Canadian Social Research Newsletter
September 4, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,455 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content


1. Submissions to the Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario
by the Income Security Advocacy Centre (Sept. 1) and the ODSP Action Coalition (August 31)

2. On Labour Day, think about unions as an equalizing force (Policy Note - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - August 31
3. How the mayor [of Toronto] could save $100 million (Carol Goar in the Toronto Star) - August 31
4. Hennessy's Index: Gone Fishin' (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - July 29
5. [British Columbia] - [Welfare] Assistance rates shame our province (Victoria Times-Colonist) - August 30
6. Report on the National Dialogue on Health Care Transformation (Canadian Medical Association) - August 10
7. Know Your Rights - CBC ten-part series
--- Episode 10 : Where do we go from here? - August 29
8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Second quarter 2011 - August 31
--- National Income and Expenditure Accounts : Data Tables, Second quarter 2011 - August 31
--- Estimates of Labour Income : Data Tables, Second quarter 2011 - August 31
--- Canada Year Book 2011 - August 30
--- Study: Job-related training of immigrants, 2008 - August 30
--- Salaries and salary scales of full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities, 2010/2011 - August 30

--- Employment, Earnings and Hours - June 2011 - August 29
9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
11. [United States]
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program helping 46 million Americans or 15% of the population (U.S. Department of Agriculture) - August 2011
12. [United States] Misconceptions and Realities About Who Pays Taxes (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) - May 31, 2011
13. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Happy Labour Day to those who are off on Monday!
To the rest of you : get back to work.
...and have a great week!


Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]



1. Submissions to the Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario by the Income Security Advocacy Centre (Sept. 1) and the ODSP Action Coalition
(August 31)

Ontario

From the
Income Security Advocacy Centre:

Submission to the Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario
September 1, 2011
The Income Security Advocacy Centre is pleased to make this submission to Ontario’s Commission for the Review of Social Assistance. Our submission sets out a vision for social assistance and an analysis of how the current programs support or undermine that vision. (...) In particular, this submission examines why the current Ontario Works (OW) program cannot reach objectives consistent with poverty reduction under its current policy framework. It will also look at the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP). While ODSP shares many of the same problems as OW with respect to financial eligibility, unlike OW it has promising legislative objectives that have been given effect in judicial decisions at the highest level. While these objectives have not been fully realized, the program nonetheless has some important features that should not be discarded but instead built upon.

ISAC Submission to the Review Commission (Word file - 241K, 25 pages)
Excerpt from the Conclusion:
It's time for a new vision for Ontario Works that moves away from the punitive negative financial eligibility and coercive work-first / workfare model to a program that uses opportunity planning to effectively intervene to help people who require assistance move to a better place, providing for both sustainable employment and long-term support where needed. And it's time to bring ODSP program rules and employment supports in line with the program's stated objectives of both providing adequate income and supporting employment aspirations

Source:
Social Assistance Review
This is the Income Security Advocacy Centre's sub-site on the Ontario social assistance review.
Income Security Advocacy Centre
The Income Security Advocacy Centre works with and on behalf of low income communities in Ontario to address issues of income security and poverty.

---

On the subject of reforming
the Ontario Disability Support Program*:

[* for social assistance for people in need who are handicapped]

Disabling effect of Ontario Disability Benefits
August 31, 2011
By Joe Fiorito
Toronto Star columnist Joe Fiorito writes about an encounter with a recipient of Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) at a hearing of the review commission. When asked why she attended the hearing, she listed the five most pressing issues of people on ODSP:
1. We don’t get enough money. We can’t look after our basic needs.
2. No more clawbacks (having her benefits cut if she earns a little extra money on the side in order to get by)
3. Rules that violate privacy and prevent long-term relationships (benefit cuts when two ODSP beneficiaries marry)
4. The quagmire of rules. You can’t keep track of them all. There’s way too many.
5. We’re viewed as criminals; they think that we steal money. I get threatening letters if I’m a day late submitting my income report — computer letters, threatening to cut me off. And the letters are not specific about what documents you need.
The Commission is just wrapping up the initial round of consultations, and it will make a preliminary report in December.
The final report is due next year.
Source:
Toronto Star

An Activation Agenda for People with Disabilities on ODSP
Progress report on the work done by the ODSP Action Coalition and the Review Commission starting in June with the release of the Coalition’s submission, Dignity, Adequacy, Inclusion: Rethinking the Ontario Disability Support Program and culminating (so far) with An Activation Agenda for People with Disabilities on ODSP.

Activation Agenda (Word file - 229K, 26 pages)
September 1, 2011

Related links:

Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario
Official Ontario Government website - launched June 9, 2011

A Discussion Paper: Issues and Ideas
June 2011
PDF version - 478K, 50 pages
Word version (.doc) (404K, 50 pages)
NOTE : this is the Ontario Government discussion paper that groups and individuals were asked to comment on before the beginning of September.

---

Poverty Free Ontario (PFO)
(Replaces Poverty Watch Ontario - see below.)
The mission of Poverty Free Ontario is to eliminate divided communities in which large numbers of adults and children live in chronic states of material hardship, poor health and social exclusion. An Ontario free of poverty will be reflected in healthy, inclusive communities with a place of dignity for everyone and the essential conditions of well-being for all.

---

ODSP Action Coalition
The ODSP Action Coalition is made up of community clinic caseworkers, agency staff, and community activists. We undertake campaigns and activities designed to raise awareness of issues affecting persons in receipt of Ontario Disability Support Program ("ODSP") benefits

---

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

2. On Labour Day, think about unions as an equalizing force - August 31
(Policy Note - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

On Labour Day, think about unions as an equalizing force
August 31, 2011
By Keith Reynolds
On Labour Day 2011 unions in North America are facing historic challenges. Governments and corporations are increasingly disputing the right of unions to exist and to represent working people. This is true not just in the United States. Here in Canada the president of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, Catherine Swift, told the London Free Press: "What would be ideal is getting rid of public-sector unions entirely."
Not that long ago such a view would have been considered extremist. Now it is common in both much of the business community and the main stream media.
So Labour Day is a good time to review both what unions have given us and what has been lost in much of the world as governments reduce the rights of working people to democratically choose to act collectively.
Source:
Policy Note
Policy Note delivers timely, progressive commentary on issues that affect British Columbians, including the economy, poverty, inequality, climate change, provincial budgets, taxes, public services, employment and much more.

Policy Note is a project of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
The CCPA is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice.

---

- Go to the Union Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/unionbkmrk.htm

3. How the mayor [of Toronto] could save $100 million - August 31
(Carol Goar in the Toronto Star)

How the mayor [of Toronto] could save $100 million
August 31, 2011
By Carol Goar
If Mayor Rob Ford really wants to “find efficiencies, not cut services,” he’ll welcome a proposal put forward by the City Service Review Group. It would save the city $100 million and make it a more humane place. If he is bent on slashing spending and getting rid of civic employees, he’ll dismiss it out of hand. The scheme was drafted by a coalition of mental health activists. It calls on the city to move people with mental illness and addiction problems out of its homeless shelters. Civic workers would help them to apply for provincial disability support ($1,053 a month). This income would allow them to rent a private apartment. Many of these people now live on welfare ($592 a month). They qualify for disability support, but they aren’t able to fill out the complicated application form and they don’t have a family doctor.
Source:
Toronto Star

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- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

4. Hennessy's Index: Gone Fishin' - July 29
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Also from the CCPA:

Hennessy's Index: Gone Fishin'
July 29, 2011
Hennessy's Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world. This August, Hennessy's Index looks at vacation time - how do Canadian vacations stack up?

Earlier editions of Hennessy's Index
* Canada vs the OECD (July 2011)
* Minimum Wage vs Living Wage (June 2011)
* Election Jawdroppers (May 2011)
* Democracy (April 2011)
* Security/Insecurity (March 2011)
* Inequality (February 2011)

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

- Go to the Work-Life Balance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/work_life_balance.htm

5. [British Columbia] - [Welfare] Assistance rates shame our province - August 30
(Victoria Times-Colonist)

British Columbia

Editorial: [Welfare] Assistance rates shame our province
August 30, 2011
(...) Benefit levels are set by the government to ensure a life of desperate poverty. A single disabled person receives up to $375 a month for shelter. (MLAs can claim up to $1,580 a month for a second home in the capital.) Imagine what kind of accommodation is available for that amount in this region, and living in those conditions with terminal cancer.
The government provides $531 a month for all other expenses - food, non-prescription medications, utilities, clothes and everything else. That is, at most, $18 a day. (...) For a parent with one child, the province provides $570 for accommodation and $672 for everything else. (...) Certainly, income assistance rates should encourage people to seek employment. Some might argue that those on welfare are paying the price for bad choices. But people do not choose to become disabled. Children do not choose to be born into poverty. And B.C.'s assistance rates are so inadequate as to be destructive. The rates have been increased once since 1994, in 2007. That is also a mark of government indifference to the plight of some of the province's poorest people.
Source:
Victoria Times-Colonist

Related link:

Raise the Rates
Raise the Rates is a coalition of over 20 organizations from around BC concerned with the level of poverty and homelessness in British Columbia and campaigns for policies that will end poverty.

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

6. Report on the National Dialogue on Health Care Transformation - August 10
(Canadian Medical Association)

Health system failing elderly and chronically ill, says report
By Sharon Kirkey
August 10, 2011
Cancelled surgeries. Patients who need hospital care but who can't get it. Families forced to sell their homes to pay for an autistic child's treatment. In person and online, thousands of Canadians who participated in a nationwide consultation over the past year say the country's health system is faltering badly and that more needs to be done to deliver care when and where it's needed. The nation's "once proud" health system is fundamentally fractured and failing — especially for vulnerable groups such as children, the elderly, aboriginal peoples and those with mental illness — says a new report from the Canadian Medical Association (CMA).

[ Comments (61) ]

Source:
Canada.com

The CMA report:

VOICES INTO ACTION
Report on the National Dialogue on Health Care Transformation
(PDF - 563K, 42 pages)
August 2011
Contents:
Health care transformation: Hearing from Canadians
Online consultation process
What Canadians said: A synopsis
Halifax town hall — January 26, 2011
Toronto town hall — March 1, 2011
Edmonton town hall — March 29, 2011
La Prairie town hall — June 2, 2011
Vancouver town hall — April 27, 2011
Ottawa town hall — June 7, 2011

News Release
CMA got flood of feedback during its dialogue with Canadians
By Patrick Sullivan
Aug. 10, 2011
The CMA's 2011 campaign to gather Canadians' input on their health care system was a marriage of old and new methods - town hall meetings, the Internet and social media - and it produced an unprecedented amount of feedback.That becomes clear quickly in Voices into Action, a report that provides a synopsis of the information gathered by the CMA since the launch of its National Dialogue on Health Care Transformation last year.

Source:
Health Care Transformation
[ Canadian Medical Association (CMA) ]

---

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

7. Know Your Rights - CBC ten-part series --- Episode 10 : Where do we go from here? - August 29

Know Your Rights - ten-part series (Audio only)
Know Your Rights is an on-the-ground and in-the-field exploration of our rights as Canadian citizens. Host Craig Norris navigates the complex world of what we legally can and cannot do in our country. What freedoms do we have? And how far can we push it before someone pushes back?
[About Know Your Rights]
- includes links to : Main - About the Show - Know Your Rights Blog - Past Episodes - The Fine Print - Contact Us

This ten-part series aired from June 27 to August 29, 2011.

Archive of all episodes to date
NOTE: These are all links to audio files (no video).
Click the link to any episode below for a summary of the program.
Then, to listen to a particular episode, go to the Past Episodes page and click on the "Listen" button.

All episodes are just over 27 minutes in length (the duration of the radio program).
Be sure to check the 50+ related resources (total for all episodes) in The Fine Print.

Episode 10
Where Do We Go From Here? (Finale)
August 29, 2011
To bid farewell, we look to the future. Next year, our Charter will be 30! Something to celebrate, for sure. But also a good time for reflection on what could be amended. And that's what our final episode is all about: Where do we go from here?

The Fine Print (Episode 10)
Click the link above to access any of the following
resources related to this program:
:: Enshrining The Charter (April 17, 1982)
:: Huntington Society of Canada
:: Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness
:: Canadian Civil Liberties Association
:: B.C. Civil Liberties Association

NOTE : the Fine Print link above is cumulative for all episodes;
it contains almost 60 links to related resources.

Episode 9
Aboriginal rights
August 22, 2011

Episode 8
Language rights
August 15, 2011

Episode 7
Freedom from discrimination based on race, origin or colour
August 8, 2011

Episode 6
Freedom from discrimination based on mental or physical disability
August 5, 2011

Episode 5
Freedom from discrimination based on sex, age
July 29, 2011

Episode 4
Life, liberty and security of the person
July 18, 2011

Episode 3
Freedom of religion
July 11, 2011

Episode 2
Freedom of peaceful assembly and association
July 8, 2011

Episode 1
Freedom of expression
June 27, 2011

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Know Your Rights Blog <===keep up with the latest releases from Know Your Rights

-----------------------------

The Fine Print
55+ links to related resources organized by episode
- also includes links to the full text of The Charter of Rights and Freedoms and a CBC Television special from 2002 entitled "The Constitution and Charter Re-evaluated".
Source:
CBC Radio

---

Know Your Rights Facebook page

- Go to the Human Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Second quarter 2011 - August 31
---
National Income and Expenditure Accounts : Data Tables, Second quarter 2011 - August 31
--- Estimates of Labour Income : Data Tables, Second quarter 2011
- August 31
---
Canada Year Book 2011 - August 30
---
Study: Job-related training of immigrants, 2008 - August 30
---
Salaries and salary scales of full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities, 2010/2011 - August 30
---
Employment, Earnings and Hours - June 2011 - August 29

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

August 31, 2011
Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Second quarter 2011
* GDP by income and by expenditure
* GDP by industry
* Balance of international payments
* Financial flows
* Labour productivity
* International investment position
* National balance sheet accounts
Source:
Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review - product main page*
This publication presents an overview of the economic developments reported in Canada's national accounts for the most recent quarter. The overview covers several broad areas: 1) gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure; 2) GDP by industry; 3) balance of international payments accounts; 4) labour productivity and other related variables; 5) international investment position; and, 6) national balance
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

---

August 31, 2011
National Income and Expenditure Accounts:
Data Tables, Second quarter 2011

Use the links in the left-hand margin to access the following:
Main page
Methodology
Data tables
Related products
More information
Source:
National Income and Expenditure Accounts : Data Tables - Product main page*
These data tables provide quarterly information on Canada's National Income and Expenditure Accounts (NIEA). It contains seasonally adjusted data on gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure, saving and investment, borrowing and lending of each of four broad sectors of the economy: (i) persons and unincorporated businesses, (ii) corporate and government business enterprises, (iii) governments and (iv) non-residents. Information is also provided for selected subsectors. The tables include data beginning in 1961.
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

---

August 31, 2011
Estimates of Labour Income : Data Tables, Second quarter 2011
Table 1 presents monthly, seasonally adjusted, estimates of wages and salaries, and supplementary income for Canada and each province and territory. In Table 2, unadjusted estimates of labour income, by industry, for both Canada and the provinces and territories are shown. The tables include data beginning in 1997.
Source:
Estimates of Labour Income: Data Tables - Product main page*
These data tables provide a regional perspective on Canada's labour income. Monthly wages and salaries by industry and labour income by component for both Canada and the provinces and territories are shown. The tables include data beginning in 1961.
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

---

August 30, 2011
Canada Year Book 2011
The 2011 edition of the Canada Year Book, available today, has been expanded to just over 500 pages to include international comparisons and online search terms that help readers find updated and related data on Statistic Canada's website. The 31 almanac-style chapters contain charts, tables, maps and easy-to-read articles that feature the latest statistics from Canada's economic, political and social life.

Canada Year Book is now available to purchase from StatCan in paper format ($24.95).
HTML and PDF versions of Canada Year Book will be released in October.

Source:
Canada Year Book - Product main page
Presented in almanac style, the 2011 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

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August 30, 2011
Study: Job-related training of immigrants, 2008
Immigrant workers were less likely to receive job-related training than their Canadian-born counterparts. Between July 2007 and June 2008, 35% of Canadian-born men received job training, compared with 31% of immigrant men. Among women, 37% of the Canadian-born took some job-related training, compared with 33% of immigrant women.

---

August 30, 2011
Salaries and salary scales of full-time
teaching staff at Canadian universities, 2010/2011

Information is now available on the salaries of full-time teaching staff at 62 Canadian universities for the 2010/2011 academic year.

---

August 29, 2011
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, June 2011
In June, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees increased 0.3% from the previous month to $876.27. On a year-over-year basis, average weekly earnings were 3.0% higher compared with June 2010.

Complete report:

Employment, Earnings and Hours - June 2011
* Highlights
Note to users
Tables
Data quality, concepts and methodology
User information
Related products
PDF version (2.2MB, 388 pages)

Source:
Employment, Earnings and Hours - product main page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
---
* On the product main page ,click "View" to see the
latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings

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The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

September 4, 2011

The CRRU site was not been accessible for a few days, but it's now (Sept. 5) back up.
Click the link above to see the latest content on the CRRU site.

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

September 2:
US Jobs and Unemployment
Children’s Health Insurance Program - Arizona
Identity Database - India

September 1:
Recuperative Care for the Homeless
COBRA Health Coverage
SNAP and Food Retailers

August 31:
US Metro Unemployment Rate
State Medicaid Programs - Tennessee, Colorado

August 30:
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Medicaid Cuts - North Carolina
Unemployment Insurance Fund - Indiana

August 29:
Medicaid and Managed Care
Cuts to Legal Aid Programs

---------------------------------------

Poverty Dispatch Archive

The IRP Poverty Dispatch Archive (2nd link below) hasn't been updated since June 2009.
The first link below is to an itemized archive for Poverty Dispatches since August 2011.

Poverty Dispatch Archive (a Canadian Social Research Links page)
- links to each dispatch (starting August 22, 2011) and a short blurb about its contents, as above.

---

IRP Past Poverty Dispatches (June 2006 to June 2009 only, offers links but no content)
The IRP Poverty Dispatch Archive hasn't been updated since June 2009.

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. [United States] Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program helping 46 million Americans (15% of the population) - August 2011
(U.S. Department of Agriculture)

[United States]

Trends in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Participation Rates: 2002 – 2009

Summary (PDF - 63K, 2 pages)
Complete report (PDF - 6.3MB, 131 pages)
August 2011
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) [formerly known as the Food Stamp program] helps low-income individuals purchase food so that they can obtain a nutritious diet. One important measure of program performance is the ability to reach its target population, as indicated by the percentage of people eligible for benefits who actually participate. This report is the latest in a series on SNAP participation rates. Estimates are based on the March 2010 Current Population Survey and program administrative data for Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. The findings represent national participation rates for FY 2009.
Source:
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
We help put healthy food on the table for over 40 million people each month.
[ Office of Research and Analysis ]
[ Food and Nutrition Service ]
[ U.S. Department of Agriculture ]
NOTE : Click any of the source links above to browse related research reports and more...

Related link:

More Americans Hungry For Food Stamps
By Marilyn Geewax
About 46 million people get government help in the form of food stamps when buying food. That's roughly 15 percent of the population.
This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is expected to release its latest update on the food stamp program [see the link above]. It's an important indicator of the nation's economic health — and the prognosis is not good. Food stamp use is up 70 percent over the past four years and that trend is expected to continue.

The spike began in late-2008 and early-2009 when the worst of the recession was triggering massive layoffs and home foreclosures. Although the economy has been growing since mid-2009, the pace has been too slow to absorb the nearly 14 million people without jobs. Nearly half of those have been out of work more than six months.

As a result, the number of people seeking federal help with groceries has been soaring. At this time four years ago, before the recession hit, about 27 million people were using food stamps. Today 46 million get help through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program — what most people call food stamps — which is roughly 15 percent of the population.
Source:
National Public Radio (NPR)
A thriving media organization at the forefront of digital innovation, NPR creates and distributes award-winning news, information, and music programming to a network of 900 independent stations. Through them, NPR programming reaches 26.8 million listeners every week.

12. [United States] Misconceptions and Realities About Who Pays Taxes - May 31, 2011
(Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)

[United States]

Misconceptions and Realities About Who Pays Taxes
By Chuck Marr and Brian Highsmith
May 31, 2011
PDF of this report (9pp.)
A recent finding by Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation that 51 percent of households owed no federal income tax in 2009 [1] is being used to advance the argument that low- and moderate-income families do not pay sufficient taxes. Apart from the fact that most of those who make this argument also call for maintaining or increasing all of the tax cuts of recent years for people at the top of the income scale, the 51 percent figure, its significance, and its policy implications are widely misunderstood.

RELATED AREAS OF RESEARCH:
* Tax — Federal
* 2001/2003 Tax Cuts
* Earned Income Tax Credit
* Individuals and Families
* Taxes and the Economy

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals. The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

13. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter

31 August 2011 - CRINMAIL Issue 1240 (latest issue)
In this issue:
REMINDER: CRIN Users Survey!
Latest news and reports
- State violence: Syria, Libya
- Reviewing children's rights in 2010: OPT, Israel
- Youth leader charged with defamation: Egypt
- The crisis continues: Somalia, Sudan
- Teenager among 11 executed: Somalia
- Good and bad news: United States
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

---------

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 

Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Public Service Announcement:

Bring your car keys to bed at night.

If you have a late-model car, the electronic remote key fob that came with your vehicle can save your life.

Put your car keys next to your bed at night.
( If you received a spare key fob when you bought your car, consider leaving the second one on your bedside table.)

If you hear a noise outside your home or someone trying to get in your house, just press the panic button for your car. The alarm will be set off, and the horn will continue to sound until either you turn it off or the car battery dies.

After a few seconds, all the neighbours will be looking out their windows to see who is out there, and the criminal will quickly leave the premises.

And remember to carry your keys in your hand while walking to your car in a parking lot, day or night. The alarm can work the same way there. It could also be useful for any emergency, such as a heart attack or a broken bone, where you can't reach a phone.

Source:
Found somewhere on the internet.

In last week's newsletter, I invited subscribers to reflect on what each of us can do to help keep Jack Layton's memory and his dream alive.
Here's what one Victorian subscriber wanted to share (while remaining anonymous):

"I like your comment on the bottom of your newsletter about taking 5 minutes to think what we can do to make this a better country. Something happened last week which I am at a loss to explain. As I was walking home from my BC government job last week, I passed a house where the owner had gone out and written in chalk on the sidewalk "Jack Layton 1950-2011". Next I heard of a candlelight vigil in downtown Victoria. Then I watched the funeral and learned a lot about a man who I thought I knew, but was clearly mistaken.
I served Canada for 23 years as a Naval Officer and got to see a lot of the rest of the world. Coming home was always a great excitement for myself and my shipmates as we would always be appreciative of what we have and take for granted here in Canada. Now I am serving the people of BC in a ministry that may not always do what we need to, but is not because of the passion and dedication of my fellow civil servants.

On Saturday I learned that Canadians do appreciate those of us who toil to make this a better place to live or make a person's life better in some small way. Jack Layton was a hero. So are all the other civil servants in Ottawa, provincial capitals and municipalities across this great land. Because of their behind the scenes work, my family and I have a wonderful home in a beautiful city, province and country.
Then there are folks like you - who toil away at home for free to continue the work you began as a civil servant. You too are my hero."

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By Gilles:

Thanks for sharing this reflexion, Victorian subscriber.
I totally agree with your comments about Jack as inspiration for all of us who believe in love, hope and optimism as the means to social justice and a better Canada. I appreciate your kind words about my work, and I'm humbled by the "hero" designation. On behalf of the many other folks who toil away (often on a volunteer basis) in supportive roles for social justice and the reduction of wealth and income inequalities in Canada, THANKS for your vote of support!

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And, in closing...

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Instrumental guitar- John Butler (video, 5:30)
http://www.dump.com/2011/08/30/one-of-the-best-instrumental-guitar-pieces-ever-by-john-butler-video/

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Let it Be (video, 3:30)
http://goo.gl/YRdZH

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1941 : Lindy Hop Dancing (video, 2:00)
http://www.dump.com/2011/08/26/1941-lindy-hop-dancing-video/
It's like the Bunny Hop --- on speed.

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I'll bet you don't stand behind your work like THIS guy.
http://www.fazed.org/out/?id=19071