Jacquie Maund, Coordinator of Ontario Campaign 2000.
Source:
25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction
25-in-5: Network for Poverty Reduction is a multi-sectoral network comprised of more than 100 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working on eliminating poverty. We have organized ourselves around the call for a Poverty Reduction Plan with a goal to reduce poverty in Ontario by 25% in 5 years and 50% in 10 years.

For more links to the government release and related information, go to the Ontario - Government Links page :
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

Selected site content:

Five Principles for a New Nutritional Supplement Program
May 20, 2010
The Ontario government is replacing the Special Diet Allowance Program with a new nutritional supplement program. As it designs this new program, the government must ensure that it is not viewed in isolation from other aspects of the social assistance system and the problems that people who rely on it experience on a regular basis. (...) Recognizing that the new program will be created before the [Social Assistance] Review can take place, we urge the Ontario government to use the following five principles as guideposts for the development of an “Ontario Nutritional Supplement”:
1. CLEAR POLICY OBJECTIVE
2. ACCESSIBILITY, ADEQUACY, AND EQUITY
*** Genuine accessibility to the program
*** Adequate levels of support
*** Regular adjustments to keep up with rising costs
*** Equity. This includes ensuring that all people on social assistance who have health challenges are given financial support appropriate to their needs.
3. MEETING THE NEED
4. RESPONSIBILITY FOR CURRENT RECIPIENTS
5. TAKE THE TIME TO GET IT RIGHT

TAKE ACTION!
Help us make sure the new Ontario Nutritional Supplement meets the test by:
1. Showing your support for these Five Principles by endorsing them online at http://www.25in5.ca/take-action/
Endorse as an individual or get your organization to endorse.

2. Sending an email to the government to show your support, using 25 in 5’s automatic email at http://www.25in5.ca/take-action/
Your email will go to Minister Deb Matthews, Minister of Health, who is responsible for setting up the new Nutritional Supplement program. It will also go to Laurel Broten, Minister Responsible for Poverty Reduction, and Dwight Duncan, Minister of Finance.

3. Sharing your support for these Five Principles with your MPP.
You can find out who your MPP is by going to http://fyed.elections.on.ca/fyed/en/form_page_en.jsp
After finding the name of your riding, click on “information about your MPP”.

4. Telling your story about the benefit you’ve had from being on Special Diet, by going to http://25in5.ca/without-special-diet/
Share what it will mean to you if the provincial government’s new Nutritional Supplement program doesn’t meet the Five Principles test. If you work with people currently receiving Special Diet, please tell them about this opportunity to tell their story.

---

Premier McGuinty Responds to 25 in 5
Posted to the 25 in 5 website May 17, 2010
On April 29, Michael Creek and Greg deGroot-Maggetti of 25 in 5 wrote to the Premier about the cancellation of the Special Diet Allowance (see below), which will have an impact on several thousand OW and ODSP recipients, and the 1% increase to social assistance rates, which falls short of the inflation rate. Predictably, the reply from the Premier (dated May 6) follows the dog-eared template that many advocacy groups know so well from past experience:
1. Thank you for your valuable feedback regarding [insert name of issue] in Ontario.
2. List McGuinty government's accomplishments in the area of [insert name of issue].
3. Reiteration of McGuinty government's firm commitment to reform and improve [insert name of issue].
4. Redirect letter/request to the Minister responsible for [insert name of issue] for further processing (read possible delay).

The letter from 25 in 5 to
Premier McGuinty:

Open Letter to Premier McGuinty
from the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction:

Budget Decisions on Social Assistance Call Commitment into Question

April 29, 2010

---

Ontario Auditor General’s Report
Underlines Need for Social Assistance Reform

November 11, 2009
Whether he meant to or not, the auditor general’s December 7th analysis of OW/ODSP let a dysfunctional social assistance system off the hook, instead laying blame with the people who have nowhere else to turn for basic support. The ensuing debate risks losing sight of the simple fact that when it comes to social assistance, it’s not the people who are the problem. Instead it’s the 800+ rules that trap people in poverty and powerlessness, fail to provide social and community supports and education and training tools to enable opportunity, and leave people so short of income that living a healthy, dignified life is impossible. As Premier McGuinty recently stated, social assistance “stomps people into the ground” and something must be done to make the system work the way it should. That something cannot come soon enough, as evidenced by the confusing picture painted by the auditor general’s report.

NOTE: the above link includes a detailed backgrounder covering the following points:
* Overpayments and Program Costs: Comparing Apples to Oranges
* What Is An Overpayment?
* The System Routinely Generates Overpayments
* Overpayments are Generated Monthly – Increasing Misperceptions
* Overpayments and Breaking the Rules
* Program Complexity and 800 Rules
* “Temporary” Assistance?
* Special Diet
* Conclusion
* What Can You Do? TAKE ACTION

Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre
[ 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction ]

Related link:

2009 Annual Report:
Office of the Auditor General of Ontario

December 7, 2009

Five benchmarks for social assistance
Ontario's fiscal woes come as bad news for the
growing number of Ontarians dealing with the fallout from the recent economic storm.
By Pat Capponi (Voices From the Street) and
Jennefer Laidley (Income Security Advocacy Centre)
October 27, 2009
As provincial coffers dry up, thousands of individuals and families also face increasing financial hardship. With unemployment expected to hit 10 per cent by 2010, there could soon be 400,000 of us out of work. And while federal changes to employment insurance will offer some short-term relief, they may be too little, too late. (...) The commitment to review Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program – made in the province's poverty reduction strategy last December – has been agonizingly slow to get off the ground. (...) [T]he newly appointed minister responsible for poverty reduction, Laurel Broten, and the government's poverty reduction results team must make the social assistance review their first order of business to support Ontario's strategy for climbing out of the recession. As Ontario considers its plan for moving forward, the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction offers the following five benchmarks for a social assistance review that will meet the test:
* The review must be grounded in a bold vision: economic security and opportunity for all Ontarians.
* The review must be proactive.
* A timely process to launch deep reforms must be part of the review package.
* Providing decent, adequate income supports must be a stated outcome of the review.
* People who have had to rely on Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program must have a leading role in shaping the review's recommendations.
Source:
Toronto Star

Authors Pat Capponi and Jennefer Laidley are members of the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction, a multi-sectoral network comprised of more than 100 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working on eliminating poverty.

Related links:

Voices From the Street
Voices from the streets was launched in 2005 with funding from the City of Toronto’s Supporting Community Partnership Initiative to develop a speakers bureau comprised of individuals with mental health and addictions history. (...)
Voices From the Street is comprised of individuals who have had direct experience with homelessness, poverty, and/or mental health issues. The organization works to put a human face to homelessness and involves people with direct experience as leaders in a public education process.

Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC)
The Income Security Advocacy Centre works with and on behalf of low income communities in Ontario to address issues of income security and poverty.

Social Assistance Review - A sub-site of the Income Security Advocacy Centre
Comprehensive source for issues, stories, resources, analysis, and news about the review
- incl. links to : About - Take Action - Tell Your Story - Resources - News

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Ontario Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty_ontario.htm

Put Food in the Budget
http://putfoodinthebudget.ca/
The Put Food in the Budget campaign began in January 2009 in response to Premier McGuinty’s decision to exclude an increase in social assistance rates for adults in Ontario from his poverty reduction strategy. The Put Food in the Budget campaign had two demands...


NOTE: For links to info about the 25-in-5 Network's involvement in Ontario's anti-poverty reduction strategy, go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page of this site [ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm ] and click the Ontario link.

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance
(formerly the Ontarians with Disabilities Act Committee)

Ontario Human Rights Reform - A Call to Action
November 27, 2006 - First Day of Toronto Public Hearings on Bill 107 - November 15, 2006
November 27, 2006 - McGuinty Muzzle Motion is an Even Bigger Flip-Flop
November 26, 2006 - AODA Alliance's November 26 2006, Toronto Sun Guest Column on Bill 107
"(...) We agree the underfunded, backlogged human rights system needs to be fixed. We've offered alternatives. The Liberals just slough them off and shut down legislative hearings, where we'd present and debate them. Instead, they heed the call of Bill 107 supporters -- a small vocal group of self-designated "human rights lawyers."*
* November 23, 2006 - Toronto Star Editorial Blasts McGuinty for Shutting Down Promised Bill 107 Public Hearings
* November 22, 2006 - Keep Up Pressure on McGuinty Government for Shutting Down Bill 107 Public Hearings
* November 21, 2006 - McGuinty Government Blasted in Legislature for Plans to shut Down Promised Bill 107 Public Hearings
NOTE: the Call to Action page contains links to dozens of resources providing extensive background and contextual information.

-----------------

*And now, a different perspective from the so-called "small vocal group of self-designated human rights lawyers" mentioned above:

[Ontario] Human Rights Reform website
This is a clearinghouse for submissions, presentations, letters and papers supporting reform of Ontario's human rights enforcement process. Please click on our Open Letter for a list of supporters; click on Letters or Briefs to Justice Committee to read what many community organizations, disability rights activists, members of racialized communities, gay and lesbian advocacy groups, community legal clinics and social justice lawyers have said about why now is the time to move forward with reform of our outdated human rights system.
- incl. links to: Home * Endorse Open Letter * Analysis of Bill 107 * Myths & Reality * Briefs to Justice Committee * Letters

Related Government Links:

Commission Defines Connection Between Human Rights and Family Relationships
May 2, 2007
Toronto - Today the Ontario Human Rights Commission released the results of its groundbreaking initiative on discrimination based on family status. “Ontario is proud to be the first jurisdiction to examine the human rights implications of barriers faced by families who are caring for children, aging parents or relatives, and family members with disabilities”, said Barbara Hall, Chief Commissioner.
The Cost of Caring: Report on the Consultation on Discrimination on the Basis of Family Status and the Policy and Guidelines on Discrimination Because of Family Status highlight the results of the Commission’s public consultation on family status, and provide employers, landlords and service providers with guidance on rights and responsibilities under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the “Code”).

The Cost of Caring: Report on the Consultation on Discrimination on the Basis of Family Status

Policy and Guidelines on Discrimination Because of Family Status
- Table of Contents

Fact Sheets - links to 35 fact sheets on a variety of topics under the theme of human rights, such as discrimination based on age, race or disability, accommodation of people with disabilities, mandatory retirement, etc.

From the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General:

Government Tables Key Amendments to
Bill 107 with Standing Committee on Justice Policy

November 28, 2006

Related Links:

Proposed Amendments to Bill 107 (dead link)
Backgrounder
November 15, 2006
The McGuinty government is proposing amendments to Bill 107 the Human Rights Code Amendment Act, 2006, which was introduced in April 2006. Key proposed amendments to the bill would enhance the Commission’s independence, strengthen its investigative and public interest powers, promote greater fairness in the tribunal process, and entrench a range of available legal supports.

Administrative Justice Support Network
http://asjn.communitylivingontario.ca/
The Administrative Justice Support Network mission is to support people to feel competent and confident to proceed with an appeal before an administrative board or tribunal whether or not they have legal representation. This site provides information on selected board and tribunals, links to additional information, and information on where to find more specific legal advice or legal representation.
- includes resources for appeals in the following areas:
* Special Education * School Expulsions * Landlord & Tenant * CCAC Appeals * Human Rights * Social Benefits (ODSP) * Consent & Capacity * Medical Professionals Complaints

Mission statement (in the words of the site's creator, Dawn Roper):
“...to encourage people to feel they are capable of launching an appeal whether or not they have legal representation.”

Related link:

Scales of justice tipped against disabled kids
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2013/08/30/scales_of_justice_tipped_against_disabled_kids_goar.html
By Carol Goar
August 30, 2013
Parent-activist creates website to guide parents of disabled children through Ontario's legal maze

Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE):
http://www.advocacycentreelderly.org/
The Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE) in Toronto is a specialty community legal clinic that was established to provide a range of legal services to low-income seniors in Ontario. The legal services include advice and representation to individual and group clients, public legal education, law reform and community development activities. ACE has been operating since 1984. ACE is funded through Legal Aid Ontario [ http://www.legalaid.on.ca/ ] and is the first legal clinic in Canada to specialize in the legal problems of seniors.

---
NOTE : Even if you're not from Ontario, I highly recommend checking out this excellent collection of online resources!
If you have a loved one who's advanci
ng in age and you're looking for a reliable source of legal information in one of the areas below, click through some of the links on the home page to get a legal perspective on the range of services for the elderly in Ontario.
---

Site content (areas of law):
Advance Care Planning - Consent and Capacity - Consumer Protection - Elder Abuse - Home Care - Hospitals - Long-Term Care Homes - General - Inquests - Rights - Pensions and Income - Powers of Attorney - Retirement Homes - Wills

The ACE Newsletter:

Spring/Summer 2012 issue (PDF - 1.2MB, 16 pages)
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/sites/all/files/ACE_Spring_Newsletter_Vol9No1_web_0.pdf

Contents of this newsletter:
* Old Age Security : What Do The Proposed Changes Mean For Low-Income Adults?
* ACE Profiles: Dr. Samir K. Sinha – Newly Appointed Expert Lead For Ontario’s Seniors Care Strategy
* Information You Should Know If You Live In A Retirement Home
* Searching The “Consumer Beware” List
* Long-Term Care Home Task Force On Resident Care And Safety Releases Action Plan
* Ten Months In The Life Of An Articling Student At ACE
* Tips And Traps When Dealing With Long-Term Care
* News and Announcements

Past Newsletters (links to 20+ past issues back to Fall 2000)
http://www.advocacycentreelderly.org/ace_library_-_newsletters.php

Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario (ACTO)
"The Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario (ACTO) works to better the housing situation of Ontario residents who have low incomes including tenants, co-op members and people who are homeless. ACTO achieves this through: test case litigation; lobbying and law reform; housing policy work; community organizing; and public legal education.
ACTO works with legal clinics, tenant associations and other groups and individuals concerned about housing issues. ACTO is funded by Legal Aid Ontario and has been in existence since September, 2001."
- incl. links to : About ACTO - Cases - Community/Campaigns - Law Reform and Advocacy - Publications - Tenant Info - Rent Control/Affordability - Eviction and Homelessness - Maintenance and Supply - Tenant Duty Counsel Program

Related Links:

Ontario Government Rent Reform Home Page

Government's Online Questionnaire

Statement of Principles: New Landlord/Tenant and Rent Control Legislation
Released by the Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario (ACTO) and theLegal Clinics' Housing Issues Committee (LCHIC)
June 5, 2003
"Issues Committee (composed of representatives from legal clinics in each region of Ontario) have jointly released this paper. Topics include: fair eviction application process, security of tenure against forfeiture, what a new tribunal would look like ... This platform will be distributed to the government and both opposition parties, and LCHIC/ACTO will request a meeting with all three parties."

Ombudsman Asked To Investigate Ontario Rental Housing Tribunal
ACTO media release
- concerning the Failure of the Tenant Protection Act and the Rules and Procedures of the Ontario Rental Housing Tribunal to meet Ombudsman Fairness Standards

Background & Quick Facts
Media Conference
June 20, 2002

Submission to the Ombudsman Ontario Concerning the Failure of the Tenant Protection Act
and the Rules and Procedures of the Ontario Rental Housing Tribunal to meet Ombudsman Fairness Standards

June 20, 2002
Table of Contents of the Submission to the Ombudsman Ontario (HTML)
Complete Submission (PDF file - 141K, 54 pages)
Complete Submission (Word file - 180K, 54 pages)

Advocates for Community-Based Training and Education for Women (ACTEW)
Founded in 1987, A Commitment to Training and Employment for Women (ACTEW) is a network of agencies providing community-based employment and training services for women. ACTEW envisions employment and training services and programs as the bridge to women's economic self-sufficiency. ACTEW advances women’s economic security through the promotion of labour force development for women.
- incl. links to:
* About ACTEW * Projects * News * Events * Jobs * Resource Library * Looking for Training? * Contact Us * Search * Site Map * Funders

Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa
The Alliance to End Homelessness is a non-partisan coalition of community stakeholders committed to working collaboratively to end homelessness by gaining and promoting a better understanding of homelessness and advocating for strategies to end it.
-
incl. links to : What's New * About the Alliance * About Homelessness * Action Centre * Events * Report Card on Homelessness in Ottawa * Ottawa Service Inventory for Agencies

NOTE: For related links,
see
the City of Ottawa's Poverty Reduction Strategy- this link takes you further down on the page you're now reading.

[Ottawa]
Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa Jan - Dec. 2011 released:
First ever "A"
(Word file - 59K, 3 pages)
http://goo.gl/ZFysy
April 3, 2011
[ Version française du communiqué:
http://goo.gl/HalWK ]

In Ottawa, the first ever "A" grade since the Alliance to End Homelessness (ATEH) starting producing report cards in 2004 was given. The "A" grade was for new affordable housing created in 2011. An "A" is awarded when new affordable housing is provided for 700-1,000 households, either through the building of new units or assistance to pay rent.
"The City of Ottawa is to be commended for quickly rolling out in 2011 its new $14 million for the Housing and Homelessness Investment Plan," said Lynne Browne, Executive Director of the ATEH. "City spending accounted for 508 of the 536 households receiving assistance to pay rent. That leadership demonstrates conclusively how targeted spending developed in consultation with community organizations can go beyond maintaining the level of homelessness and actually start moving towards ending it."
"In contrast, two of the three other areas we measure received a failing grade of "F" and the third one a "D+", said Browne.

Complete report (PDF - 4.2MB, 16 pages)
http://goo.gl/NBttI

Version française complète: (fichier PDF - 3,6Mo., 16 pages)
http://goo.gl/QcInq

[ homelessness reports cards for previous years (2004-2009) ]

Source:
Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa
The Alliance to End Homelessness Ottawa (ATEH) is a non-profit organization whose mandate is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its member organizations working in the area of housing in Ottawa.

From Homeless to Home Project
Click the link above for five ways to learn from people who have been homeless in Ottawa and became housed again.
The project brings to life the findings from the Panel Study on Homelessness in Ottawa (see links below)

1. Interviews:
Eleven people share their experience of homelessness in brief 4-5 minute audio-visual interviews.

2. Booklet with Research Highlights
Easy to read highlights help get the word out on how community organizations, governments and people in the community can work together to end homelessness.

3. A Documentary Film:
From Homeless to Home (video)
By filmmaker Jason GondziolaFrom Homeless to Home is one of five ways developed in a project to help the community learn from people who have been homeless in Ottawa and to bring to life for a broad audience the findings from the Panel Study on Homelessness in Ottawa.Through a partnership between the University of Ottawa, Carleton University and the Alliance to End Homelessness, the project was funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada through its Homelessness and Diversity Issues initiative. The project shares with the broader community answers to these questions – Who is homeless in Ottawa ? How do people move into and out of homelessness? What challenges do they face? How do people become homeless? How can community organizations, governments and people in the community work together to end homelessness?

4. Radio Show
A two-part radio documentary about homelessness in Ottawa on CHUO by Heather Gilberds, Communication Studies at Carleton University.

5. Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa, Jan-Dec 2007
Eight of the people interviewed below are also in the Housing WORKS section in the 2007 Report Card, talking about how they found a place to live after being homeless

Related links:

Panel Study on Persons Who Are Homeless in Ottawa:

Phase 2 Results Final Report (PDF - 473K, 67 pages)
By Tim Aubry, Ph.D., Fran Klodawsky, Ph.D., Rebecca Nemiroff, B.A., Sarah Birnie, B.A. & Cristina Bonetta, M.A.
March 2007

Phase 1 Results Final Report (PDF - 378K, 51 pages)
By Tim Aubry, Ph.D., Fran Klodawsky, Ph.D., Rebecca Nemiroff, B.A., Sarah Birnie, B.A. & Cristina Bonetta, M.A.
December 2003 - Revised to November 2006

[ more homelessness reports from the
Alliance to end Homelessness in Ottawa
]

------


Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa, Jan–Dec 2010

April 2010
The community faced challenges in meeting 2010 targets to end homelessness by 2020. Clearly, the Federal and Provincial governments need to do much more, not less. Targeted spending will make a difference! That’s why we very much welcome the new direction from City Hall under the leadership of Mayor Watson as embodied in the 2011 budget. It includes $10M for the Housing and Poverty Initiative to address homelessness and poverty, and $4M for capital investment in housing.

Ottawa community still not on target to end homelessness
in 10 years says The Alliance to End Homelessness
(PDF - 393K, 3 pages)
News Release
April 11, 2011
[ Version française ]
“Despite some progress in creating additional affordable housing units last year, the Ottawa community faced challenges in meeting the 2010 targets we set to end
homelessness by 2020,” says Marion Wright, Chair of the Alliance to End Homelessness (ATEH). Last year the Alliance to End Homelessness set strong annual targets to end homelessness within the next decade, particularly for the development of new affordable housing units.
- includes detailed highlights from the report card.
Selected highlights:
* the Report Card gave Ottawa its first "F" grade for housing affordability
* a single person on Ontario Works would need 121% of the income rate set by the provincial government to rent a bachelor apartment (...) For a single person on Ontario Disability Support Program benefits, that bachelor apartment eats up 69% of their income.
* the average stay in shelters for families with children was 72 days; there were 1,408 homeless children last year
* Ottawa families are now spending more than two months in emergency shelter before finding housing.
- also included in the report:
* Specific messages for politicians and voters at the national, provincial and municipal levels
* Calgary’s Plan to End Homelessness and how its approach could work in Ottawa.
* Canada’s “hidden health emergency” – Canadians who are “vulnerably housed” face the same severe health problems as people who are homeless
* Deprivation “hot spots” in Ottawa and neighbourhood initiatives aimed at improving the situation
* New housing that works

Complete report (PDF - 5.6MB, 16 pages)
[ Version française ]
Table of contents:
1. On target to end homelessness?
2. How we see it
3. Parliament and housing
4. Queen’s Park, housing and homelessness
5. In the City of Ottawa
6. A portrait of shelter use in Ottawa
7. Calgary’s Plan to End Homelessness
8. Data: perspective, housing & affordability
9. Data: shelter use, length of stay plus 7-Year Trend
10. What is Canada’s hidden emergency?
11. Deprivation in Ottawa. Try Ontario’s Deprivation Index
12. Deprived, not hopeless – neighbourhood perspective
13. Place matters: photovoice in Ottawa
14. / 15. New housing in 2010!
16. Psst…Can I ask you a favour?

[ homelessness reports cards for previous years (2004-2009) ]

Source:
Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa
The Alliance to End Homelessness (ATEH) in Ottawa envisions an inclusive community that takes responsibility for ensuring every resident has an appropriate home. Our non-partisan coalition is committed to working collaboratively to end homelessness.
- incl. links to : What's New * About the Alliance * About Homelessness * Action Centre * Events * Report Card on Homelessness in Ottawa * Ottawa Service Inventory for Agencies

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

------------------------------------------------------

Fifth Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa, Jan–Dec 2008
Billions for banks while Ottawa shelters overflow : Children and youth hardest hit
(PDF - 40K, 2 pages)
March 30, 2009
Media Release
- evaluates the city’s progress in combating the crisis of homelessness by comparing 2008 with 2007 to provide grades in four areas: housing, income, homelessness and length of shelter stay.
"The 2008 Report Card will report that the total number of men, women, youth and children using shelters shot up over the year. Families alone increased by 15.2%. There were 747 homeless families with 1,179 children under 16 years old in 2008. Perry Rowe, Chair of the Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa, is particularly concerned that not only were more people homeless but they stayed in shelters an average of 51 days in 2008, five days longer than in 2007. The average length of stay in an Ottawa shelter has been increasing since 2006.Since mid-2008, the demand for shelter beds has been surging and Ottawa emergency shelters have been running out of beds every night."

Complete report:

Experiencing Homelessness
Report Card on ENDING Homelessness in Ottawa
(PDF - 2.6MB, 16 pages)
March 2009
Annual report card of the Alliance to End Homelessness to track the Ottawa community’s progress in ending homelessness.
[ version française (PDF - 2,6Mo., 16 pages)]

Highlights (PDF - 23K, 1 page)

[ Past report cards - 2004 to 2007 ]

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Fourth Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa Jan-Dec 2007
2007 - A Step Backwards!
HOUSING: C-
INCOME: C
HOMELESSNESS : D
LENGTH OF SHELTER STAY : D-
- incl. links to report cards for earlier years

Read the complete 2007 Report Card (PDF - 2.5MB, 16 pages)
[ version française ]

Highlights (small PDF file, 1 page)
[ English ]
[ Français ]

Experiencing Homelessness
Third Report Card on ENDING Homelessness in Ottawa, Jan-Dec 2006
(PDF file - 3.2MB, 16 pages)
"(...)On February 27, 2007, the Alliance to End Homelessness released the third annual Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa and for the first time, provided grades in four areas: housing, income, homelessness and length of shelter stay. This year’s Report Card also includes a Special Report on Homelessness & Health, another risk factor for homelessness."

NOTE: the home page of the Alliance website offers highlights from the third report on homelessness in Ottawa

Related link:
Centre for Research on Educational and Community Services - University of Ottawa

Related Web/News/Blog links:

Google Search Results Links - always current results!
Using the following search terms (without the quote marks):
"homelessness report card, 2006, Ottawa"
Web search results page
News search results page
Blog Search Results page
Source:
Google.ca

Proceedings of the 2006 Community Forum on Homelessness
Linking Ottawa Research with Action and Policy
In Honour of National Housing Day
November 22, 2006
On National Housing Day, the Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa held its third Community Forum on Homelessness - Linking Ottawa Research with Action and Policy.
- incl. links to over a dozen Powerpoint presentations from the community forum on a variety of topics related to homelessness, including an overview of the panel study of homelessness in Ottawa, homelessness and youth, cycles of homelessness, the Government of Canada's National Homeless Individuals and Families Information System (HIFIS) Initiative, and more...

Second Report Card on Homelessness in Ottawa, Jan-Dec 2005
Released February 28, 2006
Grade C+
Only slight progress made.
8,853 people were homeless and stayed in a shelter at some point in 2005.

Complete report:
English
Français

An Oldie Goldie:

Alcohol & Welfare Recipients
On November 14, 2000, Ontario's Minister of Community and Social Services, John Baird (Yup, the same one), launched province-wide consultations on mandatory drug treatment for welfare recipients. Under the proposed plan, those who refused treatment would be cut off social assistance. Click the above link to access a large collection of links to relevant statistics, research papers, and background information, as well as information on prevention programs.


ARCH Disability Law Centre
The ARCH Vision : A world in which all people with disabilities enjoy social justice and equal participation in society and our communities.
- incl. links to:
* About ARCH * Our Services * Significant Cases * Publications * Submissions * Useful Links

ARCH Alert Special Ontario Election 2011 issue (Word file - 184K, 14 pages)
Selected content:
* Disability Issues and the Election
* Accessible Voting in the October 6th Election
* Access to Democracy and the Electoral System: Challenges and Legal Opportunities
* Various Election Campaigns and Questions for Candidates

[ Earlier issues of ARCH Alert - back to January 2006 ]

Source:
ARCH Disability Law Centre
The ARCH Vision : A world in which all people with disabilities enjoy social justice and equal participation in society and our communities.
- incl. links to:
* About ARCH * Our Services * Significant Cases * Publications * Submissions * Useful Links * Attendant Services * Education Law * Legal Capacity * Services for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities * Priority Area Archives

---

- Go to the Disability Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm


Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO)
The Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) works with and for municipal governments. AMO's traditional activities include inter-government relations and policy development; information gathering and disseminating on all issues affecting municipalities.  AMO also develops and delivers new and innovative products and services for municipalities.

At Home/Chez Soi
Research Demonstration Project in Mental Health and Homelessness : Toronto Site
October 2011 Update
(PDF - 222K, 4 pages)"At Home/Chez Soi" Toronto Site Update #4: October 2011 (PDF attached).

580 people are now enrolled in "At Home/Chez Soi" in Toronto. This update includes some of what we've learned so far about participants and their experiences, as well as updates from the different groups involved in the project.

"At Home/Chez Soi" Research Demonstration Project in Mental Health and Homelessness is a five-city national research project exploring ways to help the growing number of homeless people across Canada who have mental health problems. The project is funded by the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

To subscribe to/be removed from this list,
or to provide comments, please contact Emily Holton at holtone@smh.ca

Atkinson Charitable Foundation
http://atkinsonfoundation.ca/
The Atkinson Charitable Foundation was established in 1942 by Joseph E. Atkinson. He was the publisher of the Toronto Star, Canada’s largest daily newspaper. More than $68 million has been invested in Ontario over seven decades to advance his vision of an equitable, inclusive and healthy society.

Atkinson Fellowship in Public Policy
http://atkinsonfoundation.ca/grants/atkinson-fellowship-in-public-policy/
Since 1988, we’ve been awarding the Atkinson Fellowship in Public Policy to a leading Canadian journalist. Fellows are supported for a period of one year – from September 1 to August 31 – to investigate a current policy issue and write a series of articles for publication in the Toronto Star.

Selected site content:

How to put Canada back together again:
Four big recommendations for repairing the tears in our social fabric.

http://www.thestar.com/news/atkinsonseries/2013/12/22/how_to_put_canada_back_together_again.html
By Michael Valpy
December 22, 2013
The Big Four ways we can advance social cohesion in Canada:
1. Mandatory voting.
2. A proportional representation electoral system.
3. A guarantee of basic income.
4. Protections for the Precariat (workers in precarious employment)

Award-winning journalist Michael Valpy is this year’s recipient of the Atkinson Fellowship in Public Policy.http://atkinsonfoundation.ca/grants/atkinson-fellowship-in-public-policy/

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

Related links:

Atkinson Fellowship in Public Policy
http://atkinsonfoundation.ca/grants/atkinson-fellowship-in-public-policy/

Atkinson Charitable Foundation
http://atkinsonfoundation.ca/
The Atkinson Charitable Foundation was established in 1942 by Joseph E. Atkinson. He was the publisher of the Toronto Star, Canada’s largest daily newspaper. More than $68 million has been invested in Ontario over seven decades to advance his vision of an equitable, inclusive and healthy society.

CBC News

Tory welfare wait period could be costly
June 1, 2011
A Progressive Conservative election promise to enact a one-year wait before new Ontario arrivals can collect welfare could cost the province millions in federal transfer payments. Included in the Ontario Tories' platform unveiled last week is a plan to make welfare applicants "show a promise to Ontario" by living in the province for a year before they are eligible. Ontarians will go to the polls in an Oct. 6 provincial election.
(...)
Federal law stipulates that Ottawa can cut transfer payments to a province that imposes any kind of time limit before people are eligible for welfare. Ontario receives $4.46 billion a year from the Canada Social Transfer, which provides support to provinces across a number of different areas, including:
- Post-secondary education.
- Social assistance and social services.
- Early childhood development.
- Early learning and childcare.
It's not clear exactly how much of that funding could be affected by a potential one-year residency welfare prerequisite.
Hudak said he is not worried his plan will cost the province money. "To me it's an important value as Ontarians that if you're going to go on the welfare rolls, you should at least live in our province for a year," he said.

[ Comments (51) ]

Source:
CBC News

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NOTE : For more detailed information on the CST "Residency Rule", see:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm#residence_rule

Caledon Institute of Social Policy
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy is a private, non-profit organization with charitable status.Caledon’s work deals with poverty and other social and economic inequalities, and overs a broad range of social policy areas including income security (e.g., pensions, welfare, child benefits, Employment Insurance, benefits for Canadians with disabilities), taxation, social spending, employment development services, social services and health.

Although national in scope, Caledon is Ontario-based, and it does offer a large number of reports and commentaries about the Ontario social landscape. Search Caledon's publications using the term "Ontario" and you'll see links to about almost 70 online documents - most of which are critical of the Harris government's cuts to social programs - Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program in particular.

NOTE : For links to an extensive collection of Caledon reports, go to:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

People’s Review Panel: Getting the Ontario Social Assistance Review issues straight
… from people with lived experiences of poverty
(PDF - 49K, 5 pages)
By Anne Makhoul and Richard Matern
January 2011
A People’s Review Panel composed of 18 members from across Ontario will provide input into Ontario ’s Social Assistance Review. People with lived experience of poverty are working with Voices from the Street and Daily Bread Food Bank to record, analyze and summarize the policy barriers which currently impede them.

---

Transitions Revisited: Implementing the Vision
By John Stapleton
September 2004
"Transitions, the landmark 1988 report of the Social Assistance Review in Ontario, created a new vision for social assistance and related programs that called for a radically redesigned set of child benefits, a new income program for persons with disabilities and a new direction to bring welfare recipients into the mainstream of community life. Although some early investments were made to implement the vision, these reforms were largely dismantled in the mid- to late-1990s. John Stapleton, a former public servant and senior policy advisor to members of the Social Assistance Review Committee from 1986-1988, argues that there has never been a better time to bring some of the key proposals of Transitions up to date and to seriously consider implementing them."
[Abstract]

Complete report (PDF file - 135K, 38 pages)

Ontario’s Shrinking Minimum Wage (PDF file - 20K, 3 pages)
February 2003
"Ontario has seen a steady decline in the value of its minimum wage because the rate has been frozen at $6.85 for eight long years."
Source: Caledon Institute of Social Policy


Calmeadow Foundation

CALMEADOW is a registered Canadian not-for-profit charity with over fifteen years of experience in microfinance. Based in Toronto, CALMEADOW focuses its efforts on mobilizing and managing capital for direct investment in developing microfinance institutions.


Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000. Campaign 2000 began in 1991 out of concern about the lack of government progress in addressing child poverty. Campaign 2000 is non-partisan in urging all Canadian elected officials to keep their promise to Canada's children. There are over 85 national, community and provincial partners actively involved in the work of Campaign 2000. Hundreds of other groups across the country work on the issue of child poverty every day, such as children's aid societies, faith organizations, community agencies, health organizations, school boards, and low-income people's groups.
Follow these links from Campaign 2000's Home Page : What's New - Take Action - Report Cards - Resources - About Campaign 2000

Ontario Campaign 2000

NOTE: some of Campaign 2000's website content can be found on the
Canadian Social Research Links Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

---

Selected content from
the Campaign 2000 website:



2013 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty- November 26, 2013
(From Campaign 2000)

Campaign 2000 and Its Regional Partners Release
New 2013 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
November 26, 2013
Campaign 2000’s annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada was released on Tuesday, November 26th in Ottawa. This year marks 24 years since the unanimous House of Commons’ resolution to end child poverty in Canada by 2000 and four years after the entire House of Commons voted “to develop an immediate plan to end poverty for all in Canada.”

National report card:

The 2013 national report card, entitled Canada’s REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication, highlights the compelling reasons why the federal government needs to take leadership. It presents the latest statistics on child and family poverty and makes recommendations for all political parties. Federal party leaders have been invited to respond to the report card.

Canada’s REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication:
2013 Report card on Child and Familkiuy Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 3MB, 22 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013C2000NATIONALREPORTCARDNOV26.pdf
[ Version française:
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013NationalReportCardNov26French.pdf ]

----------------------------------

Provincial report cards:

On the same day as the national report card was released, several of Campaign 2000 regional partner organizations released their provincial report cards on child and family poverty as well, including:
* Vancouver, BC
* Edmonton, Alberta
* Calgary, Alberta
* Toronto, Ontario (see link below)
* Saint John, New Brunswick
* Halifax, Nova Scotia

---

Ontario

Beyond Austerity : Investing in Ontario's Future
Ontario Report Card on Child and Family Poverty, 2013
(PDF - 5.6MB, 16 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/Ontario/reportcards/2013%20FULL%20ON%20Campaign%202000%20Report%20Card%20-Nov26.pdf
By Anita Khanna with Laurel Rothman & Nicole Forget
November 2013
Ontario must chart a new path; austerity has been harmful to marginalized Ontarians struggling to move beyond poverty. Now, low income children and families need the province to move beyond words into action by making investments in poverty reduction that will help to achieve social justice and equity. Prior to austerity in 2012, such investments led to declining levels of child and family poverty in Ontario.
Source:
Family Service Toronto

http://www.familyservicetoronto.org/
Family Service Toronto (FST) helps people face a wide variety of life challenges. For almost 100 years, we have been assisting families and individuals through counselling, community development, advocacy and public education programs.

---

NOTE : For links to the reports on child poverty from Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Saint John (NB) and Halifax,
go to : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm#2013_report_card_child_poverty

---

Join us and take e-action to send a message to our Prime Minister and all the federal party leaders today.
Click here to send a letter : http://www.makepovertyhistory.ca/act/where-s-our-federal-poverty-eradication-plan

---

Related online resource:

A history of inaction (PDF infographic [English and French] - 19.7MB, 2 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2013C2000INFOGRAPHIC_FULL%20COLOUR.pdf
- incl. timelines and potential outcomes
[HUMONGOUS FILE ALERT!]

Source:
Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of more than 120 national, provincial and community organizations committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada, over 70 of which are from Ontario.

-------------------------

NOTE: You'll find links to a collection of child poverty reports for earlier years on the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page of this website:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

---

Child poverty up in Ontario
By Laurie Monsebraaten
November 24, 2010
Queen’s Park needs to step up efforts if it hopes to cut child poverty by 25 per cent by 2013, advocates say
Source:
Toronto Star

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Number of seniors living in poverty soars nearly 25%
By Joe Friesen
November 25, 2010
The number of seniors living in poverty spiked at the beginning of the financial meltdown, reversing a decades-long trend and threatening one of Canada’s most important social policy successes. The number of seniors living below the low-income cutoff, Statistics Canada’s basic measure of poverty, jumped nearly 25 per cent between 2007 and 2008, to 250,000 from 204,000, according to figures released on Wednesday by Campaign 2000. It’s the largest increase among any group, and as the first cohort of baby boomers turns 65 next year, could place increased pressure on families supporting elderly parents.
[ 435 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

NOTE:
This is one of a series of provincial reports all released under the Campaign 2000 banner on November 24 (2010), the anniversary of the 1989 unanimous House of Commons resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000. For links to the complete collection of federal and provincial reports and (selected) related media coverage, go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

----------------------------

From Promise to Reality – Recession Proofing Ontario Families
2009 Report Card on Child & Family Poverty in Ontario
(PDF - 234K, 8 pages)
November 2009
* Breaking the Cycle: Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy - Key commitments and progress as of November 2009
* Indicators of Child & Family Poverty: A 20 Year Retrospective
* Rate and Depth of Poverty
* Working Poor Families
* Children at Greater Risk of Poverty
* Children in Families on Social Assistance
* Food Bank Use by Children
* Access to Affordable Housing
* Access to Quality, Regulated Child Care
* Looking Ahead - The Need for Strong Leadership in Tough Times
* Next Steps in Poverty Reduction – What Ontario Needs to Do Now

Version française:
D’une promesse à la réalité – prémunir les familles ontariennes contre la récession

Rapport 2009 sur la pauvreté des enfants et des familles en Ontario
(PDF - 231Ko., 8 pages)
Novembre 2009

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Working poor still losing ground:
Report shows Ontario child poverty rate still rising; system penalizes working poor

April 2, 2008
By Laurie Monsebraaten
When Andrea Duffield's youngest child started Grade 1 last fall, the single mother of three got a part-time job in the hope of pulling her family out of poverty. But the extra income caused her subsidized rent to double. And after taxes and work-related expenses, her Toronto family wasn't any further ahead.
Source:
The Toronto Star

Campaign 2000 Media release: Poverty Should Top First Ministers’ Agenda
January 10, 2008
Reducing poverty should lead the agenda of today’s First Ministers’ Meeting in Ottawa, says Campaign 2000, the national non-partisan coalition working to end child and family poverty. In an open letter, the coalition urged the First Ministers to use the meeting to take initial steps toward creating a national Poverty Reduction Strategy with targets and timetables.

Related link:

Eliminating poverty makes economic sense
January 11, 2008
By Ann Decter*
When Canada's First Ministers meet over dinner tonight in Ottawa, they'll sit down to the unusual opportunity to chew on an issue that has support from premiers of all political stripes. Along with dinner, they can take a big bite out of poverty. Any meeting focused on the economy and labour force requirements should take a hard look at the statistic that almost 12 per cent of Canadians under 18 are living in poverty. Meeting labour force requirements will mean ensuring all Canadian youth are prepared for the working world, and none are left behind with inadequate skills.
Source:
The Toronto Star

[ * Ann Decter is national co-ordinator of Campaign 2000, a coalition working to end poverty in Canada, and interim director of social reform at the Family Service Association of Toronto. ]

Prosperity gap weakens province
July 16, 2007
Excerpt re. anti-poverty strategies and targets:
"(...) In the United Kingdom, the government set a target to reduce child poverty by 25 per cent by 2004, missing it only by a small margin. The target is twice as ambitious for 2010, with a total elimination of child poverty by 2020. With similar goals, Ireland reduced its child poverty rate from 15 per cent in 1994 to less than 5 per cent and aims to hit zero. Here at home, Newfoundland has set a goal to be the province with the least poverty within a decade. And Quebec hopes to have one of the lowest poverty levels among the industrialized nations by 2013.
Source:
The Toronto Star

Also from The Star:

Poverty plan targets election:
Blueprint by activists urges Ontario
political parties to commit to strategy during upcoming campaign
July 13, 2007
By Kerry Gillespie
"(...) More than 330,000 Ontarians rely on food banks to survive – and 40 per cent of them are children. Today, a group dedicated to ending child poverty in Canada is releasing a blueprint for reducing child poverty in Ontario in the hopes of setting the agenda for the Oct. 10 provincial election. The Campaign 2000 report, obtained early by the Star, calls for all three political parties to commit to developing a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy. The goal should be to reduce child poverty by 25 per cent within five years and by 50 per cent within 10 years, the report states."

The Discussion Paper:

A Poverty Reduction Strategy for Ontario (PDF file - 425K, 14 pages)
July 2007.
By Jacquie Maund (Campaign 2000), Sarah Blackstock (Income Security Advocacy Centre), Greg deGroot -Maggetti (Citizens for Public Justice), Sara Farrell (Toronto Public Health), Elizabeth Ablett (Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care).
This report calls on all Ontario political parties to commit to a “Poverty Reduction Strategy for Ontario” as they finalize their party platforms for the October election.
Source:
Ontario Campaign 2000
[ Campaign 2000 ]

Ontario's political parties respond:

No commitments offered on poverty group's targets
But parties to meet with Campaign 2000 officials
July 14, 2007
By Kerry Gillespie
"Ontario's political parties yesterday would not commit to the firm targets for reducing poverty that have been proposed in a new report by the non-profit coalition Campaign 2000. Liberal officials said they appreciate the suggestions and the dedication of the group, which yesterday called on Ontario politicians to commit during the upcoming election campaign to cut child poverty in half within 10 years. The Liberals also talked about improvements they've made, including raising the minimum wage and welfare rates and introducing a child benefit for low-income families."

Related link:

War on Poverty - from The Toronto Star
- series of articles and editorials about the plight of Canada's needy and possible reforms to the social programs that assist them.
(...and a number of related Star articles
)

Campaign Against Child Poverty
"The Campaign Against Child Poverty is a national, non-partisan coalition of citizens from faith-groups, social justice groups, charities, child welfare organizations and others concerned about the unacceptably high levels of child and family poverty in Canada. We are also concerned about the hazards to the future educational, social, physical, developmental and employment success of those children presently living in poor families"

Maybe it’s time we had a commission investigating child poverty...
April 23, 2005
The Campaign Against Child Poverty ran this full-page ad in the Toronto Star on April 23. It talks about the 15% of our children - more than 1,000,000 kids – who live below the poverty line, about how, more than 15 years ago, Canadian Parliament voted unanimously to end child poverty, and how Europe and Scandinavia have proven conclusively that child poverty rates can be dramatically reduced with no risk to national economies. It talks about the need for a national early childhood education and care plan, affordable housing, a livable minimum wage, and support for the National Child Tax Benefit.

.


Financial assistance for grandparents caring for
children in need of protection in Ontario

CANGRANDS is a not-for-profit organization devoted to providing kinship support for caregiver families across Canada.
The aim of CANGRANDS is to support grandmothers, grandfathers, and Kinship families to maintain or re-establishing family ties. Here you will find some answers to frequently asked questions concerning legal and health issues, as well as practical help for those Kin raising children and grandchildren.
- incl. links to :
* About Us * Resources (recommended!) * Life Skills * Connect * Events * Help - Donate * Join Us * Contact Us * Member Login * Video Vault * Betty's Blog
NOTE : most of the information on the site is from 2008 and earlier, but if you know a grandparent in this sad and stressful situation, I'm sure you'll find something of interest in the content (especially in the "Resources" section).


Family support: Help grandma help the kids
January 21, 2011
By Craig Glover
For the second time in less than a year a tribunal has ordered the provincial government to reinstate a $240 monthly benefit that helps grandparents raise their needy grandchildren. But instead of seeing this latest judgment as cause to clarify the rules so other grandparents don’t have to go through this same fight, Social Services Minister Madeleine Meilleur is content to simply urge others to follow in their tortured footsteps.“The appeal process is in place for people to access when they disagree with an eligibility decision,” says her spokeswoman. Sure, they can get a lawyer and head off to Ontario’s Social Benefits Tribunal, but why should they? This is not how government programs should be applied.
(...) The government should undo the harm it caused with a 2008 directive “clarifying” the rules that started the spate of grandparents being cut off because the care they provided was not deemed temporary enough.
(...) The allowance applied to grandparents is helping achieve exactly what the government is trying to do with its broader child welfare policies: keeping children with their extended family and out of the foster care system. It’s better for children and cheaper for taxpayers.
(...) The minister should fix this mess and issue a new directive to local welfare administrators making it clear that time alone is not a reason to withhold the temporary care benefit. O’Riley’s case should be the last time the tribunal has to hear about a grandparent being cut off for doing too good a job.
[ Comments (12) ]
Source:
Toronto Star

Also from The Star:

Rare win for grandparents: Financial support reinstated
By Laurie Monsebraaten
January 19, 2011
Ontario’s Social Benefits Tribunal has reinstated a $240 monthly benefit to a Chatham grandmother caring for her granddaughter.


From the
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services:

Temporary Care Assistance
Temporary Care Assistance (TCA) provides income assistance and benefits to an adult on behalf of a child where:
* the child is in the temporary care of the adult;
* the child is in financial need;
* the child is not a dependent child for the purposes of Ontario Works or the Ontario Disability Support Program;
* the adult providing the care does not have a legal obligation to support the child; and
* the adult caregiver is not receiving compensation for caring for the child under the Child and Family Services Act
Source:
Ontario Works Policy Directives
[ Ontario Works Ontario's welfare program for people who are able to work]

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From the
Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth:

Support for Grandparents Caring for Children in need of Protection
The Ontario government is committed to helping more vulnerable children grow up in safe, caring and permanent homes. As part of new reforms to Ontario’s child well-being and protection system, grandparents, extended family members and community members caring for children in need of protection may now be able to receive financial support. Members of aboriginal communities who are looking after a child in a formal customary care arrangement may also be eligible.

---

From
Toronto Employment and Social Services
:

Temporary Care Assistance
Excerpt from the Ontario Works Act, 1997
NOTE: The Ontario Works Act is provincial legislation that sets standards regarding the application of the program in all Ontario municipalities.

---

From the
Children's Aid Society of Simcoe County:

Frequently-Asked Questions* about foster care in Simcoe County
Scroll about two-thirds of the way down the page for detailed (but possibly superseded) information regarding financial support for grandparents caring for children in need of protection.
* NOTE : I found this FAQ page by doing a Google search for "Ontario foster care rates". The FAQ page is undated, and the information contained in it appears to contradict the above Toronto Star articles. My first thought was to simply ignore the FAQ page (i.e., to not include its link here), but I decided to highlight it instead, as cautionary advice for researchers who may occasionally forget to verify the timeliness of information they find online. I scanned the foster care FAQ page for some indication of how current the information was, and found (in Q.7) a reference to February 2007. I may be wrong, but it's the only clue that's on the page. So researchers, please remember to do your critical website evaluation to ensure that you're using the best AND the latest information. And webmasters, why not help your site visitors by dating the content of your pages? Please?

---

Related links
from British Columbia:

Saviours in the Shadows: Grandparents Raising Kids
In BC alone, 10,000 children live with grandparents, many struggling for support.
A special report.
By Robyn Smith
3 Feb 2011
(...)By 2006, more than 65,000 Canadian grandchildren were living with one or two grandparents [Source: StatCan]. Nearly 10,000 of them live in B.C. It's an arrangement often created by trauma, though every story is different.
Source:
TheTyee.ca

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Parent Support Services Society of BC
We create opportunities for parents and grandparents that foster independence and personal responsibility, and by creating cost-effective and comprehensive community based services in cooperation with public and private partners. Our staff is dedicated to providing these services with respect, compassion, and accountability, and to championing the Canadian Charter of Rights and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.



Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - National Office
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates. We have a National Office in Ottawa, and provincial offices in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Nova Scotia.

Ontario Office - CCPA
- Publications

The Canadian Charger - "Canada's National E-Weekly"

Reuel Amdur
in The Canadian Charger:

To the Lankin-Sheikh Social Assistance Review
January 5, 2011
By Reuel S. Amdur
(...) The current government has still not reversed Mike Harris’ cut of 21.6% to Ontario Works rates. Effectiveness is not only measured in terms of “getting people into jobs” and “providing security for those who cannot work.” It also needs to be measured in terms of how well the program meets the needs of recipients. Currently, five provinces and the territories all have higher rates than for a single person on Ontario Works. The gap in Ontario between the person who in Ontario is on Ontario Works and the person receiving the disability amount is the greatest in Canada.
Ontario governments of all stripes have consistently refused to examine rates in terms of what it costs to function in society. They have refused to rely on home economists and nutritionists to help in setting rates. There is no indication whatever that this government is even vaguely interested in doing so. (...) One wishes Frances Larkin and Dr. Sheikh good luck in their endeavor. They will need it. And the rest of us will not be holding our breath.
[ Author Reuel S. Amdur is a member of the Ontario Association of Social Workers (OASW) and the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers. ]

October 22, 2009
McGuinty abandons children
By Reuel S. Amdur
The voice is the voice of Dalton McGuinty, but the hands are the hands of Mike Harris.

June 29, 2009
Dalton McGuinty’s War on the Poor
By Reuel S. Amdur
Overview and critique of Ontario's two social assistance programs, Ontario Works (OW) and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP).

Source:
The Canadian Charger - "Canada's National E-Weekly"

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Also from Reuel Amdur, in
Peacock Poverty
:

Auditing the Ontario Auditor General
December 14, 2009
by Reuel Amdur
Social worker and freelance writer Reuel Amdur asks some pointed questions about the 2009 Ontario Auditor General's report.
Source:
Peacock Poverty
PeacockPoverty is a Canadian collective of individuals with an experience of poverty who join together to share knowledge, strength, talent and wisdom with each other and friends. The collective is autonomous, independent of agency affiliation, by and for poor people and friends.

Related link:

2009 Annual Report:
Office of the Auditor General of Ontario

December 7, 2009


May 25, 2009
From the
Canadian Council on Social Development:

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Poverty in Ontario – Failed Promise and the Renewal of Hope Ontario
(PDF - 411K, 34 pages)
By Glynis Maxwell, Community Development Halton (Social Planning Network of Ontario)
Table of contents:
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
PROFILE OF POVERTY IN ONTARIO
DEVELOPMENT OF POLICY AND PROGRAMS
* The Post-War Era
* 1975 to 1985: A Growing Need to Tackle Poverty
* 1985 to 1995: SARC and the Failure of Reform
* 1995 to 2003: The ‘Common Sense Revolution’
CURRENT POLICIES AND PROGRAMS
* Social Assistance Incomes
* Minimum Wage
* Quality of Employment
* Barriers to Employment for Social Assistance Recipients
* Barriers to Employment for Newcomers
* Affordable Housing
* Child Care
* Developing a Poverty Reduction Strategy
CONCLUSION

Source:
Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs
Social Development Report Series, 2009
[ Canadian Council on Social Development ]

Also from CCSD :

Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs in Canada (PDF - 341K, 29 pages)
By David I. Hay, Information Partnership

Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIAR)
The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research spans a country and connects with the world to initiate and conduct basic research in the natural and social sciences. CIAR links some of the best Canadian and international research minds in dynamic networks that often include unanticipated and innovative combinations of  disciplines to collaborate on large questions from fresh perspectives. It constitutes Canada's research university without walls, creating communities of scholars from different places and divergent fields who are working at the frontier of knowledge and generating new insights.

Early Years Study
* Early Years Study 1: Reversing the real brain drain (1999)
* Early Years Study 2: Putting Science into Action (2007)
* Early Years Study 3: Making Decisions, Taking Action (2011)


Canadian Medical Association Journal

Risk of death among homeless women: a cohort study and review of the literature
April 13, 2004
Angela M. Cheung and Stephen W. Hwang
Abstract
Complete article:
HTML version
PDF version
(146K, 5 pages)

Related Link:

Dying in the shadows: the challenge of providing health care for homeless people
Commentary on the article by Cheung and Hwang
By James O'Connell (Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School)
April 13, 2004
HTML version
PDF version
(172K, 2 pages)

Homeless women 'crisis'
In Toronto, they're dying at 10 times the normal rate
AIDS, drugs, suicide common causes, researchers find
Elaine Carey
"Homeless women in Toronto are dying at 10 times the rate of other women between 18 and 44, according to a new study released today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal."
Source:
The Toronto Star

Canadian Policy Research Networks

Homelessness, Program Responses,
and an Assessment of Toronto’s Streets to Homes Program
(PDF - 224K, 49 pages)
February 2009
By Nick Falvo
The emergent Housing First model, focused on new means of rapid rehousing of the homeless, is popular in North America among policy-makers and the mass media. Yet little has been written on the Housing First model’s transferability to Canadian municipalities. This report begins by discussing the Housing First model as it has evolved in the United States context. Turning to the main focus of this research, the paper then documents, analyzes and interprets Canada’s version of Housing First, Toronto’s Streets to Homes (S2H) program, based on primary and secondary research including semi-structured key informant interviews. The report concludes with recommendations about how to both improve S2H and ensure that Housing First programs in other Canadian cities are effective in housing homeless persons.
Source:
Canadian Policy Research Networks

The “Housing First” Model: Immediate Access to
Permanent Housing
(PDF - 121K, 4 pages)
Nick Falvo
[ version française - PDF ]
- summary of main findings from the above study; this summary appeared in a special edition of Canadian Housing magazine.

More of the Same? The Position of the Four Largest Canadian Provinces
in the World of Welfare Regimes
(PDF file - 1.5MB, 32 pages)
November 2004
By Paul Bernard, Sébastien Saint-Arnaud
[translation of an article initially published in French in the
Canadian Journal of Sociology, Spring 2004]

"In More of the Same? The Position of the Four Largest Canadian Provinces in the World of Welfare Regimes, Paul Bernard and Sébastien Saint-Arnaud locate the welfare regimes of Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia among those of a group of advanced countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD]. They compare them in terms of a wide set of indicators representing public policy, social situations and level of public participation."

NOTE: This article is based partly on Gøsta Esping-Andersen's 1990 typology of welfare regimes in advanced capitalist societies and more recent related work. It's not a detailed comparison of welfare programs in certain Canadian jurisdictions, but rather an academic analysis of how the welfare systems in four Canadian provinces fit within the international typology. It should be emphasized that the analysis of welfare regimes in the four Canadian jurisdictions focuses on the mid-1990s, which was a tumultuous period in the evolution of the Canadian welfare system. Programs (and governments, except for Emperor Klein...) have changed since then, but ten years later, it's still true that "Alberta somewhat resembles the 'ultra-liberal' United States, while Quebec leans in the direction of Europe, and to some extent, of social-democracy." [Excerpt from the Abstract].

Source:
Family Network - CPRN

Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)

ACCENTURE: A snapshot of cost overruns job loss and dissatisfaction
June 24, 2003
"Accenture has more than 75,000 employees based in more than 110 offices in 47 countries delivering a wide range of consulting, technology and outsourcing services.
(...) Accenture is the new name for Andersen Consulting, (...) major provider of management and technology consulting. Outsourcing for government includes computer systems design and network creation and management. Accenture's history of public services outsourcing, and privatization of major parts of service delivery under a certain time period, has often been very problematic. There have been problems in many state governments in the USA and the Province of Ontario."

Related Link:
Accenture

NOTE: for more on Accenture, see the Accenture section of the Canadian Social Research Links Ontario Government Links page

Canadian Union of Public Employees - Ontario

Agencies and unions issue joint call for immediate reinvestment
in community-based, nonprofit social services

News Release
February 20, 2004
"TORONTO — Ontario’s community-based, nonprofit social services agencies need an immediate financial investment from the provincial government, says a group of agencies and unions who launched a province-wide lobbying campaign today. The province’s social service infrastructure is suffering under the weight of flatlined funding, increased demand for service and growing expectations from government, said the group in its report, Building Strong Communities: A call to reinvest in Ontario’s nonprofit social services."

Building Strong Communities:
A call to reinvest in Ontario’s nonprofit social services
(PDF file - 46K, 7 pages)
January 2004

Cathy Crowe's Home Page
Cathy Crowe has been a street nurse in Toronto for 19 years. She received the Atkinson Economic Justice Award which permits her to pursue her passions for nursing and working on homelessness and housing issues. In this newsletter she reports on her activities, she creates a link to a broader group of individuals who care about these social issues, and she encourages critical debate.

Cathy Crowe's Monthly Newsletter - sample issues

Cathy Crowe's Monthly Newsletter
#44 - April 2008 Newsletter

Table of contents:
1. Home is more than four walls.
2. Stephen Harper and Stéphane Dion - Put down the Guns and pick up the Hammers and Nails!
3. Who’s Hot, Who’s Not!
PDF version of this newsletter (393K, 8 pages)

Cathy Crowe's Newsletter - issue #42 - February 2008
In this issue of her newsletter, Toronto street nurse Cathy Crowe reports on "a radical technology that will make great strides in solving the problem of global homelessness"; you can also read her January 2008 presentation on poverty hunger and homelessness to the provincial budget consultation; and finally, she appears somewhat skeptical with respect the prognostications of by Philip Mangano, America’s so-called ‘Homeless Czar’, who allegedly told the Edmonton Sun recently that Alberta's capital city can wipe out homelessness within a decade. Cathy wonders whether Canadians should be looking South for inspiration for solutions when there is plenty of evidence that there is an ongoing hunger and affordable housing crisis in most large American cities. She draws specific evidence from the latest report on hunger and homelessness from the U.S. Conference of Mayors, which decries growing food insecurity and homelessness across the United States. (The link to the mayors' report appears further below in this newsletter.)

Newsletter Archive - links to newsletter issues back to the summer of 2007, PLUS a link (at the bottom of the page) to all issues back to #1 in 2004

To subscribe to Cathy's Monthly Newsletter,
send an email message to crowenews@sherbourne.on.ca

Source:
Cathy Crowe's website

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)
CAMH is the largest mental health and addictions facility in Canada, only one of four such facilities in that field to receive designation from the World Health Organization as a Centre of Excellence. Underlying all of the Centre's efforts are two principal tasks: advancing our understanding of mental health and addiction, and translating this knowledge into practical resources and tools that can be used in our own programs and in the broader community.

Selected site content:

Penalized for working? Disabled on ODSP [Ontario Disability Support Program] lose 50 cents on every dollar earned
May 23, 2011
By Laurie Monsebraaten
(...) Earning rules and administrative practices are one of the reasons why those who rely on Ontario’s welfare system for the disabled are 11 times more likely to be unemployed than the average Ontarian, says a new report by advocates for the mentally ill. While 49 per cent of Ontarians with disabilities are employed, just 11 per cent on the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) are working, says the report, to be released Tuesday.

The report What Stops Us From Working? calls on Queen’s Park to allow those receiving ODSP to earn up to $300 a month with no clawbacks for one year and to be able to reconcile earnings annually rather than monthly. The government should also “help make work pay” for this group by streamlining ODSP earnings rules with other social programs such as subsidized housing and child care and by expanding ODSP employment supports, says the report, obtained by the Star.

[ Comments (136) ]

Source:
Toronto Star

Complete report:

What stops us from working?
New ways to make work pay, by fixing the treatment
of earnings under the Ontario Disability Support Program
(PDF - 1.2MB, 32 pages)
http://www.camh.ca/en/hospital/about_camh/influencing_public_policy/Documents/ODSP%20Report%20final.pdf
By John Stapleton and Stephanie Procyk
May 2011

Source:
This paper is a collaboration among three organizations:

The Dream Team is a group of psychiatric consumer/survivors who advocate for more supportive housing in Ontario for people with mental health issues. Dream Team members demonstrate and promote the life-altering benefits of supportive housing, by telling their own stories, conducting and presenting research, and standing up for human rights.

Houselink Community Homes is a non-profit, charitable agency based in Toronto. It provides supportive housing to people living with mental illness. Houselink makes it possible for people living with mental illness to build meaningful lives on their own terms.

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health is Canada's largest mental health and addiction teaching hospital. CAMH combines clinical care, research, education, policy development, and health promotion to help transform the lives of people affected by mental illness and addiction.

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More coverage
in the Toronto Star
:

Good jobs a lifeline for people with mental illness
May 28, 2011
By Dr. Kwame McKenzie
I count myself lucky. When I arrived in Canada four years ago, I had a job and it helped me find community, colleagues and friends. Work helped me connect with Toronto. Most of my clients are not so lucky. Living with the stigma and symptoms of a severe mental health problem is challenging enough. But they have to add to that the social isolation that comes with being jobless. Many people with schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses do not work, and many have been told they cannot work. Yet an interesting thing happens when they do find employment — their health improves. Study after study has confirmed that a good job is good for their health. Their quality of life goes way up. Their use of health services goes way down. (...) If you have a mental health problem, you are on ODSP and you may lose so many benefits that it is simply not worth your while financially to work. You actually lose money by going to work. That is enough to put most people off. This is a shame because a job is more than the money — it is a link to the rest of the community and it is good for your health.
The Dream Team, Houselink Community Homes and CAMH have been working together on recommendations that take a different approach. ODSP could balance its administrative imperatives with a determined focus on supporting people to work. This would make a significant difference in the lives of the people I treat.

[ Author Dr. Kwame McKenzie is a senior scientist within the Social Equity and Health Research section at CAMH. ]

Ease the path to work
May 23, 2011
Ontario’s disability support program is supposed to keep people from falling into destitution because of their disability and help find jobs for those who can work. At just $1,053 a month for a single person the rate is so low that it fails utterly in its first goal. And, once someone receives that cheque, hundreds of punitive rules kick in that undermine the program’s second goal as well. As the Star’s Laurie Monsebraaten reports, Ontarians on disability support who have tried to improve their financial circumstance (and reduce their reliance on taxpayers) by doing some work have found themselves even poorer than before. This makes no sense. Provincial officials — from Premier Dalton McGuinty down to the worker behind the glass window at a disability support office — must know that.

Related link:

Open Policy Ontario is the social policy consultancy of John Stapleton.

Centre for Children and Families in the Justice System (London Family Court Clinic)
The is a non-profit agency in London, Ontario, which advocates for the special needs of children involved in the justice system as young offenders, victims of crime or abuse, or as the subjects of custody disputes. Our advocacy includes assessment, counselling, prevention services, research, dissemination of information, and training for the community.
The Centre has seven core areas: Child Witness Project - Clinical Supports Program - Counselling Services - Custody and Access Project (including mediation) - Research Services - Young Offender Services - Violence Prevention Services


Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA)
CERA
is an Ontario-based non-profit human rights organization that promotes human rights in housing and challenges discrimination. CERA works to remove the barriers that keep disadvantaged individuals and families from accessing and retaining the housing they need.

Toronto homeless launch charter challenge:
Say federal and Ontario governments violate their rights to equality
May 27, 2010
Single mother Jennifer Tanudjaja’s two-bedroom apartment near Kipling and Finch Aves. costs $997 a month. But her monthly welfare cheque is just $935. (...) Brian Dubourdieu, 48, who became homeless after a cancer diagnosis five years ago, lived in a shack by the Don River for four years until it burned down last spring. (...) Tanudjaja and Dubourdieu are among four homeless and formerly homeless Torontonians who say Ottawa and Queen’s Park are violating the Canadian Charter of Rights by “creating and maintaining conditions that lead to and sustain homelessness and inadequate housing.” (...) Ontario is expected to release its affordable housing strategy next month
Source:
The Toronto Star

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Charter Challenge: the right to housing in Canada
May 26, 2010
Today, formerly and currently homeless Ontarians launched a landmark legal challenge against the federal and provincial governments. Joined by housing advocates and their lawyers, the individuals are seeking a Court declaration that Canada and Ontario have violated their rights under section 7 and section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms by creating and maintaining conditions that lead to and sustain homelessness and inadequate housing.
Source:
Right to Housing

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Government has human rights obligation
to end homelessness argues historic Charter challenge
News Release
May 26
Source
Canada Newswire

Related link:

The Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario (ACTO)
ACTO works to better the housing situation of Ontario residents who have low incomes including tenants, co-op members and people who are homeless
ne.

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Claims filed by single mothers at the Ontario Human Rights Commission charge
that the current maximum 'shelter allowance' discriminates against women and children
Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA) and
Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario (ACTO)
February 11, 2003
"Several women from across Ontario filed claims at the Ontario Human Rights Commission, charging that the current maximum 'shelter allowance' discriminates against women and children. The inadequacy of the shelter allowance makes it impossible for social assistance recipients to find and maintain housing in the private rental market."
Related Links:
Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation
Ontario Human Rights Commission

Voices: Experiences of Eviction in Ottawa
Report of follow-up interviews conducted by two Masters of Social Work Students from Carleton University with tenants who had been contacted by the CERA Ottawa Project
Source : Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation


Centre for Independent Living in Toronto
"C.I.L.T. is a non-profit resource organization, consumer-controlled and community based. C.I.L.T. is funded through the United Way, City of Toronto grants, Federal and Provincial government grants, donations, earned income and membership support. C.I.L.T. is a consumer-controlled, community-based resource organization. We help people with disabilities to learn Independent Living skills and integrate into the community. (Please note: C.I.L.T. is a resource agency and does not do any political, systemic or group advocacy!)"

Centre for Research on Educational and Community Services
http://www.socialsciences.uottawa.ca/crecs/eng/
The Centre for Research on Educational and Community Services (CRECS) collaborates in research, evaluation, and training with organizations in the educational, social service, and health sectors to improve social programs and policies for citizens, especially those facing social exclusion.

Source:
Faculty of Social Sciences
[ University of Ottawa ]

Centre for Social Justice (Toronto) (CSJ) - "Narrowing the gap in income. wealth and power
The Centre for Social Justice is an advocacy organization that seeks to strengthen the struggle for social justice. We are committed to working for change in partnership with various social movements and recognize that effective change requires the active participation of all sectors of our community. (...) CSJ works to strengthen movements for social justice in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and globally.
- incl. links to:
* Home * Key Issues * Publications * Movement Building * Media * Contribute * About * Contact

Key Issues include:
* Democracy & Corporate Power * Economic Inequality * Racial Inequality * Gender Inequality * Health Inequality * Aboriginal Issues * Peace & Justice


Centre for Urban and Community Studies [ University of Toronto ]
"The Centre for Urban and Community Studies (CUCS) promotes and disseminates multidisciplinary research and policy analysis on urban issues. The Centre was established in 1964 as a research unit of the School of Graduate Studies.
The Centre’s activities contribute to scholarship on questions relating to the social, economic and physical well-being of people who live and work in urban areas large and small, in Canada and around the world."

The Three Cities within Toronto: “a city of disparities” (PDF file - 96K, 3 pages)
Media Release
December 20, 2007
TORONTO – The City of Toronto is becoming increasingly divided by income and socio-economic status, says a new report issued today by the Centre for Urban and Community Studies (CUCS) at the University of Toronto. No longer a “city of neighbourhoods,” the study calls modern-day Toronto a “city of disparities.” In fact, Toronto is now so polarized it could be described as three geographically distinct cities made up of 20 percent affluent neighbourhoods, 36 percent poor neighbourhoods, and 43 percent middle-income earner neighbourhoods and that 43 percent is in decline.

Report:

The Three Cities within Toronto:
Income polarization among Toronto’s neighbourhoods, 1970–2000
(PDF file - 880K, 12 pages)
December 2007
by J. David Hulchanski

Related Table, maps and figures
* Characteristics of the Three Cities, grouped on the basis of 30-year average income trends, 1970 to 2000
* Change in Average Individual Income, City of Toronto, 1970 to 2000
* Average Individual Income, City of Toronto, 1970
* Average Individual Income, City of Toronto, 2000
* Toronto Neighbourhoods with a Persistent Change in Income, 1980 to 2000
* Change in Neighbourhood Income Distribution in the City of Toronto 1970 to 2000
* Change in Neighbourhood Income Distribution in Toronto’s Outer Suburbs (the “905 region”) 1970 to 2000

Policy Options for Rent Regulation and Tenant Protection in Ontario
Policy Options Forum
November 13, 2003
"A policy options forum on rent regulation, tenant protection and related issues was held on Thursday, Nov. 13, 2003. This event was sponsored by the Centre for Urban and Community Studies at the University of Toronto and the Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario. Julia McNally, Kenn Hale and David Hulchanski are among the policy experts who presented an overview of the issues and potential solutions."
- includes links to over two dozen documents:
papers from the Forum, the Ontario Liberal Party's 2003 election promises, recommendations for tenant law reform, context: rental housing problems

Adequate & Affordable Housing for All
Research, Policy, Practice

An international conference held under the auspices of
Housing and the Built Environment, Research Committee 43, of the International Sociological Association
June 24-27, 2004
"The Centre for Urban and Community Studies is pleased to host the 2004 international housing research conference under the auspices of Housing and the Built Environment, Research Committee 43 of the International Sociological Association."
- follow the links in the right-hand column of the conference home page (the link above) to find the following info: Conference Theme - Auspices: ISA RC43 - Organizing Committee - Call for Papers - Conference Program - Housing Practice Field Workshops - Deadlines (Key Dates) - Registration & Fees - Delegates, Abstracts, Papers - Tours and Social Program - Accommodation - About Toronto - About Canada - Housing Issues in Toronto - ousing Information Gateway - ENHR Housing Conference July 2004
Related Link:
International Sociological Association

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Justice for Children and Youth
"Justice for Children and Youth provides legal representation to low-income children and youth in Toronto and vicinity. We are a non-profit legal aid clinic that specializes in protecting the rights of those facing conflicts with the legal system, education, social service or mental health systems."

ProBonoNet Ontario
"ProBonoNet Ontario was built by Pro Bono Law Ontario (PBLO) to provide information for individuals, communities and lawyers about pro bono activities and opportunities in Ontario. Its goal is to support pro bono programs and increase access to justice for underserved groups and individuals across the province."

Advocates' Society
"Our Mission: Promoting Excellence in Advocacy
The Society's mission statement reflects five principal objectives that define our role and drive our activities: 1. Be the Voice of Advocates in Ontario 2. Promote Ethical and Professional Practice Standards for Advocates 3. Expand Our Leadership Role in Teaching the Skills of Advocacy 4. Protect the Independence of the Bar and the Judiciary 5. Foster Collegiality Among Members

OPICCO (no longer updated - archive)
"The Ontario Project for Inter-Clinic Community Organizing (OPICCO) grew out of the Toronto community legal clinic training session in April 2002, the theme of which was Community Development for Changing Times. (...) The purpose of OPICCO is to provide community organizations & community legal clinics in Ontario with tools for organizing."
- OPICCO members include community legal workers, staff lawyers, clinic directors and LAO staff.
- the Child Advocacy Project link was posted to the OPICCO website on September 24.

Child Welfare Research Unit  - Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto (funded by Bell Canada)
The Bell Canada Child Welfare Research Unit (BCCWRU) was funded and established in 1998 to conduct and disseminate research on child and family services with a particular emphasis on child maltreatment. The BCCWRU helps focus and expand the University of Toronto, Faculty of Social Work's Centre for Applied Social Research's capacity to disseminate, support and conduct research on effective child welfare services.

Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
Highly recommended, frequently-updated, large site!

To avoid duplication whenever I can, I've moved all CRRU links to the Early Learning and Child Care Links page of this site.

Children's Aid Society of Toronto (CAST)
Large site, includes links to : Annual Report - Programs and Services* - Employment - Our Foundation - How You Can Help - Foster Parenting - Adoption - Discover Your Roots - Child Abuse - Online Publications - Related Links - Communicate Online
*[Integrated Family and Children's Services] [Protective Services] [Family Support] [High Risk Infant Program] [Pregnancy and After Care] [Day Treatment] [Community Work] [Research] [Community Education] [Branch Children's Services] [Long- term Care] [PARC] [Foster Care] [Health Services] [Internal Resources] [External Resources] [Adoption] [Adoption and Crown Ward Disclosure] [Volunteer Involvement]

Related Links:

Ontario Association of Children's Aid Societies

Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ)

CPJ is a national NGO.
For CPJ links, see the Canadian Social Research Links National NGO Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

 

Canadian Federal Election
- links to election resources and 400+ links to daily news articles about the 2006 federal election, from April 2005 right up to January of this year.

Council of Canadians with Disabilities

City of Ottawa

The City of Ottawa's
Poverty Reduction Strategy:

Poverty Affects Us All:
A Community Approach to Poverty Reduction
(PDF - 1.9MB, 83 pages)
Undated (PDF file date: December 11, 2009)
Ottawa's initiative builds on the Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy and expands the target group to include individuals, families and children living on low income. The focus of Ottawa's Strategy is to implement local initiatives that reduce poverty, promote awareness and complement existing activities in the community.The report presents 3 Strategic Priorities and 16 Recommendations, including concrete, local actions that can be achieved and measured within a two-year timeframe. Beginning in 2010, Phase II of the Strategy will implement the recommendations and monitor progress by developing measures and tracking outcomes.
Source:
City of Ottawa

Poverty Affects Us All : A Community Approach to Poverty Reduction
Note : Report to be presented to Community and Protective Services Committee and Council
21 January 2010
By Steve Kanellakos, Deputy City Manager (City Operations)
[ version française :
La pauvreté, c'est l'affaire de tous : une approche communautaire pour réduire la pauvreté ]

Related links:

City of Ottawa Proposes Poverty Reduction Strategy
September 28, 2009
Source:
Citizens for public Justice

Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa

Ontario Campaign 2000

National Campaign 2000

NOTE: For related links,
see Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa
- this link takes you to the top of the page you're now reading

City of Toronto

Social Services Division
On behalf of the City of Toronto, we manage and deliver employment, financial and social supports. As a leader, we work directly with and through our community and government partners to ensure the services we deliver to those in need are appropriate, effective and accessible.
- incl. links to : Department - Social Services - Policy index - Children's Services - Homes for the Aged - Shelter, Support & Housing - Social Development - Toronto Housing

Children's Services
- incl. links to : Children's Services - About us - Looking for child care - Applying for subsidy - Information for child care providers - Child Care Advisory Committee - Reports - Facts & figures - Calendar - Contact us

Research Information Resources:

* Wellbeing Toronto:
www.toronto.ca/wellbeing

* Neighbourhood Profiles:
http://www.toronto.ca/demographics/neighbourhoods.htm

* Census 2011 Backgrounders & other resources
http://www.toronto.ca/demographics/

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From the
City of Toronto:

SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]

http://goo.gl/NT0JPA
The SPAR Monitor is a biweekly newsletter sent out by the Social Policy Analysis & Research unit of the Social Development, Finance and Administration division at the City of Toronto. The Monitor contains links to 4-8 items of interest to social researchers, such as new statistical or policy reports on poverty, aboriginal affairs, economics, seniors, youth, children, health, mapping or other related topics.

"Official" SPARmonitor archives
http://goo.gl/NT0JPA
- NOT including the table of contents for each issue

- links to SPAR Monitor Issue #1 (Oct 7, 2009) to SPAR Monitor Issue #141 (October 29, 2014)

[ Social Development, Finance & Administration
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/index.htm ]
[ City of Toronto
http://www.toronto.ca/ ]

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"Unofficial" SPARmonitor Archive:
- including the table of contents for each issue

SPARmonitor : August 5 (2015) - issue 160 (PDF - 378KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_160.pdf
August 5, 2015

This issue covers the following:

Ø Compulsory Government Pensions vs. Private Savings: The Effect of Previous Expansion to the Canada Pension Plan
Ø Our Communities Our Youth: The Health of Homeless and Street-Involved Youth in BC
Ø Memory Disabilities among Canadians Aged 15 Years and Older, 2012
Ø The Recession’s Impact on Canada’s Labour Market
Ø Facing FAQS: H1N1 and Homelessness in Toronto

SPARmonitor : May 20 (2015) - issue 156 (PDF - 375KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_156.pdf
June 03, 2015

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Use of Research-Based Evidence in Public Policy in Canada
Ø Architecture Disability Supports: Missing On the Policy Radar
Ø The Structure and Presentation of Provincial Budgets
Ø What to Do about Canada’s Declining Math Scores
Ø Mental Health and Contact with Police in Canada, 2012

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SPARmonitor : May 20 (2015) - issue 155 (PDF - 375KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_155.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Contracting Out At the City: Effects on Workers’ Health
Ø Measuring Tax Complexity in Canada
Ø The Impacts of Affordable Housing on Health
Ø Renewing Canada’s Social Architecture Employment Skills Training
Ø Sources of Debt Accumulation in Resource-Dependent Provinces

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SPARmonitor : May 6 (2015) - issue 154 (PDF - 158KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_154.pdf
March 11, 2015

This issue covers the following:

Ø Beyond College Rankings: A Value-Added Approach to Assessing Two- and Four-Year Schools
Ø Reaching Out: Asking about Partner Violence in Toronto Teaching Hospitals
Ø The Union Card
Ø Government of Canada Action for Seniors
Ø Can States Improve Children’s Health by Preventing Abuse and Neglect?

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SPARmonitor : April 22 (2015) - issue 153 (PDF - 153KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_153.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Code Red: Ontario’s Hospital Cuts Crisis
Ø Experiencing Integrated Care
Ø Challenges, Growth and Opportunity
Ø Performance Management in a Housing First Context
Ø The Working Poor in the Toronto Region

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SPARmonitor : April 8 (2015) - issue 152 (PDF - 160KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_152.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Growing Distance between People and Jobs in Metropolitan America
Ø Democracy 360: A Report Card on How Canadians Communicate, Participate and Lead in Politics
Ø Beyond 4 Walls and a Roof: Addressing Homelessness among Transgender Youth
Ø Missed Connections: The Adoption of Information Technology in Canadian Healthcare
Ø Report of the Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario: Taking Stock Two Years Late

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SPARmonitor : March 25 (2015) - issue 151 (PDF - 160KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_151.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Caught In The Middle
Ø The Care We Need
Ø Canadian Postsecondary Performance: IMPACT 2015
Ø The Opportunity Equation
Ø Bringing Care Home
Ø Better off Dead: “Value Added” In Economic Policy Debates

SPARmonitor : March 11 (2015) - issue 150 (PDF - 158KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_150.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø 2015 Digital Outlook Report
Ø Shelter from the Storm: Weather-Induced Patterns in the Use of Emergency Shelters
Ø Rethinking Canada’s Unbalanced Mix of Public and Private Healthcare
Ø The ABC of Gender Equality in Education: Aptitude, Behaviour, Confidence
Ø Public Health in Canada Future 2014

SPARmonitor : February 25 (2015) - issue 149 (PDF - 146KB, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_149.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Ontario Child Welfare Report 2014
Ø The 2014 Global Tax Competitiveness Report: A Proposed Business Tax Reform Agenda
Ø Doctors without Hospitals: What to do about Specialists Who Can’t Find Work
Ø Financing Future Communities Innovative: Finance for Urban Spaces and Places
Ø Change Agent – Ontario's Universities: Transforming Communities, Transforming Lives
Ø Charitable Donors, 2013

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SPARmonitor : February 11 (2015)- issue 148 (PDF - 158K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_148.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Evaluating Student Performance in Pathways to Education
Ø First Peoples, Second Class Treatment
Ø First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework
Ø A Safe and Decent Place to Live: Towards A Housing First Framework for Youth
Ø The Distribution of Income and Taxes/Transfers in Canada: A Cohort Analysis
Ø Moving to the City: Housing and Aboriginal Migration to Winnipeg

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SPARmonitor : January 14 (2015) - issue 146 (PDF - 158K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_146.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Weight and Social Mobility: Taking the Long View on Childhood Obesity
Ø The Canadian Unemployment Rate — With and Without Alberta’s Boom
Ø Canada 2014 Final Report conducted by the Environics Institute
Ø Labour Force Characteristics of the Métis
Ø Weight and Social Mobility: Taking the Long View on Childhood Obesity

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SPARmonitor : December 24 (2014) - issue 145 (PDF - 196K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_145.pdf


This issue covers the following:

Ø Wellbeing Toronto Version 3
Ø Immigration, Low Income and Income Inequality in Canada: What's New in the 2000s?
Ø Education at a Glance 2014
Ø Managing Healthcare for an Aging Population: Ontario’s Troubling Collision Course
Ø Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2014 Generosity Index
Ø Who’s Hungry: 2014 Profile of Hunger in the GTA
Ø Affordable Access to Medicines

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SPARmonitor : December 12 (2014) - issue 144 (PDF - 160K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_144.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Hidden in our Midst: Homeless Newcomer Youth in Toronto – Uncovering the Supports to Prevent and Reduce Homelessness
Ø The Economy And Resilience of Newcomers (EARN): Exploring Newcomer Entrepreneurship
Ø Should Public Drug Plans be based on Age or Income?
Ø Pan-Canadian Assessment Program (2013)
Ø The Impact of Substance Use Disorders on Hospital Use Technical Report
Ø Better Work: The Path to Good Jobs Is Through Employers

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SPARmonitor : November 26 (2014) - issue 143 (PDF - 160K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_143.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Hidden Epidemic: A Report on Child and Family Poverty in Toronto
Ø Dying on the Streets: Homeless deaths in British Columbia
Ø 2014 Social Change Impact Report
Ø 2014 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada: Child Poverty, 25 Years Later
Ø Report on the Social Isolation of Seniors 2013-2014

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SPARmonitor
- Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/spar-archives.htm
But curiously, nothing since then...

[ Social Development, Finance & Administration
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/index.htm ]
[ City of Toronto
http://www.toronto.ca/ ]

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SPARmonitor : November 12 (2014) - issue 142 (PDF - 174K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_142.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Profiles for the City's new Neighbourhood Improvement Areas (NIAs)
Ø Social Profile #4: NHS Languages, Immigration, Income
Ø The State of Homelessness in Canada 2014
Ø Narrowing the Gap: The Difference that Public Sector Wages Make
Ø Progress on Women’s Rights
Ø 2014 Social Change Impact Report
Ø Closing the Prosperity Gap
Ø Ontario’s Full-Day Kindergarten: A Bold Public Policy Initiative

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SPARmonitor : October 29 (2014) - issue 141 (PDF - 172K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_141.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Beyond Housing First: Essential Elements of a System-Planning Approach to Ending Homelessness
Ø Episodic Caregiver Support Initiative (ECSI) 2014 Final Report
Ø “NO MORE” Ending Sex-Trafficking In Canada
Ø Family Justice Reform Project
Ø A Failure on Several Counts
Ø System Pathways Into Youth Homelessness
Ø Dispelling Minimum Wage Mythology

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SPARmonitor : October 15 (2014) - issue 140 (PDF - 172K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_140.pdf
October 15, 2014

This issue covers the following:

Ø Building Toronto, Creating Community
Ø Toronto's Vital Signs Report 2014
Ø Global Age Watch Index 2014 Insight Report
Ø Tier for Two: Managing the Optics of Provincial Tuition Fee Policies
Ø Police and Crime Rates in Canada
Ø Hear Our Voices - Technical Report, Do Adolescent Girls’ Issues Really Matter?
Ø The Trauma and Homelessness Initiative

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SPARmonitor : October 1 (2014) - issue 139 (PDF - 174K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_139.pdf
October 1, 2014

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Colour Coded Labour Market by the Numbers
Ø Population Projections: Canada, the Provinces and Territories, 2013 to 2063
Ø TEMPO: Police Interactions
Ø Representation in Municipal Government
Ø Escalator: Jobs for Youth Facing Barriers
Ø A Difficult Road Ahead: Canada's Economic and Fiscal Prospects
Ø Haves and Have-Nots: Deep and Persistent Wealth Inequality in Canada

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SPARmonitor : September 17 (2014) - issue 138 (PDF - 175K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_138.pdf
September 17, 2014

This issue covers the following:

Ø Action for Seniors
Ø Realizing our Potential: Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy 2014-2019.
Ø The Geography of Foreign Students in U.S. Higher Education: Origins and Destinations
Ø Activation of Youthworks Employment Toolkit
Ø What Now? Addressing the Burden of Canada’s Slow-Growth Recovery
Ø The Parenting Gap
Ø Teacher Incentive Pay that Works
Ø Waiting Lists Survey 2014

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SPARmonitor : September 3 (2014) - issue 137 (PDF - 161K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_137.pdf
September 3, 2014

This issue covers the following:

Ø New Data Shows Epidemic Poverty Levels in Toronto
Ø How Poor are America’s Poorest? U.S. $2 a Day Poverty in a Global Context
Ø Policies that Build (Caring) Community
Ø The Faculty at Work Report
Ø National Report on Heath Care: Seniors Health Issues and the Impact of an Ageing Population
Ø Experiencing Homelessness. The Seventh Report Card on Homelessness in Greater Moncton

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SPARmonitor : August 20 (2014) - issue 136 (PDF - 172K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_136.pdf
August 20, 2014

This issue covers the following:

Ø Part of the Solution: Pre-Baccalaureate Healthcare Workers in a Time of Health System Change
Ø “It’s All About Money”: Crime in the Caribbean and Its Impact on Canada
Ø Reducing the Language Accessibility G A P: Language Services Toronto Program Evaluation Report
Ø Taxes Versus the Necessities of Life
Ø 14th Annual Report Card on Health Care in Canada: Seniors Health Issues and the Impact of an Ageing Population
Ø Social Impact of the Non-profit Sector: The Power of One

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SPARmonitor : August 7 (2014) - issue 135 (PDF - 172K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_135.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Unhealthy State of Homelessness: Health Audit Results 2014
Ø Capital Needed: Canada Needs More Robust Business Investment
Ø Human Development Report 2014
Ø An Examination of Housing First Initiatives for Individuals with Concurrent Mental Disorders: Implementation and Feasibility
Ø User Discretion Advised: Fiscal Consolidation and the Recovery
Ø Police-Reported Crime Statistics in Canada, 2013

SPARmonitor : July 9 (2014) - issue 133 (PDF - 164K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_133.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Finding Home: The Impacts of Partner Violence on Women’s Housing Stability, Health and Wellbeing
Ø Competitive Alternatives Special Report: Focus on Tax
Ø Toronto Final Report: At Home/Chez Soi Project
Ø Who, Or What, Is To Blame for the Accumulation of Debt in Ontario and Quebec (And What Will It Take to Stop the Bleeding?)
Ø The Public Purse versus Private Wallets: Comparing Provincial Approaches to Investing in Economic Growth
Ø How Canada Performs: Education and Skills

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SPARmonitor : May 28 (2014) - issue 131 (PDF - 172K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_131.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Access to City Services for Undocumented Torontonians
Ø Disability Policy Highlights
Ø Report of the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Ø Don’t Forget the Kids: How Immigration Policy Can Help Immigrants’ Children
Ø Focused on Quality, Delivering Solution: Building Capacity in Long Term Care to Support Ontario’s Health Action Plan
Ø Is Canada In The Running? How Canada Stacks Up Against 14 Other Countries on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

Ø Twelve Ways to Fix the Youth Unemployment Crisis

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SPARmonitor : May 14 (2014) - issue 130 (PDF - 178K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_130.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø National Final Report: Cross-Site at Home/Chez Soi Project
Ø The CEO Poverty Measure, 2005 – 2012
Ø Ten Economic Facts about Crime and Incarceration in the United States
Ø Temporary Foreign Workers in Canada: Are They Really Filling Labour Shortages?
Ø How are Ontarians Really Doing?
Ø Labour Force Survey, April 2014

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SPARmonitor : April 16 (2014) - issue 128 (PDF - 178K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_128.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø For Health or Wealth? The Evidence Regarding Private Clinics and User Fees in Ontario
Ø Measuring Choice and Competition in Canadian Education
Ø Coming of Age: Reimagining the Response to Youth Homelessness in Canada
Ø Social Progress Index 2014
Ø Older Adults and Technology Use
Ø Report Card on Ontario’s Secondary Schools 2014
Ø Profiting from the Precarious: How Recruitment Practices Exploit Migrant Workers

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SPARmonitor : April 2 (2014) - issue 127 (PDF - 190K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_127.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø How Well Are American Students Learning?
Ø The Plummeting Labour Market Fortunes of Teens and Young Adults
Ø Public Consultation Report on Montreal Development Plan
Ø Evaluating Public-Sector Pensions: How Much Do They Really Cost?
Ø Simulated Replacement Rates for CPP Reform Options
Ø Repairing Shattered Lives: Brain Injury and its Implications for Criminal Justice
Ø The Black Experience Project

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SPARmonitor : March 19 (2014) - issue 126 (PDF - 176K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_126.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy 2020 Report
Ø Youth Services and Supports in Toronto
Ø The State of Homelessness in Canada 2013
Ø Working Women, Working Poor
Ø The Poverty and Inequality Report
Ø Nine out of Ten Families at Risk of Homelessness in Toronto’s Aging Rental High-Rise Buildings
Ø Regent Park Revitalization Study

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SPARmonitor : March 5 (2014) - issue 125 (PDF - 176K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_125.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Economic Security Scorecard: Policy and Security in the States
Ø Income Adequacy among Canadian Seniors: Helping Singles Most
Ø By Invitation Only: Canadians’ Perceptions of Political Parties
Ø Homelessness, Urban Aboriginal People, and the Need for a National Enumeration
Ø Statistical Signs of Social Influence on Suicides
Ø Survey of Financial Security, 2012
Ø Workshop on the Electoral and Civic Involvement of Canada’s Immigrant Communities

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SPARmonitor : February 19 (2014) - issue 124 (PDF - 160K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_124.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Finding Food: Community Food Procurement in the City of Toronto
Ø Income Splitting in Canada: Inequality by Design
Ø 2013/4 Report Teaching and Learning
Ø Alternative Federal Budget 2014: Striking a Better Balance
Ø Testimony on Early Childhood Education to the House Committee on Education and the Workforce
Ø The Rise and Fall of Social-Assistance Use In Canada, 1969–2012

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SPARmonitor : February 5 (2014) - issue 123 (PDF - 160K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_123.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø 2014 Minimum Wage Advisory Panel
Ø Ever Higher Government Spending on Canada’s Aboriginals since 1947
Ø The Value of Caregiver Time: Costs of Support and Care for Individuals Living with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Ø Maximising Resident Care and Safety
Ø Labour Force Survey, December 2013

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SPARmonitor : March 19 (2014) - issue 126 (PDF - 176K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_126.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy 2020 Report
Ø Youth Services and Supports in Toronto
Ø The State of Homelessness in Canada 2013
Ø Working Women, Working Poor
Ø The Poverty and Inequality Report
Ø Nine out of Ten Families at Risk of Homelessness in Toronto’s Aging Rental High-Rise Buildings
Ø Regent Park Revitalization Study

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SPARmonitor : March 5 (2014) - issue 125 (PDF - 176K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_125.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Economic Security Scorecard: Policy and Security in the States
Ø Income Adequacy among Canadian Seniors: Helping Singles Most
Ø By Invitation Only: Canadians’ Perceptions of Political Parties
Ø Homelessness, Urban Aboriginal People, and the Need for a National Enumeration
Ø Statistical Signs of Social Influence on Suicides
Ø Survey of Financial Security, 2012
Ø Workshop on the Electoral and Civic Involvement of Canada’s Immigrant Communities

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SPARmonitor : February 19 (2014) - issue 124 (PDF - 160K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_124.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Finding Food: Community Food Procurement in the City of Toronto
Ø Income Splitting in Canada: Inequality by Design
Ø 2013/4 Report Teaching and Learning
Ø Alternative Federal Budget 2014: Striking a Better Balance
Ø Testimony on Early Childhood Education to the House Committee on Education and the Workforce
Ø The Rise and Fall of Social-Assistance Use In Canada, 1969–2012

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SPARmonitor : February 5 (2014) - issue 123 (PDF - 160K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_123.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø 2014 Minimum Wage Advisory Panel
Ø Ever Higher Government Spending on Canada’s Aboriginals since 1947
Ø The Value of Caregiver Time: Costs of Support and Care for Individuals Living with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Ø Maximising Resident Care and Safety
Ø Labour Force Survey, December 2013

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SPARmonitor : January 22 (2014) - issue 122 (PDF - 160K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_122.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Toronto Youth Equity Strategy
Ø Where You Live Matters: Canadian Views on Health Care Quality
Ø Measuring Government in the Twenty-First Century
Ø Is It All About the Tails? The Palma Measure of Income Inequality
Ø The Economic Effects of Living Wage Laws
Ø Data, Boundaries, Competitiveness: The Toronto Urban Region in Global Context
Ø Baffling Budgets: Canada’s Cities Need Better Financial Reporting

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SPARmonitor : January 8 (2014) - issue 121 (PDF - 136K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_121.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø A Comprehensive Assessment of Health Care Utilization Among Homeless Adults Under a System of Universal Health Insurance
Ø Labour Force Survey, November 2013
Ø Economic Implications of Recent Changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program
Ø How a Guaranteed Annual Income Could Put Food Banks out of Business
Ø Impact of the Great Recession on Retirement Trends in Industrialized Countries

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SPARmonitor : December 18 (2013) - issue 120 (PDF - 124K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_120.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Measuring Up: Canadian Results of the OECD PISA Study
Ø Building on Evidence
Ø The “Welfareization” of Disability Incomes in Ontario
Ø Noble Frustration: The Many Practical Problems with Municipal Poverty Initiatives
Ø Welfare in Canada 2012
Ø Economic Freedom of North America 2013
Ø The Glass Floor: Education, Downward Mobility, and Opportunity Hoarding

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SPARmonitor : December 4 (2013) - issue 119 (PDF - 148K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_119.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Canada's REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication
Ø Hunger Report 2013
Ø Youth Gang Prevention Fund Projects (2007 – 2012)
Ø Quality: Shifting the Focus
Ø Labour Force Survey, October 2013
Ø Priced Out: Understanding the Factors Affecting Home Prices in the GTA

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SPARmonitor : November 20 (2013) - issue 118 (PDF - 124K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_118.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Police and Community Engagement Review (The PACER Report)
Ø How's Life? 2013: Measuring Well-Being
Ø The Advantages of a Flexible Labour Market
Ø Welfare Re-form: The Future of Social Policy in Canada
Ø Building Skills Together

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SPARmonitor : November 6 (2013) - issue 117 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_117.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Diaspora Nation: An Inquiry into the Economic Potential of Diaspora Networks in Canada
Ø The Integration Imperative: Reshaping the Delivery of Human and Social Services
Ø Labour Force Survey, September 2013
Ø The “Green Jobs” Fantasy: Why the Economic and Environmental Reality Can Never Live Up To the Political Promise
Ø The Challenge of Defining Medicare Coverage in Canada
Ø Child Welfare Report 2013
Ø Racialization and Health Inequities in Toronto

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SPARmonitor : October 23 (2013) - issue 116 (PDF - 124K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_116.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Shadow Economies: Economic Survival Strategies of Toronto Immigrant Communities
Ø Geospatial Technologies and Crime: The Jamaican Experience
Ø OECD Skills Outlook 2013 First Results from the Survey of Adult Skills
Ø Entrepreneurship at Ontario Universities Fuelling Success
Ø The Aspiring Workforce

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SPARmonitor : October 9 - issue 115 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_115.pdf
[Revised version October 17]

This issue covers the following:

Ø Toronto’s Vital Signs Report 2013
Ø How and Why Demographic Forces Are Driving Up Sick Days in Canada
Ø Who Is Working For Minimum Wage In Ontario?
Ø International Migration Outlook 2013
Ø Poverty Is A Health Issue
Ø Spotlight on Science Learning

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SPARmonitor : September 25 - issue 114 (PDF - 132K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_114.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø "Life is Really Hard Here": The Living Conditions and Needs of Filipino Elderlies in the Greater Toronto Area
Ø The Cost of Raising Children
Ø Degrees of Uncertainty Navigating the Changing Terrain of University Finance
Ø Labour Force Information
Ø Health Care Lessons from Switzerland
Ø Family Caregiving: What are the Consequences?

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SPARmonitor : September 11 - issue 113 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_113.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø 2011 National Household Survey: Income of Canadians
Ø Canada’s Immigrant Selection Policies
Ø Finding the Right Fit: Age-Friendly Community Planning
Ø Predicting Recessions in Real-Time: Mining Google Trends and Electronic Payments Data for Clues
Ø The Parenting Gap
Ø World Happiness Report 2013
Ø The Price of Public Health Care Insurance 2013

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SPARmonitor : August 28, 2013 - issue 112 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_112.pdf

This issue covers the following:
Ø Medically Uninsured Residents in Toronto
Ø Police-Reported Crime Statistics in Canada, 2012
Ø Police-Reported Hate Crime in Canada, 2011
Ø Health Care in Canada: What makes us Sick?
Ø Housing Discrimination against Racial and Ethnic Minorities 2012
Ø DIY-Immigrant Entrepreneurs are Doing It for Themselves
Ø Renewing Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy: Consultation Booklet

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SPARmonitor : July 31, 2013 - issue 111 (PDF - 148K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_111.pdf

This issue covers the following:
Ø No Vacancy: Trends in Rental Housing in Canada
Ø The Main Challenge of our Times: A Population Growing Younger
Ø Education at a Glance 2013
Ø The Gap in the Gender Gap: Violence against Women in Canada
Ø Younger Siblings of Gang Members: Risk Factors and Best Practices
Ø Treading Water: The Impact of High METRs on Working Families in Canada
Ø Public Awareness of Income-Related Health Inequalities in Ontario, Canada
Ø Household Food Insecurity in Canada 2011

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SPARmonitor : July 17, 2013 - issue 110 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_110.pdf

This issue covers the following:
Ø Neighbourhood Social Profiles for Languages and for Family and Dwellings
Ø Revera Report on Ageism: A Look at Gender Differences
Ø Where are the Good Jobs? Ten Case Stories of “Working Rough, Living Poor.”
Ø Knowledge Exchange for Mental Health
Ø Safety at Home: A Pan-Canadian Home Care Study
Ø Improving Immigrant Selection: Further Changes Are Required Before Increasing Inflows
Ø Canada’s Aging Population: The Municipal Role in Canada’s Demographic Shift

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SPARmonitor : July 3, 2013 - issue 109 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_109.pdf

This issue covers the following:
Ø 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) Release – Labour Force, Education, Place of Work, Commuting and Mobility
Ø Portrait of Canada's Labour Force: National Household Survey
Ø An Immigrant All Over Again? Recession, Plant Closures, and Older Racialized Immigrant Workers
Ø The Case for a Canada Social Report
Ø The Training Wheels Are Off: A Closer Look at the Canada Job Grant
Ø Poverty or Prosperity Indigenous Children in Canada
Ø The Global Gender Gap Report 2012

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SPARmonitor : June 19, 2013 - issue 108 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_108.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø State of Homelessness in Canada: 2013
Ø Where’s Home? Looking back and looking forward at the need for affordable housing in Ontario
Ø Global Employment Trends for Youth 2013: A Generation at Risk
Ø Labour Force Survey, May 2013
Ø Are Public Pensions Keeping Up With The Times?
Ø Governing the Social Dimension in Canadian Federalism and European Integration

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SPARmonitor : June 5, 2013 - issue 107 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_107.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø The Case for a Canada Social Report
Ø Canada-Ontario Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities 2011-12 Annual Report
Ø Mind the Gap: Inequality in Ontario’s Schools
Ø Child Well-Being in Rich Countries: A Comparative Overview
Ø The 2013 Human Development Report: The Rise of the South: Human Progress in a Diverse World
Ø How to Bend the Cost Curve in Health Care

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SPARmonitor : May 22, 2013 - issue 106 (PDF - 132K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_106.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø All the Workers We Need: Debunking Canada’s Labour-Shortage Fallacy
Ø The Cycle of Sacrifice: Nurses’ Health and the Ontario Health System
Ø Quality Monitor: 2012 Report On Ontario’s Health System
Ø Taxes Versus the Necessities of Life: The Canadian Consumer Tax Index, 2013 Edition
Ø Health Care Lessons from Japan
Ø Improving the Competitiveness of Metropolitan Areas
Ø Services for Seniors in Toronto

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SPARmonitor : May 8, 2013 - issue 103 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_105.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Backgrounder on 2011 National Household Survey- Immigration, Citizenship, Ethnicity and Religion
Ø The Toronto Seniors Strategy
Ø Youth Homelessness in Canada
Ø The Trouble with Course Choices in Ontario High Schools
Ø No More Second-Class Taxpayers
Ø Career Motion: How Web-Based Technologies can Improve the Career Choices of Young People
Ø A Triple Threat to Equity Changing Priorities for Toronto Schools

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SPARmonitor : April 10, 2013 - issue 103 (PDF - 124K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_103.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø A Submission to the Ontario Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs
Ø Can The Poor Be Organized? Evidence from Rural India
Ø Creating a Virtuous Circle: Workforce Development Policy as a Tool for Improving the Prospects of America’s Unemployed Workers
Ø Unions Matter
Ø Child Well-Being in Rich Countries

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SPARmonitor : March 27, 2013 - issue 102 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_102.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2012
Ø Progress Report on Resident Care and Safety
Ø Who is Still Standing in Line? Addressing a Mismatch of Skills and Jobs in the Canadian Labour Market
Ø Global Status Report on Road Safety 2013
Ø The 2013 Human Development Report – "The Rise of the South: Human Progress in a Diverse World"
Ø How Well Are American Students Learning?
Ø Seniors in the Lower Mainland: A Snapshot of Facts and Trends

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SPARmonitor : January 30, 2013 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_98.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Domestic Workers Across the World
Ø Scaling Up Programs for the Rural Poor: IFAD's Experience, Lessons and Prospects (Phase 2)
Ø A Model Lesson: Finland Shows Us What Equal Opportunity Looks Like
Ø What Do International Tests Really Show About U.S. Student Performance?
Ø World's Most Affluent Metropolitan Areas: 2012
Ø 2012 Global Go to Think Tanks Report and Policy Advice
Ø Emerging Stronger 2013

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SPARmonitor : October 3, 2012 (PDF - 148K, 5 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_90.pdf

This issue covers the following:
(Click the link above to access all content below)

Ø Census 2011 Backgrounder - Families, Households and Dwellings
Ø Toronto's Vital Signs Report
Ø Cities of Migration: Good Ideas from Successful Cities
Ø Made in Canada: How the Law Constructs Migrant Workers’ Insecurity
Ø Planning for Retirement on a Low Income
Ø Job Vacancies, Three-Month Period Ending in June 2012
Ø The Real Cost of Homelessness
Ø Pathways to the Middle Class: Balancing Personal and Public Responsibilities

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SPARmonitor : August 15, 2012 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_87.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Long-Term Care Task Force on Resident Care and Safety
Ø Ontario Home Care Association Submission
Ø Young Carers in Canada: The Hidden Costs and Benefits of Young Caregiving
Ø Compulsory School Attendance: What Research Says and What It Means for State Policy
Ø Payroll Employment, Earnings and Hours, May 2012
Ø Filling the Data Gap: A Conversation on Coordinating and Using Program Data
Ø Eleventh Annual National Report Card on Health Care

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SPARmonitor : August 1, 2012 (PDF - 124K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_83.pdf

Table of contents for this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)

Ø The Search for Skills: The Demand for H-1B Workers in U.S. Metros
Ø The Review of the Roots of the Youth Violence
Ø Kids' Share 2012*: Report on Federal Expenditures on Children through 2011
Ø An Equal Start Improving Outcomes in Children’s Centres: An Evidence Review
Ø Access to New Oncology Drugs in Canada Compared with the United States and Europe

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SPARmonitor : June 20, 2012 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_83.pdf

Table of contents for this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)

Ø Immigrants and the Toronto Food Services and Accommodation Services Sectors
Ø State of Recidivism: The Revolving Door of America’s Prisons
Ø Hospital Care for All
Ø Wage Growth over the Past 30 Years: Changing Wages by Age and Education
Ø Policing Newcomers in Small and Medium Sized Cities in Ontario: Policy, Training and Practice
Ø The Power of Ontario’s Provincial Testing Program
Ø Canadian Community Health Survey, 2011

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SPARmonitor : June 6, 2012 (PDF - 148K, 5 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_82.pdf

Table of contents for this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)

Ø 2011 Census Data Release – Age and Sex Counts, City of Toronto
Ø The Canadian Population in 2011: Age and Sex
Ø World Health Statistics 2011
Ø World of Work Report 2012: Better Jobs for a Better Economy
Ø World Youth Report 2011
Ø Employment Insurance
Ø Youth Neither Enrolled Nor Employed
Ø Making Connections beyond School Walls

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SPARmonitor : May 23, 2012 (PDF - 164K, 6 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_81.pdf

Table of contents for this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)

Ø Changing Directions Changing Lives, the Mental Health Strategy for Canada
Ø Work Absences in 2011
Ø Labour Force Update
Ø Fiscal Transfers to Immigrants in Canada
Ø Scaling up Corporate Social Investments in Education
Ø 25 is the New 21: The Costs and Benefits of Providing Extended Care & Maintenance to Ontario Youth in Care Until Age 25
Ø My Real Life Workbook
Ø Working after Age 65: What is at Stake?
Ø Bold Action with an Aging Tool Kit: Toward A True Canadian Innovation Strategy
Ø Poverty in Canada: UN food Envoy Blasts Inequality

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SPARmonitor : May 9, 2012 (PDF - 148K, 5 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_80.pdf

Table of contents of this issue:
Ø Making it in Canada: Immigration Outcomes and Policies
Ø Colour Coded Health Care: The Impact of Race and Racism on Canadians’ Health
Ø Dementia A Public Health Priority
Ø Response to the Social Assistance Review Discussion Paper
Ø Job-Related Training of Older Workers
Ø Canada Speaks 2012: Mental Health, Addictions and the Roots of Poverty
Ø Final Report - Toronto Aboriginal Research Project (TARP)
Ø What Immigration Means for U.S. Employment and Wages

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SPARmonitor : March 14, 2012 (PDF - 164K, 6 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_76.pdf
Table of contents of this issue:

Ø The State of the World’s Children 2012: Children in an Urban World
Ø Factors Associated with Voting
Ø Permanently Temporary? Agricultural Migrant Workers and Their Integration in Canada
Ø How Well Are American Students Learning? The 2012 Brown Center Report on American Education
Ø The Social Democracy of Canadian Federalism
Ø Older Workers Stampede into the Labour Market
Ø Approaches for Reform Discussion Paper 2
Ø Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Out of Sight, Not out of Mind
Ø Social Determinants of Health and Populations at Risk Chapter 12
Ø The Library in the City: Changing Demands and a Challenging Future

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SPARmonitor : February 1, 2012 (PDF - 164K, 6 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_73.pdf
Table of contents of this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)
* Global MetroMonitor Volatility, Growth, and Recovery
* Canadian Trends in Cancer Prevalence
* Quality of Personal Networks: Does Living Alone Make a Difference?
* Personal Networks and the Economic Adjustment of Immigrants
* Recent Evolution of Immigrant-Language Transmission in Canada
* The Eight Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey
* Housing Subsidies and Homelessness: A Simple Idea
* Quantity and Quality of Jobs Falling in Tandem
* Emerging Stronger: Transformative Agenda for Ontario
* Focus Canada 2011 - Highlights Report on Crime and Justice
* Ontario’s Action Plan for Health Care

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SPARmonitor : January 18, 2012 (PDF - 152K, 5pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_72.pdf
Table of contents of this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)
* The Canada We Want in 2020
* A 2011 Global Snapshot of Canada
* Labour Force Update
* Fixing the Fiscal House: Alternative Macroeconomic Solutions for Ontario
* What’s wrong with American Housing?
* Where Does Crime Go After Public Housing Projects Are Demolished?
* State of Knowledge: Female Drunk Drivers
* Drug Costs Driving B.C. Residents to Skip Medication

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SPARmonitor : January 4, 2012 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_71.pdf
Table of contents of this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)
* Paid and Unpaid Work over Three Generations
* The Recession’s Ongoing Impact on America’s Children
* Canada’s CEO Elite 100: The 0.01%
* Income Inequality in Western Canada
* Common Ground: A Strategy for Moving Forward on Poverty Reduction
* Ending Violence against Aboriginal Women and Girls
Source:
SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change

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SPARmonitor : December 21, 2011 (PDF - 197K, 9 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011-12-21_SPAR Research Bulletin_70.pdf
Table of contents of this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)
* Forty is Too Young to Die: A call for action from Toronto's Early Onset Illness and Mortality Working Group, a coalition of Toronto agencies, academics and housing providers, December 08, 2011.
* Brain Health + Brain Skills = Brain Capital, Wilson + Wilkerson 2011, Global Business and Economic Roundtable on Addiction and Mental Health 2011 Report, December 08, 2011.
* Regional Economic Shocks and Migration by André Bernard, Perspectives on Labour and Income, Statistics Canada, November 23, 2011.
* The Impact of Considering Birthplace in Analyses of Immigrant Health by Michelle Rotermann, Health Reports, Statistics Canada, November 2011.
* The Real Outsiders: Politically Disengaged Views on Politics and Democracy, by Heather Bastedo, Wayne Chu, Jane Hilderman and Andre Turcotte, Samara, December 2011.
* How Have the Risk of Layoff and Earnings Losses of Laid-off Workers Evolved since the Late 1970s in Canada? By René Morissette, Theresa Qiu, and Ping Ching Winnie Chan, Analytical Studies Branch (Research Paper Series), Statistics Canada, December 2011.
* National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2011, by Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), November 03, 2011.
* Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective 2011, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, September 2011.
* Human Rights Accountability in National Security Practices: A Special Report to Parliament by Canadian Human Rights Commission, November 28, 2011.
* Community Transformation from an Economic Costing Perspective: The link between area of residence and places of employment in a disadvantaged community Dr. Linda DeRiviere and Jeffrey Brojges, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, December 2011.
* State of the Inner City Report 2011, Neoliberalism: What a difference a theory makes by Lindsey Li, Sarah Cooper, Shauna MacKinnon, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Manitoba Office, December 14, 2011.
* Tapping our Potential: Diaspora Communities and Canadian Foreign Policy, a Joint Initiative of the Mosaic Institute and the Walter & Duncan Gordon Foundation, December 19, 2011.
Source:
SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change

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SPARmonitor:
Social Research Bulletin June 08, 2011
(PDF - 186K, 8 pages)
Table of contents of this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)
* Homelessness in Yellowknife: An Emerging Social Challenge
* Unequal Access to Mental Health and Addictions Services Threatens Ontarians
* Adoption from Foster Care: Aiding Children While Saving Public Money
* Visions for Change: Recommendations for Effective Policies on Sustainable Lifestyles
* Projecting the Adequacy of Canadians’ Retirement Incomes
* Quality Monitor: 2011 Report On Ontario’s Health System
* Waiting Lists Survey by Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association (ONPHA’s)
* Rekindling the American Dream, A Northern Perspective
* A Canada-US Comparison of Labour Market Outcomes among Highly Educated Immigrants
* 2011 DiversCity Counts Report: A Snapshot of Diverse Leadership in the GTA
Source:
SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change

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SPARmonitor:
Social Research Bulletin June 08, 2011
(PDF - 186K, 8 pages)
Table of contents of this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)
* Homelessness in Yellowknife: An Emerging Social Challenge
* Unequal Access to Mental Health and Addictions Services Threatens Ontarians
* Adoption from Foster Care: Aiding Children While Saving Public Money
* Visions for Change: Recommendations for Effective Policies on Sustainable Lifestyles
* Projecting the Adequacy of Canadians’ Retirement Incomes
* Quality Monitor: 2011 Report On Ontario’s Health System
* Waiting Lists Survey by Ontario Non-Profit Housing Association (ONPHA’s)
* Rekindling the American Dream, A Northern Perspective
* A Canada-US Comparison of Labour Market Outcomes among Highly Educated Immigrants
* 2011 DiversCity Counts Report: A Snapshot of Diverse Leadership in the GTA
Source:
SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change

---


Suggestion by Gilles for
the nice folks at the City of Toronto:

The SPARmonitor page of the City of Toronto website [ http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/spar-archives.htm ] hasn't been updated since March of 2011, and all seven links to issues of the SPARmonitor on the page are incorrectly dated 2010, although the content of each issue is correctly dated 2011. The link at the bottom of the incorrectly-dated issues will take you to a separate page with links to 33 SPARmonitor issues posted to the site during 2010.

**Please** consider posting each weekly issue of the SPARmonitor to your website.
It would mean that (a) the collection of SPARmonitor issues would be available to a much larger potential audience if it were actually on your website
, and (b) I wouldn't have to upload multiple issues of the SPARmonitor to my own web server. I've posted 15 issues of SPARmonitor on my site so far because it's currently accessible only as an email attachment to your weekly newsletter for people on your mailing list.

---


Ontario Works Caseload Profile
- Report to the Toronto Community Services Committee
Heather McVicar, Commissioner of Community and Neighborhood Services
City of Toronto
August 23, 1999
** Excellent summary of welfare reforms in Ontario under the Harris government and even before (highlighting trends since the eighties), with particular emphasis on the changing nature of the welfare caseload in Toronto. A good snapshot of how Ontario Works was working in Toronto in 1999.

Selected reports:

From The City of Toronto:

New research: street homelessness in Toronto cut in half
2009 Street Needs Assessment: homeless people want permanent housing;
more affordable housing is still needed

News Release
April 16, 2010
Street homelessness - people living outdoors - in Toronto is down by 51 per cent since the inaugural Street Needs Assessment in 2006, according to the newly released results of the 2009 Street Needs Assessment (SNA).

2009 Street Needs Assessment:
Results and Observations
(PDF - 36K, 10 pages)
Staff Report
April 9, 2010
From the Shelter, Support and Housing Administration

2009 Street Needs
Assessment Results
(PDF - 5.4MB, 42 pages)

____________________

Related link:

Controversial Toronto street needs
assessment reports sharp drop in street homelessness

April 16, 2010
Toronto’s latest street needs assessment (released today) shows that the number of street homeless has dropped by half, while the number of sheltered homeless has risen. The methodology behind the count is controversial, as the Wellesley Institute has noted. There are plenty of more reliable studies of the real needs of people who are homeless or precariously housed. The latest assessment ignores the single biggest component of the homeless population – the hidden homeless (couch-surfers). Toronto’s affordable housing waiting list is at an all-time high, and the number of people housed in March of 2010 is way down from last year. The Street Health Report, supported by the Wellesley Institute, provides a detailed review of the health status of people who are homeless.

Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ Wellesley Institute ]
__________________________

NOTE (by Gilles)
I've removed the dead hyperlinks below but decided to keep the text for information.
Try doing a Google site search of http://www.city.toronto.on.ca/socialservices/ or aWeb search on a particular title that interests you; it's surprising how many of those reports can be found with a simple title search.

Systems of Survival, Systems of Support:
An Action Plan for Social Assistance in the City of Toronto
(PDF file - 1.2MB, 98 pages)
April 2006
"[The Action Plan] aims to ensure that benefits people receive, and the employment services and supports that help Toronto's vulnerable residents find and keep jobs, are available, adequate and effective.
The Action Plan sets out recommendations and actions for the different orders of government to reinvest in and restore Toronto's social safety net. It is a response to Toronto City Council's request for recommendations on how the Ontario Works program can respond better to the needs of low-income people."

Related Links:

April 11, 2006
Memorandum to Community Services Committee
From Heather MacVicar,
General Manager, Social Services Division

Summary of Systems of Survival, Systems of Support:
An Action Plan for Social Assistance in the City of Toronto
(PDF file - 7.25MB, 15 pages)

Powerpoint Presentation on an Action Plan for Social Assistance
to Community Services Committee
(PDF file - 1.5MB, 36 pages)
May 8, 2006

What Next in Welfare Reform?
A Preliminary Review of Promising Programs and Practices
Prepared for Toronto Social Services
(PDF file - 325K, 37 pages)
By Dean Herd, PhD
April 2006
"Recent years have seen a new consensus emerge around welfare reforms. As a result a number of promising programs and practices have been adopted in various jurisdictions which have shifted policy design and delivery beyond work-first. Instead of a simplistic focus upon the “shortest route to employment”, the new emphasis has recognized that large numbers have been left behind by such strategies and is focusing instead on identifying and meeting needs and supporting sustainable transitions into work. This report highlights a number of these “next steps” in welfare reform which reflect the types of services and supports necessary to move clients away from unemployment and poverty.

A Selection of Earlier Reports and Research on Ontario Works (welfare) and social services in Toronto:

Memorandum to Community Services Committee
From Heather MacVicar, General Manager, Social Services Division

The Continuing Erosion of Ontario Works Benefit Rates (PDF file - 136K, 11 pages)
October 14, 2005
This report provides an update on the status of social assistance benefit rates and makes recommendations for adjustments to the Ontario Works rate structure that recognizes the cost of living in a large city such as Toronto.
"(...) OW benefit rates are far too low, threatening the health and safety of the City’s most vulnerable residents and their children. Since 1995, the purchasing power of OW benefits has fallen by nearly 40 percent to a level not seen since 1985."

Living the Vision (PDF file - 681K, 31 pages)
September 2002
- offers an overview of how the City of Toronto delivers social assistance programs and services to the city's residents.

After Ontario Works (PDF file - 281K, 47 pages)
May 2002 (File revised June 2004)
- survey of people who left Ontario Works in Toronto in 2001 --- former social assistance recipients, discussing why they left the program, how they fared, and whether they were better off after leaving.

Social Assistance & Social Exclusion:
June 2004
Findings from Toronto Social Services' 2003 survey of single parents on Ontario Works describes the characteristics and experiences of single parents in the Ontario Works program in Toronto within the context of the labour market, their communities and their homes.
2003 Survey of Single Parents on Ontario Works
(PDF file - 906K, 68 pages)
2003 Presentation on Survey of Single Parents on Ontario Works
(PDF file - 252K, 22 pages)

June 14, 2005
Memorandum to Community Services Committee
From Heather MacVicar, General Manager, Social Services Division
Subject:
Kids @ Computers Scholarship Project – Impacts, Outreach and Recognition
(PDF file 129K, 14 pages)
"Purpose:
To describe the accomplishments of the Kids @ Computers Scholarship Project since 2001, including its recent selection as the 2005 recipient of the Willis Award for Innovation by the Canadian Association of Municipal Administrators and its contribution to Toronto’s selection as one of 2005’s top seven intelligent communities in the world."

March 6, 2003
Memorandum to Community Services Committee
From Heather MacVicar, General Manager, Social Services Division
To: Community Services Committee
From: Commissioner, Community and Neighbourhood Services
Subject:
Ontario Works Benefit Rates: Loss of Purchasing Power Since 1995
(PDF file - 208K, 20 pages)
"Purpose:
This report discusses the progressive loss of purchasing power for persons participating in the Ontario Works (OW) program in Toronto as a result of steadily rising costs of living and social assistance rates which have remained unchanged since 1995. The report first examines the sufficiency of benefits, compared with standard of living indicators for Toronto residents as a whole. It then considers the adequacy of both the shelter and basic needs components of the monthly OW benefit. Finally, the report describes a proposal put forward by the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) intended to help address these and other key issues concerning OW."
["Together with the 1995 reductions, social assistance rates have fallen by almost 35 percent in real and relative terms over the past eight years." --- Excerpt from page 2]

Preserving Child Care in Toronto: The Case for New Ontario Government Funding (PDF file - 44K, 9 pages)
Released January 30, 2003
"Toronto's child care system is at risk. Funding cuts by the provincial government have resulted in the erosion of the system on which over 16,000 subsidized families rely. Federal funding is available in Ontario to reverse the erosion and to return stability to the child care system but the Province has declined to use it. This report will outline the risks facing the child care system in Toronto and the opportunities that exist to revitalize it."
Source:
Children's Services
[City of Toronto]
"Child care in the City of Toronto is available in over 800 licensed child care centres and through 23 licensed private home care agencies working with over 2,000 approved home care providers."


The Toronto Report Card on Children
2003 Update
(Volume 5)
January 2004
"This 5th edition of The Toronto Report Card on Children measures the health and well-being of children using a variety of social indicators. Changes in the condition of children over time are monitored to ensure that targets for improvement are developed and adequate resources are allocated to allow every child, regardless of their circumstance, to thrive and grow."
2003 update - complete report
- incl. HTML and PDF versions of each section of the complete report : Introduction - Environment for children: setting the stage - Determinants and outcomes ( Economic security * Health * Safety * Access to developmental opportunities * Positive parenting) - Determinants and outcomes (Economic security *Health * Safety * Access to developmental opportunities * Positive parenting * Conclusion * Interactive Maps & Overlays

Related Link:

Preserving Child Care in Toronto:
The Case for New Ontario Government Funding
(PDF file - 45K, 9 pages)
June 2003
"Toronto's child care system is at risk. Funding cuts by the provincial government have resulted in the erosion of the system on which over 16,000 subsidized families rely. Federal funding is available in Ontario to reverse the erosion and to return stability to the child care system but the Province has declined to use it. This report will outline the risks facing the child care system in Toronto and the opportunities that exist to revitalize it."

Toronto Social Services' Employment Assistance Renewal Strategy (PDF file - 35K, 11 pages)
April 5, 2004
Report to the Community Services Committee by the Commissioner of Community and Neighbourhood Services for the City of Toronto
"The report will describe Toronto Social Services' (TSS') successful delivery of quality employment programs and services to Ontario Works (OW) [welfare] clients, as well as new approaches to providing
Employment Assistance (EA) services based on lessons learned and experiences gained over the past several years. The report will discuss key directions required to further improve EA services for clients, and briefly describe the process for consulting with stakeholders (including clients)."
Source:
2004 Council and Committee Schedule
[ City of Toronto ]
Related Links:
City of Toronto Social Services
- Toronto Social Services [Ontario Works] Welfare Policy
Ontario Works
[ Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services ]

City of Toronto Social Services Policy - Toronto welfare policy manual, organized in alphabetical order
- includes detailed information on welfare rates, eligibility criteria for different client types, treatment of financial resources, etc.

Shelter, Housing and Support Division

Coalition for Fair Opposition
NDP Party Status
- Ontario
Tuesday, October 21, 2003
"Over 650,000 Ontario voters selected NDP candidates, up by over 100,000 from 1999. Nearly 15 per cent of voters chose the NDP to represent them at Queen’s Park, up from 12 per cent in 1999, yet the NDP lost two seats. And now Dalton McGuinty has said he may not recognize the NDP as a legitimate political party. (...) The Liberals have won the right to govern and the Conservatives will come through loud and clear as the Official Opposition, but the over 650,000 citizens who voted NDP deserve a say in these decisions."
- incl. contact info for all Liberal members of the Ontario Government
Contact the Coalition for Fair Opposition - FairOpposition@hotmail.com
Source : DAWN DisAbled Women's Network - Ontario

Colour of Poverty (Ontario)
September 4, 2007
Poverty in Ontario is growing at an alarming rate. On September 5, 2007 the Colour of Justice Network announced the launching of the Colour of Poverty Campaign - a province-wide community-based effort to help raise public awareness about the serious problem of poverty within the racialized communities of Ontario.

With the Department of Canadian Heritage as a key sponsor, the Colour of Poverty Campaign partners have developed a series of ten ( 10 ) Fact Sheets addressing different aspects of racialized poverty and its negative impacts on education & learning, health & well-being, employment, income levels, justice and policing, immigration and settlement, housing and homelessness and food security in Ontario.

Community Advocacy & Legal Centre - a non-profit community legal clinic
serving low income residents of Hastings, Prince Edward and Lennox & Addington counties

BAFFLEGAB Fall 2010 newsletter (PDF - 600K, 10 pages)
Posted November 1, 2010
Articles include:
* Reflecting on 30 years of working for social justice
* Energy update
* Bedbugs in your rental unit -- Who's responsible?
* Are you disabled? Under age 60? Have an RDSP? You should!
* Social Assistance Improvements for those on Ontario Works
* Affordable housing update and National Housing Strategy Day
* Are your workplace concerns being heard?
* The Provincial Government creates a new dental program for children
* Listening to our community: Update on the Connecting Region project
Source:
Community Advocacy & Legal Centre (Belleville ON)


Welfare benefit levels in Ontario
and much more...

------------------------

Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, April - June 2013 (PDF - 168K, 2 pages)
http://www.communitylegalcentre.ca/legal_information/Tips/IM/SA_pension_rate_Apr-Jun_2013.pdf
Prepared by the
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services
[ http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/mcss/english/ ]
Recommended reading/saving/printing!
All in two pages, (just about) everything you ever
wanted to know about federal and provincial social program benefit levels in Ontario.
NOTE :
This factsheet is mostly benefit levels and rates - to find corresponding program information, do a Google search using any program name from the list below...

This factsheet contains current rate information (benefit levels)
for the following federal and Ontario programs:

* Federal Income Security and tax benefit programs
----- Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement, the Allowance (formerly Spouse's Allowance)
----- Canada Pension Plan
----- Harmonized Sales Tax Credit
----- Medical Expense Tax Credit
----- War Veterans Allowance
----- Employment Insurance
----- Canada Child Tax Benefit (incl. the Basic Child Tax Benefit, the National Child Benefit Supplement, the Child Disability Benefit and the Universal Child Care Benefit)

* Ontario income assistance programs
----- Ontario Works - Social Assistance rates + earnings exemptions and incentives
----- Ontario Disability Support Program - Social Assistance rates
----- Ontario Guaranteed Annual Income System (provincial top-up for Ontario seniors receiving the Guaranteed Income Supplement under the federal Old Age Security program)
----- Ontario Child Benefit
----- Ontario Child Care Supplement for Working Families
----- Ontario Trillium Benefit
(replaces former property and sales tax credits)
----- Assistance for Children with Severe Disabilities

Found in:
Tip Sheet List - (check this link for more recent updates)
[ Community Advocacy & Legal Centre - a non-profit community legal clinic
serving low income residents of Hastings, Prince Edward and Lennox & Addington counties.]

--------------------

NOTES:

1. Although this fact sheet was prepared and is updated by the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services, it doesn't appear anywhere on their website.
<BOOOOOOO!!>

The link below is to a copy of the pension and rate table from the website of the Community Advocacy & Legal Centre in Belleville.
<YAYYYYYYYY!!>

2. Although this fact sheet was prepared with an Ontario perspective, it's also a useful reference sheet of federal benefits payable everywhere across Canada.

--------------------------------------------------------

Some gratuitous advice from the
Canadian Social Research Links Guy:

1. To students and researchers:
Print this two-page pamphlet and keep it with your social research reference documents.
You'll thank me the next time you need to know the current OAS rate or the shelter allowance under ODSP or OW.

2. To other welfare departments in other provinces:
Please consider producing and making available online a short factsheet like this one for the programs in your jurisdiction.
It's an invaluable social research aid.

3. To the nice folks at the Ontario
Ministry of Community and Social Services:

This is such an excellent social research reference that it deserves to be on the MCSS home page, or at least the OW & ODSP home pages.
I can't find it anywhere on the MCSS website.
(Please correct me if I'm wrong.)
Please consider uploading this factsheet to your own website.

4. To the nice folks at the
Community Advocacy & Legal Centre:

Thanks for posting this to your site!
[BTW - If the MCSS Police come breaking down your door because you posted an
Ontario govt file that says "INTERNAL: FOR PLANNING PURPOSES ONLY"to the Web, you don't know me and I don't know you, OK?]

Community economic development (CED)

CED Learning Network
"Community economic development (CED) involves initiatives that attempt to strengthen the community by building equitable and inclusive economies. (...) The Toronto CED Learning Network is a group of over 350 organizations and individuals who are interested in CED in the Toronto area. Its membership reflects an exciting range of perspectives and approaches. Its main goal is to provide a space where members can learn from each other, share their resources and work together to develop healthy, equitable and sustainable business activity in Toronto."

**********************************************************

CEDTAP - The Community Economic Development Technical Assistance Program
"CEDTAP is a five-year, Canada-wide initiative that aims to assist 500 communities by 2006. CEDTAP helps community-based organizations engaged in CED by supporting technical assistance, study tours, target group initiatives and requests for computer hardware and software. CEDTAP is also committed to strengthening the CED sector as a whole by disseminating innovative models, funding the development of tools and resources, and organizing learning events.
- incl. links to : About CEDTAP - News - Approved Initiatives - Application Guidelines - Application Form - Directory of Technical Assistance Providers - CEDTAP Forum - Gender and CED - Resources and Links - Contact Information

Community Foundations of Canada
We are the Canadian movement for community vitality, representing 174 Community Foundations across the country. Together, we help Canadians invest in building strong and resilient places to live, work and play.

Vital Signs reports released in 15 Canadian cities
October 5, 2010
Vital Signs is part of a growing nation-wide initiative by Canadian community foundations to measure quality of life and take action to improve it.
On October 5, fifteen local Vital Signs report cards were released by community foundations across Canada.

Source:
Vital Signs
Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada that measures the vitality of our communities, identifies trends, and shares opportunities for action in at least ten areas critical to quality of life. Since Toronto's first Vital Signs publication, the Report has been adopted by 16 communities across Canada and is now conducted nationally by Community Foundations of Canada.

Related links:

Community Foundation of Ottawa
The Community Foundation of Ottawa is a public, non-profit organization created by and for the people of Ottawa. As an independent centre for community philanthropy, it connects donors who care with causes that matter and serves as a trusted resource for addressing issues and leveraging opportunities in the community.

Toronto Community Foundation
We help people invest in Toronto, making it the best place to live, work, learn and grow. We monitor the quality of life in our city, identifying its strengths and weaknesses through our Toronto’s Vital Signs® report

- Go to the Municipal Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/municipal.htm


Community Information Toronto
Community Information Toronto is the leading provider of information and referral to the people of Toronto. We meet the information needs of the community by providing the critical link between people and social services.
"Most comprehensive directory of human services in Toronto..."

Possibilities Project is a Toronto-based electronic magazine of employment, education and training information, containing monthly Feature Articles, weekly News & Events, detailed Community Resources, Advice, and tips for using the HRDC Interactive Training Inventory. Possibilities Project is a project of Community Information Toronto funded by Human Resources Development Canada.

CLEO - Community Legal Education Ontario
CLEO is a community legal clinic, founded in 1974, that specializes in public legal education. CLEO is administered by a volunteer board of directors, and funded by Legal Aid Ontario and the Department of Justice Canada.

------------------
Site français :
Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario
------------------


Your Legal Rights
Rights here. Rights now.
November 15, 2011
CLEO announces launch of Your Legal Rights website, a new online source of legal information for people across Ontario.
Your Legal Rights
is the new face of CLEONet, CLEO's highly successful legal information portal.

Legal topics covered in Your Legal Rights:
* Abuse and Family Violence * Employment and Work * Housing Law * Social Assistance and Pensions * Consumer Law * Environmental Law * Human Rights * Wills and Estates * Criminal Law * Family Law * Immigration and Refugee Law * Education Law * Health and Disability * Legal System * Legal topics A-Z

The Your Legal Rights site contains the following features:

* Resources: Legal information covering a wide range of legal topics, in a variety of formats, and available in dozens of languages
* Common Questions: Questions and answers to everyday legal problems
* Find Services: Interactive map of key legal and social services across Ontario
* Training: Public legal education training webinars for service providers
* News & Events: The latest headlines and community events about the law and access to justice

Your Legal Rights is a project of CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario / Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario) and is funded by the Law Foundation of Ontario.

-----------------

CLEO Legal Rights Guides ( rental housing and social assistance)
CLEO is producing these guides to provide people with another way to easily access essential legal information.
* Rental Housing - Repairs, rent increases, eviction and more
* Social Assistance - Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program: applying, appealing and more

-----------------

Selected site content:

CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario) website redesigned!
http://www.cleo.on.ca
CLEO is pleased to announce the redesign of our website at www.cleo.on.ca.
The improved design and navigation will give you a better snapshot of our publications and resources, as well as our research and projects.
Our new features – the ability to browse by topic or by language – will help you find what you're looking for even more efficiently.

Selected site content:

On the Radar - July 2012
http://goo.gl/JtYJC
On the Radar is a monthly email alert from CLEO that highlights timely legal information.
In the July 2012 issue:
* Planning a vacation? What are your rights?
* The Employment Standards Act – minimum rules
* The right to vacation time
* The right to vacation pay
* How workers can enforce their rights
* For more information or help

Subscribe to receive future On the Radar alerts by email:
http://goo.gl/4YDpv

Browse CLEO site resources by topic:
http://www.cleo.on.ca/en/resources-and-publications/resources-topic
* Abuse and Family Violence * Criminal Law * Employment and Work * Family Law * Health and Disability * Housing Law * Immigration and Refugee * Legal System * Social Assistance and Pensions

New CLEO Family Law Series
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/news/84315
April 23, 2012
CLEO is pleased to announce the release of our new Family Law Series. CLEO's new family law publications (small PDF files) offer clear explanations of key topics in custody, access, parenting plans, child and spousal support, and property division.

Separation and Divorce: Child Custody, Access, and Parenting Plans
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/PDF/family/custodyaccess.pdf
Discusses different custody and access arrangements, how to get help to work out a parenting plan, and how judges and arbitrators make these decisions if the parents cannot agree.

Separation and Divorce: Child Support
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/PDF/family/childsupport.pdf
Discusses how to calculate the amount of child support to be paid and how to enforce payment, with information about parents who are on social assistance.

Separation and Divorce: Spousal Support
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/PDF/family/spousalsupport.pdf
Discusses the factors that affect whether spousal support must be paid, the amount to be paid, and for how long, and how to enforce payment, with information about spouses who are on social assistance.

Separation and Divorce or Death of a Spouse: Property Division
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/PDF/family/propertydiv.pdf
Explains the basic rules for property division between separating married spouses, including special rules about the matrimonial home and what happens to property if one spouse dies, with information about the different situation of common-law spouses

Source:
Your Legal Rights
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/
A project of CLEO, Your Legal Rights is a website of free legal information for people in Ontario. This site has free, practical, and easy-to-find legal information produced by hundreds of organizations across Ontario.

The Your Legal Rights site contains the following features:

Resources:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/legal-topics-a-z
Legal information covering a wide range of legal topics, in a variety of formats, and available in dozens of languages

Common Questions:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/common-questions-browse
Questions and answers to everyday legal problems

Find Services:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/find-services
Interactive map of key legal and social services across Ontario

Training:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/training
Public legal education training webinars for service providers

News & Events:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/news-events
The latest headlines and community events about the law and access to justice

---

Your Legal Rights is a project of CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario / Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario):
http://www.cleo.on.ca/

Your Legal Rights is funded by the Law Foundation of Ontario:
http://www.lawfoundation.on.ca/

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ontario Social Assistance rates effective November / December 2011 (PDF - 70K, 1 page)
This rate table reflects the 1 per cent increase to Ontario Works and Ontario Disability Support Program rates announced in the 2011 Ontario budget.
Source:
CLEONet
CLEONet is a web site of legal information for community workers and advocates who work with low-income and disadvantaged communities.
NOTE : On November 15, 2011 CLEONet was re-launched as Your Legal Rights: a web site of legal information for people in Ontario.

Ministry of Community and Social Services - Ministry responsible for social assistance in Ontario
Ontario Works - for eligible people without disabilities 

Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) - for eligible people with disabilities

NOTE : for more Ontario welfare information, go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page of this site :
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

...and click Ontario in the left margin.

-------------------

Housing and human rights in Ontario: How to fight for your rights
July 20, 2011
This video looks at human rights enforcement and provides introductory information on how to legally challenge housing discrimination in Ontario.

Human Rights and Housing in Ontario
July 20, 2011
This video has information on Ontario's Human Rights Code and how it applies to rental housing. It looks at what housing discrimination is, who is protected by the Code, and what rental practices are illegal.

-----------------

How Welfare Works in Ontario
- for clients of the system:

Social Assistance
In Ontario, if you have a low income or no income, you may qualify for help from one of these social assistance programs:
1. Ontario Works (OW), which some people call welfare. This program is delivered by municipal governments. In other words, it is run by the local government of the town, city, county, district, or region you live in.

2. The Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), which some people call disability benefits. This program is for people with serious health problems. It is run by the Ontario government's Ministry of Community and Social Services."

Click the above link to read the rest of the OW and ODSP general descriptions, then select the program that interests you in the dark green horizontal band at the top of the page. Clicking Ontario Works, for example, opens a new subset with the following links:
* Qualifying for OW * Participation Agreements * Living with a spouse * Support payments and OW * If you are under 18 * Community Start Up and Maintenance Benefit * OW and working * Proving you still qualify * Refused, reduced, or cut off * Health benefits when you go off OW

Social Assistance - links to over a dozen PDF files to help clients make sense of the system - information on Ontario Works, ODSP, appeals, the Canada Child Tax Benefit, and more

CLEONet Launches Online Legal Rights Guides
News release
Posted August 24, 2010

Browse resources by legal topic
* Abuse and Family Violence * Aboriginal Law * Consumer Law * Criminal Law * Education Law * Employment and Work * Family Law * Health and Disability * Housing Law * Human Rights and the Charter * Immigration and Refugee Law * Legal System * Social Assistance and Pensions * Wills and Estates
[ Ressources en français par sujet ]
[ Resources in 40+ languages - including Swahili. ]

CLEO Publications Online
- incl. links to dozens of short pamphlets, all recent and all in PDF format, on a variety of issues organized under the following subjects:
* Criminal * Family * Health & Disability * Immigration & Refugee * Landlord & Tenant * Legal Services * Seniors * Social Assistance * Work & Employment Insurance * Workers' Compensation * Youth Justice
* Other

News & Events - Latest news and events about legal issues and law reform

Selected recent news
(from the News & Events link):

Don't slash food assistance
Posted August 23, 2010
- A Toronto Star editorial says the Special Diet replacement program is unlikely to meet the needs of recipients with medical conditions unless the government consults with them before implementing it.

Groups want input on Ontario's new nutrition supplement
Posted August 23, 2010
- Health and social advocates say they are still waiting for promised Ontario government consultation on the design of a program to replace the special diet allowance, according to a Healthzone.ca article.

Hydro price comparison requirement gets zapped
Posted August 19, 2010 - A Toronto Star article reports that a proposal to require electricity retailers to give consumers a side-by-side price comparison, showing what they would pay with or without an energy contract, has been quietly ditched by the Ontario government.

A quick way to ease poverty
Posted August 18, 2010 - A Toronto Star editorial says urging people to get jobs and then stripping them of the financial benefits that come with work makes little sense, but that is just what Ontario's welfare system does.

Women's Court of Canada offers alternative thoughts on equality judgments
Posted August 17, 2010 - According to its web site, the Women's Court of Canada is an innovative project bringing together academics, activists, and litigators in order literally to rewrite the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms equality jurisprudence.

---

Youth Justice:
Booklets for Youth in Conflict with the Law
Booklets for Parents, Victims and Others

Booklets for youth: Getting a job with a youth record - Travelling with a youth record - Your record doesn't end when you turn 18 - What's the big deal about court orders? - Talking to police: Why you need a lawyer - Hiring a lawyer - Working with your lawyer - What's new in youth justice?
Booklets for Parents, Victims and Others: Restorative justice: A different approach to youth justice - Restorative justice: A different option for victims of youth crime - My child is in trouble with the law: What can I do to help?

---


Welfare Fraud: The Constitution of Social Assistance as Crime
(PDF file - 475K, 137 pages)
http://goo.gl/b8mLr
By: Professor Janet Mosher, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University
and Professor Joe Hermer, Division of Social Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough
March 2005
[This paper was prepared for the Law Commission of Canada]
"The number of convictions for 2001-02 (393 convictions) is roughly equivalent to 0.1 percent of the combined social assistance caseload and one percent of the total number of allegations."[p. 34]
NOTE: this paper offers some excellent information on welfare reforms in Ontario in the mid-1990s, and it covers a number of contentious issues, including the Mike Harris welfare snitch phone hotline, the Spouse-in-the-House rule, "enhanced verification" and "consolidated verification procedures", fraud vs. client error, welfare fraud vs fraud in the areas of income taxes and employment standards, the Kimberly Rogers case, and more...

Where I found this link:
Social Assistance Law Resources - includes Ontario Works, Ontario Disability Support Program, how to apply for benefits, appeals, and workfare.
[ part of Resources and Tools ]
[ part of CLEONet ]

Selected recent CLEONET site content:

Fact Sheet: Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Adjudication of Addictions (PDF - 41K, 2 pages)
August 2009
People with addictions to drugs or alcohol or both may now be eligible for benefits from the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP). This fact sheet explains what people who have disabling conditions caused only by drug or alcohol addictions should expect when applying for ODSP benefits.

Source:
[ Social Assistance booklets ]
[ Online publications ]
Community Legal Education Ontario (CLEO)

CLEO is a community legal clinic that produces clear language material for people with low incomes. Main topics include social assistance, landlord and tenant law, refugee and immigration law, workers' compensation, women's issues, family law, employment insurance and human rights.

Community Social Planning Council of Toronto (CSPC-T)

See Social Planning Toronto:
http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/

 

Council of Agencies Serving South Asians (CASSA)
"CASSA is a community focused and community driven organization whose mandate is to advocate for and support existing as well as emerging agencies; to ensure that the social service needs of the community are met; and to play an active role in eliminating all forms of discrimination in society."

---

Putting Equity on the Agenda : Are We Being Heard? (PDF - 1.1MB, 30 pages)
York Region Equity Campaign Report
December 2009
The Council of Agencies Serving South Asians (CASSA) initiated Putting Equity on the Agenda – Are We Being Heard? in York Region in 2009; it emerged out of the Welcoming Communities Initiative (WCI). The local partners for this campaign were Social Services Network and the Social Planning Council of York Region. Working within a framework of access, equity and inclusion, the campaign invited community members to share their views on education systems, police and justice, service provision, municipal and regional service delivery, representation and more as they relate to newcomers and immigrants. Using a participatory community engagement model that views residents as partners in decision-making processes, the campaign used a number of methods to interact with community members through the spring of 2009.
Source:
Council of Agencies Serving South Asians (CASSA)
CASSA is a social justice umbrella organization working with Ontario’s diverse South Asian communities.

Related link:

Welcoming Communities Initiative (WCI)
WCI is a 3-year project funded by Citizenship & Immigration Canada that aims to bring multi-stakeholders from government, education, employment, settlement services, community groups and residents together to address the needs of access, equity and inclusion. The long-term goal of this project is to engage immigrants as partners in the community building process through a more equitable, accessible and inclusive approach.

NOTA : La version française suit l'anglais ci-dessous.
-----------

Council on Aging of Ottawa
http://coaottawa.ca/
The Council on Aging works with and for seniors to voice issues and concerns to all levels of government and to the general public.

Health Care : Let's Talk About It.
Ottawa Council on Aging Bulletin, Summer 2013
(PDF - 9.9MB, 18 pages)
http://coaottawa.ca/about-us/documents/2013BulletinHealthCareENG.pdf
Today there are deep seated issues facing Canada’s health care system: the population is aging, the institutional structure of the system is considered by many to be inefficient, and cost increases for health care services far outstrip inflation. Articles in this edition focus on: the need for private clinics as a way of improving access and services, the need for better funding and organization of the public health care system, a proposed a blending of private and public systems, etc.

Table of Contents

* Federal Health Funding to the Provinces: What is at stake? - Allan Moscovitch
* The Earlier the Better
(long term care planning as an integral part of the family financial plan.) - Ken Browness
* The Doctor Will See You Now (reducing health care costs in Ontario) - Mark Stabile
* The Future of Our Health System - Michel Bilodeau
* Time to Fight for Universal Pharmacare - Steve Morgan and Jamie Daw
* The Next Generation of Health Care - Libby Davies
* Canada Favours Mixed Model System - Steve Morgan and Jamie Daw
* Planning to Age at Home? - Jana Mitchell
* Better Value Trends in Spending on Healthcare - Stuart Soroka and Adam Mahon

Source:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Version française du bulletin:

Le système de santé : Parlons-en
Bulletin du Conseil sur le vieillissement d'Ottawa - Été 2013
(PDF - 3,4Mo., 14 pages)
http://www.coaottawa.ca/about-us/documents/2013BulletinHealthCareFR.pdf
[Veuillez noter que certains articles diffèrent entre les versions anglaise et française de ce bulletin.]

Le système de santé canadien offre des soins qui sont accessibles à tous. Cependant, le coût de ces soins continue d’augmenter et le financement du secteur de la santé ne cesse d’augmenter. Nous espérons que la lecture de notre bulletin vous éclairera sur les enjeux et les solutions qui devront être mises de l’avant afin que nous et les générations qui nous suivent bénéficient d’un accès à un système de santé de qualité et à coûts raisonnables pour l’ensemble des Canadiennes et des Canadiens

Source:
Conseil sur le vieillissement d'Ottawa

http://coaottawa.ca/
Le Conseil sur le vieillissement travaille avec et pour les aînés afin de faire connaître leurs questions d'intérêt et préoccupations à tous les paliers gouvernementaux ainsi qu'au grand public.


See these related Canadian Social Research Links pages:

--- Guide to welfare in Ontario
--- Provincial government
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [A-C]
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [D-N]
--- NGO/Municipal govt. [O-Z]
--- Review of social assistance in Ontario
--- The Ontario Special Diet Allowance
--- The Drummond Commission report
--- Drug testing people who apply for or receive welfare
--- Spouse-in-the-house (54) (welfare cohabitation rules for single people & single parents) 
--- Government Budget Links page - incl. Ontario budget links
--- Federal, provincial and territorial budgets - incl. Ontario budgets +analysis & critiques
--- Ontario anti-poverty strategies and poverty reduction
--- Early Learning and Child Care (for all Ontario ECD links)
--- Case Law / Court Decisions / Inquests - incl. information on the Kimberly Rogers inquest.
--- Provincial-Territorial Political Parties and Elections in Canada - incl. Ontario election links
--- Drug Testing for Welfare Recipients in Ontario

--- Gouvernement de l'Ontario - page d'accueil (version française)


 
 
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