Canadian Social Research Newsletter
July 3, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,439 subscribers.

************************************************************************

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...



IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1.
[Ontario] 800-rule welfare system assailed (Windsor Star) - June 29
2. Changing Families, New Understandings (Vanier Institute of the Family) - June 29
3. Know Your Rights - ten-part radio series starting June 27 (CBC Radio)
4. [Ontario] Poverty reduction does make a difference (Toronto Star) - June 15
5. CBC contributes $3.7B to economy: study (CBC News) - June 15
6. The Kids Are Not All Right [youth unemployment] (Progressive Economics Forum) - June 22
7. Canada Learning Bond helps low-income families (Moneyville.ca - Toronto Star) - June 26
8. Dead links? Wayback Bookmarklet to the Rescue!

9.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, April 2011 - June 30
--- Consumer Price Index, May 2011 - June 30
--- Study: Economy and the environment, 1990 to 2010
- June 28
--- Family income and individuals income, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2009 - - June 28
---
Canadian Social Trends - Summer 2011 - June 28

--- Canadian Community Health Survey: Injuries, 2009-2010 - June 28
--- Employment Insurance Coverage Survey, 2010 - June 27
---
Shelters for abused women, 2010 - June 27
---Study: Life-path outcomes associated with reading ability, 2010 - June 27
--- Study: The underground economy in Canada, 1992 to 2008 - June 27
10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
12. Media propaganda techniques or political propaganda techniques?
(Truth-out.org) - July 2
13. [U.S.] Asset Building: A Bipartisan Policy Solution (Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity) - June 27
14. [U.S.] Mollie Orshansky, Developer of the U.S. Poverty Thresholds (Health and Human Services)
15. [U.S.] Unions, Norms, and the Rise in American Wage Inequality (Harvard University) - March 2011
16. World Bank Is Opening Its Treasure Chest of Data (World Bank) - July 2
17. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]


1. [Ontario] 800-rule welfare system assailed - June 29
(Windsor Star)

800-rule welfare system assailed
June 29, 2011
By Don Lajoie
As she begins consultations in the city with Canada's highest unemployment rate, the woman charged with reviewing the province's welfare system says a fundamental overhaul is needed to help lift families from poverty. Frances Lankin, recently appointed commissioner of the province's new Social Assistance Review Commission, told the general meeting of the United Way for Windsor and Essex County Tuesday that the system may be too complicated and irrational. "We've been asked to simplify the rules," said the former NDP provincial cabinet minister. "There are now 800 rules. How does anyone navigate through? It's not humanly possible for a caseworker to know all the (eligibility) rules without bogging down in administration .... There's no time left to help families."
In addition, she said, the benefit rates, which are supposed to guarantee a basic living for recipients, seem to be based on random numbers.
Source:
The Windsor Star

---

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

2. Changing Families, New Understandings - June 29
(Vanier Institute of the Family)

Changing Families, New Understandings
June 29, 2011

[ Version française :
Familles en évolution, nouvelles interprétations
]

The report:

Changing Families, New Understandings (PDF - 462K, 46 pages)
By Meg Luxton
York University
Changing Families, New Understandings, by Dr. Meg Luxton, explores key debates about the roles and responsibilities families in Canada today. Dr. Luxton makes the case that unpacking our understanding of family is key to crafting policies and programs that support families, in all of their diversity, in the essential work that they do.

[ Meg Luxton is a Professor in the School of Women’s Studies at York University. ]

Related VIF products (see links on the Changing Families, New Understandings page)
* Divorce: Facts, causes and consequences, Anne-Marie Ambert, 19 Nov, 2009
* Are the Children Well? VIF, 15 Sep, 2009
* Cohabitation and Marriage: How Are They Related?, Anne-Marie Ambert, 17 Sep, 2005
* Older Canadians and Their Families, VIF, 20 Oct, 2004
* Response to: Marriage and Legal Recognition of Same-Sex Unions: A Discussion Paper , Robert Glossop, 18 Feb, 2003
* Youth and Identity, VIF, 20 Oct, 2001
* A Death in the Family, VIF, 20 Apr, 2001

All VIF Research
- browse by topic or by publication title

Source:
Vanier Institute of the Family
The Vision of the Vanier Institute of the Family is
to make families as important to the life of Canadian society
as they are to the lives of individual Canadians. VIF's mission is "t
o create awareness of, and to provide leadership on, the importance and strengths of families in Canada and the challenges they face in their structural, demographic, economic, cultural and social diversity."

---

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

3. Know Your Rights - ten-part radio series starting June 27
(CBC Radio)

Know Your Rights
Know Your Rights is an on-the-ground and in-the-field exploration of our rights as Canadian citizens. Host Craig Norris navigates the complex world of what we legally can and cannot do in our country. What freedoms do we have? And how far can we push it before someone pushes back?
- includes links to : Main - About the Show - Know Your Rights Blog - Past Episodes - The Fine Print - Contact Us

The home page includes an embedded audio player with the first episode - Freedom of Expression (Duration 27:30) - queued up for you to listen.
The show originally aired Monday, June 27, 2011, and it's the first of a ten-part series.
You can catch all weekly episodes on CBC Radio One or Sirius Satellite Radio, or you can subscribe to the podcast via RSS or iTunes.
Click the home page link above to access all of these options.

Source:
CBC

Know Your Rights Facebook page

---

- Go to the Human Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm

4. [Ontario] Poverty reduction does make a difference - June 15
(Toronto Star)

Poverty reduction does make a difference
June 26, 2011
By Greg deGroot-Maggetti*
The evidence is in. A lot of people in Canada took a real hit during the recent recession. Figures from Statistics Canada show that poverty became a reality for more Canadians between 2007 and 2009. No surprise there, really. It’s hard to imagine poverty falling in the worst global recession in recent history. But look a little closer and something more interesting appears. In Ontario, child poverty actually fell between 2008 and 2009, inching down from 15.2 per cent to 14.6 per cent. That means 19,000 Ontario children and their families were moved out of poverty, despite very tough times. Granted, the change is small, but it’s a stark contrast to other provinces that were also hit hard by the recession. In Alberta, for example, child poverty soared by 25 per cent in the same period. What’s the difference? Ontario took concrete action to reduce child poverty. Provinces like Alberta didn’t. (...) Now is the time for all parties in Ontario to talk about their poverty reduction policies and plans. We need to know what action they plan to take to make sure all Ontarians, adults as well as children, will experience less poverty.

[* Author Greg deGroot-Maggetti is poverty advocate for Mennonite Central Committee Ontario and a former member of the National Council of Welfare.]

[ Comments (16) ]

Source:
Toronto Star

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

5. CBC contributes $3.7B to economy: study - June 15
(CBC News)

CBC contributes $3.7B to economy: study
June 15, 2011
CBC/Radio-Canada contributed $3.7 billion to the Canadian economy in 2010, according to an economic impact study by Deloitte and Touche.
The study, commissioned by the CBC and released Wednesday, attempts to measure the value of having a publicly funded broadcaster in Canada. CBC president Hubert Lacroix says the report helps prove Canadians are getting value for their tax dollars.

[ 121 comments ]

Source:
CBC News

---

- Go to the Miscellaneous Media Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/media_misc.htm

6. The Kids Are Not All Right (youth unemployment) - June 22
(Progressive Economics Forum)

From the
Progressive Economics Forum:

The Kids Are Not All Right
By Andrew Jackson
June 22, 2011
As is well-known, young people are still bearing the brunt of the recession. The employment rate for youth aged 15-24 last month was 55.6%, well down from 60.3% back before the recession in September, 2008 due to an increase in unemployment and an increase in those not looking for work. And the proportion of youth in part-time jobs has risen.

Related links:

Labour force characteristics by age and sex - from Statistics Canada

Unemployment; youth total (% of total labor force ages 15-24) in Canada
- from
TradingEconomics.com

NOTE : On the Trading Economics website home page, you'll find info for different regions of the world and for each of 232 countries on the following : * GDP Billions US$ * GDP Growth * Interest rate * Inflation rate * Jobless rate * Gov. Budget * Exchange rate * Population

"Trading Economics provides its users with accurate information for 232 countries including historical data for more than 300.000 economic indicators, exchange rates, stock market indexes, government bond yields and commodity prices. Our data is regularly checked for inconsistencies and based on official sources; with the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, central banks and national statistics bureaus being the most important. TradingEconomics.com has received more than 10 million page views from more than 200 countries."

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

7. Canada Learning Bond helps low-income families - June 26
(Moneyville.ca - Toronto Star)

Canada Learning Bond helps low-income families
By Louise Brown
June 26, 2011
"(...) in Toronto, some 78,000 eligible families don’t claim the Canada Learning Bond, even though it is open to any child born since 2004 whose net family income is no more than $41,000 a year. Across Ontario, an alarming 405,000 eligible families don’t apply..."
Source:
Moneyville.ca - Toronto Star

Canada Learning Bond
The Canada Learning Bond (CLB) is a grant offered by the Government of Canada to help parents, friends, and family members save early for the post-secondary education of children in modest-income families. (...) The Government of Canada will make a one-time payment of $500 into the RESP of children who qualify for the Canada Learning Bond and a $100 deposit each subsequent year the child’s primary caregiver receives the National Child Benefit Supplement, to a maximum of $2,000.
Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Canlearn.ca offers more detailed information regarding the Canada Learning Bond.

---

- Go to the Education Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm

8. Dead links? Wayback Bookmarklet to the Rescue!

Eureka! No more lost Internet websites and files!!
(Well, *almost* no more...)

Frustrated when you click on a link to a website or a report and end up with a dreaded 404 error?
Wouldn't it be nice to have a button on your browser that could retrieve archived copies of the site or report that just vanished?
Say hi to the Wayback Bookmarklet.

Wayback Bookmarklet - Click this link, then scroll halfway down the page to "Take The Wayback Machine With You". Drag the Wayback link to your browser's toolbar (also called a Links bar). Now, when you click a link to a website OR to website content and the link is dead, just click your Wayback toolbar link and you'll be transported to a calendar with links to any historic versions of the website or the file archived at the Wayback Machine. Select the latest version before the link went dead. You'll just have to play with this tool to learn how useful it can be to help you retrieve lost files and sites!

NOTE: You can also retrieve archived copies by copying and pasting a link into the Wayback Machine Search Engine:
http://www.archive.org/

----

Canadian Social Research Links on December 6, 2000
This is a functional archived copy of this website from the Wayback Machine as at 06-12-2000.
It's one of 238 separate versions of Canadian Social Research Links website (the whole thing) going back to December 2000, when Archive.org started indexing my site. Click the link to see how much the website look and feel have changed since December 2000!!

More about the Wayback Machine - Archive.org
NOTE : this link takes you to the Canadian Social Research Links Reference page;
"The Wayback Machine - Archive.org" is near the top of the page.

---

- Go to the Reference Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/reference.htm

9. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, April 2011 - June 30
--- Consumer Price Index, May 2011 - June 30
--- Study: Economy and the environment, 1990 to 2010
- June 28
--- Family income and individuals income, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2009 - - June 28
---
Canadian Social Trends - Summer 2011 - June 28

--- Canadian Community Health Survey: Injuries, 2009-2010 - June 28
--- Employment Insurance Coverage Survey, 2010 - June 27
---
Shelters for abused women, 2010 - June 27
---Study: Life-path outcomes associated with reading ability, 2010 - June 27
--- Study: The underground economy in Canada, 1992 to 2008 - June 27

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

June 30, 2011
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, April 2011
Average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees increased 0.7% from March to $876.44 in April. Compared with April 2010, average weekly earnings were 3.5% higher.

Source:
Employment, Earnings and Hours - product main page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE:
Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month or later after this report first appears in The Daily.
---
* On the product main page,click "View" to see the
latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings


June 29, 2011
Consumer Price Index, May 2011
Consumer prices rose 3.7% in the 12 months to May, following a 3.3% increase posted in April. The increase in May was primarily a result of higher gasoline prices. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices rose 0.2% in May.
- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Complete report for May 2011
* Highlights
* Briefing notes
* Analysis
* Tables
* Charts
* Data quality, concepts and methodology
* Appendices
* User information
* Related products
* PDF version (394K, 67 pages)

Source:
The Consumer Price Index - product main page*
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
* On the product main page, click View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ earlier editions of this report ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)

Related subjects:
* Prices and price indexes
* Consumer price indexes


June 28, 2011
Study: Economy and the environment, 1990 to 2010
Canada's natural wealth, defined as the dollar value of selected natural resource stocks and land, stood at roughly $3 trillion in 2009. In 1990, it was just under $1 trillion.

Related links:

Human Activity and the Environment - product main page*
Human Activity and the Environment (16-201-X) is an annual publication that focuses on a current environmental issue. The latest information and statistics are gathered from many sources to produce an in-depth analytical article.
[ * Click "View" for the latest issue of this periodical; click "Chronological" index for earlier editions. ]

Human Activity and the Environment: Detailed Statistics - product main page*
Human Activity and the Environment: Detailed Statistics (16-201-S) is a collection of statistics focusing on human activities from an environmental perspective. Data are compiled from many sources including Statistics Canada, federal government departments, provincial governments and other sources.
[ * Click "View" for the latest issue of this periodical; click "Chronological" index for earlier editions. ]


June 28, 2011
Family income and individuals income, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2009
According to family income data derived from 2009 personal income tax returns, Ottawa–Gatineau was the census metropolitan area (CMA) with the highest median total family income ($89,410), followed by Calgary ($88,410), Edmonton ($86,250) and Regina ($83,550).
- includes two tables:
* Median total income of census families and persons not in census families by census metropolitan area
* Median total income of census families by family type and census metropolitan area

Related subjects:
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household assets, debts and wealth
* Household, family and personal income


June 28, 2011
Canadian Social Trends - Summer 2011
The Summer 2011 edition of Canadian Social Trends includes six articles previously released in the online edition.
Click the link above to access any of the articles below.
* Working at home: An update explores characteristics of people most likely to work at home and the various reasons behind their decision.
* Uptake of water- and energy-conservation devices in the home looks at home and homeownership characteristics in relation to the use of conservation measures.
* Ethical consumption examines the evolution of consumers' purchasing behaviour based on ethical criteria.
* The financial knowledge of Canadians shows how personal financial knowledge is related to socio-demographic characteristics and other financial behaviours.
* Debt and family type in Canada asks which types of families are experiencing high levels of debt.
* How does personal bankruptcy affect retirement plans " identifies the retirement preparations of pre-retirees who have experienced bankruptcy.

Source:
Canadian Social Trends - Product main page*
This publication discusses the social, economic, and demographic changes affecting the lives of Canadians
[ * Click "View" for the latest issue of this periodical; click "Chronological" index for earlier editions. ]


June 28, 2011
Canadian Community Health Survey: Injuries, 2009-2010
About 4.27 million Canadians aged 12 or older suffered an injury severe enough to limit their usual activities in 2009/2010, according to a study published today in Health at a Glance. The overall injury rate in 2009/2010 was 15%, up from 13% in 2001. The most noticeable increase over this period was among young people aged 12 to 19. For girls in this age group, the proportion of injured increased from 18% to 23%. However, adolescent males remain the group most at risk (30%).

Related subjects:
* Children and youth
* Health and well-being (youth)
* Health
* Diseases and health conditions

Source:
Health at a Glance - product main page*
Health at a Glance features current Canadian health statistics from Statistics Canada's health-related surveys and administrative databases. Each issue of Health at a Glance includes a short analytical article that uses statistics to illustrate topical health issues. They include analysis of the complex inter-related topic of health by examining social, economic, and demographic factors.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related link:

Health Profile - product main page*
This profile features community-level data from a number of sources including Statistics Canada's health surveys, administrative data, and the census of population. The application is designed to give quick access to the latest health-related data available for a selected health region, providing the corresponding provincial data by default, but users can easily select any region of choice for comparison.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]


June 27, 2011
Employment Insurance Coverage Survey, 2010
In 2010, rates of eligibility for receiving regular Employment Insurance (EI) benefits declined compared with 2009, when Canada was in an economic downturn. The eligibility rate fell for both men and young people aged 15 to 24, but remained unchanged for women.
- includes links to three tables:
* Coverage and eligibility of the unemployed for Employment Insurance benefits, 2010
* Coverage and eligibility of the unemployed for Employment Insurance benefits by sex, 2010
* Coverage and eligibility of the unemployed for Employment Insurance benefits, by province, 2010

More information about the
Employment Insurance Coverage Survey (EICS)

The Employment Insurance Coverage Survey provides a meaningful picture of who does or does not have access to EI benefits among the jobless and those in a situation of underemployment. The survey also covers access to maternity and parental benefits.
- includes detailed information for 2010, the questionnaire(s) and reporting guide(s), a description of the survey, data sources and methodology and data accuracy.

Related subjects:
* Labour
* Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
* Non-wage benefits

---

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm


June 27, 2011
Shelters for abused women, 2010
On April 15, 2010, there were 593 shelters offering services to abused women in Canada, up from 569 in 2008 when this information was last collected. On that day, 4,645 women were residing in these shelters. More than one-third (36%) were staying at transition homes, followed by emergency shelters (21%), second-stage housing (20%) and women's emergency shelters (15%). The remaining 7% were staying in other types of shelters.

Also released on June 27, 2011:

* Study: Life-path outcomes associated with reading ability, 2010

* Study: The underground economy in Canada, 1992 to 2008
[ Related link : The Underground Economy and Business Tax Evasion by Andrew Jackson (Progressive Economics Forum) ]


The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

July 2, 2011

What's new online this week:

Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Early education economic forum
29 Jun 2011
Video and slides available from recent Atkinson Centre forum; presentations by Pierre Fortin and Robert Fairholm, panel discussion moderated by Dr. Lars Osberg.

Mentoring Pairs for Child Care Project: Final outcome report
29 Jun 2011
Final report from an Ontario-wide project by the Early Childhood Community Development Centre that aims to enhance child care quality by matching up more and less experienced child care supervisors.

Birthdate and student achievement: The effects of school grouping practices in British Columbia
29 Jun 2011
Report examines the effects of single cut-off date for kindergarten admission and one-year age grouping practices on student learning in British Columbia schools.

Annual report on Ontario's publicly funded schools 2011
29 Jun 2011
Report from People for Education includes a section addressing Early Years Education & Care; recommends that Ontario "enact regulations so that only school boards, municipalities and not-for-profit agencies are permitted to operate extended day programs in schools".

Improving public financing for early learning programs
29 Jun 2011
Policy brief from the US National Institute for Early Education Research "reviews sources and models of public financing of early care and education and makes recommendations for improving upon what currently exists so as to remove barriers to increasing program access and quality".

MORE research, policy & practice

Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Almost 20,000 Toronto tots waiting for child care subsidies
29 Jun 2011 Ontario

Is your kid ready to start? Youngest in class more likely to have problems keeping up with the curriculum
29 Jun 2011 Canada

Full assessment of kindergarten students promised for fall 2012
29 Jun 2011 British Columbia

Pregnant? Wait till the boss hears
29 Jun 2011 Europe

Take-A-Break cuts threaten occasional childcare
29 Jun 2011 Australia and New Zealand

MORE Child care in the news

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

July 1:
Medicaid Cuts - California
Dental Health of Poor Children
Drug Sentencing Laws
State Government Shutdown - Minnesota

June 30:
Academic Achievement of Low-Income Students
Reductions to Cash Assistance - New Jersey
TANF and Drug Testing - Florida

June 29:
Workplace Health Insurance Coverage - Minnesota
States and Voter ID Laws
Education Cuts and Class Sizes
States and Medicaid Changes - Indiana, Arizona

June 28:
Job-Training Programs
Social Impact Bonds
Cities and Energy Efficiency Projects

June 27:
Affordable Housing and Homelessness - Minnesota
Privatization of Social Services - Indiana
States and Medicaid Cuts

---------------------------------------

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

12. Media propaganda techniques or political propaganda techniques? - July 2
(Truth-out.org)

Media propaganda techniques
or political propaganda techniques?

The (Sun) Media Watch Facebook page
This Facebook page is a spinoff from the Media Watch page from rabble.ca
(Sun) Media Watch exists to dispel myths perpetrated by ideologically driven reporters and sensationalist media (read "Sun News") in Canada, and to c
orrect the record - reminding media that facts matter.

The latest (Sun) Media Watch Facebook posting links to the following article in Truth-out.org about 14 propaganda techniques used by Fox News in the U.S. to spread their disinformation. The posting from Sun Media Watch invites visitors to "substitute 'Fox News' for 'Sun News' - it's as if this piece was written with Canadian SunTV in mind."

Now that I've read the article below, I'd invite visitors to substitute "Fox News" for "Conservative Party of Canada". It's uncanny how easily one can remember Harper Government™ examples of almost every tactic in the list below --- Heck, you can probably paste John Baird's name next to most of those techniques...

14 Propaganda Techniques Fox
"News" Uses to Brainwash Americans

July 2, 2011
"There is nothing more sacred to the maintenance of democracy than a free press. Access to comprehensive, accurate and quality information is essential to the manifestation of Socratic citizenship - the society characterized by a civically engaged, well-informed and socially invested populace. Thus, to the degree that access to quality information is willfully or unintentionally obstructed*, democracy itself is degraded. It is ironic that in the era of 24-hour cable news networks and "reality" programming, the news-to-fluff ratio and overall veracity of information has declined precipitously."
---
* [Can YOU say "Census long form questionnaire?"]
---

My favourite line: "The good news is that the more conscious you are of these techniques, the less likely they are to work on you. The bad news is that those reading this article are probably the least in need in of it."

The techniques include:
1. Panic Mongering.
2. Character Assassination/Ad Hominem.
3. Projection/Flipping.
4. Rewriting History.
5.
Scapegoating/Othering.
6. Conflating Violence With Power and Opposition to Violence With Weakness.
7. Bullying.
8. Confusion.
9. Populism.
10. Invoking the Christian God.
11. Saturation.
12. Disparaging Education.
13. Guilt by Association.
14. Diversion.
[ Click the link above for more info on each of these.]

Source:
Truth-out. org
Truthout works to broaden and diversify the political discussion by introducing independent voices and focusing on under-covered issues and unconventional thinking. Harnessing the expanding power of the Internet, we work to spread reliable information, critical thought and progressive ideas.
We are devoted to equality, democracy, human rights, accountability and social justice. We believe in the power of free speech, and know that democratic journalism can make the world a better place.

---

- Go to the Miscellaneous Media Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/media_misc.htm

13. [U.S.] Asset Building: A Bipartisan Policy Solution - June 27
(Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity)

United States

Asset Building: A Bipartisan Policy Solution
June 27, 2011
Commentary
By Representative Eric Pettigrew (D) and
Representative Bill Hinkle (R),
Washington State Legislature

Many working families in America are facing a savings crisis. Over half of the families with incomes under $24,800 could not remain above the poverty line for a mere three months if they lost their source of income. For these families, both sides of the aisle agree the answer is not just to boost incomes, it’s to help them save for the future and become more financially secure through asset building.

Source:
Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity
Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity was launched in October 2007 by major U.S. foundations to foster non-partisan debate during the 2008 campaign season about policy approaches for addressing poverty and opportunity. Today, Spotlight provides a platform for ongoing discussion about how best to address the needs of those who have fallen into poverty during the Great Recession and those who have struggled for generations to move up the economic ladder.

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- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

14. [U.S.] Mollie Orshansky, Developer of the U.S. Poverty Thresholds
(Health and Human Services)

Mollie Orshansky, Developer of the U.S. Poverty Thresholds

Mollie Orshansky:
Her Career, Achievements, and Publications

This new web page on the website of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (Health and Human Services) offers information on Mollie Orshansky’s career, her achievements, and her publications on the subject of the poverty population and poverty thresholds. The web page includes links to articles and conference presentations about Orshansky, a paper on the development and history of her poverty thresholds, and a chronological bibliography of her publications and Congressional testimony from 1947 to 1990.

On the last page of this August 2008 conference presentation (PDF - 68K, 8 pages) by Gordon Fisher, you'll even find a reference to Jennie Podoluk, the federal civil servant who developed the Canadian Low Income Cutoffs ("LICOs") at Statistics Canada in the 1960s, around the same time as Ms Orshansky was working on the American poverty thresholds. In this presentation, Mr. Fisher, who is now responsible for the preparation of the annual poverty guidelines for Health and Human Services, acknowledges the contributions to poverty measurement of both Orshansky and Podoluk, at a time when there weren't many women in senior government jobs on either side of the Canada- U.S. border.

Source:
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE)
[ Health and Human Services ]

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Related ASPE links:
(Released January 20, 2011)

The 2011 HHS Poverty Guidelines
The 2011 HHS Poverty Guidelines for the 48 contiguous states* and the District of Columbia are as follows:
# of Persons in Family --------- Poverty Guideline
1 ------------------------------------- $10,890
2 ------------------------------------- $14,710
3 ------------------------------------- $18,530
4 ------------------------------------- $22,350
5 ------------------------------------- $26,170
6 ------------------------------------- $29,990
7 ------------------------------------- $33,810
8 ------------------------------------- $37,630
For each additional person, add - $3,820
[ *The HHS Poverty Guidelines are higher in Alaska and Hawaii.
Click the link above to see guidelines for these two states.]

[ Federal Register Notice, January 20, 2011 — Full text ]
[ Prior Poverty Guidelines and Federal Register References Since 1982 ]
[ Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) ]
[ Further Resources on Poverty Measurement, Poverty Lines, and Their History ]
[ Computations for the 2011 Poverty Guidelines ]
[ Poverty Guidelines, Research, and Measurement ]

***

There are two slightly different versions of the federal poverty measure: the poverty thresholds and the poverty guidelines.
On the 2011 HHS Poverty Guidelines page, you'll find an explanation of thresholds and guidelines.

Key differences between poverty thresholds and poverty guidelines are outlined in a table under Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

Source:
Office of Human Services Policy
[Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning & Evaluation ]
[ Department of Health and Human Services ]

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- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

15. [U.S.] Unions, Norms, and the Rise in American Wage Inequality - March 2011
(Harvard University)

Unions and Inequality
By Andrew Jackson
June 27, 2011
An important paper by Bruce Western and Jake Rosenfeld which is forthcoming in the American Journal of Sociology finds that the decline in private sector union density in the US (from 34% to 8% for men, and from 16% to 6% for women) explains one fifth to one third of the increase in inequality of hourly earnings over the period 1973 to 2007. This shows declining union density to be a much greater causal factor than most studies have found.
The novel contribution of the authors is to show empirically through a sophisticated quantitative analysis that a fall from high to lower union density in industrial/regional clusters is associated with rising levels of wage inequality among non union workers in those clusters.
Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

The paper:

Unions, Norms, and the Rise in
American Wage Inequality
(PDF - 283K, 48 pages)
By Bruce Western and Jake Rosenfeld
March, 2011
"(...) We revisited the effect of declining union membership on wage inequality, arguing that unions not only equalized the wages of union members; they
also equalized the nonunion wage distribution by threatening union organization and buttressing norms for fair pay.
Source:
Department of Sociology
[ Harvard University ]

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- Go to the Union Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/unionbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

16. World Bank Is Opening Its Treasure Chest of Data - July 2
(World Bank)

World Bank Is Opening Its Treasure Chest of Data
By Stephanie Strom
July 2, 2011
(...) The World Bank’s traditional role has been to finance specific projects that foster economic development, whereas the I.M.F.’s goal is to safeguard the global monetary system. But many people, particularly in the developing world, have long questioned whether the economic prescriptions that these two lofty institutions hand down from Washington — essentially: liberalize, privatize and deregulate — have done anything but advance the interests of wealthy nations like the United States. (..) So it might come as a surprise that the president of the World Bank, Robert B. Zoellick, a career diplomat and member of the Republican foreign-policy elite, argues that the most valuable currency of the World Bank isn’t its money — it is its information.
(...)
Long regarded as a windowless ivory tower, the World Bank is opening its vast vault of information. True, the bank still lends roughly $170 billion annually. But it is increasingly competing for influence and power with Wall Street, national governments and smaller regional development banks, who have as much or more money to offer. It is no longer the only game in town. And so Mr. Zoellick, 57, is wielding knowledge — lots of it. For more than a year, the bank has been releasing its prized data sets, currently giving public access to more than 7,000 that were previously available only to some 140,000 subscribers — mostly governments and researchers, who pay to gain access to it. Those data sets contain all sorts of information about the developing world, whether workaday economic statistics — gross domestic product, consumer price inflation and the like — or arcana like how many women are breast-feeding their children in rural Peru. (...) Mr. Zoellick says the bank’s newfound openness is part of a push to embrace competition, both internally and externally, as it tries to reduce poverty and foster economic development.

Source:
New York Times

[Comment (by Gilles) : Ironic that the Harper Government™ appears to be moving in the opposite direction with its (His) decision to axe the Census long form questionnaire - see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm for more on that.]

From the World Bank:

Virtual Statistical System (VSS)
The VSS is an online resource for national statistical offices, other data producing agencies, data users, including policy makers, academics, students, or anyone who wants to know more about official statistics. The VSS provides in-depth information on how effective statistical systems/organizations operate and the essential knowledge prerequisites of official statisticians working in these organizations.

Open Data
The Data Catalog provides download access to over 7,000 indicators from World Bank data sets.
View profiles by country - [ Canada profile ]

Source:
World Bank

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- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

17. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter

29 June 2011, CRINMAIL issue 1231
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Call against institutionalisation: Europe, Central Asia
- Early morning arrests & torture: Israel-OPT
- Immigration amendments urged: United States
- Anti-Roma discourse: Europe
- Nestlé’s marketing formula: Laos
- Dumping child workers: Namibia
- Seeking accountability: Libya, Côte d’Ivoire
Funding opportunity: gender development
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

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Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (second link up) does not include the table of contents for each issue.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 

Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com

 

The Dos and Don'ts of Quotes

Not sure when quotation marks are appropriate?
Here are the basics.

DO:
• Use quotation marks when you are quoting someone’s exact words. (“Don’t blame me,” she said. “I just work here.”)
• Use quotation marks when you are quoting someone’s writing. (In his review, the critic wrote that Fat Momma’s House 5 was “a visually stunning masterpiece, worthy of an Oscar.”)
• Use quotation marks when you’re being sarcastic. (My “best friend” stole my boyfriend, my car, and my favorite pair of argyle socks.)

DON'T:
• Use quotation marks when other parts of the sentence already tell the reader you’re being sarcastic. (My so-called “best friend” stole my boyfriend, my car, and my favorite pair of argyle socks.)
• Use quotation marks when you’re paraphrasing someone’s words (She told me “not to blame her, she just worked there.”)
• Use quotation marks when you want to emphasize a word. More often than not, random quotation marks sound unintentionally sarcastic.

The following examples are all incorrect.
• All "fried chicken" dinners half off.
• This offer is good for a "limited time" only.”
• Our team of "professionals" offers full-service IT solutions.
• I was "literally" on the edge of my seat.
• Open "24 hours"

A good proofreading job is the best defense against misused quotation marks and other grammatical blunders.

Source:
The Writers for Hire
http://www.thewritersforhire.com/

 

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And, in closing...

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What do you love? (from Google)
http://www.wdyl.com/#

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Parahawking in Nepal (video)
Something to add to my bucket list!
http://www.wimp.com/parahawkingnepal/

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The Log Driver's Waltz (YouTube video)
(Canada Vignettes)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upsZZ2s3xv8

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"Cold Cocking Cocky Cleverly Kills Cockiness" (video)
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=7db_1309474929

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LYTRO - Picture Revolution
http://www.lytro.com/
Adjust the depth-of-field in your photo!

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The Newspaper clipping generator
http://www.fodey.com/generators/newspaper/snippet.asp