Canadian Social Research Newsletter
June 3, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,556 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Talking to seniors about Working Poverty (John Stapleton, Open Policy) - June 1
2. Austerity’s Discontents (Trish Hennessy, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - June 1
3. Black Out Speak Out June 4 : Silence is NOT an option
4. [Ontario] Advocacy Centre for the Elderly
5. Prince Edward Island : Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty (Government of PEI) – May 30
6. Tax Fairness Newsletter – May 2012 (Canadians for Tax Fairness)
7. Dangling Participial Phrases : A Gratuitous Grammar Lesson
8. New Brunswick committee to study proposed Employment Insurance changes (iPolitics) - May 29
9. New federal All-Party Anti-Poverty Caucus + Health Indicators 2012 (Canada Without Poverty) - May 29
10. Seven reasons why you should support a move to low tuition fees for higher education (BC Office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - May 29
11. Income inequality, by the numbers (Huffington Post Canada) - May 28
12. Revised Ontario Budget 2012 Impact Analysis (Income Security Advocacy Centre) + NGO Commentary from Ottawa - May 2012
13.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, March 2012 - May 31
--- Public sector employment, first quarter 2012 - May 30
--- 2011 Census: Age and sex - May 29
--- Adult criminal court statistics, 2010/2011
- May 28
--- Youth court statistics, 2010/2011 - May 28
--- Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs, longitudinal data, 2005/2006 to 2010/2011 - May 28
--- Food availability, 2011 - May 28

14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
16. Measuring Child Poverty : child poverty in the world's rich countries (United Nations Children’s Fund) - May 2012

17. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. Talking to seniors about Working Poverty - June 1
(John Stapleton, Open Policy Ontario)

The working poor have computers and colour TV's,
and they call themselves "'poor'???

---

Talking to seniors about Working Poverty
By John Stapleton
http://openpolicyontario.com/talking-to-seniors-about-working-poverty/
(...) the conversation about the working poor with colour televisions and personal computers is almost the same conversation as the conversation about indoor plumbing, electricity and central heat. It is a discussion about invention, improvement and plummeting prices in a world where the exclusive and highly exotic become both humdrum and inexpensive. But it’s also a phenomenon whereby our distant memories fool us into thinking that mere possession of yesterday’s exotica somehow makes it impossible to experience hunger and hardship. Why?

Source:
Open Policy Ontario - John Stapleton's blog
http://openpolicyontario.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. Austerity’s Discontents - June 1
(Trish Hennessy,
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Austerity’s Discontents
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/austeritys-discontents
June 1, 2012
Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number
By Trish Hennessy
Hennessy's Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world.

75 million:
Number of youth, aged 15-24, who will be unemployed globally this year. That’s 6% more than in 2007. The global youth unemployment rate is 12.7%.
Source : http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/22/global-youth-unemployment_n_1537103.html

46.4%:
The 2011 youth unemployment rate in Spain, up from 18.2% in 2007.
Source : http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-05-22/ilo-says-global-youth-unemployment-may-stay-elevated-for-years.html

13.9%:
Canada’s youth unemployment rate in April; nearly twice as high as the 7.3% rate for the overall labour market.
Source : http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1182249--youth-jobless-rates-remain-high-globally-report-says

6.4:
Number of unemployed Canadian workers for every reported job vacancy.
Source : http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/05/16/memo-to-ministers-the-issue-is-unemployment-not-job-vacancies/

100,000:
Number of total jobs the Parliamentary Budget Office estimates will be lost in Canada by 2014-15 as a result of federal and provincial government cutbacks.
Source : http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2012/04/25/pbo-strikes-again/

More...
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/austeritys-discontents

Earlier months (16 more links going back to early 2011):
http://policyalternatives.ca/index

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

See also:

Framed in Canada - Trish Hennessy's personal blog
http://framedincanada.com/

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

3. Black Out Speak Out June 4 : Silence is NOT an option

Black Out Speak Out
http://blackoutspeakout.ca/

[ Version française :
Science On Parle
http://www.silenceonparle.ca/ ]

Speak out on June 4, 2012 in defence of two core Canadian values: nature and democracy. On that date, Canada's major environmental organizations, together with leading charities, unions, bloggers, and others will darken their websites and join thousands of Canadians like you to Speak Out in defence of nature and democracy.

Right now, Parliament is pushing through a bill to weaken many of the country's most important environmental protection measures and silence the voices of all Canadians who seek to defend nature. Today it's our voice; tomorrow it could be yours.

Top five reasons to Speak Out:
http://www.blackoutspeakout.ca/about.php
1. Charities are being targeted.
2. Canadians' participation in Parliament is being disrespected.
3. Nature is being put at serious risk.
4. Too much power is in the hands of too few.
5. Trusted advisors to government that provide high-quality analysis for balanced policy are being ignored.

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Top 10 items of environmental concern in the 2012 budget bill (Bill C-38) (small PDF file)
http://www.blackoutspeakout.ca/cms/uploads/budget-bill-top-10.pdf

---

How to Speak Out:

Blacking Out Your Website on June 4:
http://www.blackoutspeakout.ca/instructions.php

Speak Out! Petition
http://www.blackoutspeakout.ca/index.php
Click the "Sign petition" button on the home page and add your name to the 6,000 people who have already done so.

Speak Out on Facebook
Speak Out on Twitter
http://www.blackoutspeakout.ca/take_action.php

Write To Your Party Leaders
http://www.blackoutspeakout.ca/addresses.php

Partners
http://www.blackoutspeakout.ca/partners.php
- list (including links to websites) of organizations, groups, companies and individuals have committed to darken their websites and SPEAK OUT in defence of nature and democracy on June 4th.

4. [Ontario] Advocacy Centre for the Elderly

Ontario

Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE):
http://www.advocacycentreelderly.org/
The Advocacy Centre for the Elderly (ACE) in Toronto is a specialty community legal clinic that was established to provide a range of legal services to low-income seniors in Ontario. The legal services include advice and representation to individual and group clients, public legal education, law reform and community development activities. ACE has been operating since 1984. ACE is funded through Legal Aid Ontario [ http://www.legalaid.on.ca/ ] and is the first legal clinic in Canada to specialize in the legal problems of seniors.

---
NOTE : Even if you're not from Ontario, I highly recommend checking out this excellent collection of online resources!
If you have a loved one who's advanci
ng in age and you're looking for a reliable source of legal information in one of the areas below, click through some of the links on the home page to get a legal perspective on the range of services for the elderly in Ontario.
---

Site content (areas of law):
Advance Care Planning - Consent and Capacity - Consumer Protection - Elder Abuse - Home Care - Hospitals - Long-Term Care Homes - General - Inquests - Rights - Pensions and Income - Powers of Attorney - Retirement Homes - Wills

The ACE Newsletter:

Spring/Summer 2012 issue (PDF - 1.2MB, 16 pages)
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/sites/all/files/ACE_Spring_Newsletter_Vol9No1_web_0.pdf

Contents of this newsletter:
* Old Age Security : What Do The Proposed Changes Mean For Low-Income Adults?
* ACE Profiles: Dr. Samir K. Sinha – Newly Appointed Expert Lead For Ontario’s Seniors Care Strategy
* Information You Should Know If You Live In A Retirement Home
* Searching The “Consumer Beware” List
* Long-Term Care Home Task Force On Resident Care And Safety Releases Action Plan
* Ten Months In The Life Of An Articling Student At ACE
* Tips And Traps When Dealing With Long-Term Care
* News and Announcements

Past Newsletters (links to 20+ past issues back to Fall 2000)
http://www.advocacycentreelderly.org/ace_library_-_newsletters.php

5. Prince Edward Island : Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty – May 30
(Government of PEI)

From
PEI Community Services and Seniors:

Social Action Plan outlines direction to prevent and reduce poverty
http://www.gov.pe.ca/newsroom/index.php3?number=news&newsnumber=8398&dept=&lang=E
May 30, 2012
News Release
Prince Edward Island’s Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty maps out how government will protect and support low income Islanders over the next three years, says Minister of Community Services and Seniors Valerie E. Docherty.
(...)
The Social Action Plan protects and builds on many existing social programs such as health care, education, early learning and child care. In addition to these services, the provincial government invests more than $100 million each year in programs directly aimed at reducing poverty, and tens of millions more in programs that prevent poverty and support social inclusion. Since 2009, more than $16 million in new funding has been added to these programs.

Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty - main page
http://www.gov.pe.ca/sss/index.php3?number=1043012&lang=E
- links to all PEI poverty reduction papers including the Action Plan itself as well as the related documents and backgrounders below:

Prince Edward Island : Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty (PDF - 284K, 16 pages)
http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_sapspeech.pdf
May 2012
"The Social Action Plan fulfills a commitment made in the 2010 Speech from the Throne. That commitment was followed by a poverty reduction discussion paper which was the starting point of many discussions and consultations. We heard from the diverse voices of our Island population: people living in poverty, people with disabilities, representatives of business, labour, health, women, Aboriginal persons, as well as newcomers. "

Backgrounders [small PDF files]:

* Seniors [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback1.pdf ]

* Social Assistance Program [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback2.pdf ]

* Social Housing [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback3.pdf ]

* Support for Islanders with Disabilities [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback4.pdf ]

* Support for Low Income Islanders [ http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/css_speechback5.pdf ]

Related Documents [PDF files]:

* Discussion Paper - Preventing and Reducing Poverty in Prince Edward Island: A Strategy for Engagement (PDF - 803K, 52 pages)
http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/cssl_povertyred.pdf
July 2011
[ Version française du document de discussion ]

* Summary of the discussion paper (PDF - 770K, 7 pages)
http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/cssl_povsummE.pdf
[ Version française du résumé du document de discussion - (PDF - 1Mo., 7 pages):
http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/cssl_povsummF.pdf ]

Source:
PEI Community Services and Seniors
http://www.gov.pe.ca/sss/

Government of Prince Edward Island
http://www.gov.pe.ca/

---

Related links:

Missed Opportunity for PEI Poverty Strategy
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/05/31/missed-opportunity-for-pei-poverty-strategy/
By Angella MacEwen
May 31, 2012
The government of Prince Edward Island has introduced a Social Action Plan to Reduce Poverty, following community consultations, including face-to-face meetings and written submissions by community groups. (...) Given that Christine Saulnier and I estimated that poverty costs the PEI government just under $100 million per year in 2009 (The Cost of Poverty in PEI [ http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/cost-poverty-prince-edward-island-2011 ] ), any new investments in poverty elimination are welcome. Also welcome is the recognition that spending needs to be focused on investments, such as affordable housing, weatherizing and repairs to existing housing, adult literacy, and early childhood education. Most notably missing from Wednesday’s announcement is a set of clear goals, and a mechanism for evaluating progress towards those goals.
(...)
For a serious poverty reduction and elimination ‘Action Plan’, governments must honestly assess need, set clear goals, and transparently monitor progress towards those goals. If there is no method to evaluate progress and success, then there is also no method to enforce poverty reduction and elimination, and there is the risk that it becomes a purely cosmetic exercise.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum Blog
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/relentless/

---

From CBC PEI:
http://www.cbc.ca/pei/

Government maps out poverty plan
The province will spend an extra $4 million to help people at risk

May 30, 2012
The P.E.I. government mapped out plans Wednesday to protect and support low income Islanders over the next three years. Community Services and Seniors Minister Valerie Docherty said the province will spend an extra $4 million to help supplement rent, to establish two new daycares and to help seniors renovate their own homes

Related CBC PEI Stories:

* Crane calls for P.E.I. poverty reduction plan
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2011/11/26/pei-crane-poverty-reduction-584.html
Nov 26, 2011

* Poverty reduction plan delayed
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2011/05/17/pei-poverty-reduction-delayed-584.html
May 17, 2011

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Prince Edward Island Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pebkmrk.htm

6. Tax Fairness Newsletter – May 2012
(Canadians for Tax Fairness)

Tax Fairness Newsletter – May 2012 (PDF - 408K, 4 pages)
http://www.taxfairness.ca/sites/taxfairness.ca/files/pdf/may_2012_newsletter.pdf
In this issue:
* Take Action! Tackle Tax Havens
* Downtown Ottawa turned into Sherwood Forest
* Ontario budget deal to raise taxes of very rich welcomed
* Canadians for Tax Fairness addresses Finance Committee on Bill C-38
* Fair Tax Summit a big success
* Poll says Canadians willing to pay more taxes to close gap
* Key Stats on Taxes
* Job Opening: Communications Coordinator
* Public Forums in Winnipeg and Scarborough
* New Book: Bill Gates, Pay Your Fair Share of Taxes...Like We Do!

Tax Fairness E-newsletter Archive
http://www.taxfairness.ca/page/resources
- includes links to seven earlier newsletters going back to May 2011
- also includes links to (1) info about must-read books, (2) articles, videos and links of interest, and (3) other tax fairness organizations and campaigns

Source:
Canadians for Tax Fairness
http://www.taxfairness.ca/
Canadians for Tax Fairness promotes a progressive tax system, based on ability to pay, to fund the public services and programs required to meet our social, economic and environmental needs.

---

- Go to the Taxes and Tax Freedom Day Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/tax_freedom_day.htm

7. Dangling Participial Phrases : A Gratuitous Grammar Lesson

Dangling Participial Phrases:
A Gratuitous Grammar Lesson from Gilles

During the course of my 17 years online, I've learned to control my inner Grammar Police tendencies.
At first, I was like Anne L. Retentive of Dilbert fame [ http://goo.gl/zVAdR ] --- going apeshit apoplectic whenever I'd spot a typo or an incorrect sentence structure on a website I was visiting. I'd send a polite email to the webmaster of the offending site to offer some avuncular advice on how to spell a particular word or to write a sentence that was grammatically correct, and I'd sign my email "Doctor DemenTypo". I even had a spelling and grammar section on the Rants page of my site [ see #2 on this page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rants.htm ], where I vented about some of my linguistic WWW Pet Peeves.

As time passed and I became somewhat more inured to the egregious examples of poor writing online, I learned to let go and focus instead on content, and I've largely weaned myself from the nit-picking habit. I do make exceptions from time to time, for website authors who make it a point of establishing their credibility by referring to their education or work experience.

Here's what prompted this outburst:

The Purple Violet Press - A Citizen Publication
http://thepurplevioletpressnb.blogspot.ca/
Created and updated by a credentialed journalist in Fredericton New Brunswick, the Purple Violet Press website is "an online citizen publication working alongside the province's mainstream media, focusing on grassroots issues involving social justice and public accountability." The site is content-rich and quite informative, and I recommend it for anyone who wants to go beyond the views of the mainstream media.

BUT...

The Policy page of the website begins with the following:

"Operated by a local credentialed journalist, your comments, questions and story ideas are welcome. For writing and editing purposes, this publication uses The Canadian Press Stylebook and The Elements of Style by Strunk and White. (...) Please ensure grammar and spelling has been checked before sending [letters to the editor]."

Doctor DemenTypo says:

Perhaps the credentialed journalist could use a credentialed copy editor.
The first part of the first sentence is called a "dangling participial phrase", and it always modifies the subject of the sentence where it is used. In the above excerpt, it's not the "comments, questions and story ideas" that are operated by the journalist, but rather the website.
[ http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/dangling-participles.aspx ]
Also in the above excerpt, the second sentence contains two subjects, so the verb must be plural: "Please ensure grammar and spelling HAVE (not has) been checked."

Credibility : Busted.
Suggestion : Either remove the reference to the journalism credentials or get someone to re-read your texts for typos and grammatical errors.
NOTE : The correct usage of the participial phrase (with slightly different wording) is as follows:
"Created and updated by a credentialed journalist in Fredericton New Brunswick, the Purple Violet Press website is..."

--------------------------------

Full disclosure:
I'm no credentialed journalist; I have a plain-vanilla BA in English Literature (class of '71). However, I did earn my reputation for nit-pickiness over my 30 years of research in the bowels of the federal government. And yes, I *do* make errors from time to time on my own website - but I usually catch them before posting. I do find it deliciously ironic, though, that this person asks people who wish to send in a letter to the editor "to ensure grammar and spelling has been checked before sending"...

[Special note to those who are even *more* nit-picky than I am : yes, I know that "credentialed" is the American spelling and that we in Canada spell this word with a double L. I decided to maintain the one-L spelling to be consistent with the text from the Purple Violet Press website.]

---

- Go to the Rants page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rants.htm

8. New Brunswick committee to study proposed Employment Insurance changes - May 29
(iPolitics)

New Brunswick committee to study proposed Employment Insurance changes
http://www.ipolitics.ca/2012/05/29/n-b-committee-to-study-proposed-ei-changes/
May 29, 2012
FREDERICTON – The New Brunswick government is creating a committee of senior civil servants to study the federal government’s proposed changes to Employment Insurance. Premier David Alward says his government needs more information before being able to pass judgement on the measures, despite the fact the three other Atlantic premiers have all denounced the changes. Among the proposed measures, regular recipients of the EI program would have to consider lower paying jobs that could require a commute of up to an hour. Economic Development Minister Paul Robichaud says the information received so far from the federal government is not clear and it’s premature to offer a comment. He says the committee will report by mid-June.

Source:
iPolitics
http://www.ipolitics.ca/
iPolitics is independent, non-partisan and committed to providing timely, relevant, insightful content to those whose professional or personal interests require that they stay on top of political developments in Ottawa and the provinces.

---

Related link from the
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice:

Alward EI Committee, Not needed! (PDF - 28K, 2 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/Press_Release _EI_May_2012.docx
May 30 , 2012
Version française:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/communique_de_presse_ae_mai_2012.docx
"We don't need Premier Alward's new committee to look at how federal reforms to employment insurance will affect workers in the province since we already know the answers: more poverty, more insecurity and more injustices!" says John Gagnon, co-chair of the Common Front for Social Justice. All workers, and not only those in seasonal industries, will need to accept jobs that offer salaries between 10% to 30% less than their previous job and they will be forced to accept work located up to one hour's drive from their residence.
(...)
"The proposed changes to employment insurance will increase the poverty level in our province, and even more so in rural New Brunswick where there is a concentration of seasonal fishery, tourism and forestry industries which demand a high number of workers at specific time of the year and where there are almost no jobs between those periods" concludes Mr. Gagnon.

Source:
Common Front for Social Justice

http://www.frontnb.ca/en/Home_en.htm

Front commun pour la justice sociale
http://www.frontnb.ca/fr/home_fr.htm

---

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

9. New federal All-Party Anti-Poverty Caucus + Health Indicators 2012 - May 29
(Canada Without Poverty)

From Rob Rainer,
Executive Director of
Canada Without Poverty:

New federal All-Party Anti-Poverty Caucus
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2012/05/new-federal-all-party-anti-poverty-caucus/
May 29, 2012
We are pleased to report that a new federal All-Party Anti-Poverty Caucus is being formed and that it will hold its first event on Parliament Hill on June 12th. Canada Without Poverty has been working to help catalyze the formation of this bi-partisan caucus. We are thrilled to see it taking shape with over 40 members thus far, and to have been invited to be part of the June 12th event.

From the invitation:
“The Anti-Poverty Caucus (APC) seeks to bring together parliamentarians, organizations, community leaders, and other key stakeholders to find concrete solutions to end poverty….Real, systemic and lasting change is required to enable people living in poverty to achieve their potential. Innovative thinking, non-partisan cooperation, and deep-seated commitment are urgently needed.”

The urgency of poverty action is underscored by a new Canadian Institute for Health Information report [ see the link below ] finding that “avoidable deaths” have plummeted in Canada – but not in low income areas, where “people living in the least affluent neighbourhoods [are] twice as likely to die from preventable causes as those in the most affluent neighbourhoods.” (See a Globe and Mail article on this report, and click here to access the report itself.) As well, see a new UNICEF report [ whose link appears above on the page you're now reading ] listing Canada in 24th place out of 35 developed countries, in terms of the incidence of child poverty. (Canada’s child poverty rate is reported at 13.3%, whereas in Iceland, in first place, the rate is reported at 4.7%. The U.S., in 34th place ahead of Romania, has a child poverty rate of 23.1%.)

The All-Party Anti-Poverty Caucus co-chairs are the Hon. Michael Chong, MP (Conservative), Jean Crowder, MP (NDP) and Hon. Art Eggleton, Senator (Liberal). The caucus treasurer is the Rev. Don Meredith, Senator (Conservative). We encourage you to send a message of thanks and support to each of them:
- michael.chong@parl.gc.ca
- jean.crowder@parl.gc.ca
- egglea@sen.parl.gc.ca
- meredd@sen.parl.gc.ca

We will keep our national network informed as to significant developments materializing from the caucus.

Rob Rainer
Executive Director
Canada Without Poverty
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

---

From the
Canadian Institute for Health Information:

Rates of avoidable deaths reduced, yet significant room for improvement remains:
Fewer avoidable deaths suggest timely health care and disease prevention are having an impact
http://goo.gl/3StRD
News release
May 24, 2012— The rate of deaths that could potentially be avoided through timely and effective health care and disease prevention dropped from 373 per 100,000 Canadians in 1979 to 185 per 100,000 Canadians in 2008. Health Indicators 2012, the most recent edition of the report produced annually by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) and Statistics Canada, includes updates on more than 40 measures for Canadian regions, including a suite of new avoidable mortality indicators.

Complete report:

Health Indicators 2012 (PDF - 2.2MB, 126 pages)
https://secure.cihi.ca/free_products/health_indicators_2012_en.pdf

Companion Product:

* Health Indicators e-publication
http://www.cihiconferences.ca/indicators/2012/ind2012_e.html

* Technical Notes
http://goo.gl/Fxkbw

Source:
Canadian Institute for Health Information
http://www.cihi.ca/CIHI-ext-portal/internet/EN/Home/home/cihi000001

---

Comment (by Gilles):
Remember when Senator Hugh Segal (Conservative) raised a ruckus last year about Canada's failed attempts to address poverty in this country? He proposed a re-examination of guaranteed annual income as part of a broader solution to child and family poverty. Senators Segal and Art Eggleton each produced reports on poverty in Canada : see [ http://goo.gl/r5ojh (PDF) and http://goo.gl/zMyxa
(video) and http://goo.gl/wQehd (Globe & Mail article) ]

So what happened next?
Senator Segal was dispatched to Siberia on an important mission:

Baird Appoints Senator Segal as Special Envoy for Commonwealth Renewal
http://goo.gl/1a1to
News Release
December 21, 2011
Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird today announced the appointment of Senator Hugh Segal as Canada’s special envoy for Commonwealth renewal. (...) The Commonwealth is a voluntary association of 54 countries that work together toward shared goals of freedom, democracy, human rights and the rule of law in its member states.

So --- anyone want to start a pool re. the date when the Harper Government™ reassigns Michael Chong and Don Meredith to assist Hugh Segal in his important work on Commonwealth renewal?? This *would* be hilarious if it weren't so pathetic.

---

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

10. Seven reasons why you should support a move to low tuition fees for higher education - May 29
(BC Office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Seven reasons why you should support a move to low tuition fees for higher education
http://goo.gl/e3Fx5
May 29th, 2012
By Iglika Ivanova
Much of the media coverage on Quebec’s student protests has dismissed the students as cranky middle and upper-middle class children clinging to the advantages they already have. But the fact that the vast majority of today’s university students come from relatively well-off families indicates that we have a serious problem with access to education. A problem that would only be exacerbated by tuition hikes. (...) Here are seven reasons why we would all be better off if we increased public investment in higher education and reduced the burden that high tuition fees pose of students and their families.

1. The notable absence of students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds from university campuses raises serious questions of fairness and social justice.
2. Financial barriers to education impact Canada’s economic well-being.
3. Questions of access to education are more important today than ever before because higher education is increasingly becoming a standard job requirement.
4. Student loans don’t make up for high tuition fees.
5. An educated society benefits everybody, not just the people who go to university.
6. The fact that individuals gain from having higher education is not sufficient reason to rely on user fees (aka tuition) to finance education.
7. Education is a great investment for our public dollars: students repay the full cost of their education through taxes over their working careers.

Source:
Policy Note

http://www.policynote.ca/

BC Office:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc
of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

11. Income inequality, by the numbers - May 28
(Huffington Post Canada)

Income inequality, by the numbers
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/05/27/income-inequality-infographic_n_1548973.html
May 28, 2012
The Huffington Post features an infographic breaking down the details on the growth of income inequality in Canada between 1980 and 2009. Created by Ryerson University journalism student Jeff Fraser, the infographic draws on data from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

Fraser also made a short video on the subject (duration 2:38):
http://vimeo.com/37532800

Source:
Growing Gap Project

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/projects/growing-gap

Growing Gap is a project of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Related link:

Huffington Post Canada
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

---

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

12. Revised Ontario Budget 2012 Impact Analysis (Income Security Advocacy Centre)
+ NGO Commentary from Ottawa - May 2012

New from the
Income Security Advocacy Centre:

Ontario Budget 2012
(after negotiations between the Ontario Liberals and NDP)
http://www.incomesecurity.org/OntarioBudget2012.htm
The Ontario budget will have a large negative impact on people on Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program.
Direct benefits to people on OW and ODSP are being cut by the largest amount since the current government was elected in 2003. The budget process was different than usual this year, because the government holds a minority of seats in the Ontario Legislature and had to negotiate with the opposition to get support for the budget. After the dust has settled from these negotiations, our most recent analysis of the impact of the budget on people on OW and ODSP was circulated May 23, 2012.

Read our May 2012 analysis here (Microsoft Word file - 78K, 3 pages):
http://www.incomesecurity.org/documents/OntarioBudget2012-UpdatedAnalysis.doc

This document reviews and analyses the impact of these decisions made in the budget:
1. OW and ODSP Rates: 1% increase
2. Ontario Child Benefit implementation delayed
3. Community Start-Up and Maintenance Benefit (CSUMB) ends Jan 2013
4. Home Repairs Benefit ends Jan 2013
5. Cap on health-related discretionary benefits for OW and ODSP
6. Move toward integrating employment supports under Employment Ontario
7. Centralizing collection of outstanding debts

Version française:
http://www.incomesecurity.org/documents/OntarioBudget2012-UpdatedAnalysis_french.doc

After the NDP and the Liberals negotiated a deal around
the budget, we commented in the Toronto Star on April 24, 2012:
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1167426

On the same day that the Liberals presented their budget in the Ontario legislature (March 27), we created an initial analysis:
http://us4.campaign-archive1.com/?u=095b12c98935ecaadd327bf90&id=2c97d3695a&e=f67f28a7b9

Just before the Liberals presented their budget, they announced in the media that OW and ODSP rates would be frozen this year, and that the implementation of the maximum Ontario Child Benefit would be delayed by a year.
Read our March 26 press release here:
http://us4.campaign-archive1.com/?u=095b12c98935ecaadd327bf90&id=130ab2367a

Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre

http://www.incomesecurity.org/

---

BONUS:

The Ottawa Perspective:
(not the feds, but the City)

Commentary on the 2012 Ontario Budget
By Linda Lalonde
Co-chair, Ottawa Poverty Reduction Network

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2012.htm#linda_lalonde
Yesterday (May 29), Linda forwarded the above revised Ontario Budget 2012 analysis by ISAC to her Ottawa mailing list - including me, Gilles - along with her own comments about the ISAC analysis and the outcome of negotiations between the Ontario ruling Liberal minority and the New Democratic Party to avoid a snap election over the Budget. Click the link above to access the Ontario Budget 2012 analysis by Linda. (With the author's permission...)

Here's an excerpt from Linda's commentary:

"The changes to discretionary benefits are going to be devastating to municipalities and this is where we need to put our energies right now, both provincially and locally. This will mean more than $5M for Ottawa although the exact numbers aren't available yet. Add to that the 50% cut to the Community Start-up and Maintenance Benefit and its move out of Social Services to Housing which will make more people eligible to use it and we have a problem."
(With the author's permission...)

- Go to the 2012 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2012.htm

13. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, March 2012 - May 31
---
Public sector employment, first quarter 2012 - May 30
---
2011 Census: Age and sex - May 29
--- Adult criminal court statistics, 2010/2011
- May 28
--- Youth court statistics, 2010/2011 - May 28
--- Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs, longitudinal data, 2005/2006 to 2010/2011 - May 28
--- Food availability, 2011 - May 28

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

May 31, 2012
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, March 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120531/dq120531a-eng.htm
In March, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees were $888.34, up 0.8% from the previous month. On a year-over-year basis, earnings rose 2.1%.
- includes two tables:
* Average weekly earnings (including overtime) for all employees
* Number of employees

Source:
Employment, Earnings and Hours - main product page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=72 -002-X&lang=eng
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE: Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month behind this report.
---
* On the main product page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.
---

Related subjects:

* Labour
http://goo.gl/FsMeZ

* Employment and unemployment
http://goo.gl/mMHwY

* Hours of work and work arrangements
http://goo.gl/DGFGo

* Industries
http://goo.gl/idqT8

* Wages, salaries and other earnings
http://goo.gl/EK2Qr

 

May 30, 2012
Public sector employment, first quarter 2012

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120530/dq120530c-eng.htm
Public sector employment on a seasonally adjusted basis was 3.6 million in the first quarter, up 0.2% from the fourth quarter of 2011.

Related subjects:

* Government
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3055&id=3055&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Employment and remuneration
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3055&id=3057&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

 

May 29, 2012
2011 Census: Age and sex
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120529/dq120529a-eng.htm
According to data from the 2011 Census of Population, seniors accounted for 14.8% of the population in 2011, up from 13.7% in 2006. However, the proportion of seniors in Canada remained among the lowest of the G8 countries.

Related report:

The Canadian Population in 2011: Age and Sex
HTML version:
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-311-x/98-311-x2011001-eng.cfm
PDF version (896K, 27 pages):
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-311-x/98-311-x2011001-eng.pdf

Table of contents:
Highlights
Part 1: National portrait
Part 2: Provinces and territories
Part 3: Portrait of metropolitan and non-metropolitan Canada
Part 4: Portrait of municipalities (census subdivisions)
Additional information

Selected highlights:

• The number of seniors aged 65 and over increased 14.1% between 2006 and 2011 to nearly 5 million. This rate of growth was higher than that of children aged 14 and under (0.5%) and people aged 15 to 64 (5.7%). • Seniors accounted for a record high of 14.8% of the population in Canada in 2011, up from 13.7% five years earlier.

• In 2011, the proportion of seniors in Canada was among the lowest of the G8 countries.

• The population of children aged 4 and under increased 11.0% between 2006 and 2011. This was the highest growth rate for this age group since the 1956 to 1961 period during the baby boom.

• In 2011, there were 5,825 centenarians in Canada, up 25.7% since 2006. This was the second most rapidly growing age group among all age groups after those aged 60 to 64.

• In 2011, the working-age population (those aged 15 to 64) represented 68.5% of the Canadian population. This proportion was higher than in any other G8 country, except Russia.

NOTE : You'll find all highlights on the first page of the HTML version of the report.

Related links (left side of the first page of the HTML version of the complete report):
* Data tables and figures
* Age pyramids
* Maps
* More information
* Centenarians in Canada
* Generations in Canada
* The census: A tool for planning at the local level
* Focus on Geography

Related new products and studies
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120529/pn120529-eng.htm
- incl. links to 20+ tables

Census - main page
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/index-eng.cfm

Related subjects:

* Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Population estimates and projections
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3433&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

---

Selected media coverage

From the
Toronto Star:
http://www.thestar.com/

* 2011 Census: Canada is getting older
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1201708
May 29, 2012

* Census 2011: Canada having a baby boomlet
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1202127
May 29, 2012

* 2011 Census: Provincial-territorial picture
Population change from 2001 to 2011

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1127913
NOTE : This Toronto Star map of Canada offers a quick way to compare population stats from Census 2011, 2006 and 2001 for each Canadian province and territory. Select a jurisdiction by clicking its name on the map or in the list in the left-hand margin of the page.

* Toronto Star : the 2011 Census
http://www.thestar.com/topic/census

---

From the
National Post:
http://www.nationalpost.com/

* Census 2011: Canada is home to 5,825 people aged 100 or older
http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/05/29/census-2011-canada-has-more-than-5825-people-aged-100-or-older/
May 29, 2012

* Canada’s aging boomers are placing new strain on business, government
http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/05/29/canadas-aging-boomers-are-placing-new-strain-on-business-government/
May 29, 2012

News 2011 Canadian census highlights: Country aging rapidly as boomers hit retirement age,
Canada may not be getting safer as its population gets older
http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/05/29/canada-may-not-be-getting-safer-as-its-population-gets-older/
May 29, 2012

More StatCan Census links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm#census
- this link will take you to a section of the Social Statistics page of this website

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

 

May 28, 2012
Adult criminal court statistics, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120528/dq120528b-eng.htm

 

May 28, 2012
Youth court statistics, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120528/dq120528c-eng.htm

 

May 28, 2012
Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs, longitudinal data, 2005/2006 to 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120528/dq120528f-eng.htm

 

May 28, 2012
Food availability, 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120528/dq120528g-eng.htm

 

Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

June 3, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Promoting children’s welfare in the Nordic countries
http://goo.gl/1oCIZ
30 May 2012 | Europe
Article from the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health in Finland, published in the CCPA's Our Schools/Our selves, describes the extensive social services for families with children in the Nordic countries.

Quality matters in early childhood education and care: Finland
http://goo.gl/wEZPl
30 May 2012 | Europe
10 of 34 OECD countries are participating in the Quality Matters in ECEC: Country Policy Profiles. Canada is not included. This week the CRRU is featuring Finland where policy lever 3 - Improving qualifications, training and working conditions, is examined.

2011 Census: Age and sex
http://goo.gl/PRxLi
30 May 2012 | Canada
Statistics Canada report detailing up-to-date age and sex population trends. Findings show the highest increase in number of young children since the end of the baby boom.

Healthy living guidelines for early learning and child care centres on Prince Edward Island
http://goo.gl/MCEM2
30 May 2012 | Prince Edward Island
Report from P.E.I. Healthy Eating Alliance suggests guidelines and practices to facilitate nutritional eating habits for children and staff in childcare centres.

Measuring child poverty: New league tables of child poverty in the world’s rich countries
http://goo.gl/sPXZm
30 May 2012 | International
New report places Canada's efforts at eradicating child poverty in an intentional context. See Canada Country profile for an overview of findings.

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Child care goes for a toss
http://goo.gl/65S1q
30 May 2012 | Asia

Budget 2012: Freeze on funds a 'cut by stealth' to strained centres
http://goo.gl/eQZwU
30 May 2012 | Australia and New Zealand

Need for a national strategy on childcare
http://goo.gl/WdSvi
30 May 2012 | Canada

Uganda: Early childhood education is a right
http://goo.gl/RLrCs
30 May 2012 | International

New food guidelines for early child care centres
http://goo.gl/6wLKl
30 May 2012 | Prince Edward Island

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

NOTE: For links to earlier (weekly) issues of this weekly alert going back to June 2009,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

June 1:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/06/01/
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
May 2012 US Unemployment
Enrollment in Safety Net Programs

May 31:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/05/31/
Kids Count Report - Minnesota
Medicaid Experiment - Oregon

May 30:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/05/30/
UNICEF Report on Child Poverty
Hospitals and Charity Care - Illinois

May 29:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/05/29/
Extended Jobless Benefits
Child Welfare System - Arizona

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

16. Measuring Child Poverty : child poverty in the world's rich countries - May 2012
(
United Nations Children’s Fund - UNICEF)

Canada lags on fighting child poverty, report finds
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1202030
May 29, 2012
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Canada falls below most of its international peers when it comes to fighting child poverty, says a new report by the United Nations Children’s Fund being released Tuesday. With a child poverty rate of 13.3 per cent, Canada ranks 24th out of 35 industrialized nations, behind the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and most of northern Europe, says the UNICEF report. Overall, the Netherlands and Nordic countries have the lowest rates of child poverty, hovering at about 7 per cent, almost half Canada’s rate. Meantime, the United States and some of the southern European countries have the highest. Iceland has the lowest child poverty rate at 4.7 per cent and Romania has the highest at 25.5 per cent. The U.S. rate is 23 per cent. When it comes to the size of the gap between child poverty [ http://goo.gl/2ofMB ] and a nation’s overall poverty rate, Canada fares somewhat better at 18 out of 35, the report notes.
(...)
In a companion report, UNICEF Canada notes that the country’s tax and transfer policies are moderately effective compared to other affluent countries. Canada’s relative child poverty rate before taxes and benefits is 24.1 per cent, close to the U.S. rate of 25.1 per cent. But after taxes and transfers, the rate in Canada drops by almost a half while the U.S. rate remains unchanged, the report says.

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

---

New release
from UNICEF:

Measuring Child Poverty : child poverty in the world's rich countries (PDF - 1.7MB, 40 pages)
http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/rc10_eng.pdf
Innocenti Report Card 10
May 2012
Report Card 10 considers two views of child poverty in the world’s advanced economies: a measure of absolute deprivation, and a measure of relative poverty. The first measure is a 14-item Child Deprivation Index that represents a significant new development in international monitoring, drawing on data from the European Union’s Statistics on Incomes and Living Conditions survey of 125,000 households in 31 European countries, which has included a section on children for the first time. Children were considered 'deprived' if they lacked two or more of the items, which ranged from three meals a day, to an Internet connection. The second measure covers the EU and an additional six OECD countries (Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Switzerland and the United States) and examines the percentage of children living below their national 'poverty line' - defined as 50 per cent of median disposable household income.

Two background papers from the UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre support this Report:

1. Bradshaw, J., Y. Chzhen, C. de Neubourg, G. Main, B. Martorano and L. Menchini (2012), ‘Relative Income Poverty among Children in
Rich Countries
’, Innocenti Working Paper 2012-01, UNICEF Innocenti
Research Centre, Florence.
www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/iwp_2012_01.pdf

2. de Neubourg, C., J. Bradshaw, Y. Chzhen, G. Main, B. Martorano and L. Menchini (2012),
‘Child Deprivation, Multidimensional Poverty and Monetary Poverty in Europe
Innocenti Working Paper 2012-02
www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/iwp_2012_02.pdf

Source:
UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre
(Florence)
http://www.unicef-irc.org/
The Innocenti Research Centre (IRC) was established in Florence, Italy in 1988 to strengthen the research capability of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and to support its advocacy for children worldwide.

UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund)
http://www.unicef.org/

---

The Canadian companion report:

Canada can do more to protect its children from poverty, new UNICEF report
http://goo.gl/J1EFd
TORONTO, May 29, 2012
A new report released by UNICEF today comparing child poverty in 35 industrialized countries reveals Canada could be doing more to protect its children. (...)
Report Card 10: Measuring Child Poverty from UNICEF’s Research Office reveals Canada’s child poverty rate is higher than Canada’s overall national poverty rate. When comparing this gap between child poverty and overall poverty, Canada ranks 18th of the 35 countries measured. Ten of the 35 countries have lower child poverty rates than overall poverty rates, including the Nordic countries, Japan and Australia. Romania is at the bottom of the list with a child poverty rate of 26 per cent - a third higher than its national rate.

Poverty : the one line we want our kids to cross
UNICEF Report Card 10 : Measuring Child Poverty - Canadian Companion
(PDF - 2.8MB, 7 pages)
http://goo.gl/ezZtF
UNICEF’s comparison of child poverty across industrialized countries shows that government action is a key driver to reduce child poverty.
In countries that accept higher levels of child poverty, this is not just a function of chance or necessity, but of policy and priority.

UNICEF Canada
http://www.unicef.ca/en

---

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

17. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)
Latest issue:

30 May 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1278
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4234
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- About time for definitive action
- Praying for adequate treatment
- Rights for some
- Biting the mosquito
- A deficient manifesto
- Ensuring safety, preventing mortality
- Feeling the strain
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Guinea-Bissau
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1: (WITH table of contents)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010:

Option 2: (WITHOUT table of contents)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- On the CRINMAIL website --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

--------------------------------------------------

NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

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There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

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Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Humour in the Court!

Q. What is your brother-in-law's name?
A. Borofkin.
Q. What is his first name?
A. I can't remember.
Q. He's been your brother-in-law for years, and you can't remember his first name?
A. No. I tell you I'm too excited.
(Rising from the witness chair and pointing to Mr. Borofkin.) Nathan, for God's sake, tell them your first name!!

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Q. Did you ever stay all night with this man in New York?
A. I refuse to answer that question.
Q. Did you ever stay all night with this man in Chicago?
A. I refuse to answer that question.
Q. Did you ever stay all night with this man in Miami?
A. No.

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Q. Doctor, did you say he was shot in the woods?
A. No. I said he was shot in the lumbar region.

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Q. Now, Mrs. Johnson, how was your first marriage terminated?
A. By death.
Q. And by whose death was it terminated?

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Q. What is your name?
A. Ernestine McDowell.
Q. And what is your marital status?
A. Fair.
Q. Are you married?
A. No, I'm divorced.
Q. And what did your husband do before you divorced him?
A. A lot of things I didn't know about.

---------------------------------
Q. Mrs. Smith, do you believe that you are emotionally unstable?
A. I should be.
Q. How many times have you committed suicide?
A. Four times.

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Q. Doctor, how many autopsies have you performed on dead people?
A. All my autopsies have been performed on dead people.

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Q. Did you tell your lawyer your husband had offered you indignities?
A. He didn't offer me nothing; he just said I could have the furniture.

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Q. The truth of the matter is that you were not an unbiased, objective witness, isn't it? You too were shot in the fracas?
A. No, sir. I was shot midway between the fracas and the navel.

Source:
http://www.freemaninstitute.com/court.htm


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And, in closing...
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Existentialist Cat (video, duration 2:06)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iShT21IQWxQ&feature=youtu.be

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What's wrong with these photos?
http://photos.ellen.warnerbros.com/galleries/whats_wrong_with_these_photos

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Diving with sharks (video, duration 3:48
http://www.wimp.com/divingsharks/
Great (mariachi?) music, great filmography, incredible shark tricks!

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Ventriloquism with a twist (video, duration 14:26)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=eFafj0ystrs

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Live Lip-Dub Proposal (video, duration 5:53)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_v7QrIW0zY&feature=plcp