Canadian Social Research Newsletter
May 1, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,410 subscribers.

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ON MAY 2, VOTE!
http://www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section=vot&lang=e

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...



IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:


Canadian content

1. Federal Election 2011 Endorsements Left and Right : The Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail (no surprises here.)
2 Addressing Child and Family Poverty in Canada: Where do the parties stand? (Campaign 2000) - April 28
3. The descent of democracy: A country under one man’s thumb (iPolitics.ca) - April 27
4. Tax Free Savings Accounts : good or bad? Surprisingly, the Financial Post and the Toronto Star disagree - April 28
5. Rick Mercer with the leaders on the federal campaign trail (Macleans.ca) - April 28
6. Short-form census makes debut Monday (Toronto Star) - April 28
7. 5,000+ websites and web pages with links back to Canadian Social Research Links (Yahoo Site Explorer)
8. Time to give the poor a break (Winnipeg Sun) - April 26
9. Tories compiled Harper's most controversial quotes (The Canadian Press) - April 25
10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Education Indicators in Canada, April 2011 issue - April 29
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, February 2011 - April 28
--- Births, 2008 - April 27
--- Study: Retiring with debt, 2009 - April 27
--- The distribution of mortgage debt in Canada - April 27
11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
13. Doing Better for Families (Organisation for EconomicCo-operation and Development) - April 27
14. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]



1. Federal Election 2011 Endorsements Left and Right : The Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail
(no surprises here.)

Lean to the left, lean to the right.
Stand up, sit down, fight, fight, fight!

Toronto Star endorses the NDP
April 30, 2011
(...) The last thing Canada needs is an affirmation of a government obsessed with control, dismissive of critics, and determined to further diminish the role of the state in charting a better future for the country. (...) New Democrats have shown at the provincial level that once in office they can square their social conscience with fiscal responsibility. They are the party of Tommy Douglas, Allan Blakeney and Roy Romanow — pragmatists with a vision and a heart. Now that a much more significant role beckons at the federal level they must accept the challenge of developing that approach nationally as well.
Source:
Toronto Star

---

The Globe’s election endorsement: Facing up to our challenges
April 27, 2011
(...) Only Stephen Harper and the Conservative Party have shown the leadership, the bullheadedness (let's call it what it is) and the discipline this country needs. (...) Mr. Harper could achieve a great deal more if he would relax his grip on Parliament, its independent officers and the flow of information, and instead bring his disciplined approach to bear on the great challenges at hand. That is the great strike against the Conservatives: a disrespect for Parliament, the abuse of prorogation, the repeated attempts (including during this campaign) to stanch debate and free expression. It is a disappointing failing in a leader who previously emerged from a populist movement that fought so valiantly for democratic reforms. (...) The campaign of 2011 – so vicious and often vapid – should not be remembered fondly. But that will soon be behind us. If the result is a confident new Parliament, it could help propel Canada into a fresh period of innovation, government reform and global ambition. Stephen Harper and the Conservatives are best positioned to guide Canada there.
Source:
Globe and Mail

---

- Go to the 2011 Federal Election and General Political Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2011_fed_election.htm

2. Addressing Child and Family Poverty in Canada: Where do the parties stand?
(Campaign 2000)

From Campaign 2000:

Three out of four cross-Canada parties commit to reduce poverty;
Conservatives ignore Poverty Reduction and Inequality
(small PDF file)
News Release
April 28, 2011
Toronto – Citing the persistence of poverty and growing gap between the rich and poor across Canada, national anti-poverty coalition Campaign 2000 today expressed satisfaction that three out of four parties have committed to a poverty reduction plan.

Addressing Child and Family Poverty in Canada: Where do the parties stand?
Campaign 2000 sent a letter with 10 key questions [ small PDF file : English -Français ] on poverty to the leaders of all parties. Based on the responses from each of the federal parties, Campaign 2000 put together a summary of the answers in a grid, outlining where each federal party stands on poverty.

Grid of party platforms on poverty-related issues (PDF - 72K, 2 pages)

Summary of party platforms on poverty-related issues (PDF - 85K, 10 pages)
Benchmarks:
* Commit to reducing child and family poverty by 25% in five years and 50% in 10 years
* Raise the Canada Child Tax Benefit to $5,400 ($2011). End the clawback by provincial governments for those receiving social assistance.
* A system of affordable, high quality, public and not-for-profit early childhood education and care accessible to all children: by 2020 including a policy framework with goals and objectives, targets and timelines, recognizing provincial and territorial roles and responsibilities.
* Develop a national strategy for affordable housing enshrined in legislation including substantial federal funding for social housing.
* All those working full-time, full-year guaranteed a life free from poverty. Re-establish the federal minimum wage to at least $11. per hour (2011$) and indexed annually to inflation. Development of strategies to achieve sustaining employment and liveable incomes. Increase WITB to $2,400 for all employed adults.

Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000.

---

- Go to the 2011 Federal Election and General Political Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2011_fed_election.htm

3. The descent of democracy: A country under one man’s thumb - April 27
(iPolitics.ca)

The descent of democracy:
A country under one man’s thumb
By Lawrence Martin
April 27, 2011
Can we still call this a parliamentary democracy? Or is it something more akin to a democracy of one? More and more, Stephen Harper’s critics are asking the question. There is a widespread view among political scientists and constitutional scholars that the prime minister, with his "l’État, c’est moi" methods, has brought Canadian democracy to new lows. Canadians themselves may be starting to feel that way. Pollster Angus Reid found this week that 62 per cent of Canadians surveyed described our democracy as being in a state of crisis. For the first time in many elections, democracy is a foremost issue. (...) The state of democracy now [under Stephen Harper] is such that the civil service is subjugated, the committee system weakened, watchdogs anemic, independent agencies intimidated, information less available, the prime minister’s own party in servitude, political parties soon — if Harper gets his way — to be stripped of public funding.
Source:
iPolitics.ca - informative, insightful, influential
NOTE: includes a damning list of examples of Stephen Harper's autocratic style in may areas

---

- Go to the 2011 Federal Election and General Political Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2011_fed_election.htm



4. Tax Free Savings Accounts : good or bad? Surprisingly, the Financial Post and the Toronto Star disagree - April 28

Seniors and low-income families suffer tax hit
The combination of taxes and GIS clawbacks mean
the effective tax rates for seniors can reach 100% for seniors, the C.D. Howe Institute says.
By Jonathan Chevreau
April 28, 2011
Despite a decade of falling personal income tax rates, low income families and seniors face effective tax rates of 50% or more if they supplement government benefits with work, a C.D. Howe brief released Wednesday says. As soon as families start earning money or seniors withdraw money from retirement funds, benefits may be taxed or "clawed back." The Marginal Effective Tax Rate or METR is one of those odd concepts that views reductions in government benefits as a sort of additional tax. The classic case is poor seniors losing the Guaranteed Income Supplement as their dubious "reward" for saving in RRSPs. These ultimately become forced taxable withdrawals from RRIFs. The combination of taxes and GIS clawbacks can reach 100% for seniors, the institute says.
[Tax Free Savings Accounts to the rescue!]
Source:
Financial Post

Related link:
C.D. Howe Institute
NOTE: the C.D. Howe brief mentioned in the article above wasn't on the Institute's site as at 4pm April 29.
Check their website to see if the new link is posted...

---

Counterpoint:

The trouble with the Tax Free Savings Account
April 30, 2011
By Linda McQuaig
While corporate tax cuts have been fiercely attacked in recent weeks as giveaways to big business, the Conservatives have managed to avoid controversy over another costly election promise that seems poised to deliver an even bigger windfall to the Bay Street crowd. The promise involves Tax Free Savings Accounts (TFSA), which the Conservatives introduced in 2009 and now plan to greatly expand. The opposition parties have avoided attacking the program, which the Conservatives have carefully pitched as a way to help moderate earners build their savings. But Neil Brooks, a professor of tax law at Osgoode Hall Law School, says the program does little for moderate earners, and is really about eliminating taxes on capital gains and other income from capital – something the financial community has long lobbied for but been unable to achieve. (...) The TFSA is nothing more than another weapon in the current Canadian government’s ideological attack on the foundations of our tax system.
Source:
Toronto Star

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

5. Rick Mercer with the leaders on the federal campaign trail - April 28
(Macleans.ca)

Is Stephen Harper a hologram?
Rick Mercer on what he learned on the campaign trail with the party leaders

by Rick Mercer
April 28, 2011
(... )My time with Harper on the road was excruciating for the Tories. Abortion, kickbacks, failed teleprompters and low turnouts—what saved the day was Harper’s successful high-profile interview with Peter Mansbridge.
Michael Ignatieff had the converse experience. He travelled the country and gave barn-burner performances, but when the lights came on in the studio with Mansbridge, Ignatieff dug up the corpse of the coalition and danced it around the room. A thousand speeches in a thousand hockey rinks won’t make up for that. And Jack Layton is a great campaigner but a good speech in Gatineau doesn’t put the NDP in first place in Quebec. Jack made that happen on French debate night. Again, it’s the air war.
Source:
Macleans.ca

---

- Go to the 2011 Federal Election and General Political Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2011_fed_election.htm

6. Short-form census makes debut Monday - April 28
(Toronto Star)

Short-form census makes debut Monday
April 28, 2011
By Bruce Campion-Smith
OTTAWA—It’s controversial, political divisive and could have a lasting effect on how Canadians see their country. And it’s not Monday’s election. It’s the census and missing this year are the detailed long-form questionnaires that have helped many corners of Canadian society plan for the future. Yet many experts warn that the loss of the mandatory long-form census — and its questions on education, employment and commuting habits — risks leaving Canadians in the dark about their changing lifestyles and trends.

“That’s my firm belief,” said Ivan Fellegi, who served as chief statistician at Statistics Canada for 23 years. “But more important than that, we will not only have less knowledge about ourselves, we will have the wrong knowledge about ourselves because we won’t know what’s right and what’s wrong."
Source:
Toronto Star

---

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

7. 5,000+ websites and web pages with links back to Canadian Social Research Links
(Yahoo Site Explorer
)

Sites that link to Canadian Social Research Links
April 2011
- 5,000+ links to websites/web pages that link to Canadian Social Research Links.
Recommended reading --- many of the links point to large collections of resources in social policy...
Source:
Yahoo Site Explorer
NOTE : you can use Yahoo Site Explorer to find sites linking in to any site, or even a single page of a website.
It's an excellent way to explore websites and web pages that deal with similar topics.

Source:
Yahoo Site Explorer

---

- Go to the Web Authoring and Editing Tools page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/webkmrk.htm

8. Time to give the poor a break - April 26
(Winnipeg Sun)

Time to give the poor a break
By Floyd Perras
April 26, 2011
Have you ever gone 18 straight years without a single cent increase in income?
Some of Manitoba’s poorest families and individuals have.
That’s because welfare rates for basic needs in Manitoba haven’t changed one bit since 1993. Taking inflation into consideration, people relying on social assistance today have only 65% of the money they did back then.
And it’s only getting worse for those on the bottom rung of the ladder.
[ Author Floyd Perras is Executive Director of Siloam Mission in Winnipeg. ]
Source:
Winnipeg Sun

---

- Go to the Manitoba Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm

9. Tories compiled Harper's most controversial quotes - April 25
(The Canadian Press)

Tories compiled Harper's most controversial quotes
April 25, 2011
A 500-page dossier of potentially damaging remarks by Stephen Harper has hit the election campaign, but don't blame the opposition parties — it was prepared by the Conservatives. The thick binder of material, obtained by the Liberals, is a treasure trove of controversial Harper quotes, listed alphabetically by subject matter. It covers everything from abortion to western alienation and dates as far back as the 1980s.

[ comments (646) ]

The Harper quotes dossier: a sample
April 25, 2011

Source:
The Canadian Press

---

- Go to the 2011 Federal Election and General Political Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2011_fed_election.htm

10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Education Indicators in Canada, April 2011 issue - April 29
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, February 2011 - April 28
--- Births, 2008 - April 27
--- Study: Retiring with debt, 2009 - April 27
--- The distribution of mortgage debt in Canada
- April 27

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

April 29, 2011
Education Indicators in Canada:
Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program

April 2011
The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) provides a statistical portrait of the elementary, secondary and postsecondary education systems through the following products:
* Tables
* Fact sheets
* Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective
* Handbook for the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program - April 2011

Source:
Education Matters
- main product page*
This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers [ This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related products:

* Learning Resources at Statistics Canada - For Teachers - For Students - For Kids - Postsecondary
* Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program
* Education Indicators in Canada: Fact Sheets
* Statistics by Subject : Education, Training and Learning
* Education finance

---

April 28, 2011
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, February 2011
Between February 2010 and February 2011, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees rose by 4.0% to $874.83. In comparison, average weekly earnings increased by 2.7% between February 2009 and February 2010.

Source:
Employment, Earnings and Hours - product main page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE:
Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month or later after this report first appears in The Daily.
---
* On the product main page,click "View" to see the
latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings

---

April 27, 2011
Births, 2008
In 2008, 377,886 babies were born in Canada, up 2.7% from the year before and the sixth consecutive annual increase. The advance, however, was lower than the gains of 3.7% in 2007 and 3.6% in 2006.

April 27, 2011
Study: Retiring with debt, 2009
In 2009, 34% of retired individuals aged 55 and over, whether single or in a couple, held mortgage or consumer debt. The median amount owed by these individuals was $19,000. The incidence of debt was much higher among those in the same age group who had not yet retired. Among pre-retirees aged 55 and over, two-thirds held mortgage or consumer debt and their median debt load was $40,000, double that of retirees.

Complete article:
HTML
PDF
(163K, 12 pages)
Source:
April 2011 issue of
Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Also in the same issue of
Perspectives on Labour and Income:

The distribution of mortgage debt in Canada
Mortgages consistently account for two-thirds of Canadians' household debt. This study uses the Survey of Household Spending to examine the characteristics of mortgagees and the size of their payments.

Highlights

Full article:
HTML
PDF
(162K, 12 pages)

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The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Summer job?
*
35,000 Census jobs across Canada (April-August 2011)
*
1,200 jobs in the Census Data Operations Centre in Gatineau QC (April-September 2011)
Source:
2011 Census of Canada

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Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

-------

April 30, 2011

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

Why I'm voting for child care
29 Apr 11
- Activist and mother Vicky Smallman discusses her child care struggles; invites Canadians to vote for good child care May 2nd.

Addressing child and family poverty in Canada: Where do the parties stand?
29 Apr 11
- Campaign 2000 assesses the federal parties' records and promises on child poverty.

Does not play well with others
28 Apr 11
- Post from CCPA's election blog offers a letter from child care staff to the Harper family regarding Stephen.

Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2011: Standing strong
28 Apr 11
- Newfoundland government promises "two-year pilot project focused on the development of child care spaces in family homes".

Funding for 25 new child care centres raises family choices. Commitment to 54 new centres over five years
27 Apr 11
- Manitoba budget includes $21.3 million for child-care centres including 46 capital projects; promises 2,100 newly funded spaces.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· Put children first
[CA] 29 Apr 11

· When you vote, keep our children in mind
[CA] 28 Apr 11

· OurVote.ca: Code Blue -- Build child care
[CA] 27 Apr 11

· Porter: Why child care is a big election issue
[CA] 27 Apr 11

· Child care takes centre stage
[CA] 27 Apr 11

· Standing behind a failing system
[CA-NL] 27 Apr 11

· Time to put children first
[CA] 26 Apr 11

· NDP push: Jack Layton answers questions
[CA] 26 Apr 11

· Mixed reaction to child care plan
[CA-NL] 20 Apr 11

· Daycares question new funding
[CA-MB] 14 Apr 11

more CC IN THE NEWS »

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Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

April 29:
OECD Report: Child Well-Being and Family Benefits
Legal Services for the Poor - New Jersey, Wisconsin
Restrictions on Electronic Benefit Transfer Cards - Massachusetts, Washington

April 28:
Participation in Federal Assistance Programs
Medicaid Reform - Florida
State Unemployment Funds
Cash Assistance Time Limits - Oregon

April 26:
Poverty and Education - Louisville, KY
Average Height of Poor Women - Africa

April 25:
Food Stamp Expenditures - Oklahoma
Fraud in the Foodshare Program - Wisconsin
Food Insecurity - Texas

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Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

13. Doing Better for Families - April 27
(Organisation for EconomicCo-operation and Development)

Society : Safeguard social support for poorest families, says OECD’s Gurría
News Release
27 April 2011
Poverty in households with children is rising in nearly all countries of the Organisation for EconomicCo-operation and Development (OECD). (...) Governments should ensure that family support policies protect the most vulnerable, according to the OECD’s first-ever report on family well-being. Doing Better for Families says that families with children are more likely to be poor today than in previous decades, when the poorest in society were more likely to be pensioners.

Doing Better for Families - main page
[version française ]
- includes an abstract of the book, press material and country notes (see Canada scetions below)
NOTE: only the first chapter is free.
To order the complete report (U.S. $56), click How to obtain this publication

Contents:
Chapter 1. Families are changing (free - see link below)
Chapter 2. The balance of family policy tools
Chapter 3. Fertility trends: what have been the main drivers?
Chapter 4. Reducing barriers to parental employment
Chapter 5. Promoting child development and child well-being
Chapter 6. Sole parents, public policy, employment and poverty
Chapter 7. Child maltreatment

Chapter 1 : Families Are Changing (PDF - 483K, 37 pages)
This chapter provides an overview of the changes in family formation, household structure, work-life balance, and child well-being. Fertility rates have been persistently low in many OECD countries leading to smaller families. With marriage rates down and divorce rates up, there are an increasing number of children growing up in sole-parent or reconstituted families. Sole-parent families are of particular concern due to the high incidence of poverty among such households.

Multilingual Summaries for Doing Better for Families
- includes links to versions of the summary in Spanish, German, Japanese, Italian and French

Country report:

Doing Better for Families: Canada (PDF - 252K, 3 pages, includes English and French versions)
Canada could step up its efforts to provide more support to parents with young children. (...) Child and family outcomes in Canada could be improved, if affordable and quality assured childcare services during the early years and throughout compulsory school where more widely available.

Five Family Facts (PDF - 777K, 18 pages)
- five facts for each of the participating countries
Excerpt:
Five Canada Facts (page 3):
* Canada had the 7th highest female employment rate in 2009, at 69.1%, compared with an OECD average of 59.6%.
* Canada’s fertility rate is 1.66 children per women, which is just below the OECD average of 1.74, and well below the population replacement rate (2.1).
* Canada has the 11th highest child poverty rate among OECD countries, at 14.8%, which is above the OECD average of 12.7%
* The size of the average household in Canada is 2.5, just below the OECD average of 2.6 persons per household.
* Canada performs well in PISA’s reading literacy scale among 15 year olds, and had the 3rd highest score among OECD countries in 2009, at 524 points.

Related documents:

* OECD Family database
* Society at a Glance 2011 - OECD Social Indicators
* Doing Better for Children
(September 2009)
* Growing Unequal? Income Distribution and Poverty in OECD Countries
(October 2008)
* Babies and Bosses - Reconciling Work and Family Life: A Synthesis of Findings for OECD Countries
(English)

Source:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

The mission of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is to promote policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world. The OECD provides a forum in which governments can work together to share experiences and seek solutions to common problems.

---

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

14.CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter

27 April 2011, CRINMAIL issue 1222
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Forced male circumcision: Kenya
- State violence: Syria, Libya
- Virginity tests: Afghanistan
- Persistent recruitment: Central African Republic
- Excessive restraint: United States
- Reviewing juvenile detention: India, New Zealand
- Child health: Kenya, Pakistan
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

---------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com

 


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The Finn & Haddie Fish Market
Flowers & Bowes • Floral Designs
House & Holmes • Real Estate
Moon, Starr & Sons • Telescopes and Optics
Mudd, Waters & Soeurs • Drainage Systems
The Reid & Wright Learning Centre
The Rich & Sweet Candy Company
Spring & Sommers • Vacation Rentals
Wright, Judge & Jury • Attorneys at Law
Ketchum & Killum • Undertakers
Doctors Hakim & Stitch • Surgeons
P. J. Faucet Plumbing Ltd. • Edmonton, Canada
Finagle & Diddle Engineering Works
Howe, Dewey, Cheatem & Wynn • Attorneys at Law
Susan Liddy-Gates • Attorney at Law
Leaven and Earth Bakery
Hyde & Haire Tannery
Lewis N. Clark, Outdoor Adventures
Argue & Phibbs, Solicitors, Sligo, Ireland
Levin N. Sinn, Pastor
Stan Tall & Bea Best, Physical Therapy
Mary Annette's Puppet Shop
White, Sands & Son, Cruise Agent


Source:
http://www.alphadictionary.com/fun/funny_company_names.html


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And, in closing...

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Do *not* mess with this person:
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