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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 2, 2011


Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,367 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:


Canadian content


1.  [The Fraser Institute] Think Tanks and the Propaganda Machine (Operation Maple) - December 5
2. Innovative Approaches to Prosperity: Shaping Toronto’s Labour Market (Toronto Workforce Innovation Group) - November 22
3. Social inclusion and poverty reduction reports released (Government of Yukon) - December 22
4. [Historical] Provincial and Municipal Social Assistance Programs (Overview) - March 1996
5. [Historical] Income Security Reform and the Concept of a Guaranteed Annual Income - 1995 (Queen's University)
6. Jim Flaherty and his Pooled Registered Pension Plan (Finance Canada) - December 20
7. Major federal transfer payments to provinces and territories for 2010-11 and for 2011-12 (Finance Canada) - December 20

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
11. Australian Policy Online - selected content
12. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week...
...and a safe, healthy and Happy New Year!

 Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]



1. [The Fraser Institute] Think Tanks and the Propaganda Machine - December 5
(Operation Maple)

The Fraser Institute:

Think Tanks and the Propaganda Machine
December 5, 2010
(...) Name any issue that social justice organizations, community and church groups and unions have fought for over the years and [Big Business] wants the opposite. But Big Business can’t just come right out and press openly for these things so instead they set up a mouthpiece – the Fraser Institute – and get right wing academics (e.g., Christopher Sarlo) to publish papers that support the Big Business viewpoint. And suddenly…there you have it…Peter Mansbridge quotes them on the National.
Source:
Operation Maple - Take Back Canada!
Operation Maple is a social media project developed and produced by a team of people who want to communicate the message that the people we elect to represent us do not have our best interests at heart. They put big corporations ahead of regular Canadians...

Fraser Institute
The Fraser Institute is a fiscally conservative think tank based in Canada that espouses free market principles. Its stated mandate is to advocate for freedom and competitive markets. It generally opposes public policy solutions based on government spending, taxes, deficits, and regulation
Source:
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Related link:

Fraser Institute - Home page
The Fraser Institute is an independent non-partisan* research and educational organization based in Canada.
"(...) The Fraser Institute is a registered non-profit organization. We depend entirely on donations from people who understand the importance of impartial research and who support greater choice, less government intervention, and more personal responsibility."
[ * Yeah. And monkeys might fly out my butt. ]

Birds of a feather?

See the Fraser Institute's Other info sources page for links to 20 Institutes around the world with a similar focus to that of the The Fraser Institute --- "A free and prosperous world through choice, market and responsibility". It's the Fraser Institute motto, the short form of which should be "Survival of the Fittest".

And while we're on the subject...

The Fraser Institute - from SourceWatch
Wikipedia-style article, unfortunately somewhat dated, but still offers insights into the connections between the Fraser Institute and its corporate masters.
- includes links to similar articles about other front groups shilling for corporate interests in Canada, such as the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies and the Frontier Institute for Public Policy.
Source:
SourceWatch
The Center for Media and Democracy (CMD)* publishes this collaborative, specialized encyclopedia of the people, organizations, and issues shaping the public agenda. SourceWatch profiles the activities of front groups, PR spinners, industry-friendly experts, industry-funded organizations, and think tanks trying to manipulate public opinion on behalf of corporations or government. We also highlight key public policies they are trying to affect and provide ways to get involved.

[ * Center for Media and Democracy (CMD)
The Center for Media and Democracy is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan media and consumer watchdog group that focuses on a number of areas, including Investigating and countering P.R. campaigns and spin by corporations, industries, and government agencies about issues and products that affect our health, liberty, economic opportunities, environment, and the vitality of the democratic process. [ About CMD ]

Who's funding the [U.S.] Conservative Movement?
Conservative Transparency : The money behind the movement
The People - The Funders - The Recipients
Source:
Media Matters Action Network

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (II) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research2.htm

2. Innovative Approaches to Prosperity: Shaping Toronto’s Labour Market - November 22
(Toronto Workforce Innovation Group)

Innovative Approaches to Prosperity: Shaping Toronto’s Labour Market
Breakfast Roundtable moderated by Carol Goar
November 22, 2010
A half day symposium on the challenges and solutions of Toronto’s changing labour market.
[ Background Paper (PDF - 530K, 4 pages) ]
[ Innovative Approaches to Prosperity: Shaping Toronto's Labour Market (Powerpoint - 5.8MB, 11 slides) ]

Source:
Toronto Workforce Innovation Group (TWIG)
TWIG (formerly known as the Toronto Training Board) is a not-for-profit organization that acts as a catalyst for workforce solutions. TWIG conducts labour market studies, analyzes employment trends, convenes stakeholder consultations and facilitates workforce initiatives that serve the needs of employees and employers in the City of Toronto.

---

Two related Toronto Star
columns by Carol Goar:

November 26, 2010
Toronto’s hourglass economy needs a makeover
An economy should be oval-shaped. Toronto's looks like an hourglass; top-heavy, bottom-heavy and emaciated in the middle.

November 24, 2010
A smart social policy innovation for lean times
Could a guaranteed income for people with severe disabilities be Canada's next social advance?

Source:
Toronto Star

Earlier report
from TWIG:

An Economy Out of Shape: Changing the Hourglass (PDF - 731K, 53 pages)
Researched and written by Tom Zizys
April 1, 2010
This Toronto Workforce Innovation Group report examines changes in the occupational structure of the labour force in the City of Toronto and the rest of Ontario using Statistics Canada census data. The purpose of this report is to highlight trends, isolate the impact of these trends on different population groups, and offer recommendations that can contribute to economic growth and productivity as well as promote equitable outcomes for all workers.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

3. Social inclusion and poverty reduction reports released - December 22
(Government of Yukon)

Yukon

Social inclusion and poverty reduction reports released
News Release
December 22, 2010
WHITEHORSE – The Yukon government today released two reports: the Whitehorse Housing Adequacy Study and the Dimensions of Social Inclusion and Social Exclusion in Yukon 2010 report, as part of the creation of the Yukon Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy. 

The 2010 Whitehorse Housing Adequacy Study (PDF - 611K, 88 pages) was designed to address a long-standing need for statistical information on homelessness and housing challenges in the Whitehorse area. While it is not intended to be representative of the whole Whitehorse population, it provides a snapshot of a vulnerable sub-population during a specific time period. (...) The survey was created by the Department of Health and Social Services in partnership with the Yukon Bureau of Statistics and the Yukon Anti-Poverty Coalition. (...)

Dimensions of Social Inclusion and Social Exclusion in Yukon 2010 (PDF - 559K, 204 pages) is a rich compilation of data using social indicators such as personal and community assets, access to necessities and participation in society. These documents are the foundation that will provide the information and evidence needed to develop the strategy.

Source:
Yukon Health and Social Services

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Yukon Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/yk.htm

4. [Historical] Provincial and Municipal Social Assistance Programs (Overview) - March 1996

Provincial and Municipal Social Assistance Programs
March 1996

Welfare historians:
The source of this historical file is the Inventory of Income Security Programs in Canada (Health & Welfare Canada, multiple editions from 1984 to 1993). The text is a version of the Overview/Introduction to the chapter on social assistance (or welfare) that's been updated to 1996, just before the Canada Assistance Plan was replaced by the Canada Health and Social Transfer. There's a snapshot of how welfare operated in 1996, and you'll find that some of the rules haven't changed that much since then. There's also some interesting information about the Federal-Provincial Agreements to Enhance the Employability of Social Assistance Recipients (mid-to-late 1980s), known in federal-provincial government circles as "the Four-Corner Agreements."
Source:
Inventory of Income Security Programs in Canada
(not found online)

NOTE: If your historical research interest is welfare in Canada in the mid-1990s,
I also recommend the following:


1996 OECD international social assistance study:

- detailed comparison of how social assistance programs operated
in 24 OECD countries, including Canada and the United States (see Volume II)

Social Assistance in OECD Countries
Volume I : Synthesis Report
(PDF - 2.6MB, 207 pages)
A study carried out on behalf of the Department of Social Security and the OECD by the Social Policy Research Unit
1996

---

Social Assistance in OECD Countries
Volume II : Country Reports
(PDF - 4.8MB, 499 pages)

A study carried out on behalf of the Department of Social Security and the OECD by the Social Policy Research Unit
By Tony Eardley, Jonathan Bradshaw, John Ditch, Ian Gough and Peter Whiteford
1996

Participating countries:
* Australia * Greece * Norway * Austria * Iceland * Portugal * Belgium * Ireland * Spain * Canada * Italy * Sweden * Denmark * Japan * Switzerland * Finland * Luxembourg * Turkey * France * Netherlands * United States * Germany * New Zealand * United Kingdom

Source:
United Kingdom
Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)

 

--------------------------------------------------

2.


Another Look at Welfare Reform

Autumn 1997
- an in-depth analysis by the National Council of Welfare of changes in Canadian welfare programs in the 1990s.
The report focuses on the provincial and territorial reforms that preceded the repeal of the Canada Assistance Plan and those that followed the implementation of the Canada Health and Social Transfer. 

Complete report online (PDF - 6.75MB, 134 pages)
- large file, but well worth the wait for detailed information on welfare reforms in the 1990s in each Canadian jurisdiction, as well as a national overview of the broad issues of welfare reform and the setting for welfare reform in Canada
Source :

National Council of Welfare

---

Version française:
Un autre regard sur la réforme du bien-être social
Source:
Conseil national du bien-être social

- Go to the Welfare and Welfare Reforms in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welref.htm

5. [Historical] Income Security Reform and the Concept of a Guaranteed Annual Income - 1995
(Queen's University)

Income Security Reform and the
Concept of a Guaranteed Annual Income
(PDF - 24MB, 50 pages)
Grady, Patrick and Kapsalis, Constantine
Government and Competitiveness Project, School of Policy
Studies, Queen’s University
1995
This paper is focused on a specific reform strategy - the Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI).It addresses an age-old issue of social welfare programming in a market
economy. How do we maintain an incentive to work yet provide a safety net for those shaken loose by large-scale yet seemingly continuous change? Why participate in a losing cause if the consequences of not participating are not all that bad materially? The problem is particularly acute when the financial rewards of work and the type of work available both continue to deteriorate for a very broad class of people, as is happening in Canada.
(Source: Abstract ]

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

6. Jim Flaherty and his Pooled Registered Pension Plan - December 20
(Finance Canada)

Ensuring a Strong Retirement System, Support for Provinces
and Territories While Moving Towards Budget Balance

News Release
December 20, 2010
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released the following statement at the close of his meeting with provincial and territorial Finance Ministers and ministers responsible for pensions: “We had a very good meeting. I’d like to thank my provincial and territorial counterparts for their contribution to what was a candid, open and productive discussion.
I’m particularly pleased to announce that we reached agreement on a framework for the introduction of a new kind of pension plan, called the Pooled Registered Pension Plan, or PRPP. This new private-sector retirement savings vehicle will improve the range of retirement savings options available to Canadians by providing a low-cost retirement savings opportunity for employees—with or without a participating employer—and the self-employed."

Related links:

Framework for Pooled Registered Pension Plans
December 2010
This backgrounder sets out a framework for defined contribution PRPPs across Canada that will improve the range of retirement saving options to Canadians
Source:
Finance Canada

 

--------------------------------------------

Saskatchewan. Pension Plan may be used to develop changes nationally
By Bruce Johnstone
December 27, 2010
The province that introduced medicare and public auto insurance to Canada -- could soon be leading the way in pension reform as well. The Saskatchewan Pension Plan, which has been around since 1986, may well be the model for the pooled pension plans that the country's finance ministers proposed last week in Kananaskis, Alta. The federal and provincial finance ministers agreed to introduce legislation to allow the creation of pooled registered pension plans (PRPPs), targeted to employees of small-and medium-sized businesses. The PRPPs would be 'low-cost' private pension plans that would be available to employees without a company pension plan or even an employer, in the case of self-employed people. Employee participation would be mandatory, unless the employee opted out of the plan. The closest thing we have to a PRPP in Canada today is the Saskatchewan Pension Plan (SPP), a voluntary pension plan to which employees, self-employed individuals and/or their spouses can contribute up to $2,500 annually.
Source:
Regina Leader-Post

--------------------------------------------

From the
Canadian Labour Congress:

Georgetti urges quick action on enhancing Canada Pension Plan
- Says Canadians losing opportunities to save for retirement

December 20. 2010
OTTAWA – Finance Ministers should move as quickly as possible to provide enhancements to the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans, says Ken Georgetti, president of the Canadian Labour Congress. “We have a looming pensions crisis and we can’t wait for years to fix this problem,” Georgetti says. “An improved CPP is easily the best way to guarantee retirement security for Canadians.”
Georgetti was commenting on the Finance Ministers’ meeting in Kananaskis, Alberta on December 19-20. At least six of the provinces prefer an enhanced CPP, a proposal that federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty supported until very recently. But he now wants provinces and territories to support a privately administered option called Pooled Registered Pension Plans (PRPPs). The ministers have agreed to do more work on both proposals and to meet again in June. “Mr. Flaherty’s idea is, at best, a poor alternative to CPP expansion,” Georgetti says.

Q's and A's re. proposed Pooled Registered Pension Plans
(...) PRPPs are a better option than an individual RRSP and other alternatives, with potential lower cost (not demonstrated or legislated) and fiduciary role. But it won’t guarantee you a decent retirement income and is greatly inferior to the option of expanding the benefits under the Canada Pension Plan.
Source:
Canadian Labour Congress

--------------------------------------------

From the
Progressive Economics Forum:

Flaherty’s Inferior Pension Plan (FLIPP)
By Andrew Jackson
December 20, 2010
. Basically they are like group RRSPs, but sponsored by a financial institution with a fiduciary responsibility as opposed to an employer. They may be somewhat lower cost than individual RRSPs, as with current group RRSPs. However, there will be a lot of such plans, with different investment options, so large economies of scale will not be reached. Unlike the CPP, there is no mandatory employer contribution; no defined benefit based on career average earnings; no inflation protection,; and no assurance of full portability.  Costs, including financial institution profits, will lower returns considerably compared to the CPP alternative. Would such plans  gain a lot of members? Enrollment of employees could be mandatory, at the discretion of a province, but almost certainly with an opt out provision.  Some individual RRSP accounts could be transferred to new, larger pools. At best, a very poor alternative to CPP expansion.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum (PEF)
Economic policy-making and economics instruction in Canada have both increasingly come to reflect a conservative, free-market perspective. There is an urgent need to promote an alternative, progressive economics community in Canada. Over 125 progressive economists—working in universities, the labour movement, and activist research organizations—have joined forces to make our collective, critical perspective heard. We have formed the Progressive Economics Forum.
The general goal of PEF is to promote the development of a progressive economics community in Canada.

--------------------------------------------

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm
- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

7. Major federal transfer payments to provinces and territories for 2010-11 and for 2011-12 - December 20
(Finance Canada)

Major federal transfer payments to
provinces and territories for 2010-11 and for 2011-12:

Ensuring a Strong Retirement System, Support for Provinces
and Territories While Moving Towards Budget Balance

December 20, 2010
If you click the link above (which is the same link as the Finance Canada news release link above) AND if you scroll down to the bottom of that page, you'll find a table showing major federal transfer payments to provinces and territories for 2010-11 and for 2011-12. See the "Federal Transfers" link below for information on the provincial-territorial programs that these major federal transfers cover.
Source:
Canada News Centre

Also from Finance Canada:

Federal Transfers to Provinces and Territories : There are four main transfer programs: the Canada Health Transfer (CHT), the Canada Social Transfer (CST), Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing (TFF).

- Go to the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm
- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

The Daily will not be published from December 25 through January 4.
Publication will resume on Wednesday, January 5, 2011.

-------------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily.

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

-------

Seasonal pause...

WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

CHILD CARE IN THE NEWS »
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

December 28, 2010
Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Coverage

December 27, 2010
Rural Poverty in the US
| Categories: Poverty | Tags: Census, Poverty measurement, Poverty rate, Rural households, Rural poverty
Poverty highest in rural America, rising in recession

December 21, 2010
Report: The Recession and Working Poor Families
State Unemployment Fund - Ohio

December 20, 2010
American Community Survey
Poverty up by 10% in most Wisconsin counties
Poverty deepens its hold on some metro-east communities
Survey finds Southern Nevada increasingly educated and diverse
Extension of Jobless Benefits

December 20, 2010
Benefits: Jobless relieved life raft still afloat
Jobless benefits are extended - but hold the applause

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

Most viewed this week (ending January 2) on APO:

1. Ampe Akelyernemane Meke Mekarle "Little children are sacred": Report of the NT Board of Inquiry into the protection of Aboriginal children from sexual abuse
2. Garma Festival 2009 key forum address
3. No quick fix
4. Communications Policy and Research Forum 2009
5. Social media and young adults

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Most viewed this week (ending January 2):

1. Social media and young adults
2. Top Social Policy reports 2010
3. Social capital by numbers
4. Leaving Care and Homelessness: A CHP Sector Forum
5. Sustainable Urbanisation: A resilient futuretatements and recent debates in Australia and overseas

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

---

On the APO Home Page:
* Top Economics reports 2010 * Top Justice reports 2010 * Top Environment & Planning reports 2010 * Top Politics reports 2010 * Top Indigenous reports 2010 * Top Social Policy reports 2010 * Top Creative & Digital reports 2010 * Top International reports 2010 * Top Education reports 2010 * Top Health reports 2010

---------------

Top Social Policy reports 2010
Australian Policy Online
The five most read reports and commentary pieces in the Social Policy area in 2010 were:
1. Who will benefit from the 1 July 2010 tax cuts?
2. Asylum seekers and refugees: what are the facts?
3. Boat arrivals in Australia since 1976: January 2010 update
4. Poverty versus inequality (July 2009)
5. Welfare quarantining: reversing the burden of truth (February 2010)
Source:
New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

--------------

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

[No CRINMAIL for the week ending January 2, 2011.]

22 December 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1206
In this issue:
* Top story : CRC election results
* Latest news and reports
--- Violence against children (Yemen, China, Indonesia)
--- Forced labour (Uzbekistan, Romania)
--- Legal action (Nigeria, India)
--- Budget cuts and child poverty (Europe)
Employment : Save the Children Finland

NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRINMAIL)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


****************************

Orphan Negatives
(words with no commonly-used positive forms)

****************************

How I Met My Wife
by Jack Winter, the New Yorker, July 25, 1994
A Tale in Orphan Negatives

It had been a rough day, so when I walked into the party I was very chalant, despite my efforts to appear gruntled and consolate.
I was furling my weildy umbrella for the coat check when I saw her standing alone in a corner. She was a descript person, a woman in a state of total array. Her hair was kempt, her clothing shevelled, and she moved in a gainly way.

I wanted desperately to meet her, but I knew I'd have to make bones about it, since I was travelling cognito. Beknowst to me, the hostess, whom I could see both hide and hair of, was very proper, so it would be skin off my nose if anything bad happened. And even though I had only swerving loyalty to her, my manners couldn't be peccable. Only toward and heard-of behavior would do.

Fortunately, the embarrassment that my maculate appearance might cause was evitable. There were two ways about it, but the chances that someone as flappable as I would be ept enough to become persona grata or a sung hero were slim. I was, after all, something to sneeze at, someone you could easily hold a candle to, someone who usually aroused bridled passion.

So I decided not to risk it. But then, all at once, for some apparent reason, she looked in my direction and smiled in a way that I could make head or tails of.
I was plussed. It was concerting to see that she was communicado, and it nerved me that she was interested in a pareil like me, sight seen. Normally, I had a domitable spirit, but, being corrigible, I felt capacitated—as if this were something I was great shakes at—and forgot that I had succeeded in situations like this only a told number of times. So, after a terminable delay, I acted with mitigated gall and made my way through the ruly crowd with strong givings.

Nevertheless, since this was all new hat to me and I had not time to prepare a promptu speech, I was petuous. Wanting to make only called-for remarks, I started talking about the hors d'oeuvres, trying to abuse her of the notion that I was sipid, and perhaps even bunk a few myths about myself.

She responded well, and I was mayed that she considered me a savoury character who was up to some good. She told me who she was. "What a perfect nomer," I said, advertently. The conversation became more and more choate, and we spoke at length to much avail. But I was defatigable, so I had to leave at a godly hour. I asked if she wanted to come with me. To my delight, she was committal. We left the party together and have been together ever since. I have given her my love, and she has requited it.

Source:
http://www.alphadictionary.com/fun/orphan_negatives.html

 

-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------

 

The Survival Station
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http://goo.gl/fupD


------------------------------


The 101 Most Useful Websites on the Internet
http://goo.gl/jZOmj

------------------------------

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