Canadian Social Research Newsletter
March 4, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,532 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. [Ontario] 25 Is The New 21: The Costs and Benefits of Providing Extended Care and Maintenance to Ontario Youth in Care Until Age 25 (Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth) - March 1
2. Transforming Ontario's Social Assistance System (The Agenda with Steve Paikin - TVOntario) - February 28
3. [Ontario] Income tax changes eliminate refunds for many Ontario residents (Toronto Star) - March 2
4. [Ontario] POWER Study (Project for an Ontario Women's Health Evidence-Based Report) - February 28
5. British Columbia - new reports:
--- The Cost of Eating in British Columbia, 2011
(Dietitians of Canada) - February 28
--- Results of 2011 Metro Vancouver Homeless Count Greater Vancouver Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness - February 29
6. Public-Private Partnership to Renovate Single-Room Occupancy Hotels in the Downtown Eastside (Department of Finance Canada) - March 2
7. [Nunavut] The Makimaniq Plan: A Shared Approach to Poverty Reduction (Department of Economic Development & Transportation) - February 27
8. Old Age Insecurity? (Caledon Institute of Social Policy) - February 27
9. Trouble in Toryland: their Dirty Tricks catalogue (By Lawrence Martin in iPolitics.ca) - February 27
10. 2012 Progressive Economics Forum student essay contest - Deadline: May 7, 2012
11. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada] :
no social studies or reports in the past week
12. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

13. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
14. [U.S.] Poor who owe child support could lose federal benefits (Washington Post) - February 26
15. Fifteenth Annual Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (Washington), May 30–June 1, 2012
16. The State of the World’s Children 2012: Children in an Urban World (UNICEF) - February 29
17. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------------------------------------------------

Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. [Ontario] 25 Is The New 21: The Costs and Benefits of Providing Extended Care and Maintenance to Ontario Youth in Care Until Age 25 - March 1
(Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth)

From the
Toronto Star:

Ontario Crown wards deserve provincial help to age 25, child advocate Irwin Elman says
http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1138906
March 1, 2012
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Ontario’s provincial child advocate is adding his voice — and new evidence — to the call for Queen’s Park to provide financial and emotional support to former Crown wards until age 25. Currently, these vulnerable youth lose all support on their 21st birthday when children’s aid workers often take them to welfare offices and homeless shelters as a last resort. A cost-benefit analysis being released Thursday says the $103.5 million price tag to extend support to about 3,000 former Crown wards for an additional four years would be more than recouped through reduced jail and social assistance costs and increased tax revenue, as these youth are better able to complete their education and get good jobs.

Ontario should help foster kids until they turn 25
http://www.thestar.com/mobile/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1138937
February 29, 2012
By John Stapleton
On an impulse, while working on a social policy fellowship years ago at St. Christopher House, I asked a number of low-income adults in a community reference group — some in their 40s and 50s — if they had ever been in foster care. Slowly, more than half put up their hands. At that time, I was surprised. But I have asked the same question again in similar settings with similar results. I am no longer surprised. At age 21, youth who “age out” of care are not allowed to have any further relationship with the system that brought them this far — the foster care system or a group home. They often have nowhere to go.
(...)
Ontario’s children’s aid societies have several programs to help support young people as they age out of care. These include Extended Care and Maintenance (ECM) agreements that extend financial and emotional support past the age of 18 until age 21. These agreements are available only to youth who are Crown wards or to those in customary care or other specified arrangements. But these agreements only extend to age 21 and that’s simply not long enough. Studies show that 20-24 year-olds now stay at home at three times the rate their counterparts did just two generations ago. Youth aging out of care do not have this option.
(...)
Last year, I was asked by Irwin Elman, Ontario’s Advocate for Children and Youth, to conduct a cost-benefit analysis, the first such study we know of to have been completed in Canada. The result is a new report — 25 Is The New 21 — released on March 1.
Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

From the
Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth:

The Complete report:

25 Is The New 21:
The Costs and Benefits of Providing Extended Care
and Maintenance to Ontario Youth in Care Until Age 25
(PDF - 1.2MB, 70 pages)
http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/documents/en/25istheNew21.pdf
By John Stapleton, Anne Tweddle, Stephanie Procyk, Rene Doucet, and Brendan Pooran
Seven cost-benefit analyses have been undertaken in the United States and Australia to examine the costs to society of providing extra supports to youth in care after the age of 18. The studies reveal vastly different approaches, assumptions, and data sources. Yet all reach the same conclusion: increased investment in services for youth transitioning from care yield benefits in the long term. This is the first such study to be done in Canada. The analysis is based on the best and most promising aspects of the seven cost-benefit analyses mentioned above. The report examines available Ontario data, as well as Canadian and international sources, to estimate the cost of a program extension in Ontario. It also estimates the savings that could be achieved by bettering the lives of youth aging out of care.

Source:
Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth:
http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/

Related link:

Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal
http://www.cecw-cepb.ca/
The Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal (CWRP) provides access to up-to-date research on Canadian child welfare programs and policies. The Portal was originally developed through the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare (CECW), the Portal continues to maintain links with the Child Welfare League of Canada, the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, the Groupe de recherche et d'action sur la victimisation des enfants (GRAVE-ARDEC), and other groups and organizations that collaborated with the CECW. The Portal is designed to provide child welfare professionals, researchers, and the general public with a single point of access to Canadian child welfare research.
- Topics include : Child Abuse & Neglect - Out-of-Home Care - Intervention & Prevention - Families & Communities - Aboriginal Child Welfare - Policy & Legislation - Provinces & Territories.

---

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

2. Transforming Ontario's Social Assistance System - February 28
(The Agenda with Steve Paikin - TVOntario)

From TVOntario's
The Agenda with Steve Paikin:

Transforming Ontario's Social Assistance System
http://theagenda.tvo.org/blog/agenda-blogs/transforming-ontarios-social-assistance-system
By Allison Buchan-Terrell
February 28, 2012
You'd be forgiven for having missed it, especially given the hoopla around Don Drummond's long-awaited recommendations, but the Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario released "Discussion Paper 2: Approaches for Reform" earlier this month. The commission is headed by Frances Lankin, former president and CEO of United Way Toronto, and Munir Sheikh, former chief statistician at Statistics Canada.
[NOTE : Click the link above, then Scroll to the bottom of the page that opens to read the online version of Discussion Paper 2. If you wish to offer the commissioners your two cents' worth about social assistance reform in Ontario, there's a workbook you can use to send your feedback, along with options for you to send in your views.]

On February 28, 2012, The Agenda with Steve Paikin welcomed (1) both commissioners, and two people with lived experience of the system: (2) a recipient and (3) a caseworker. All three links below are to MP3 audio-only files; if you wish to watch the program segment in addition to hearing it, go to http://feeds.tvo.org/tvo/TxZN and click "Play Now" for videos of each segment.
[Humungous File Alert for anyone on a "light" Internet account : the video version of the first segment below is 95 Megabytes and the other two are 50+MB apiece. Also murder if you're on a slow Internet connection...]

----------------

(1) Overhauling Ontario's Social Assistance
Audio podcast MP3 format, 8.4MB, duration 23:52
http://podcasts.tvo.org/theagenda/audio/2001252_48k.mp3
February 28, 2012
Frances Lankin and Munir Sheikh were tasked with looking over Ontario's social security system. They join Steve Paikin to discuss the findings from their second discussion paper.

----------------

(2) Laura Cattari: Living on ODSP (Ontario Disability Support Program)
Audio podcast MP3 format, 4.3MB, duration 12:18
http://podcasts.tvo.org/theagenda/audio/2002123_48k.mp3
February 28, 2012
Laura Cattari wants to reform Ontario's social assistance program. She says it's unwieldy and difficult to navigate. And she should know, as she is an ODSP recipient. She shares her experience with Steve Paikin.

----------------

(3) Crystal Murphy: The Caseworker Perspective
Audio podcast MP3 format : 4.5MB - duration 12:50
http://podcasts.tvo.org/theagenda/audio/2002731_48k.mp3
February 28, 2012
Crystal Murphy has been an Ontario Works caseworker in Toronto for almost a decade. She tells Steve Paikin what she believes would help transform social assistance

----------------

Source:
The Agenda

http://theagenda.tvo.org/
TVOntario
http://ww3.tvo.org/home

---

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

3. [Ontario] Income tax changes eliminate refunds for many Ontario residents - March 2
(Toronto Star)

Income tax changes eliminate refunds for many Ontario residents
http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1140158
March 2, 2012
By Ellen Roseman
Ontario residents with low to moderate incomes may get a nasty surprise when filing their 2011 tax returns. Their refunds are disappearing, thanks to a low-key provincial decision to stop giving lump sum tax credit payments once a year. Instead, it has combined several tax credits into the Ontario Trillium Benefit. This will be paid monthly, starting in July, to those who receive relief for energy costs, rent, sales tax and property tax. The government made the move after consulting welfare experts, who said a monthly benefit would provide a steady income flow to pay bills. But that’s no consolation to people who expected to get a lump sum refund. They’re furious to get a promise of monthly payments later this year instead of a windfall at tax time.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

4. [Ontario] POWER Study (Project for an Ontario Women's Health Evidence-Based Report) - February 28

[Ontario] POWER Study (Project for an Ontario Women's Health Evidence-Based Report)
http://www.powerstudy.ca/
The POWER Study (Project for an Ontario Women's Health Evidence-Based Report), examined access, quality, and outcomes of care across the province using a comprehensive set of evidence-based indicators for the leading causes of disease and disability in the province and how they varied by sex, income, ethnicity and where one lives. Researchers are also providing the government with indicators and a 10–point road map (see attached) to reduce health inequities among men and women.

Researchers urge action to improve health of all Ontarians : Authors of women’s
health report develop 10-point Health Equity Road Map to move health equity forward
(PDF - 116K, 4 pages)
http://www.powerstudy.ca/sites/powerstudy.ca/files/ch_12_media_release.pdf
February 28, 2012
Media release
Researchers at St. Michael’s Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) released findings of a six-year long women’s health report they say provides government and health system players with the evidence and tools they need to drive reform to improve the health of women and men across Ontario.

---

- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

5. British Columbia - new reports:
--- The Cost of Eating in British Columbia, 2011
(Dietitians of Canada) - February 28
--- Results of 2011 Metro Vancouver Homeless Count Greater Vancouver Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness - February 29

Housing and food are still out of reach for too many people in British Columbia
http://goo.gl/ihpBK
February 29, 2012
By Trish Garner
Two significant reports were released this week that shine a light on the crisis of poverty we face as a province. Cost of Eating in B.C. 2011 found that healthy food is unaffordable for the poorest people in B.C. And the final Metro Vancouver Homeless Count report reveals that 2,650 people were homeless in 2011. Together, they paint a picture that shows that the basic necessities of housing and food are out of reach to many in our province.
[Links to both reports appear below.]
(...)
The most significant theme emerging from the two reports released yesterday is the issue of health. According to Cost of Eating, lack of healthy food can lead to “poor growth and development in children, learning deficits, poor school performance, [and] increased illness and susceptibility to disease for people of all ages.” The homeless-count report reveals that nearly all of the homeless have health problems, with the vast majority (62 per cent) reporting multiple health conditions. (...) The homeless-count report recommends action to address this crisis and the Cost of Eating proposes a poverty reduction strategy.

Source:
The Province Blogs (Vancouver)
http://www.theprovince.com/opinion/blogs/index.html
The Province - home page
http://www.theprovince.com/index.html

------------------------------

From the
Dietitians of Canada:

The Cost of Eating in British Columbia, 2011
http://www.dietitians.ca/Secondary-Pages/Public/The-Cost-of-Eating-in-British-Columbia.aspx
On February 28, 2012, Dietitians of Canada, BC Region released the report The Cost of Eating in BC 2011.Dietitians publish the report to bring attention to the fact that many British Columbians don’t have enough money to buy healthy food.
And, it’s not getting any better.

TIP : Click the link above and scroll down the page for links to earlier editions of this report for 2009, 2007, 2006 and 200.

2011 Cost of Eating in BC Report Released: Nothing is Improving
http://www.dietitians.ca/News-Releases/2012/Cost-of-Eating-report.aspx
News Release
February 28, 2012

The complete report:

The Cost of Eating in British Columbia, 2011 (PDF - 4.7MB, 16 pages)
http://goo.gl/U7CGh
Ensuring that individuals and families are food secure is more than addressing the immediate need to feed our hungry citizens. The solution rests in addressing the underlying factors that cause food insecurity, specifically poverty and the food system.
Recommendations for change outlined in this report:
1. Establish a provincial poverty reduction strategy
2. Build affordable housing
3. Update income assistance to reflect the cost of living
4. Enact a living wage policy
5. Work toward sustainable food systems that no longer require food banks

Source:

Dietitians of Canada:
http://www.dietitians.ca/
Dietitians of Canada (DC) is the national professional association for dietitians, representing almost 6000 members at the local, provincial and national levels. DC is one of the largest organizations of dietetic professionals in the world.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

------------------------------

From the
Greater Vancouver Regional
Steering Committee on Homelessness:
http://stophomelessness.ca/

2011 Homeless Count Report Finds Some Progress
but Increase in Family, Women and Youth Homelessness
http://stophomelessness.ca/homeless-count/final-homeless-count-report/
February 29, 2012
Today, The Greater Vancouver Regional Steering Committee (RSCH) on Homelessness released One Step Forward… Results of 2011 Metro Vancouver Homeless Count. This final Homeless Count report indicates that the total homeless population in Metro Vancouver was virtually unchanged at 2,650 in 2011 compared to 2,660 people counted in 2008. Those who reported being unsheltered decreased dramatically by 52%. (...) The Homeless Count also revealed that within the homeless population there was a sharp rise in the number of families with children, women and unaccompanied youth.
Aboriginal people comprise about 2% of the general population of Metro Vancouver but they remain overrepresented at 27% of homeless people enumerated that day.

Complete report:

One Step Forward…
Results of 2011 Metro Vancouver Homeless Count
(PDF - 1.8MB, 79 pages)
http://goo.gl/volvi
The 2011 Metro Vancouver Homeless Count was commissioned by the Greater Vancouver Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH) to update the number of homeless people in the region, the demographic profile of those surveyed or enumerated on Count Day, and trends on the nature and character of homelessness with reference to the three previous Counts in 2002, 2005 and 2008. (Source : Executive Summary - p.8)

Media backgrounder (PDF - 32K, 2 pages)
http://goo.gl/rpO4P
February 28, 2012
- includes Key Findings and About the Homeless Count

Source:
Greater Vancouver Regional
Steering Committee on Homelessness:
http://stophomelessness.ca/
The Greater Vancouver Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH) is a coalition of community organizations and all levels of government.
Our Vision is to eliminate homelessness in Greater Vancouver through the full implementation of the Regional Homelessness Plan: Three Ways to Home. you'll find a link to that plan on the "Homelessness in Vancouver" page [ http://vancouver.ca/commsvcs/housing/homelessness.htm ] on the Vancouver (city) website, along with links to over a dozen related reports.

---

Related link:

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/
We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour organizations, and social policy groups. We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness. We have 25 Coalition Members and over 350 supporting organizations with a collective membership of over 300,000 that have joined the call for a poverty reduction plan.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

6. Public-Private Partnership to Renovate Single-Room Occupancy Hotels in the Downtown Eastside - March 2
(Department of Finance Canada)

And, speaking of homelessness and sub-standard accommodation in BC...

Public-Private Partnership to Renovate Single-Room Occupancy Hotels in the Downtown Eastside
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n12/12-024-eng.asp
March 2, 2012
Vancouver, British Columbia—The Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia today announced a public-private partnership to renovate and restore 13 provincially owned Single-Room Occupancy (SRO) hotels housing some 900 residents in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside to provide access to clean and safe social housing. The Government of Canada will contribute up to $29.1 million through the P3 Canada Fund towards eligible construction and implementation costs. The Province will contribute $87.3 million towards construction and implementation costs and additional funding over a 15-year maintenance period.

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

http://www.fin.gc.ca/

---

- Go to the BC Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm

7. [Nunavut] The Makimaniq Plan: A Shared Approach to Poverty Reduction - February 27
(Department of Economic Development & Transportation)

From the
Department of Economic Development & Transportation:

Poverty reduction plan focuses on
community self-reliance, collaboration and healing

http://www.edt.gov.nu.ca/apps/News/dspNews.aspx?ID=276
IQALUIT, Nunavut
February 24, 2012 -The Makimaniq Plan: A Shared Approach to Poverty Reduction was released today as part of a long-term Poverty Reduction Action Plan for Nunavut. Nunavut's Minister of Economic Development and Transportation (EDT), Peter Taptuna, and Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. (NTI) Vice President, Jack Anawak, released the plan.

The Nunavut Poverty Reduction Action Plan:

The Makimaniq Plan: A Shared Approach to Poverty Reduction (PDF - 528K, 12 pages)
http://goo.gl/ysi3g
Poverty Summit
November 30, 2011
Iqaluit, Nunavut

NOTE : The Makimaniq Plan was actually announced at the close of Nunavut’s first territory-wide poverty summit on December 1, 2011. However, the Poverty Reduction Action Plan itself was made public on Feb. 24, 2012. The Dec. 1 article from Nunatsiaq Online (below) offers some contextual information.

---

December 1, 2011
Nunavut poverty summit produces “a shared approach to poverty reduction:”
But Makimaniq action plan isn't public yet
http://goo.gl/VEA3D
Nunavut’s first territory-wide poverty summit [ http://goo.gl/XEfac ] wrapped up in Iqaluit Nov. 30, delivering a vision to cut poverty with the help of all Nunavummiut. The Poverty Reduction Action Plan produced by the summit is still a few weeks away from release, although the plan has a name – Makimaniq, Inuktitut for "empowerment.” (...) The 45 participants at the three-day summit finalized a draft of the plan Nov. 30, which summit hosts says must first be approved before it goes public. But Aariak’s government has already committed to meet certain objectives by the end of its mandate in 2013...

Source:
Nunatsiaq Online
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/

-------------------------------

Related links:

Nunavut Roundtable for Poverty Reduction:
http://www.makiliqta.ca/
The Nunavut Roundtable for Poverty Reduction brings together those who fight to reduce poverty in our territory. Members share a vision of Nunavut with significantly­ reduced levels of poverty.

---

Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat
http://www.edt.gov.nu.ca/apps/Authoring/dspPage.aspx?page=anti_pov_secretariat
The Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat, part of the Nunavut Department of Economic Development & Transportation, is responsible for developing and implementing Nunavut’s Poverty Reduction Action Plan through public engagement, and for overseeing the implementation of comprehensive community initiatives to address poverty.

Source:
Department of Economic Development & Transportation
http://www.edt.gov.nu.ca/apps/authoring/dspPage.aspx?page=home

---

Memo to the Prime Minister: Overcoming Poverty in Nunavut
http://goo.gl/ZY3Vv
February 27, 2012
By Don Lenihan
(...) In 2009, a major review of the government’s performance surveyed 2,100 people from 25 communities and found that: "Often people described governance in Nunavut as a vision not yet realized and, at times, a vision derailed. Without doubt, the expectations most people had of Nunavut at its inception have not yet been met." Premier Eva Aariak has staked her government’s credibility on turning this around. A major step was the Poverty Reduction Process [ http://www.makiliqta.ca/ ], a year-long initiative that directly engaged some 800 people in 22 communities across the territory.
(...) In Nunavut, life expectancy is 10 years below the national average for men and 12 years for women. Infant mortality rates are two and a half times the national average. Unemployment is chronic. People live in over-crowded, public housing. Nunavut has, by far, the highest suicide rate in the country, sometimes reaching nine times the national average. Only a few years ago, the suicide rate for Inuit youth was 11 times the national average.

Source:
iPolitics

http://www.ipolitics.ca/

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Nunavut Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nunavut.htm

8. Old Age Insecurity? - February 27
(Caledon Institute of Social Policy)

From the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Old Age Insecurity? (PDF - 128K, 29 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/983ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
February 2012
The controversy over raising the age of entitlement for Old Age Security from 65 to 67 is taking attention away from alternative possible reforms of that vital program, and of Canada’s pension system generally. The allegation that Old Age Security will be unsustainable in future is more a political than a policy judgement, and the substantive evidence does not support it.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

http://www.caledoninst.org/

---

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

9. Trouble in Toryland: their Dirty Tricks catalogue - February 27
(By Lawrence Martin in iPolitics.ca)

Trouble in Toryland: their Dirty Tricks catalogue
http://goo.gl/Vy5kC
February 27, 2012
By Lawrence Martin
The Conservatives have been caught up in many shady activities since coming to power. The revelation that they may have been behind a robocall operation to suppress voting for opposition parties would rank, if proven, among the more serious offences. (...) To the misfortune of Team Harper, its record on duplicitous activities is hardly one to inspire confidence that its hand are clean. There follows a list – is Harperland becoming Nixonland? — of dirty tricks, black ops and hardball tactics from the Conservatives’ years in power.
[Click the link above to see all 22 tactics.]

1. Cooking the Books - the Tories exceeded spending limits in the 2006 campaign that brought the Conservatives to power.
2. The Hidden Slush Fund - $40+million slated for border-infrastructure improvements instead went into enhancement projects in Tony Clement’s riding.
3. Falsifying Documents - the document-altering scam involving Bev Oda’s office and the aid group Kairos.
4. Shutting Down Detainees’ Probes - use of a number of authoritarian tactics to avoid culpability on the Afghan detainees’ file
5. The Cotler Misinformation Campaign - Conservatives systematically spread rumours in Irwin Cotler’s Montreal riding that he was stepping down.
(...)
18. Dirty Work on Dion - personal attack ads in the 2008 campaign (remember the bird pooping on Stephane Dion’s head?)
19. Tory Logos on Taxpayer Cheques - PC party logo on economic recovery program cheques
20. The Rob Anders Nomination Crackdown - PC goons thwart a legitimate challenge to Harper loyalist Rob Anders for the nomination in his Calgary riding
21. The Rights and Democracy Takeover - the Harper Government™ has removed or suspended board members and stacked the board with pro-Israeli hardliners.
22. Vote Suppression Tactics - pre-recorded robocalls sending non-PC supporters voters astray in last election.

The list does not include such controversies as the Cadman affair in which the Conservatives allegedly tried to bribe independent MP Chuck Cadman for his vote; the whitewashing by Integrity Commissioner Christiane Ouimet of 227 whistleblower complaints against the government; the allegation by eyewitness Elizabeth May that Harper cheated in the 2008 election’s televised debates by bringing in notes; and many others.

Source:
iPolitics

http://www.ipolitics.ca/

Related link:

Harper dossier:
Quotes compiled by Conservative Party

April 25, 2011
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canadavotes2011/story/2011/04/25/cv-election-harper-dossier.html
===> SCROLL DOWN PAST THE ARTICLE TO ACCESS
THE FOUR-PART DOSSIER OF STEPHEN HARPER QUOTES.

- the above link is to an article about a 500-page dossier of potentially damaging remarks by Stephen Harper that came to light during the 2011 federal election campaign. The dossier was prepared by the Conservatives. "The fact that the Tories felt compelled to research their own leader suggests they believed Harper's past penchant for blunt, uncompromising talk could pose a problem on the campaign trail."

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/

---

NEW Canadian Social Research Links page:

The Harper Government™ Record Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/harper_government.htm

10. 2012 Progressive Economics Forum student essay contest - Deadline: May 7, 2012

Progressive Economics Forum student essay contest
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/student-essay-contest/
The Progressive Economics Forum student essay contest is open to all Canadian students, studying in Canada or abroad, and international students presently studying in Canada. Both full-time and part-time students are eligible. Entries may be on any subject related to political economy, economic theory or an economic policy issue that reflects a critical approach to the functioning, efficiency, and social and environmental consequences of unconstrained markets. A cash prize of $1,000 will be awarded the winner of the graduate competition; and $500 will be awarded to the winner of the undergraduate competition.
Click the link above for 2012 Essay Contest Rules.

Deadline: May 7, 2012

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/
The Progressive Economics Forum aims to promote the development of a progressive economics community in Canada. The PEF brings together over 125 progressive economists, working in universities, the labour movement, and activist research organizations.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

11. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Nothing in social studies this week...

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

--- No reports or studies in social programs during the past week.
Feel free to peruse The Daily Archives to see for yourself:

The Daily Archives
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

12. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

March 4, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Childcare SOS: A call for the Ontario government to take action
http://goo.gl/dc1yj
2 Mar 2012 | Ontario
CUPE report calls on the Ontario government for "emergency short-term actions in response to the current crisis in childcare".

The pursuit of profit in Ontario child care: Risky business for parents and government
http://goo.gl/wAWG6
2 Mar 2012 | Ontario
Research and policy analysis from CUPE shows that "overall, for-profit child care—especially when it becomes a big business—is a bad bargain for the public purse and for governments."

Deconstructing Drummond
http://goo.gl/wkrlI
29 Feb 2012 | Ontario
Collection of documents from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives provides analyses of the 'Drummond report'; includes presentations from the Deconstructing Drummond event held in Toronto and blogs from various CCPA research associates.

Issue File: Early childhood education and care in the 2012 provincial/territorial budgets
http://goo.gl/WpTkj
28 Feb 2012 | Canada
New CRRU Issue File collects information on how ECEC is addressed in the 2012 provincial/territorial budgets. Additional resources will be added throughout the next couple of months as more provinces and territories have their budgets.

Money matters for early education: The relationships among child care quality, teacher characteristics, and subsidy status
http://goo.gl/kmvAp
28 Feb 2012 | United States
Findings from a regression analysis are presented and show that "programs that do not accept subsidy funds are more likely to offer high-quality programming in language and reasoning activities that have a positive impact on children's development and school readiness."

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

OFL statement: Women are the majority of the majority
http://goo.gl/eWa5r
2 Mar 2012 | Ontario

Toronto faces child care 'crisis' due to full-day kindergarten: Mammoliti
http://goo.gl/nGNHz
1 Mar 2012 | Ontario

European states support UN complaints procedure on children's rights
http://goo.gl/38Epq
29 Feb 2012 | International

Daycare workers reach agreement in principle
http://goo.gl/aEvrF
29 Feb 2012 | Quebec

Childcare onus on the government
http://goo.gl/h3idO
28 Feb 2012 | Ontario

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

NOTE: For links to earlier (weekly) issues of this weekly alert going back to June 2009,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

13. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

March 2:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/03/02/
SNAP Enrollment and Eligibility
Public Colleges and Job Training
States and Medicaid Rules
Limits on Electronic Benefit Transactions

March 1:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/03/01/
State Medicaid Programs - Florida, Kentucky
Drug Testing and Assistance Programs
US Unemployment

February 29:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/29/
Child Welfare System - Nebraska
Emergency Rooms and Dental Care
Extreme Poverty Worldwide

February 28:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/28/
UNICEF Report: State of the World’s Children 2012
Teen Pregnancy - England

February 27:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/27/
Drug Testing and Assistance Programs
State Medicaid Programs - North Carolina, Ohio, Missouri
Child Support Debt

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

14. [U.S.] Poor who owe child support could lose federal benefits - February 26,
(Washington Post)

[U.S.] Poor who owe child support could lose federal benefits
http://goo.gl/ub6FX
By Daniel Wagner
February 26, 2012
Thousands of poor and disabled men stand to lose their only income next year because of a change in government policy that will allow states to seize every dollar of federal benefits from people who owe back child support. Previously, states could capture only 65 percent of benefits from people who opted to be paid by paper check. Advocates estimate that 275,000 men could be left destitute as a result of the change. The concern is an unintended consequence of the Treasury Department’s decision to pay all benefits electronically, including Social Security, disability and veterans’ benefits, starting next year. A separate Treasury Department rule, in place since May in a preliminary form, guarantees states the power to freeze the bank accounts of people who collect federal benefits and owe child support. By allowing seizure of the remaining 35 percent of benefits, the rules could cause thousands of poor men to lose their only income. (...) In many cases, the bills are decades old and the children long grown. Much of the money owed is interest and fees that add up when men are unable to pay because they are disabled, institutionalized or imprisoned.

Source:
Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

15. Fifteenth Annual Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference
Washington, May 30–June 1, 2012

Fifteenth Annual Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference
http://www.wrconference.net/index.aspx
May 30–June 1, 2012
Omni Shoreham Hotel
Washington, DC
The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is pleased to announce that the 15th Annual Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference will be held May 30–June 1, 2012 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC.
The 2012 conference will provide another exciting opportunity to learn about the latest findings from evaluations of welfare and poverty programs and policies, discuss ways to incorporate findings into the design and implementation of programs, and develop strategies for future evaluations. Conference presentations will feature both basic and applied research and will be addressed to both researchers and practitioners.

Before you get all excited....

The 2012 conference agenda hadn't been posted yet when I checked this site on March 3/12. A link to the 2012 agenda will be included in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter as soon as it's available on the conference site. In the meantime, the event organizers suggest that you check out the 2011 Agenda and Session Footage to get a taste of the types of presentations to expect this year.

2011 Agenda and Session Footage
http://www.wrconference.net/wrconference_2011/2011Agenda.aspx

WOW --- Jackpot!
The 2011 agenda is a detailed program for the three days of the conference, and it includes twelve video sessions lasting from 70 to 80 minutes each.
I watched a few, and I was so impressed by the quality content from the government and academic experts on the panels that I decided to include the complete list of videos below. [To watch a video from the list below, click the above agenda link and scroll down the page to click on a specific video link.]

* TANF During a Time of High Unemployment and Limited Resources
* Job Training as a Means Towards Labor Market Advancement
* Fathers, Their Effect on Family Self-Sufficiency and Federal- and State-Led Responses
* TANF Child-Only Cases
* Subsidized Employment in the TANF Emergency Fund
* The Future of the U.S. Labor Market: A Conversation on Challenges and Next Steps
* Understanding Disconnected Families
* Disadvantaged Youth: Supporting Transitions to a Successful Adulthood
* Higher Education for TANF Recipients
* Federal Collaboration Around Career Pathways
* TANF Performance Measures
* Applying Behavioral Perspectives to Strengthening the Safety Net and Stabilizing Low-Income Families

---
NOTE: If you're on a "light" Internet account that requires you to limit your downloads, you may want to take a pass on the videos for the 2011 and 2010 conferences. Each of the two-hour videos below will run just under 300MB.
---

2010 Agenda and Session Footage
http://www.wrconference.net/wrconference_2010/agenda2010.aspx
[To watch a video from the list below, click the above agenda link and scroll down the page to click on a specific video link.]
(Each video sessions lasts almost two hours.)

* Welcome and Introductory Remarks
* The Role of Evidence in Policy
* TANF Reauthorization: Future Directions for the TANF Program
* The Future of Employment, Retention and Advancement: How Do We Move Forward?
* Child Well-Being and Economic Downturns
* Transitional Jobs and Subsidized Employment for Retention and Advancement
* Men, Fathers and Income Support Policy
* Connections to Businesses: A Path to Improved Retention and Advancement?
* Cross-Agency Collaboration in the Federal Government: Identifying and Promoting Shared Interests
* Employment Strategies for the Hard-to-Serve
* Invitation to the National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics Conference

Earlier conferences in this series (back to 2006)
http://www.wrconference.net/pastconferences.aspx

Source:
Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/

Administration for Children and Families
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/index.html

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
http://www.hhs.gov/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

16. The State of the World’s Children 2012: Children in an Urban World - February 29
(UNICEF)

NEW from UNICEF:

The State of the World’s Children 2012: Children in an Urban World
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/index.php
December 2011
Almost half the world’s children now live in urban areas; the report calls for greater emphasis on identifying and meeting their needs.

Complete report:

The State of the World’s Children 2012: Children in an Urban World (PDF - 4MB, 156 pages)
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/pdfs/SOWC-2012-Main-Report_EN_21Dec2011.pdf

Updates and corrections to the report up to Feb. 29, 2012 (small PDF file, 2 pages):
http://goo.gl/Kx6EX

Executive summary (PDF - 1.1MB, 16 pages)
http://goo.gl/J5Dx3
Key recommendations:
Increasing numbers of children are growing up in urban areas. they must be afforded the amenities
and opportunities they need to realize their rights and potential.
Urgent action must be taken to:

1. Better understand the scale and nature of poverty and exclusion affecting children in urban areas.
2. Identify and remove the barriers to inclusion.
3. Ensure that urban planning, infrastructure development, service delivery and broader efforts to reduce poverty and inequality meet the particular needs and priorities of children.
4. Promote partnership between all levels of government and the urban poor – especially children and young people.
5. Pool the resources and energies of international, national, municipal and community actors in support of efforts to ensure that marginalized and impoverished children enjoy their full rights.
These actions are not goals but means to an end: fairer, more nurturing cities and societies for all people – starting with children.

Statistical tables for 2011
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/statistics.php

Figures
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/figures.php

Panels
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/panels.php

Press materials
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/press.php

Children in an Increasingly Urban World : Infographic (PDF - 124K, 1 page)
http://goo.gl/STbhr

Previous editions of The State of the World's Children
http://www.unicef.org/sowc/index.html

Source:
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

UNICEF is on the ground in over 150 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence. The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.

Related link:

UNICEF Canada
Since 1955, UNICEF Canada has grown into a recognized national symbol for the world’s children and the most visible United Nations presence across the country. UNICEF Canada’s mandate is to raise funds in support of UNICEF’s work for children in more than 150 countries and territories and build awareness among Canadians about the issues facing the world’s children.

Media coverage of the report
from The Scout Report (University of Wisconsin):

The State of the World's Children 2012
The first link below will take visitors a piece from this Tuesday's Guardian which offers commentary on this recently released report. Moving on, the second link will whisk users away to the official report press release from UNICEF's press center. The third link will take interested parties to a post from the Los Angeles Times' World Now blog which includes a short video about the report and its basic findings. The fourth link leads to the entire State of the World's Children Report, along with interviews with experts, infographics, and figures. The fifth link leads to the full text of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1959. The last link leads to the homepage of the UN's Committee on the Rights of the Child. Here visitors can learn about this independent body, their work, and also read their press releases and papers.

Children in urban areas around the world continue to face tremendous challenges
Make children the cornerstone of urban decision-making, urges UNICEF
http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2012/feb/28/unicef-children-central-urban-planning

Cities are failing children, UNICEF warns
http://www.unicef.org/media/media_61839.html

World's slum children in desperate need, UNICEF says
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/world_now/2012/02/unicef-report-says-worlds-slum-children-in-desperate-need.html

Children in an Urban World: The State of the World's Children 2012
http://www.unicef.org/sowc2012/

Declaration of the Rights of The Child
http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/humanrights/resources/child.asp

Committee on the Rights of the Child
http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/

In 1959, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child to complement the Declaration of Human Rights approved in 1948. The hope was that this declaration would secure certain basic rights for children across the globe, regardless of nation origin, ethnicity, or other factors. Over the intervening five decades, much progress has been made, but according to a report released by UNICEF this Tuesday, many children in urban areas still face tremendous challenges. Commenting on the report, UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake noted that "Today an increasing number of children living in slums and shantytowns are among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable in the world, deprived of the most basic services and denied the right to thrive." While cities often offer children the advantages of a diverse set of schools, health care and playgrounds, they do not work very well for the majority of those children living in poverty. For example, in some poor neighborhoods, a basic necessity like water can cost 50 times more than in wealthier neighborhoods, where residents are connected directly to water mains. The report is worth reading, and the hope is that it will inspire a broad coalition to tackle some of these challenges head on.

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2012.

http://scout.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the International Children, Families and Youth Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chn2.htm

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

17. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)
Latest issue:

29 February 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1265
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4116

In In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Twenty States sign new Optional Protocol!
- Acknowledging media misrepresentations
- Call to pack in the 'therapy'
- Pre-Eurovision evictions
- Syrian city to be 'cleaned'
- Tour operators profit from 'human safaris'
- Same-sex relations up for debate
- CRIN's media toolkit in 5 languages!
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Azerbaijan
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010:

Option 2:
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

--------------------------------------------------

NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Very Punny

1. I thought I saw an eye doctor on an Alaskan island, but it turned out to be an optical Aleutian.

2. She was only a whiskey maker, but he loved her still.

3. No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

4. A dog gave birth to puppies near the road and was cited for littering.

5. A grenade thrown into a kitchen in France would result in Linoleum Blownapart.

6. Two silk worms had a race. They ended up in a tie.

7. A hole has been found in the nudist camp wall. The police are looking into it.

8. Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.

9. Atheism is a non-prophet organization.

10. Two hats were hanging on a hat rack in the hallway. One hat said to the other:
'You stay here; I'll go on a head.'

11. I wondered why the baseball kept getting bigger. Then it hit me.

12. The midget fortune-teller who escaped from prison was a small medium at large.

13. If you jumped off the bridge in Paris, you'd be in Seine.

14. A vulture boards an airplane, carrying two dead raccoons. The stewardess looks at him and says, 'I'm sorry, sir, only one carrion allowed per passenger.'

15. Two Eskimos sitting in a kayak were chilly, so they lit a fire in the craft. Unsurprisingly it sank, proving once again that you can't have your kayak and heat it too.

16. Did you hear about the Buddhist who refused Novocain during a root canal?
His goal: transcend dental medication.

Source:
http://goo.gl/8Zhij
Click the source link for nine more puns.

---------------------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

Pinterest
http://pinterest.com/
Pinterest lets you organize and share all the beautiful things you find on the web. People use pinboards to plan their weddings, decorate their homes, and organize their favorite recipes.

Manteresting
http://manteresting.com/
The manly-man version of Pinterest (motorcycles, Robert deNiro and stuff)

---

Common Errors in English Usage
http://www.serendipity.li/errors.html
1. Click the link, open the page and add it to your Favorites or bookmarks
2. The next time you're scratching your head about whether to use "e.g." or "i.e." in a sentence, click your Favorite or bookmark and there's your answer!
Other confusing word pairs explained on this site:

"its" and "it's"
"there", "their" and "they're"
"to", "too" and "two"
"pressure" and "pressurize"
"regardless" and "irregardless"
"uninterested" and "disinterested"
"who", "whom", "who's" and "whose"
"your", "you're", "yaw",
"yours" and "yaws"
"beg the question"
"that" and "which"
"principle" and "principal"
"forward" and "foreword"
"forgo", "forgone" and "foregone"
"affect" and "effect"
"insure" and "ensure"
"loose" and "lose"
"practice", "practise",
"advice", "advise"
"licence" and "license"

There's also a section on British vs American spelling.
NOTE : Some people are even more obsessive than I am about correct spelling, and they probably got their knickers in a knot when they saw the American spelling of "Favorite" above. I spelled it that way because that's the name (and spelling) of Internet Explorer's URL-saving tool. There's no "u" in the IE spelling of Favorite in Murcan spelling.

---

Il Silenzio : Trumpet solo by Melissa Venema (video, duration 5:01)
http://www.dump.com/2012/02/13/trumpet-solo-melissa-venema-video/

Melissa is a protégé of
André Rieu
http://www.andrerieu.com/

---

Tongue Drums: The Most Soothing Sound You’ll Hear Today (video, duration 3:18)
http://www.dump.com/page/7/