Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 2, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail alert for this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,474 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content


1. Just the facts - Seniors (Vanier Institute of the Family) - September 30
2. Ontario election media coverage - media scan by Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre
3. Balancing the Books on the Backs of the Poor (By Senator Art Eggleton in Huffington Post Canada) - September 28
4. In the Red - Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - September 30
5. [Ontario] Party platforms thin on fighting poverty, says coalition (Toronto Star) - September 29
6. The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty (National Council of Welfare) - September 28
7. Mowat Centre Employment Insurance (EI) Task Force : Update - September 29
8. Rich Getting Richer In Ontario (Video : Hugh Mackenzie) - September 28
9. When business talks about inequality, it’s time to worry (By Armine Yalnizyan in the Globe and Mail) - September 27

10. The Cost of Poverty in New Brunswick (Nova Scotia Office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - September 27
11. Ontario Campaign 2000 and the 2011 Ontario provincial election - September 27
12. Disability Issues and the Ontario Election (ARCH Disability Law Centre) - September 26
13. Le Québec chiffres en main, édition 2011 --- Québec Handy Numbers, 2011 Edition (Institut de la statistique du Québec) - Revised May 2011
14. Mad Students Society (for post-secondary students with psychiatric and/or mental health issues) - Toronto
15. Putting People First : The Ontario New Democrat Fiscal Framework Document 2011 (Ontario provincial election) - September 26
16. [Ottawa] Local Candidates’ Responses to the Alliance to End Homelessness Questionnaire (Alliance to End Homelessness - Ottawa) - September 25
17. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canada Year Book 2011 - September 30
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, July 2011 - September 29
--- Residential care facilities, 2009/2010 - September 29
--- Canada's population estimates: Age and sex, July 2011
--- Canada's population estimates: Age and sex, July 1, 2011 - September 28
--- Deaths, 2008 - September 27
--- Workers Laid-off During the Last Three Recessions: Who Were They, and How Did They Fare? - September 20

18. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

19. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
20. [United States] The 10 best things government has done for us (Rex Nutting in MarketWatch) + a Canadian version of "10 best things" + 96 more!
- September 27
21. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]



1. Just the facts - Seniors - September 30
(Vanier Institute of the Family)

Just the facts - Seniors (PDF - 262K, 2 pages)
September 30, 2011
[ Version française ]
October 1st is Seniors Day in Canada.
It is generally accepted that in a decade, Canada’s seniors will outnumber children. Seniors are the fastest growing age group in Canada. The social, economic, political and environmental impacts of population aging on Canadians and their families are varied and complex. To better understand some of these changes, let’s begin with what we currently know about Canada’s seniors...
Source:
Vanier Institute of the Family (VIF)
The Vision of the VIF is to make families as important to the life of Canadian society as they are to the lives of individual Canadians.

---

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

2. Ontario election media coverage - media scan by Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre

Jennefer's Ontario election links

Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre in Toronto does a regular media scan that she distributes to her mailing list.
Below, you'll find a selection of the links that she circulated recently pertaining to the Ontario election.
Merci, Jennefer!

[ ISAC works with and on behalf of low income communities in Ontario to address issues of income security and poverty. Visit their website and their affiliate Social Assistance Review website for a large collection of Ontario resources. ]

The latest link below is September 29.

Jim Stanford on the platforms:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/how-ontarios-three-party-platforms-stack

Hugh Mackenzie on the leadership debate:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/ontarios-leadership-debate-reality-check

Ontario Federation of Labour poll shows NDP ahead in key ridings:
http://www.torontosun.com/2011/09/29/poll-shows-ndp-aheas-in-some-key-ridings

The online campaign:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/story/2011/09/29/ontario-votes-social-media-campaigns.html

In the war rooms:
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1061512--cohn-the-battle-of-the-war-rooms-on-the-ground-and-in-the-air

One week left “to show the vision thing”
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/editorials/ontario-leaders-have-a-week-to-show-the-vision-thing/article2183738/

The Hamilton Spectator on jobs and the economy:
http://www.thespec.com/opinion/editorial/article/602008--jobs-and-the-economy-it-s-a-crap-shoot

Libs promise early tax credit rollout:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/story/2011/09/29/ontario-leaders-campaign356.html

Carol Goar on why nobody cares:
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1062146--goar-eyes-on-city-not-province

Provincial Election and Poverty:

Party platforms thin on fighting poverty, says Campaign 2000 and 25 in 5:
http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1062072

Debbie Douglas, Avvy Go , and Grace-Edward Galabuzi on why Ontario needs an equity agenda:
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1061979--ontario-needs-a-real-equity-agenda

Hudak’s mum on accessibility:
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1061506--disturbing-silence-from-hudak-on-accessibility

---

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

3. Balancing the Books on the Backs of the Poor - September 30
(By Senator Art Eggleton in Huffington Post Canada)

Balancing the Books on the Backs of the Poor
By Senator Art Eggleton (Liberal)
September 30, 2011
With fears of a double-dip recession on the rise, some have questioned whether this is the right time for the federal government to begin drastic and hard cuts. Some have even called for a second round of stimulus to ensure that Canada can steer through these troubling economic waters. Although the Harper government has no problem spending money, I believe that they will probably ramp up the cuts that have already started. When they do come in full force, we must make sure that we are not balancing the books on the backs of the poor. This doesn't make moral sense and it doesn't make economic sense either. Because make no mistake, poverty costs us all. It forces up our tax bills, depresses the economy, increases health care bills and breeds alienation and crime.

A recent Ontario study (the next link below) by the Ontario Association of Food Banks, guided by economists and policy experts such as Don Drummond, Judith Maxwell and James Milway, estimates that poverty costs this country about $7.5 billion dollars every year in health care costs alone and between $8 and $13 billion in lost productivity. All told, they set poverty's bill at over $30 billion annually.

The Cost of Poverty: An Analysis of
the Economic Cost of Poverty in Ontario
(PDF - 1.3MB, 36 pages)
November 2008
Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks

Source:
Huffington Post Canada

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

4. In the Red - Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number- September 30
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

In the Red
Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number
By Trish Hennessy
September 30, 2011
[ PDF version of this index - 81K]

Excerpts* from In the Red (October 2011)
(*Click either of the two links above for the complete list of numbers for the October Hennessy Index.)

===> 1.57 Trillion --- Canadians’ household debt in the second quarter of 2011, reaching an all-time high this year.
===> 150.8% --- Canadians’ household debt ratio to personal disposable income in the second quarter of 2011, higher than our U.S. neighbours.
===> 7.6% --- Percentage of Canadian disposable income that goes toward interest payments.
===> 27% --- Percentage of non-retired Canadians who don’t commit to any type of savings, not even for retirement.
===> 1/3 --- Proportion of retired Canadian households carrying an average debt load of $60,000 into retirement.

Earlier editions of Hennessy's Index
* It's a living (September 2011)
* Gone Fishin' (August 2011)
* Canada vs the OECD (July 2011)
* Minimum Wage vs Living Wage (June 2011)
* Election Jawdroppers (May 2011)
* Democracy (April 2011)
* Security/Insecurity (March 2011)
* Inequality (February 2011)

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
"The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice.

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

5 . [Ontario] Party platforms thin on fighting poverty, says coalition - September 29
(Toronto Star)

Party platforms thin on fighting poverty, says coalition
September 29, 2011
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Tim Hudak’s Progressive Conservatives have made no campaign commitments to help vulnerable children and families get ahead, says a coalition of anti-poverty groups that has analyzed the various party platforms for the Oct. 6 election.
But the Liberals, NDP and Greens offer only limited solutions to ending child and family poverty, according to the analysis by Ontario Campaign 2000, which has joined with the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction in calling for more political attention to the issue.
Source:
Toronto Star

Related links:

Ontario Campaign 2000

25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction

---

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

6. The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty - September 28
(National Council of Welfare)

The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty - report home page
September 28, 2011
The report shows the high dollar cost we are currently paying for the consequences of poverty. It examines why investments to end poverty make better economic sense, and it shows how ending poverty would save money and improve wellbeing for everyone. It concludes with recommendations for the way forward.

The report:


The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty
* HTML version
* PDF version
(3.6MB, 116 pages)
Table of contents:

PART ONE – SENSE
1. Costs, benefits and the difference between spending and investing
2. The economy and poverty
3. Society and poverty
4. Social and economic relationships
PART TWO – DOLLARS
5. Comprehensive cost/benefit calculations
6. Specific cost/benefit examples
PART THREE – DOLLARS AND SENSE
7. Governance and public policy
8. Canadian policy in practice
PART FOUR – SENSIBLE INVESTMENT
9. Taking action: Council recommendations

Related materials:

The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty: In Brief
*
HTML version
* PDF version
(488K, 8 pages)

The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty : Comprehensive Bibilography
Recommended resource --- almost 300 links!

* HTML version
* PDF version (271K, 48 pages)
Table of contents:
Section 1 : Canadian Studies
1.1 General
1.2 Policies and Programs
1.3 Housing
1.4 Early Education Programs
1.5 Education
1.6 Health
Section 2 : American Studies
Section 3 : International Studies
Section 4 : Newspaper Articles

National Council of Welfare Press release - includes findings

Source:
National Council of Welfare
The National Council of Welfare is an advisory group to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The mandate of the Council is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.


Version française:

Le sens des sous pour résoudre la pauvreté
* Format HTML
* Format PDF
(4.8MB, 132 pages)
Table des matières:
PARTIE UN - SENS
1. Coûts, avantages et la différence entre une dépense et un investissement
2. L’économie et la pauvreté
3. La société et la pauvreté
4. Relations sociales et économiques
PARTIE DEUX - SOUS
5. Calculs exhaustifs des coûts/avantages
6. Exemples de coûts/avantages
PARTIE TROIS - LE SENS DES SOUS
7. Gouvernance et politiques gouvernementales
8. Les politiques canadiennes mises en pratique
PARTIE QUATRE - INVESTISSEMENT JUDICIEUX
9. passer à l’action : Recommandations du conseil

Liens connexes:

Le sens des sous pour résoudre la pauvreté : Résumé
* Format HTML
* Format PDF
(393K, 8 pages)

Le sens des sous pour résoudre la pauvreté : Bibliographie exhaustive
Ressource recommandée --- près de 300 liens!
* Format HTML
* Format PDF
(393K, 8 pages)
Table des matières:
Section 1 : Études canadiennes
1.1 Généralités
1.2 Politiques et programmes
1.3 Logement
1.4 Programmes d'éducation de la petite enfance
1.5 Éducation
1.6 Santé
Section 2 : États-Unis
Section 3 : Autre pays
Section 4 : Articles de journaux

Source:
Conseil national du bien-être social
Le Conseil national du bien-être social conseille le/la ministre des Ressources humaines et du Développement des compétences. Le mandat du Conseil est de conseiller le/la ministre sur les questions en matière de développement social que le/la ministre soumet à son examen ou que le Conseil juge opportun d'aborder.

 

Selected media coverage:

Canada urged to spend smarter to cut poverty
September 28, 2011
By Laurie Monsebraaten
It would have taken $12.6 billion to give the 3.5 million Canadians living in poverty enough income to live above the poverty line in 2007. And yet Canadians spent at least double that amount treating the consequences of poverty that year, says the National Council of Welfare. Clearly, this spending pattern doesn’t make good economic or social sense, the council says in its report “The Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty,” being released Wednesday.
Source:
Toronto Star

---

Canadians cover $24-billion a year in poverty costs: report
Poverty costs Canadian taxpayers more than $24-billion a year,
according to a report from the National Council of Welfare

By Jordan Press
September 28, 2011
OTTAWA — The federal government should make a billion-dollar investment to eradicate the root causes of poverty, or face billions more in ongoing expenses, a new report says. Poverty costs taxpayers more than $24-billion a year, said the report, which was released Wednesday from a federal government advisory board, the National Council of Welfare. (...) A large cash investment today would reduce poverty costs to taxpayers in the ensuing years, the council says. (...) Governments should focus public spending on prevention programs such as income supplements and affordable housing, which are cheaper than reactionary measures such as emergency shelters, the council says.
Source:
National Post

---

Google.ca Search Result:
"Dollars and Sense of Solving Poverty"
* Web pages (765 results)
* News coverage (40 results)
* Blog posts (18 results)
NOTE : The number of results shown above was on September 29;
clicking each of the three links will refresh each search to the present,
so you'll likely see a different number of results.

---

-- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

7. Mowat Centre Employment Insurance (EI) Task Force : Update - September 29

Mowat Centre Employment Insurance (EI) Task Force : Update
September 29, 2011

The Mowat Centre EI Task Force is developing an Ontario proposal for a renewed national EI system.
The latest release from the Task Force presents four background papers on a variety of topics related to Canada's EI system.
The Task Force will release its final recommendations in November.

The four papers:

* Michael Pal and Sujit Choudhry investigate the constitutionality of regional entrance requirements in the EI system:
http://www.mowateitaskforce.ca/sites/default/files/Pal-Choudhry.pdf
(PDF - 823K, 28 pages)

* Kathleen Day and Stanley Winer review the past four decades of empirical research on the relationship between internal migration and regional variation in the generosity of Canada’s unemployment insurance system.
http://www.mowateitaskforce.ca/sites/default/files/Day-Winer.pdf
(PDF - 654K, 33 pages)

* William Scarth analyzes three broad approaches to the provision of income support from a macro-economic perspective.
http://www.mowateitaskforce.ca/sites/default/files/Scarth.pdf
(PDF - 878K, 20 pages)

* Craig Riddell examines the role of EI in providing support to “displaced workers,” those who permanently lose their jobs because of changing economic circumstances.
http://www.mowateitaskforce.ca/sites/default/files/Riddell.pdf
(PDF - 856K, 29 pages)

Source:
Mowat Centre Employment Insurance Task Force
The Mowat Centre has convened a research-driven Employment Insurance Task Force to examine Canada's support system for the unemployed. The objective is to develop an Ontario proposal for modernizing the EI system—conscious of the national context—that works for individuals and businesses.

---

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

8. Rich Getting Richer In Ontario - September 28
(Video : Hugh Mackenzie)

 
More at The Real News

Rich Getting Richer In Ontario
September 28, 2011

Hugh Mackenzie: "From 1992 to 2007, 90% of the income gain in Canada went to the top 1% while their effective tax rate went down."

Video, duration 16:12

---

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

9. When business talks about inequality, it’s time to worry - September 27
(By Armine Yalnizyan in the Globe and Mail)

When business talks about inequality, it’s time to worry
By Armine Yalnizyan
September 27, 2011
The world is marking the third anniversary of the biggest global economic crisis since the 1930s by staring down the imminent possibility of a second global downturn. Virtually none of the conditions that triggered the first one have been addressed.
(...)
It is in business’ interests to reduce inequality, but short-term gains eclipse the long-term view for too many. Governments have less excuse. Their job is not to save the rich and lose the economy. It is to think forward, to implement public policy that benefits the majority, sustainably, and reverses this relentless trend towards growing inequality.
At the very least, governments shouldn’t make things worse.
NOTE: this article includes several links to related material from the Conference Board of Canada, the International Monetary Fund and others.

[ 73 comments ]

Armine Yalnizyan is a senior economist with the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

More Globe and Mail articles
about income inequality in Canada:

* Income inequality rising quickly in Canada (September 13)
* Taxing high earners: Five key points for the debate
(September 21)
* Taxing the rich may be fair, but it won’t fill the coffers
(September 19)

Source:
Globe and Mail

---

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

10. The Cost of Poverty in New Brunswick - September 27
(Nova Scotia Office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Poverty costs New Brunswickers $2 billion dollars per year
News Release
September 27, 2011
Halifax/Moncton
A new study released today, entitled Cost of Poverty in New Brunswick, co-authored by economist Angella MacEwen and Christine Saulnier, reveals that:
* Poverty costs the New Brunswick government a half a billion dollars per year.
* These costs accounted for 6.5% of the 2009/10 New Brunswick government budget.
* Health care spending on poverty alone costs the government $196 million per year.
* When the costs to government are added to the broader costs to the economy, the total cost of poverty for the province is $2 billion dollars.
* Investing in a comprehensive plan to alleviate poverty could cost as little as half as much as the quantifiable costs of poverty.

The report:

The Cost of Poverty in New Brunswick (PDF - 421K, 12 pages)
(...) For the New Brunswick government, we estimate that the direct cost of poverty is approximately a half a billion dollars per year—and that these costs account for 6.5% of the 2009/10 New Brunswick government budget.

Source:
Nova Scotia Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

11. Ontario Campaign 2000 and the 2011 Ontario provincial election - September 27

Ontario Campaign 2000 and the
2011 Ontario provincial election
Toronto, Sept. 27:
Ontario Campaign 2000 released a political commitment grid which evaluates the commitments of each of Ontario's four major political parties on helping people living on low income. The grid shows that even though most parties have mentioned or discussed their poverty reduction strategies, the political anti-poverty dialogue remains limited, with some parties failing to make extensive commitments on anti-poverty work. The grid is accompanied by and informs a Call to Action letter from the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction.

To find out where each party stands on issues of poverty and other related areas, click on the links below:

Media Release (PDF - 46K, 2 pages) - September 27, 2011
Political platform grid - brief version (PDF - 54K, 2 pages)
Political platform grid - long version (PDF - 56K, 6 pages)
Call to Action on Poverty in Ontario (PDF - 124K, 2 pages)
List of endorsers for Call to Action on Poverty in Ontario (PDF - 120K, 2 pages)

Source:
Ontario Campaign 2000
[ Campaign 2000 - National ]
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000.

25 in 5
25-in-5: Network for Poverty Reduction is a multi-sectoral network comprised of more than 100 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working on eliminating poverty.

---

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

12. Disability Issues and the Ontario Election - September 26
(ARCH Disability Law Centre)

ARCH Alert Special Ontario Election 2011 issue (Word file - 184K, 14 pages)
Selected content:
* Disability Issues and the Election
* Accessible Voting in the October 6th Election
* Access to Democracy and the Electoral System: Challenges and Legal Opportunities
* Various Election Campaigns and Questions for Candidates

[ Earlier issues of ARCH Alert - back to January 2006 ]

Source:
ARCH Disability Law Centre
The ARCH Vision : A world in which all people with disabilities enjoy social justice and equal participation in society and our communities.
- incl. links to:
* About ARCH * Our Services * Significant Cases * Publications * Submissions * Useful Links * Attendant Services * Education Law * Legal Capacity * Services for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities * Priority Area Archives

---

- Go to the Disability Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

13. Le Québec chiffres en main, édition 2011 / Québec Handy Numbers, 2011 Edition - Revised May 2011
(Institut de la statistique du Québec)

Le Québec chiffres en main, édition 2011 (PDF - 3,8Mo, 72 pages) ]
Révision mai 2011
L’Institut de la statistique du Québec publie chaque année cette brochure de format pratique qui réunit l’information statistique de base relative à la société québécoise. Le Québec chiffres en main présente un grand nombre de données sur la population et l’activité économique à l’échelle du Québec, ainsi que quelques figures pour en éclairer la lecture. Par ailleurs, la dernière section, intitulée « Coup d’oeil régional », effectue un survol des 17 régions administratives.

Source:
Institut de la statistique du Québec

---

- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

---------------------------------

English version:

Québec Handy Numbers, 2011 Edition (PDF - 3.6MB, 72 pages)
Revised May 2011
Each year the Institut de la statistique du Québec publishes this practical brochure, which collates basic statistical information about Québec society. Québec Handy Numbers contains a wide range of demographic and economic data for Québec as a whole, as well as some illustrations to help clarify the reading. Québec Handy Numbers, 2011 Edition was published by the Institut de la statistique du Québec in collaboration with over 50 specialists in the field of Québec data. It features statistical tables and charts on several aspects of Québec society: territory, population, living conditions, the economy and finance.

NOTE: on page 18, you'll find the following welfare
("Last-Resort Financial Assistance") statistics for 2001, 2009 and 2010:

* Beneficiaries
* Total benefits paid for adults / children
* Average benefits paid for adults / children
* Number of Households (cases)
* Average benefits paid per household

Source:
Institut de la statistique du Québec (English home page)

- Earlier editions of this report:

* Québec Handy Numbers, 2010 Edition (PDF - 2.8MB, 72 pages) - Revised May 2010
* Québec Handy Numbers, 2009 Edition (PDF - 1.8MB, 60 pages) - Revised April 2009
* Québec Handy Numbers, 2008 Edition (PDF - 1.7MB, 57 pages) - Revised April 2008

---

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm

14. Mad Students Society (for post-secondary students with psychiatric and/or mental health issues) - Toronto

Mad Students Society (MSS) is a free peer support and advocacy group for students who are attending institutions of post-secondary or adult education and have past and/or present experiences with the psychiatric and/or mental health systems. MSS meets on the second Saturday of every month in downtown Toronto and maintains an email discussion listserv (open to anyone, regardless of geographic location). Please pass on this information to people you are supporting who may find this group a useful resource. If you are working with someone who wants support to join the group, please get in touch.
For more information or to request brochures for your office, please email outreach@madstudentsociety.com.
The MSS website is currently being updated.

---

- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

15. Putting People First : The Ontario New Democrat Fiscal Framework Document 2011 - September 26
(Ontario provincial election)

From the
New Democratic Party of Ontario:

Putting People First:
The Ontario New Democrat Fiscal Framework Document 2011

September 26, 2011
The Ontario NDP's comprehensive platform costing, including all policies announced during the election campaign.
Source:
New Democratic Party of Ontario

---

Ontario NDP platform: The full monty
Commentary by Erin Weir
September 26, 2011
Source:
rabble.ca

---

Bonus media resource:

Elections 2011 in rabble.ca
Media coverage of all provincial and territorial elections across Canada!
Source:
rabble.ca

---

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

16. [Ottawa] Local Candidates’ Responses to the Alliance to End Homelessness Questionnaire - September 25
(Alliance to End Homelessness - Ottawa)

Ottawa

Local Candidates’ Responses to the Alliance to End Homelessness Questionnaire * (PDF- 514K, 5 pages)
September 25, 2011
The (Ottawa) Alliance to End Homelessness, as a non-partisan coalition with 70 organizations as members, takes action to end homelessness. (...) 110,585 households or 33.3% are renting in Ottawa and 26.9% – more than 86,000 of Ottawa households – have incomes under $40,000. (...) The vast majority of these households are renters. Yet out of 70,078 housing starts in the city between 2000 and 2011, 94% were ownership and only 5.8% were rental units.
---
* Eighteen of the 24 candidates in Ottawa answered the questionnaire. The Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario delegated the task of preparing a reply to the ATEH questionnaire to a Progressive Conservative Stakeholder Relation Guy, who responded that they are "only commenting on Changebook initiatives. We are looking forward to meeting and consulting with many important groups such as yours after October 6th." Then, a few paragraphs from the party speaking notes --- but no answers to any of the ATEH's questions.
---

The Alliance was looking for two things when it sent five questions [see the next link below for the five questions] to the provincial election candidates running in six ridings in Ottawa:
(1) a measure of candidates’ interest in homelessness and affordable housing; and
(2) an indication of their party’s position on the specific questions so it could be shared with voters on our website. Our community needs representatives at Queen's Park who will proactively fight for the housing needs of people at every income level. The Alliance knows that those elected sometimes need to lead the way in
their own caucus and as well as speak up in Legislative Assembly.
Source:
Alliance to End Homelessness - ATEH (Ottawa)
The Alliance to End Homelessness as a non-partisan coalition with 70 organizations as members takes action to end homelessness. ATEH in Ottawa is a member of The Housing Network of Ontario which calls for funding of a housing program that creates a minimum of 10,000 universally accessible affordable non-profit and co-op developed housing units annually. At least 50% of these units should be funded to provide “rent geared to income” assistance, and an annualized fund to repair and maintain existing and new affordable housing units should also be created.

Also from ATEH:

Ottawa's Affordable Housing Activity:
Failures and Possibilities
(PDF- 299K, 2 pages)
September 2011
Find out why ATEH asks five specific questions in its report released September 12th.
- includes the five questions

---

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

17. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canada Year Book 2011 - September 30
---
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, July 2011 - September 29
---
Residential care facilities, 2009/2010 - September 29
--- Canada's population estimates: Age and sex, July 2011
--- Canada's population estimates: Age and sex, July 1, 2011 - September 28
---
Deaths, 2008 - September 27
--- Workers Laid-off During the Last Three Recessions: Who Were They, and How Did They Fare? - September 20

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:


Canada Year Book 2011
September 30, 2011
The 2011 edition of the Canada Year Book has been expanded to just over 500 pages to include international comparisons and online search terms that help readers find updated and related data on Statistic Canada's website. The 31 almanac-style chapters contain charts, tables, maps and easy-to-read articles that feature the latest statistics from Canada's economic, political and social life.
The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.
HTML version
PDF version ((HTML table of contents + links to a PDF file for each chapter)
NOTE : Both the HTML and PDF versions of this report contain links (in the left-hand margin) to earlier issues of the Canada Year Book for 2006 to 2010.


Chapters:
[Click the HTML or PDF link above
to access links to the individual chapters.]

* Aboriginal peoples
* Agriculture
* Business, consumer and property services
* Business performance and ownership
* Children and youth
* Construction
* Crime and justice
* Culture and leisure
* Economic accounts
* Education, training and learning
* Energy
* Environment
* Ethnic diversity and immigration
* Families, households and housing

* Geography


* Government

* Health
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Information and communications technology
* International trade
* Labour
* Languages
* Manufacturing
* Population and demography
* Prices and price indexes
* Retail and wholesale
* Science and technology
* Seniors
* Society and community
* Transportation
* Travel and tourism


Related products:

* Canada Year Book teacher's kits

* Summary tables

* Canada at a Glance

* Statistics by subject


Canada Year Book Historical Collection (1867 to 1967)
"..., a wealth of historical data in digitized format compiled from 100 years of the Agency's annual Canada Year Book (CYB).This new module, available free of charge on our website, covers the first century of Canadian history following Confederation in 1867, through to 1967, with historical text, tables, charts and maps. It is supplemented by interconnected learning resources for students and teachers.
- contains 100+ photos and nearly 50 maps dating back to 1868, as well as over 75 charts and 1,200 tables. Completing the picture are multimedia extras, such as newspaper clippings, video clips and posters. There are details on the lives and work of politicians, industrialists, scientists, agriculturalists and others who shaped the land, economy and society of Canada."
* Browse the collection by year - 1867 to 1967
*
Browse the collection by topic
- Changing families and households - Lives of men and women - Occupations - Economic gains - The Great Depression - Communications - Ethnocultural diversity - Provinces and manufacturing - Immigration and emigration - Canada at war

Source:
Canada Year Book - Product main page*
Presented in almanac style, the 2011 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

September 29, 2011
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, July 2011
In July, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees increased 0.1% from the previous month to $872.70. On a year-over-year basis, average weekly earnings grew by 2.2%. This was the slowest earnings growth since January 2010.
- includes two tables:
* Average weekly earnings (including overtime) for all employees
* Number of employees

Related report:

Employment, Earnings and Hours - main product page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE: Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month behind this report.
Click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Hours of work and work arrangements
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings

September 29, 2011
Residential care facilities, 2009/2010
*
HTML version
* PDF version
(578K, 119 pages)
Table of contents:
--- Highlights
--- Introduction
--- Analysis
--- Tables
--- Data quality, concepts and methodology
--- User information
--- Related products
Source:
Residential Care Facilities - Product main page*
The term "residential care facilities" refers to facilities with four beds or more that are funded, licensed or approved by provincial/territorial departments of health and/or social services. This report focuses on facilities for the aged, facilities for persons with mental disorders and other facilities which provide health or social care
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related subjects
* Health
* Health care services

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

September 28, 2011
Canada's population estimates: Age and sex, July 1, 2011
As of July 1, the median age of Canada's population was estimated at 39.9 years, up 0.2 years from the same date a year earlier. The main factors explaining the aging of the Canadian population are fertility rates persistently below the generation replacement level of 2.1 children per woman and an increasing life expectancy.
- includes the following four tables:
Table 1 - Components and factors of demographic growth
Table 2 - Annual population estimates
Table 3 Population estimates, age distribution and median age as of July 1, 2011, Canada, provinces and territories
Table 4 Population estimates by sex and age group as of July 1, 2011, Canada

Source:
Annual Demographic Estimates: Canada, Provinces and Territories - product main page*
This publication presents annual estimates of the total population and annual estimates by age and sex for Canada, provinces and territories. It also presents estimates of the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and inter-provincial migration, the latter by origin and destination. As in the case of population estimates, the components are also available for the total population and by age and sex.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

September 28, 2011
Canada's population estimates, Second quarter 2011
The April to June 2011 issue of Quarterly Demographic Estimates is now available.
Table of contents:
Highlights
Analysis
Tables
Charts
Data quality, concepts and methodology
Appendices
User information
Related products
PDF version (376K, 80 pages)

Source:
Quarterly Demographic Estimates - product main page*
This publication presents quarterly estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as well as statistics on the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and interprovincial migration, the latter by origin and destination.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Ethnic diversity and immigration
* Immigrants and non-permanent residents
* Population and demography

September 27, 2011
Deaths, 2008
Life expectancy at birth continued to rise, reaching a new high of 80.9 years during the three-year period from 2006 to 2008. This was up 0.2 years from 2005-2007. Life expectancy at birth was above the national average in three provinces: British Columbia (81.4 years), Ontario (81.3 years) and Quebec (81.0 years). The lowest life expectancy at birth was recorded in the three territories combined (75.2 years).

Companion documents:

* Cancer Incidence in Canada, 2008 and 2009
* Causes of Death, 2008

Source:
Deaths - Product main page*
The statistical tables in this document present the numbers of deaths and death rates by marital status, age and sex for Canada, the 10 provinces and 3 territories. Also presented are data on infant, neonatal, post-neonatal and perinatal deaths; deaths in hospital; and deaths subject to autopsy.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Health
* Life expectancy and deaths
* Population and demography
* Births and deaths

Workers Laid-off During the Last Three Recessions: Who Were They, and How Did They Fare?
By Ping Ching Winnie Chan, René Morissette, and Marc Frenette
September 20, 2011
Acknowledgments
Abstract
Executive summary
Between October 2008 and July 2009, total employment fell by more than 400,000 in Canada. By January 2011, total employment had returned to the level observed in October 2008. Which workers were laid-off during this recession? To what extent did these workers differ from their counterparts who were laid-off during the recessions that took place during the early 1980s and the early 1990s? How many of them found a job shortly after being laid-off? Among those who were re-employed shortly after being laid-off, which ones, if any, experienced substantial pay cuts? This article uses data from Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey to answer these questions.

Main article
Tables
Charts
Appendices
User information
PDF version (1.4MB, 45 pages)

Related subjects:
* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Labour mobility, turnover and work absences
* Wages, salaries and other earnings

----------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

18. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

October 2, 2011

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Early childhood education and care in the fall 2011 provincial/territorial elections
21 Sep 2011
New ISSUE File from CRRU collects information about how ECEC is being addressed in elections in Newfoundland and Labrador, PEI, Ontario, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, and the Yukon Territory.

The dollars and sense of solving poverty
28 Sep 2011
New report from the National Council on Welfare looks at the high dollar cost of poverty and the long-term investments needed to solve it; says "the importance and cost-effectiveness of quality early learning is one of the most well-documented fields of study."

Child development in developing countries 2
28 Sep 2011
"Four years after The Lancet published a first Series on early child development, the challenge of supporting 200 million children under five years to reach their developmental potential remains. A new Series of two papers and a Comment now documents progress worldwide."

Effectiveness of early educational intervention
28 Sep 2011
Article by W. Steven Barnett in the journal Science examines the effectiveness of early childhood programs designed to offset the impacts of poverty and inadequate learning environments on child development and school success. Full-text available online.

Ontario election 2011 report cards
28 Sep 2011
Report cards from IVoteChildCare and the Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care on the Ontario political parties' commitments to child care.

MORE research, policy & practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Call the premier, Doug Ford tells snack-offering kids
28 Sep 2011 Ontario

Thousands call for more public investment in child care in advance of the Ontario election
28 Sep 2011 Ontario

Profit-driven care cannot be child-centred care
28 Sep 2011 Alberta

Investing in childhood: the progress and the pitfalls
28 Sep 2011 Australia and New Zealand

Liberal candidates lobby school board
26 Sep 2011 Ontario

MORE child care in the news

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

19. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

September 30:
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - Oregon
School Breakfast Program - New Jersey
States and Medicaid - Florida, Wisconsin
Joblessness and Unemployment
State Immigration Law - Alabama
Community College Enrollment - Michigan

September 29:
Census Poverty Data
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

September 28:
Kids Count Report - Alabama
Joblessness and Unemployment
Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program

September 27:
Census Poverty Data
State Foster Care Programs
State Medicaid Programs - Washington, Wisconsin

September 26:
Recession and Unemployment
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - Tennessee
Child Poverty - South Dakota

---------------------------------------

Poverty Dispatch Archive

Past Poverty Dispatches (June 2006 to June 2009 only, offers links but no content)
The IRP Poverty Dispatch Archive hasn't been updated since June 2009.

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

20. [United States] The 10 best things government has done for us - September 27
(Rex Nutting in MarketWatch) + a Canadian version of "10 best things" + 96 more!

United States

The 10 best things government has done for us
By Rex Nutting
September 27, 2011
WASHINGTON— “The government is the problem,” they say. “The government can’t create jobs.” Or: “The government should just get out of the way.” How many times over the past three — or 30 — years have you heard conservatives (and even a few liberals) say that there’s no role for government in fixing our economy? They’re wrong, but this constant refrain is having an impact on our political system; it’s narrowing our options as we struggle with excessive unemployment, burdensome debt and wasted lives.
[ 752 Comments ]

Related link
from MarketWatch:

Slide Show: What the U.S. government has given us
There’s plenty that private enterprise could never have provided
September 27, 2011
[ 114 Comments on this article ]

Source:
MarketWatch
[ Wall Street Journal ]

___________________________________

Is there a Canadian version of this, you ask?

Ten Big Reasons to Feel Good About Taxes
[My favourite : "taxes are the price we pay for the Canada we love." Gilles]

96 more everyday reasons to feel good about taxes
- reasons like : governors-general - access to information - adoption records - critical infrastructure protection - airbag safety - fisheries - elections - pensions - money-minting - aviation museums - polar ice-watching - police college - social assistance - unemployment insurance - autopsies - ferries - bingo permits...

Related link:

Canada's Quiet Bargain:
The benefits of public spending
(PDF - 1.3MB, 40 pages)
April 2009
By Hugh Mackenzie and Richard Shillington
This study adds a dimension that has been missing to the public debate over taxes and public spending in Canada. It weighs the benefits of public services provided by federal, provincial, and municipal governments against the benefits of recent tax cuts.

Source:
Canadians for Tax Fairness
Canadians for Tax Fairness promotes a progressive tax system, based on ability to pay, to fund the public services and programs required to meet our social, economic and environmental needs.

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

21. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter
Latest issue:

28 September 2011 - CRINMAIL Issue 1244
In this issue:
Homophobia in schools in Europe
- A human rights comment
Latest news and reports
- Inhuman sentencing: Iran
- State violence: Syria, Ireland, Libya
- Corporal punishment: United States
- Gender: Colombia, CEDAW
- In other news: United Kingdom, Europe
- UN News
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

---------

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)

[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter alert using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)
.
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

As of September 2011, I've discontinued the plain-text e-mail version (i.e., no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) of this newsletter that I'd created to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. In reality, the text-only format caused as many problems as it solved --- those same corporate networks often blocked out my newsletter because it was sent as a mass mailing, which is sometimes interpreted as spam by network security software.

LONG STORY SHORT:
Every week, I send out a brief email alert to all subscribers to say that I've posted the latest newsletter to my site; in that alert, you'll find both the table of contents for, and the link to, that week's newsletter.


Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter alert.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 


Autoantonyms

Two words with opposite meanings are called antonyms.
They have variously been called contranyms, contronyms, antilogies, Janus words, and enantiodromes.
Below is a list of ten such words, and their associated opposite (or near-opposite) meanings.
Click the source link at the bottom for 30 more autoantonyms...

1. bill

• invoice (e.g. in a restaurant)
• money; banknote

2. bolt

• to secure in place
• to dash away suddenly

3. buckle

• to fasten
• to come undone; give way; collapse

4. cleave

• to adhere; stick together
• to cut apart; divide

5. clip

• to fasten together; hold tightly
• to cut apart; cut off (e.g. with shears)

6. dust

• to remove fine particles from (e.g. when cleaning)
• to sprinkle fine particles onto

7. fast

• fixed firmly in place
• moving quickly; speedy

8. fine

• just meets minimum standards; satisfactory
• considerably better than average; excellent

9. handicap

• advantage (e.g. in sport)
• disadvantage; disability

10. left

• departed from
• remaining

Source:
http://www.fun-with-words.com/nym_autoantonyms.html
Click the link for 30 more autoantonyms.

 

----------------------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

 

Rock & Roll Video Riffs 1964 to 1975 (video, duration 9:55)
http://videosift.com/video/Rock-Roll-Video-Riffs-1964-to-1975
("I'm gonna take ya back to schoolin...'")

----------------------------------------

Facebook's ticker privacy scare, and what you should do about it
http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/09/26/facebook-ticker-privacy-scare/

----------------------------------------

Things that look like other things
http://thingsthatlooklikeotherthings.tumblr.com/

----------------------------------------

Toroidal vorteces [circular air bubbles] (video, duration 4:03)
http://videosift.com/video/Toroidal-Vortices-produced-by-Dolphins-Whales-Vocanos

----------------------------------------

"Still, it's not rocket science, is it?" (video, duration 2:08)
http://www.wimp.com/brainsurgeon/