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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
August 2, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,064 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. A brief history of pensions. Pay attention because you may be about to lose yours (Thomas Walkom in The Toronto Star) - August 1
2. What's New from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):
--- Canada's Growing Gap Explained
(video) - July 31
--- Canada’s “He-cession” - July 24

3. Employment Insurance (EI) Claims Surge (Progressive Economics Forum Blog) - July 28
4. A Living Wage for Families (British Columbia)
5. Social/Income Assistance for Immigrants to Canada (Canada International - Government of Canada)
6. New Research Products from the Centre for the Study of Living Standards
--- Median Wages and Productivity Growth in Canada and the United States
--- Final Report of the Advisory Panel on Labour Market Information (LMI) - May 2009
--- Best Practices in Labour Market Information: Recommendations for Canada's LMI System - July 2009
--- Canadian Index of Wellbeing - June 10
--- The Effect of Increasing Aboriginal Educational Attainment on the Labour Force, Output and the Fiscal Balance - May 21
--- The Ontario-Quebec Continental Gateway: A Situational Analysis of Human Resources Needs - May 13
--- A Review of the Potential Impacts of the Métis Human Resources Development Agreements in Canada - May 12
--- A new multifactor productivity database for Canada and the provinces
7. Picturing poverty: Ontario's new Material Deprivation Index (Citizens for Public Justice and Daily Bread Food Bank) - July 9
8.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, May 2009 - July 30
--- Employment Insurance, May 2009 - July 28

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - August 2

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
11. Australian Policy Online
12. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - July 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. A brief history of pensions. Pay attention because you may be about to lose yours - August 1
(Thomas Walkom in The Toronto Star)

A brief history of pensions.
Pay attention because you may be about to lose yours

August 1, 2009
By Thomas Walkom
The drive to dismantle the welfare state has a new target. Governments have already gutted unemployment insurance and social assistance. Out-of-date labour laws make it tough to organize unions in the new, decentralized, service-based economy. Now, thanks in large part to the dynamics of the recession, pensions are under attack. (...) Even before this recession hit, it was clear that pensions were under the gun. Good retirement benefits, like good wages, interfere with what economists call labour market flexibility – that is, the willingness of workers to take low-wage jobs.
Source:
The Toronto Star

Related link:

Pension savings of Canadians
in 1993 and in 2003

- incl. total accumulated assets of Canadians (in current and constant 2003 dollars) invested in:
* Public plans * Registered pension plans (RPPs) * Registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs)
* Supplementary retirement income programs
Source:
Tables by subject: Employment insurance,
social assistance and other transfers
<=== links to six more tables + separate link to labour tables
[ Statistics Canada ]

- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm
- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

2. What's New from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):
--- Canada's Growing Gap Explained
(video) - July 31
--- Canada’s “He-cession” - July 24

New from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

Canada's Growing Gap Explained
A video about how the income gap between the rich and the rest keeps growing
by Trish Hennessy & Armine Yalnizyan
July 31, 2009

Canada’s “He-cession”
Men bearing the brunt of rising unemployment
by Trish Hennessy & Armine Yalnizyan
July 24, 2009
Prime working age men are bearing the brunt of Canada's recession, says a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). According to the report, 71% of those who have lost their jobs in the recession so far are men. Canada's unemployment gender gap is wider now than at any time since Statistics Canada began collecting monthly gender unemployment statistics in 1976.
[ Report: Canada’s “He-cession”: Men bearing the brunt of rising unemployment - PDF file, 152K, 3 pages]

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

3. Employment Insurance (EI) Claims Surge - July 28
(Progressive Economics Forum Blog)

Employment Insurance (EI) Claims Surge
By Erin Weir
July 28, 2009
The worst news in today’s Employment Insurance (EI) figures is that new benefit claims hit a record high. Rising numbers of unemployed workers and hence EI beneficiaries are an unsurprising result of a deteriorating labour market. However, the increase the number of new EI claims suggests that the pace of deterioration is worsening rather than easing. Despite signs of a nascent recovery of economic output, today’s figures suggest that Canada’s job market will remain grim for some time to come.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum Blog
[ other posts by Erin Weir ]
[ Progressive Economics Forum
The Progressive Economics Forum aims to promote the development of a progressive economics community in Canada. The PEF brings together over 125 progressive economists, working in universities, the labour movement, and activist research organizations. ]

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

4. A Living Wage for Families (British Columbia)

A Living Wage for Families (BC)
Work should lift you out of poverty, not keep you there
The Living Wage for Families Campaign is guided by an Advisory Committee of representatives from community organizations and other partners and supporters in Metro Vancouver.
- incl. links to:
* Home * What is a Living Wage? * Get Involved * Learn More * What is a Living Wage Employer? * About Us

Latest News:

Sign up and endorse the Living Wage For Families Campaign (PDF - 321K, 1 page)
July 2009

Living Wage Campaign launched in Ottawa
June 2009

Related links from the BC Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

Living wage shows real cost of raising a family
Would lift thousands out of poverty, share prosperity of BC’s economy

Press Release
September 25, 2008
(Vancouver) A new study calls on major public and private sector employers to pay a living wage that would lift low-income families out of poverty and severe financial stress.

Working for a Living Wage:
Ensuring Paid Work Meets Basic Family Needs in Vancouver and Victoria - 2008

Summary (PDF file - , 753K, 8 pages)
Complete report (PDF - 2.9MB, 52 pages)

Living Wage Calculation Spreadsheet (Excel spreadsheet - 56 K)
September 2008

Living Wage Calculation Guide (pdf - 738k, 24 PAGES)
- September 2008
Note: While this guide is most appropriate for BC communities, its methodology should be fairly easily transferable to other Canadian communities."
Calculating the Living Wage in six stages:
* Family Expenses * Government Transfers * Government Deductions and Taxes * Determining the Living Wage Amount * BC Child Care Subsidy * Verifying the Calculations

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - BC Office

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Minimum Wage /Living Wage Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

5. Social/Income Assistance for Immigrants to Canada
(Canada International - Government of Canada)

Social/Income Assistance for Immigrants to Canada

Different rules apply depending on whether someone wishes to come to Canada as an immigrant (i.e., permanently), a visitor, a worker (temporarily), a student or a refugee.
Select a link below for more information on eligibility and benefit levels for each program.

Immigrate
If you want to immigrate to Canada, there are a few different ways to apply. You will need to decide which immigration program will work best for you and your family.

Visit
Every year, more than five million people visit Canada. Depending on where you live, and the reason for your visit, you will need to meet certain entry requirements. In some cases, if you plan to stay in Canada for a certain period of time, you will need a Temporary Resident Visa.

Work temporarily
Every year, over 90,000 foreign workers enter Canada to work temporarily in jobs that help Canadian employers address skill shortages, or as live-in caregivers.
A work permit is needed for most temporary jobs in Canada, though for some positions and business people it is not necessary.

Study
More than 130,000 students come to study in Canada every year and even more come to Canada to learn English or French.

Refugees
Refugees and people needing protection are people in or outside Canada who fear returning to their home country. Groups and individuals can sponsor refugees from abroad who qualify to come to Canada.

Source:
Canada International (Government of Canada)

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm
- Go to the General Federal Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fed2.htm
- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

6. New Research Products from the Centre for the Study of Living Standards:
---
Median Wages and Productivity Growth in Canada and the United States
--- Final Report of the Advisory Panel on Labour Market Information (LMI) - May 2009
--- Best Practices in Labour Market Information: Recommendations for Canada's LMI System - July 2009
--- Canadian Index of Wellbeing - June 10
--- The Effect of Increasing Aboriginal Educational Attainment on the Labour Force, Output and the Fiscal Balance - May 21
--- The Ontario-Quebec Continental Gateway: A Situational Analysis of Human Resources Needs - May 13
---
A Review of the Potential Impacts of the Métis Human Resources Development Agreements in Canada - May 12
---
A new multifactor productivity database for Canada and the provinces

Recent Release of New Research Products from the
Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS)

The Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS), a national, independent, not-for-profit, economic research organization, recently released five new research reports and one new research note. The new research documents are briefly described below:

* On July 27, the CSLS released a new research note,
Median Wages and Productivity Growth in Canada and the United States(PDF - 434K, 12 pages).
Two key findings were that (1) the rise in inequality was a much more important factor for the divergence between the growth rates of labour productivity and real wages in the United States and that (2) ambiguity in the interpretation of labour share suggests the attention should be more appropriately focused on rising inequality as a key driver of the divergence between the growth of real wages and labour productivity.

* The Advisory Panel on Labour Market Information recently tabled its Final Report.
The CSLS has been an active participant to the Panel through its report Best Practices in Labour Market Information: Recommendations for Canada's LMI System (PDF - 858K, 55 pages), released in July 2009. The report presented 20 recommendations to improve the operation of LMI in Canada in the areas of LMI data, LMI analysis and forecasting, and LMI dissemination.

* On June 10, the Institute of Wellbeing and its signature product, the Canadian Index of Wellbeing were officially launched at the St. Lawrence Hall in Toronto. The CSLS has been an active participant in this important development, and in particular wrote the report on the living standards domain of the CIW.

* On May 21, the CSLS released a research report,
The Effect of Increasing Aboriginal Educational Attainment on the Labour Force, Output and the Fiscal Balance
(PDF - 1.6MB, 108 pages).
This report examines the potential economic gains of increased Aboriginal education, as well as the fiscal implications of increased education and improved Aboriginal social well-being for Canadian governments to 2026. Most notably, it concludes that if the Aboriginal population were to attain complete economic and social parity with the non-Aboriginal population, Canadian governments would improve their balance sheets by nearly $12 billion in 2026 alone.

* On May 13, the CSLS released a research report,
The Ontario-Quebec Continental Gateway: A Situational Analysis of Human Resources Needs (PDF - 5.2MB, 173 pages).
This report examines human resource and skills issues pertaining to the Ontario-Quebec Continental Gateway and Trade Corridor over the short- to medium-term and concludes that despite the economic downturn, there may be shortages of skilled labour in certain occupations.

* On May 12, the CSLS released a research report,
A Review of the Potential Impacts of the Métis Human Resources Development Agreements in Canada
(PDF - 1.1MB, 80 pages).
The report concludes that the Métis Human Resources Development Agreements result in annual fiscal savings of $8.5 million to the federal and five provincial governments covered by the program, with total lifetime benefits of one year of Métis programming reaching $103 million.

* In addition, the CSLS recently released a new multifactor productivity database for Canada and the provinces. Unlike the earlier CSLS database, the new estimates adjust labour and capital inputs for changes in composition and are methodologically consistent with national estimates produced by Statistics Canada. The data cover the period 1997-2007 and 15 industries. All CSLS databases can be found in the Data section of the CSLS website.

Source:
Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS)
The Centre for the Study of Living Standards is a non-profit, national, independent organization that seeks to contribute to a better understanding of trends in and determinants of productivity, living standards and economic and
social well-being through research

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

7. Picturing poverty: Ontario's new Material Deprivation Index - July 9
(Citizens for Public Justice and Daily Bread Food Bank)

Picturing poverty: Ontario's new Material Deprivation Index
By Chandra Pasma
July 9, 2009
"(...) Canada has no official definition of poverty. There are a number of definitions and measures that are commonly but unofficially used for social policy discussions, but no formal agreement as to what we are seeking to eliminate in Canada. For this reason, provincial poverty reduction strategies have had to choose their own definition and measurement of poverty. Measuring is essential to tracking movement and providing accountability.

Ontario chose to develop a new measure, the Ontario Material Deprivation Index. Ontario’s strategy will use this measure in conjunction with two other measures: 40% of median income as a measurement of the depth of poverty, and 50% of median income to measure low income. (Although both of these are relative measures, Ontario chose to fix its target of 25% reduction of poverty in 5 years according to the 50% low income measure fixed at its 2008 level and adjusted by inflation only). The Deprivation Index fits in the context of these other two measures as a way of understanding standard of living. It is not considered to be a complete description of poverty, but a way of recognizing common symptoms of poverty. It includes multiple elements of poverty, including deprivation that leads to social isolation, issues of economic security, and the ability to make changes in your life.
[ more... ]

The Ontario Material Deprivation Index
was developed by the Daily Bread Food Bank
in conjunction with people living in poverty.
Source:
Chandra's Blog
[ Citizens for Public Justice ]

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, May 2009 - July 30
--- Employment Insurance, May 2009 - July 28

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

July 30, 2009
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, May 2009
Total non-farm payroll employment fell by 64,000 in May, down 0.4% from April, bringing total losses to 423,900 since the peak in October 2008. The proportion of industries experiencing job losses edged down in May to 63%.
- incl. two tables:
* Number of employees
* Average weekly earnings (including overtime) for all employees

Related link:

Employment, Earnings and Hours (Click "View" for the latest issue)
[ more Labour studies and stats ]

July 28, 2009
Employment Insurance, May 2009
In May, 778,700 people received regular Employment Insurance benefits, up 65,600, or 9.2%, from a month earlier, with Alberta and Ontario showing the fastest rates of increase.
- incl. links to four tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related link:

Maps and table showing the % change in the number
of people receiving Employment Insurance benefits, May 2008 - May 2009

- for each province and territory or region
and for Canada

---

The Daily Archives - select a year and month from the drop-down menu to view releases in chronological order
[ Statistics Canada ]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - August 2

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

August 2, 2009

Conservatives misleading Canadians on the state of child care
29 Jul 09
- Media release from the Liberal Party of Canada on the Conservative’s third anniversary celebration of their Universal Child Care Benefit.

With our best future in mind: What does the report say about ECEs?
29 Jul 09
- Bulletin from the Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care covering what the early learning report says about early childhood educators.

Work-life ‘balance’ in Europe
29 Jul 09
- Paper from the Gender Equality Network examining national variations in reported work-life conflict in Europe.

Child care and economic development: Markets, households and public policy
29 Jul 09
- Paper from Cornell University looking at issues in the U.S. and Canada regarding the role of child care in economic development.

About Canada: Childcare
24 Jun 09
- Just published – a new book co-authored by CRRU director Martha Friendly and University of Manitoba Sociologist Susan Prentice.

With our best future in mind: Implementing early learning in Ontario
17 Jun 09
- Report to the Premier of Ontario from Charles Pascal, the Premier's Special Advisor on Early Learning.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news


· Academic claims government policy creates 'underbelly of childcare' in poor areas
[GB] 29 Jul 09

· No cause for celebration
[CA] 27 Jul 09

· Parents should welcome early learning blueprint
[CA-ON] 25 Jul 09

· Critics cool on child care benefit
[CA] 22 Jul 09

· More childcare bailouts feared
[AU] 16 Jul 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

July 31:
Food Stamp Program Eligibility - Pennsylvania
State Budget Cuts and Health Care Programs
Report: Hunger in India
Rhode Island Pre-Kindergarten Program
Razing of Large Public Housing Projects - Atlanta, GA

July 30:
Editorials: Budget Cuts and the Safety Net - California
Poverty Rate in Italy
Pensioners in Poverty - United Kingdom
New York City Homeless Policies

July 29:
Report: 2009 Kids Count Databook
Use of Credit as a Safety Net in Low-income Households
Large Retailers Accepting Food Stamps
State Budget Cuts - California
Child Welfare Reform - Florida

July 28:
Report: 2009 Kids Count Databook
Medicaid Coverage and Enrollment - Indiana, Colorado
Jobless Benefit Systems - Texas, California
Budget and Program Cuts - Washington DC, Illinois

July 27:
Report: Poor Neighborhoods and Economic Mobility
Health Care Reform
Groups Affected by Minimum Wage Hikes
Iraqi Refugees in the U.S.
Access to Affordable and Nutritious Foods for Low-income Families
Economic Stimulus and Job Creation - Tennessee
Economic Stimulus and State Budget Gaps

---
To subscribe or unsubscribe,
please send an email request
(mention the "Poverty Dispatch") to
irppubs@ssc.wisc.edu

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. Australian Policy Online

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. CRINMAIL - July 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issue of CRINMAIL:

29 July 2009 - CRINMAIL 1096
* NEW ZEALAND: Battle over corporal punishment comes to a head [news]
* SPAIN: Judges denounce proposal to lower age of criminal responsibility [news]
* NAMIBIA: Social networking for children's rights [news]
* INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION: Upcoming visits of Rapporteur on Child Rights [news]
* DISCRIMINATION: Intersectional discrimination against children [publication]
* HIV and AIDS: Advocacy guides [publication]
* AWARD: Children's Peace Prize - nominations deadline extended
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

---

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com




***********************************************

Rules of Etiquette for Inexperienced Cats

***********************************************

* If you have to throw up, get into a chair quickly. If you cannot manage this in time, get to an Oriental rug. Shag is good!

* Determine quickly which guest hates cats.  Sit on that lap during the evening.  He won't dare push you off and will even call you "nice kitty."  If you can arrange to have cat food on your breath, so much the better.

* For sitting on laps or rubbing against trouser legs, select colors that contrast with your own.

* Always accompany guests to the bathroom. It is not necessary to do anything. Just sit and stare.

* For guests who say, "I love kitties," be ready with aloof disdain, claws applied to stockings or a quick nip on the ankles.

* Do not allow closed doors in any room. To get one open, stand on hind legs and hammer with forepaws. Once the door is opened for you, it is not necessary to use it. You can change your mind. When you have ordered an outside door opened, stand half in and half out and think about several things. This is particularly important during very cold weather or mosquito season.

* If one person is busy and the other is idle, sit with the busy one.

* For book readers, get in close under the chin, unless you can lie across the book itself.

* For ladies knitting, curl quietly into lap and pretend to dose. Then reach out and slap knitting needles sharply. This is what she calls a dropped stitch. She will try to distract you. Ignore it.

* For people doing homework, sit on the paper being worked on. After being removed for the second time, push anything movable off the table -- pens, pencils, stamps -- one at a time.

* Get enough sleep during the daytime so that you are fresh for playing at night between 2 & 4 a.m.

   
Source:
http://www.xmission.com/~emailbox/etiquette.htm

********

I'm a cat person, but I'm also egalitarian, so...

Basic Dog rules
http://www.nanceestar.com/DogBasicRulesDogHolidayPage18.html



*****************

And, in closing...

*****************


Sizes of
Food Portions, 20 year ago and today
http://www.divinecaroline.com/22177/49492-portion-size--vs--now

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Username Translator
http://www.cracked.com/funny-1214-username-translator/

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How Canada Works (video)
By Rick Mercer
http://www.portapathy.ca/2009/02/how-canada-works/

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100+ Free Websites to find out about Anything and Everything
http://c4lpt.co.uk/Showcase/100anything.html