Canadian Social Research Newsletter
February 5, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,530 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. [Ontario] Social Assistance Review Progress Report + feedback on first discussion paper (Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario) - February 3
2. Raising the Roof Toque Campaign --- February 7 (2012) is Toque Tuesday!
3. Old Age Security changes ahead?
--- Stephen Harper: Old Age Security changes are 'being considered'
- February 3
--- OAS changes could cost Ontario $200 million a year - February 3
--- Lots of pension options, no open discussion in Parliament
(rabble.ca) - February 1
--- Pension reform raises questions about effect in provinces - February 1
--- Research shows Old Age Security system keeps seniors out of poverty(Canadian Business Magazine) - February 1
--- No changes to Old Age Security benefits in upcoming budget, Flaherty says - February 1
--- Why raising OAS to 67 doesn't make sense (Ellen Roseman in Moneyville.ca - Toronto Star) - February 1
--- Research belies PM’s warning about OAS - January 30
--- CCPA and other resources on pension reform and Old Age Security : Update - January 30

4.
[Ontario] SPAR Monitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change (City of Toronto) - February 1
5. British Columbia Update:
--- MLA Welfare Challenge Update and Fact Sheet (Raise the Rates) - January 2012
--- Five Myths About Welfare
--- Inequality Facts
--- B.C. poverty reduction plan could reduce costs, advocates argue (The Straight.com) - January 30
--- B.C. welfare payments are adequate, says the Fraser Institute (Vancouver Sun) - January 26
--- Rebuttals to the Jan. 26 Vancouver Sun article (from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, the BC Association of Social Workers, a Vancouver pediatrician and the Canadian Social Research Links Guy)
6. Action to End Poverty in Alberta (AEPA) and the Social Policy Framework - January 31
7. New Brunswick anti-poverty advocate quits the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation Board - January 31
8. So There's Income Inequality. Now What? (Rob Rainer in Huffington Post Canada) - January 31
9. Can microcredit work in Canada? (Globe and Mail ) - January 30
10. Crown - First Nations Gathering Outcome Statements (Prime Minister's Office and Assembly of First Nations National Chief) - January 24
11. The Manitoba Mincome Experiment (M. L'Heureux in Legal Checkpoint Blog) - November 2007

12. [Brain Drain] Evidence from the 2000 Cohort of Canadian University Graduates (Canadian Public Policy Journal) - 2008
13. Sixth Estate Blog : The Harper Government™ Patronage List and Lobbyists

14. Indicators of Well-being in Canada (Human Resources and Skills Development Canada)
15.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Statscan to abandon no-layoff policy as budget cuts loom - January 30
--- Labour Force Survey, January 2012 - February 3
--- Adult and youth correctional services: Key indicators, 2010/2011 - January 31

--- Seniors returning to Canada- January 30
16. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

17. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
18. UNdata (United Nations)

19. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm



1. [Ontario] Social Assistance Review Progress Report and feedback on first discussion paper - February 3
(
Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario)

Small fixes to Ontario’s welfare system not enough, says progress report
http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/article/1125640
February 2, 2012
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Small fixes will not be enough to bring about the transformational change Ontario’s social assistance needs, says a progress report by the province’s social assistance review commission. More employment support for those on welfare, including those with disabilities; streamlined delivery and new benefits available to all low-income people outside the welfare system are some of the ideas the commission is exploring. “Across the province, people asked us to be bold in thinking about how to reform the social assistance system,” says the report being released Friday [Feb. 3) by commissioners Frances Lankin and Munir Sheikh. (...)
The commission, established in November 2010, is aimed at removing barriers and increasing opportunities for people to work. It is expected to release its recommendations in June. The progress is the result of 11 community meetings across the province with more than 2,000 participants, numerous informal meetings and 700 written submissions. Rather than a comprehensive report on options for reform, the update discusses different approaches and highlights areas for more discussion.
Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

--------------------------------
NOTA : Pour la version française du Document de discussion et des liens connexes ci-dessous, voir

http://www.socialassistancereview.ca/publications-de-la-commission
--------------------------------

New from the
Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario:

Message from the Commissioners
http://www.socialassistancereview.ca/a-message-from-the-commissioners
February 2012
With the release of Discussion Paper 2: Approaches for Reform we are entering the second phase of our engagement process. Our purpose with this paper is to seek your perspective on the different approaches to improving social assistance that we are considering based on what we heard and learned through our research. We hope you will take the time to send us your thoughts, which you can do through this website.
(...)
We have summarized the feedback we received [to the first discussion paper] in What We Heard: A Summary of Discussions on Social Assistance, also available on the Commission's website. We encourage you to read the summary as a companion to the second discussion paper.

The Commission's progress report:

Approaches for Reform
Discussion Paper 2

February 2012

PDF version (1.2MB, 77 pages)
http://goo.gl/RyvnX

Word version (445K, 77 pages)
http://goo.gl/iMydq

(...) This paper advances the dialogue with Ontarians that we began in our first discussion paper Issues and Ideas [ http://goo.gl/wa1qx - 478K, 50 pages] in June 2011, and continued over the summer and fall through community visits and other opportunities to engage with people and organizations with diverse perspectives on social assistance.
(...)
Our purpose in this paper is to discuss different approaches to improving some of the key areas of the social assistance system. This paper provides
opportunities for further discussion, as opposed to final recommendations. (...) We would like to receive your input by Friday, March 16, 2012.
---
NOTE : See the References section of the report (p. 67) for links to eight related studies from various sources.
---

Also just released by the Commission:

Feedback in response to the first discussion paper
The Commission has summarized the feedback received in response to the first (June 2011) discussion paper in What We Heard: A Summary of Discussions on Social Assistance. We encourage you to read the summary below as a companion to the second discussion paper.

What We Heard: A Summary of Discussions on Social Assistance
February 2012

PDF version (696K, 44 pages)
http://goo.gl/uwKUU

Word version (1.1MB, 44 pages)
http://goo.gl/p5XaZ

Source:
Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario
http://www.socialassistancereview.ca/

Commission d'examen du système d'aide sociale de l'Ontario
http://www.socialassistancereview.ca/accueil

---

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

2. Raising the Roof Toque Campaign --- February 7 (2012) is Toque Tuesday!

Raising the Roof Toque Campaign - Let's Put a Cap on Youth Homelessness!
http://www.raisingtheroof.org/Our-Programs/Toque-Campaign.aspx
2011/2012 marks the 15th anniversary of the Toque Campaign.
The campaign runs from November 2011 to the end of February 2012.
Toque Tuesday is February 7th.
Buy yourself a stylish, toasty-warm toque and support solutions to homelessness in communities across Canada.

To date, the Toque Campaign has generated over $3.3 million in grants – money that has been used to support 145 homelessness-serving agencies in 70 communities across Canada, as well as Raising the Roof’s national Youthworks initiative, which focuses on long-term solutions to youth.

Source:
Raising the Roof / Chez toit
--- Long term solutions to Canada's homeless
http://www.raisingtheroof.org/default.aspx
Raising the Roof provides strong and effective national leadership on long-term solutions to homelessness through partnership and collaboration with diverse stakeholders, investment in local communities, and public education.

Also from Raising the Roof:

Housing Again Bulletin No.148 - February 2012
http://hosted.verticalresponse.com/688376/cdc8f83ef5/
Contents:
Feature: Historic Meeting Lays Out Commitment to First Nations People (Crown-First Nations summit)
Community Spotlight: Tokens4Change --- Students Raise Awareness of Youth Homelessness
News Briefs

Youthworks
http://www.raisingtheroof.org/Our-Programs/Youthworks.aspx
This national initiative is aimed at helping to solve youth homelessness.
Why the focus on youth? It’s simple. We believe that the best way to prevent long-term homelessness is to address the issue when people are young.

Shared Learnings
http://www.raisingtheroof.org/Our-Programs/Shared-Learnings.aspx
Developed by Raising the Roof, www.sharedlearnings.org makes practical tools and information accessible to the hundreds of organizations across Canada that work to address homelessness in their communities.

---

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

3. Old Age Security changes ahead?
--- Stephen Harper: Old Age Security changes are 'being considered'
- February 3
--- OAS changes could cost Ontario $200 million a year - February 3
--- Lots of pension options, no open discussion in Parliament
(rabble.ca) - February 1
--- Pension reform raises questions about effect in provinces - February 1
--- Research shows Old Age Security system keeps seniors out of poverty(Canadian Business Magazine) - February 1
--- No changes to Old Age Security benefits in upcoming budget, Flaherty says - February 1
--- Why raising OAS to 67 doesn't make sense (Ellen Roseman in Moneyville.ca - Toronto Star) - February 1
--- Research belies PM’s warning about OAS - January 30
--- CCPA and other resources on pension reform and Old Age Security : Update - January 30

Stephen Harper: Old Age Security changes are 'being considered'
http://goo.gl/0oL60
By Mark Kennedy
February 3, 2012

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Friday for the first time that his government is considering increasing the eligibility age for Canada's Old Age Security (OAS) system, which provides benefits for people once they turn 65.
Harper made the comment in a candid interview in his office across from Parliament Hill with Postmedia News and the National Post.
Source:
Ottawa Citizen
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/

-------------------------------------------------------

OAS changes could cost Ontario $200 million a year
http://goo.gl/7oJQY
By Rebecca Lindell
February 3, 2012
OTTAWA - Delaying the age of Old Age Security by two years could cost Ontario more than $200 million annually, according to the province’s Ministry of Finance. Ontario has yet to be consulted on any federal proposal to change the retirement income system, including any changes to OAS eligibility.
Source:
Global News
http://www.globalnews.ca/

-------------------------------------------------------

Hill Dispatches: Lots of pension options, no open discussion in Parliament
http://goo.gl/vesPe
By Karl Nerenberg
February 1, 2012
Quick now, what do Kim Campbell -- who served as prime minister briefly in 1993, and led her party to its biggest defeat ever -- and Stephen Harper have in common?
Well, aside from the fact that they are both nominally "Conservative," they both seem to believe, as Campbell put it during her disastrous 1993 campaign, "an election campaign is no time to discuss serious issues."
(...)
There is plenty of evidence that Harper and his chorus of cheerleaders in the commentariat (see Coyne, Andrew, et al.) are crying Chicken Little on the question of Canada's looming, "unfunded" pension obligations.
(...)
Harper talks vaguely about "assuring the sustainability of our social programs." But what are the goals of those programs; what shared values should they reflect?
There is no public forum to deal with these basic questions. As with the previous Chrétien-Martin government, too much policy is breathlessly enunciated in a clouded and turbulent atmosphere of supposed "fiscal crisis."
Source:
rabble.ca blogs
http://rabble.ca/blogs/
[ rabble.ca:
http://rabble.ca/ ]

-------------------------------------------------------

Pension reform raises questions about effect in provinces
http://goo.gl/v4nLe
By Bill Curry
February 1, 2012
Free bus passes for poor seniors in British Columbia never came up during Stephen Harper’s speech to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Neither did prescription drug cards for struggling retirees in Newfoundland. But there is a link. The Prime Minister has signalled that he is ready to tackle long-term questions about the sustainability of Canada’s social programs as the ratio of seniors to workers climbs. Yet as provinces, seniors groups and federal opposition parties read the tea leaves coming from Ottawa on pension reform, questions are being raised about the trickle-down effects of a unilateral change in Ottawa.

Several provinces require citizens to prove they receive the federal Guaranteed Income Supplement for low-income seniors to qualify for their own programs aimed at helping poor seniors. In addition to B.C. and Newfoundland, other examples include Manitoba, Nova Scotia and Ontario. Liberal MP Gerry Byrne pointed out that the city of Corner Brook uses the GIS as a trigger for tax breaks on water bills for low-income seniors. Using the GIS is a way for provinces and municipalities to receive proof that those applying for programs to help poor seniors are, in fact, poor. If Ottawa raises the current eligibility age of 65 for Old Age Security and the GIS – a prospect the government has neither ruled out nor confirmed – it would impact these other programs.

[ 348 comments : http://goo.gl/VKPMo ]

Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

-------------------------------------------------------

Research shows Old Age Security system keeps seniors out of poverty
http://goo.gl/1kgho
February 1, 2012
By Heather Scoffield

OTTAWA - Research prepared for the federal government shows that the old-age benefits cited by Stephen Harper as perhaps unsustainable are a key factor keeping seniors out of poverty. The technical, 80-page paper shows that without Old Age Security or the Guaranteed Income Supplement, more than a third of women and more than a quarter of men in their 60s would fall below the poverty line. "The OAS programs have a significant influence on the incidence of low income," the report's author, Richard Shillington, wrote.
(...)
The paper, titled Evaluation of the Old Age Security Program*, was written by social policy researcher Shillington in 2009, on a contract with the Ottawa-based econometrics firm Informetrica Ltd. It was prepared for the Human Resources Department.
---
* NOTE : I couldn't find this report online on Feb. 2 (2012)
Click the shortcut link below to see a Google Search Result page which will include the report if it's is eventually posted online.
http://goo.gl/BXyKP
---
Source:
Canadian Business Magazine
http://www.canadianbusiness.com/

Related links:

Canadian Labour Congress
http://www.canadianlabour.ca/

Informetrica
http://www.informetrica.com/

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/

-------------------------------------------------------

No changes to Old Age Security benefits in upcoming budget, Flaherty says
http://goo.gl/4IQrV
February 1, 2012
OTTAWA - The upcoming federal budget will not include changes to the Old Age Security program for seniors but changes are coming, Finance Minister Jim Flaherty said Wednesday. The minister said in a CBC interview from Israel that nothing in the coming budget will affect Canadians receiving benefits this year.
Source:
Winnipeg Free Press
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/

-------------------------------------------------------

Why raising OAS to 67 doesn't make sense
http://www.moneyville.ca/article/1124518
By Ellen Roseman
February 1, 2012
Prime Minister Stephen Harper raised eyebrows with a speech last week that fueled speculation he plans to lift the eligibility for Old Age Security to 67 (from 65). Harper’s argument that deep cuts are required to keep the program afloat deserves closer attention, even though he’s been backpedalling ever since. I have two points to make:
— There is nothing new in the numbers he quotes about OAS costs rising as baby boomers retire.
— There are ways to reduce costs that won’t incense Opposition parties and organized seniors’ groups.

Comments (68):
http://www.moneyville.ca/article/1124518#comments

Source:
Moneyville (Toronto Star)
http://www.moneyville.ca/

-------------------------------------------------------

Research belies PM’s warning about OAS
http://goo.gl/4vXz7
By Bill Curry
January 30, 2012
Expert advice commissioned by the federal government contradicts Stephen Harper’s warnings that Canada can’t afford the looming bill for Old Age Security payments.
(...)
Edward Whitehouse – who researches pension policy on behalf of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and the World Bank – was asked by Ottawa to study and report on how Canada stacks up internationally when it comes to pensions.
[See the link to his report below.]

His conclusion: “The analysis suggests that Canada does not face major challenges of financial sustainability with its public pension schemes,” and “there is no pressing financial or fiscal need to increase pension ages in the foreseeable future.”

[ 898 comments : http://goo.gl/11n5t ]

Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

The Whitehouse report:

Canada's retirement-income provision:
An international perspective

http://www.fin.gc.ca/activty/pubs/pension/ref-bib/whitehouse-eng.asp
[Undated, appears to be a 2009 report]
Excerpt from "Conclusions":
Long-term projections show that public retirement-income provision is financially sustainable. Population ageing will naturally increase public pension spending, but the rate of growth is lower and the starting point better than many OECD countries.

-------------------------------------------------------

CCPA and other resources on pension reform and Old Age Security : Update
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/resources-pension-reform-and-old-age-security
January 30, 2012
Last week Prime Minister Harper signaled possible cuts to Canada's pension programs, namely Old Age Security benefits for middle- and lower-income seniors. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has produced several resources on pension reform, including analysis of the possible plan to raise the age for OAS eligibility:
[Click the link above to access any of the following links)

* Is The OAS/GIS Program Unaffordable?, by Andrew Jackson
* Hennessy's Index: Grey Power, by Trish Hennessy
* Low Income and the Age of Eligibility for OAS, by Andrew Jackson
* Raising The Retirement Age Is The Wrong Way To Deal With The Retirement Crisis, by Andrew Jackson
* Delaying Retirement: What does it mean for younger workers?, by Karen Foster
* A Stronger Foundation: Pension Reform and Old Age Security, by Monica Townson
* Pension Breakdown: How the Finance Ministers Bungled Pension Reform, by Monica Townson

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

4. [Ontario] SPAR Monitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change - February 1
(City of Toronto)

From the
City of Toronto:

SPAR Monitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]
This bi-weekly bulletin is a quick inventory of recent social research information. Its purpose is to promptly
disseminate the most current external and internal research relevant to social policy.

SPARmonitor : February 1, 2012 (PDF - 164K, 6 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_73.pdf
Table of contents of this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)
* Global MetroMonitor Volatility, Growth, and Recovery
* Canadian Trends in Cancer Prevalence
* Quality of Personal Networks: Does Living Alone Make a Difference?
* Personal Networks and the Economic Adjustment of Immigrants
* Recent Evolution of Immigrant-Language Transmission in Canada
* The Eight Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey
* Housing Subsidies and Homelessness: A Simple Idea
* Quantity and Quality of Jobs Falling in Tandem
* Emerging Stronger: Transformative Agenda for Ontario
* Focus Canada 2011 - Highlights Report on Crime and Justice
* Ontario’s Action Plan for Health Care
Source:
SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
- includes links to bulletins from January to March 2011 (more to come) and to all 33 issues of SPARmonitor for 2010.
[ Social Development, Finance & Administration ]
[ City of Toronto ]

Related links:

Social Policy, Analysis and
Research Information Resources:

* Wellbeing Toronto:
www.toronto.ca/wellbeing

* Neighbourhood Profiles:
http://www.toronto.ca/demographics/neighbourhoods.htm

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

5. British Columbia Update:
--- MLA Welfare Challenge Update and Fact Sheet (Raise the Rates) - January 2012
--- Five Myths About Welfare
--- Inequality Facts
--- B.C. poverty reduction plan could reduce costs, advocates argue (The Straight.com) - January 30
--- B.C. welfare payments are adequate, says the Fraser Institute (Vancouver Sun) - January 26
--- Rebuttals to the Jan. 26 Vancouver Sun article (from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, the BC Association of Social workers, a Vancouver pediatrician and the Canadian Social Research Links Guy)

[British Columbia]

From Raise the Rates:

British Columbia MLA Welfare Challenge Update
http://mlaonwelfare.com/
Tuesday, February 1, after a last night ‘couch surfing’ in Surrey, BC MLA Jagrup Brar ended his month of living on the welfare rate of $610. He lost 26 pounds in weight, ended up $7 in debt and had to sell his backpack to have enough money to take the Skytrain back to his home in Surrey.

Jagrup’s latest blog posts
http://mlaonwelfare.com/jagrups-blog-2/

Jean Swanson of Raise the Rates interviews Jagrup Brar (PDF - 52K, 4 pages)
http://mlaonwelfare.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/interview.pdf

British ColumbiaWelfare Fact Sheet (140K, 12 pages)
http://mlaonwelfare.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/welfarefactsheet1.pdf
PDF file date: January 16, 2012
At the end of May 2011 Raise the Rates launched the ‘MLA Welfare Challenge’. This challenged one or more of BC's MLAs to live on welfare for a month to gain real life experience of living on welfare. For the month of January, 2012, Jagrup Brar (MLA Surrey Fleetwood) will live on the single person’s welfare rate of $610 for everything. Raise the Rates’ experience is that people cannot live a healthy life on welfare. A key part of any poverty reduction strategy, a policy aim that all BC MLAs say they support, is raising welfare. This fact sheet provides information on the position of people on welfare in BC in November 2011.
- twelve pages of BC welfare information including :
* Who Gets Welfare ("In November 2011 a total of 178,128 people in BC live on welfare")
* Recession Hits (impacts of the 2008-2009 recession)
* Welfare Rates and Poverty (average wages, poverty lines and welfare incomes)
* The Maze and Obstacle Course of Welfare (Who can qualify? - Barriers to Welfare and Getting Back to Work)
* Welfare and Housing
* Support Payments and Other Necessities
* Single Parent Families cannot afford to Live or raise Healthy Children
* Welfare Doesn’t cover cost of Living and Housing
* Cost of Food and Living
* Punishing Children (Welfare lone parents not allowed child support from former partners
* Historic Welfare rates since 1980 (BC's welfare rate for a single person in 2012 is $610 monthly; if this amount were adjusted for inflation, the same person would receive $930 monthly)

Five Myths About Welfare
http://mlaonwelfare.com/5-myths-about-welfare/
1. It is easy to get on welfare
2. Life on welfare is easy
3. People on welfare don’t want to work
4. Lots of people are defrauding the system
5. It costs too much to fix poverty

Related links from
Raise the Rates:

Inequality Facts
http://raisetherates.org/inequality.html
Last updated on December 6, 2008, also contains Canadian and BC Tax Facts.

Raise the Rates
Raise the Rates is a coalition of community groups and organisations concerned with the level of poverty and homelessness in British Columbia.
MLA Welfare Challenge was a project of Raise the Rates.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

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B.C. poverty reduction plan could reduce costs, advocates argue
http://goo.gl/NA6ZL
January 30, 2012
By Yolande Cole
As Surrey-Fleetwood MLA Jagrup Brar completes his 31 days of living on the monthly welfare rate of $610 [ http://goo.gl/2CVpb ], advocates are calling for a plan that they argue would cost less than half of what is currently spent on poverty. “Poverty’s costing our province between $8 and $9 billion a year— that’s a conservative estimate,” said Seth Klein, B.C. director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), at a press conference in the Downtown Eastside today (January 30). “The cost of actually fully implementing a bold, comprehensive poverty reduction plan is less than half of that.” (...) According to the CCPA’s calculation, annual costs of poverty in B.C. include $1.2 billion in health care, $745 million in crime costs, and an estimated $6.2 billion in lost productivity.
Source:
The Straight.com - Vancouver's Online Source
http://www.straight.com/

Related links:

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

* British Columbia Office:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc
The CCPA BC Office works with a team of over 60 staff and volunteer researchers to investigate major problems in our province—the high rate of poverty, the extreme concentration of wealth, the serious environmental challenges. But we don’t stop there: we propose real, workable solutions to these problems. Our goal: social, economic and environmental justice.

[ In December 2008, the CCPA-BC Office published a comprehensive poverty reduction plan. Read the news release, watch a slideshow or download the study at www.policyalternatives.ca/reports/2008/12/poverty_reduction ]

* National Office:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.

---

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca
We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour organizations, and social policy groups. We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness. We have 25 Coalition Members and over 350 supporting organizations with a collective membership of over 300,000 that have joined the call for a poverty reduction plan.

Provincial Poverty Reduction Plans
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/poverty-reduction-plans/
Recommended reading!
---- includes information and many links to related documents for all provinces and territories with a poverty reduction plan
---- breakdown of poverty plans across Canada, and highlights the fact that BC is one of the last provinces without one and BC still has the highest rate of poverty in Canada.

Reports and studies about poverty in BC (from various sources)
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/resources/
- links to key reports about the effects of poverty in BC

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

B.C. welfare payments are adequate
For the most part, they line up with basic needs;
where they don't, for employable singles, there is a reason

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/welfare+payments+adequate/6054331/story.html
January 26, 2012
By Niels Veldhuis, Amela Karabegovic, and Milagros Palacios
The authors are economists with the Fraser Institute - http://www.fraserinstitute.org/

Source:
Vancouver Sun
http://www.vancouversun.com/

---

Rebuttals:

---

From the
BC Office
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc
of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives CCPA:
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Congratulations to Jagrup Brar: Time to raise welfare rates
http://www.policynote.ca/congratulations-to-jagrup-brar-time-to-raise-welfare-rates/
February 3, 2012
By Seth Klein
On Tuesday, BC MLA Jagrup Brar wrapped up his month living on a basic welfare income of $610. He has returned to his family and a comfortable home. But we owe him great thanks. And kudos as well to the folks at Raise the Rates, who issued the challenge that MLAs try living on welfare themselves (Brar was the only MLA to accept the challenge), and who organized near daily activities during Brar’s month-long challenge.
(...)
While most of the coverage of Brar’s month was sympathetic, a few negative voices were heard. In particular, the Minister responsible (Stephanie Cadieux) and the Fraser Institute made a number of media interventions in defense of BC’s abysmally low welfare benefit rates. Their comments indicate they truly need to get out of the office more — they simply have no understanding of what life on welfare is actually like.

Among the key points made by the Minister and Fraser economists was that we needn’t worry about the $610 basic rate, because a majority of welfare recipients receive more (either because they have children or a recognized disability), an amount they deem “adequate.” It’s true that most welfare recipients get more than the basic rate, but calling those rates “adequate” is way off the mark.

As the National Council of Welfare notes, those on welfare with children and those with a disability still live thousands of dollars below the poverty line. And extensive research conducted by the CCPA (a study I co-authored called Living on Welfare in BC [see the next link below], which followed real people on welfare over a two year period, rather than just pondering numbers as the Fraser folks have) found that even those in receipt of the higher (supposedly “adequate”) rates were still frequently reliant on food banks and other charities to meet basic needs.

Source:
Policy Note (CCPA)
http://www.policynote.ca/

Related CCPA study:

Living on Welfare in BC:
Experiences of Longer-Term “Expected to Work” Recipients
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/living-welfare-bc
By Seth Klein, Jane Pulkingham, et al
April 22, 2008

---

From the
BC Association of Social workers
http://www.bcasw.org/

Dear Editor... (small PDF file, 1 page)
http://goo.gl/Pkh7H
The position taken by the Fraser Institute in the January 26 Vancouver Sun article (B.C. Welfare payments are adequate) does not reflect the realities of today’s world.
BC social assistance rates do not meet a “basic needs level”. As social workers, we encounter individuals who cannot meet their basic needs, particularly shelter needs.
(...) Our society can do better than to condemn unemployed individuals to a life on the street or in sub-standard housing.
Source:

---

From Barbara Fitzgerald, Vancouver pediatrician
in the Vancouver Sun:

Hardships of welfare poverty harm children and families
http://goo.gl/sWBZH
February 3, 2012
The economists at the Fraser Institute tell us that welfare payments are adequate. I am not an economist; I am a pediatrician in the inner city. I would like them to see the children I see on a daily basis and tell me that is true. (...) Children on welfare come to school hungry, ill-clothed and tired from sleeping with bed bugs. They are not ready to learn and they are not ready to succeed. If we want to make a difference, if we want the next generation of children to succeed, we will boost welfare rates to allow them to grow up with their families, finish school and seek employment. Let's start thinking about the children.

---

Gilles' two cents' worth:

I loved The Nova Scotia Finance Minister's candid assessment, last September, of the work of the Fraser Institute.
http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/blog/post/967950
And I concur...

However, just as the broken old mantle clock in our living room is correct twice a day, the folks at the Fraser were bang on when they suggest in their Sun article that the B.C. government "should allow those on welfare to work and keep a certain amount of what they earn without a reduction in their welfare benefits."
Hear, hear!

To that I would add:
SHAME ON YOU, BC GOVERNMENT --- yours is the only jurisdiction in Canada that claws back 100% of any earnings declared by a welfare recipient.

See how earnings exemption policies in other provinces and
territories provide incentives for welfare clients to reintegrate into the labour force:
http://goo.gl/5x4ng

This link takes you to "Welfare and earnings", chapter 7 of Welfare Incomes 2009, from the National Council of Welfare.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

6. Action to End Poverty in Alberta (AEPA) and the Social Policy Framework - January 31

Action to End Poverty in Alberta (AEPA) and the Social Policy Framework
Developing a Social Policy Framework for Alberta: A response from the Action to End Poverty in Alberta Initiative
http://actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/index.php/component/content/article/13/918

January 31, 2012

To: Assistant Deputy Minister Shannon Marchand
and Executive Director Lora Pillipow

The Action to End Poverty in Alberta network is an initiative of the Inter-City Forum on Social Policy (ICFSP) [ http://goo.gl/chwIM ], a collaborative of 19 of Alberta's cities and larger urban areas plus the Family and Community Support Services Association of Alberta [ http://www.fcssaa.ab.ca/ ]. ICFSP is focused on information sharing, networking and advocacy in an inter-governmental context to improve social policies and programs in member municipalities and throughout the province. In 2010, members of ICSFP determined that it was timely to undertake a project to address poverty in Alberta by promoting comprehensive poverty reduction planning throughout the province.

Currently there are 33 members of the AEPA network including numerous municipalities, non-governmental organizations and community agencies. The focus of the AEPA network is to endorse and promote a call for the Province to develop a poverty reduction strategy (PRS).
(...)
Similar to the Province's 10- year Plan to Eliminate Homelessness [ http://housing.alberta.ca/603.cfm ] (and in support of strategy 16 in that plan), AEPA believes that a PRS embedded within government by virtue of legislation and regulations with accountabilities and timelines is plausible and necessary.

Source:
Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

7. New Brunswick anti-poverty advocate quits the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation Board - January 31

New Brunswick anti-poverty advocate quits the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation Board
http://www.metronews.ca/london/canada/article/1085031--new-brunswick-anti-poverty-advocate-quits
January 31, 2012
FREDERICTON - An anti-poverty advocate has resigned from a government-appointed body in New Brunswick in protest over decisions by the government affecting the poor. Pam Coates quit the Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation [ http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/esic.html ] Board, citing the Conservative government's decisions to double the co-payment cap on prescriptions for low-income seniors and delay a minimum wage increase."Both are blatant examples of obstacles/barriers to getting out of poverty and will in some cases enhance and encourage more poverty," she wrote in a Jan. 18 letter to the board. The board consists of 22 members representing the government, businesses, non-profit organizations and people who have experienced poverty.
Source:
MetroNews.ca

http://www.metronews.ca/

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

8. So There's Income Inequality. Now What? - January 31
(Rob Rainer in Huffington Post Canada)

So There's Income Inequality. Now What?
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/rob-rainer/income-inequality_b_1242439.html
By Rob Rainer
January 31, 2012
Spiked by public attention to the Occupy phenomenon, 2011 was the year in which the issue of income and wealth inequality mainstreamed in Canada. Witness: Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney called the Occupy demonstrations "entirely constructive." Jeffrey Simpson, perhaps the land's top newspaper columnist, wrote about inequality. The Conference Board of Canada released a significant report. On January 6, Jeffrey Simpson wrote further to say that, "it's imperative that political actors put the issue front and centre on the national agenda." The NDP leadership race, at least, is embracing the challenge, for example Brian Topp's plan for federal tax reform.
So let's herald a little good news: Inequality is on the public and political radar.
---
Author Rob Rainer is of Canada Without Poverty
(formerly known as the National Antipoverty Organization):
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

Source:
Huffington Post Canada

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

Related links from
Huffington Post Canada:

* Income inequality - The Conference Board of Canada
http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/details/society/income-inequality.aspx

* Financial Security - Income Distribution / Indicators of Well-being in Canada
http://www4.hrsdc.gc.ca/.3ndic.1t.4r@-eng.jsp?iid=22

* Income inequality rising quickly in Canada - The Globe and Mail
http://goo.gl/lHKCz

* OECD report finds income inequality rising in Canada | CTV News
http://goo.gl/3WlPv

* Canada Income Inequality: Toronto's Cabbagetown A Prime Example Of Shrinking Middle Class
http://goo.gl/i4JLp

* Canada Income Inequality And The Decline Of Unions : Have We Passed A Point Of No Return?
http://goo.gl/wNJMs

---

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

9. Can microcredit work in Canada? - January 30
(Globe and Mail )

Can microcredit work in Canada?
http://goo.gl/KeaFH
January 30, 2012
By Craig and Marc Kielburger
In December, Craig and Mark travelled in Africa with Sir Richard Branson, the billionaire founder of the Virgin Group and avid philanthropist. They visited microcredit programs that provide small loans to people in poor communities to start businesses and become financially self-sufficient. During that journey, Branson pondered aloud whether such a model could apply to the developed world and achieve scale through commercial banking. (...)
Microcredit is a simple but powerful concept: Lend small amounts to people who wouldn’t have the collateral for a regular bank loan to start a self-run business. Because the loans typically go to groups of people who vouch for and support each other, repayment rates are as high as 99 per cent. (...) Microcredit isn’t a cure-all, but its spirit of supporting entrepreneurship could be helpful for tackling some of the challenges of poverty in this country.

Craig and Marc Kielburger co-founded Free the Children:
http://www.freethechildren.com/

Source:
Globe and Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

---

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

10. Crown - First Nations Gathering Outcome Statements - January 24
(Prime Minister's Office and Assembly of First Nations National Chief)

Crown - First Nations Gathering Outcome Statement
http://pm.gc.ca/eng/media.asp?id=4600
24 January 2012
Ottawa, Ontario
Today, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn A-in-chut Atleo participated in an historic Crown – First Nations Gathering. The theme of the gathering was Strengthening Our Relationship – Unlocking Our Potential.
Source:
Prime Minister's Office
http://pm.gc.ca/

---

A Communiqué from National Chief Shawn Atleo (PDF - 52K, 5 pages)
http://www.afn.ca/uploads/files/nc-bulletin-cfng.pdf
January 2012
(...) The Crown-First Nations Gathering is an important first step in renewing the relationship between
First Nations and our historic partner, the Crown, but it is only a first step.
Source:
Assembly of First Nations

http://www.afn.ca/

---

- Go to the First Nations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm

11. The Manitoba Mincome Experiment - November 2007
(M. L'Heureux in Legal Checkpoint Blog)

The Manitoba Mincome Experiment
http://legalcheckpoint.blogspot.com/2007/11/social-policy-manitoba-mincome.html
November 15, 2007
By M. L'Heureux

The Mincome Project, also called the Manitoba Basic Guaranteed Annual Income Experiment, was the “first large scale social experiment in Canada and was designed to evaluate the economic and social consequences of an alternative social welfare system based on the concept of negative income tax (NIT)”. The experiment took place between 1975 and 1979 in Winnipeg and Dauphin, Manitoba. The research project was jointly funded by the Federal Government of Canada and the Manitoba Government. Little is known about the experiment as the federal government chose to shelve the report for reasons still unknown to the public. The raw data that was accumulated during the experiment is still relevant to today’s Guaranteed Income debates and is available in some academic libraries and in all provincial legislatures.
Source:
Legal Checkpoint Blog

http://legalcheckpoint.blogspot.com/

---

Related links:

Livable Income For Everyone
http://www.livableincome.org/
Brtitish Columbia-based Livable4All advocates and provides information on the world social movement for Guaranteed Livable Income (GLI) or Basic Income -- formerly known as Guaranteed Annual Income.

- incl. links to : * Introduction * Facts First * Key Reports * Key Primer * Rationale * Jobism * Objections * Articles * Links * News * Buried Treasure * Gallery * Remembering

Links - 100+ online resources on livable/guaranteed annual income
http://www.livableincome.org/links.htm

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

12. [Brain Drain] Evidence from the 2000 Cohort of Canadian University Graduates - 2008
(Canadian Public Policy Journal)

Evidence from the 2000 Cohort of Canadian University Graduates (PDF - 168K, 15 pages)
http://utpjournals.metapress.com/content/l50l077g033u7012/fulltext.pdf
By David Zarifa and David Walters
2008
Abstract:
Existing studies on Canada’s brain drain have established the importance of income gains as a critical factor that motivates individuals to move to the United States. It remains unclear, however, how sizable the earnings gap may be for recent post-secondary graduates and whether or not this gap varies by the field of study of the most common drainers. Drawing on the most recent National Graduates Survey (NGS), this study compares the early labour market earnings of the 2000 cohort of university graduates who remained in Canada to their counterparts who obtained employment in the United States. Our results indicate that only a small proportion of this cohort migrated south of the border, yet the great majority of these migrants are heavily concentrated in only a few knowledge-economy fields. Annual earnings are significantly higher for all individuals who relocated to the United States. Moreover, these differences are most salient among undergraduate engineers and computer scientists.

[David Zarifa is with the Department of Sociology, McMaster University. David Walters is with the Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
University of Guelph. ]

Source:
Canadian Public Policy
http://economics.ca/cpp/en/
Canadian Public Policy is Canada's foremost journal examining economic and social policy. The aim of the journal is to stimulate research and discussion of public policy problems in Canada.

---

- Go to the Brain Drain Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hightax.htm

13. Sixth Estate Blog : The Harper Government™ Patronage List and Lobbyists

From the
Sixth Estate Blog:

Lobbyists
http://sixthestate.net/?page_id=1088
March 21, 2011
“Politics will no longer be a stepping stone to a lucrative career lobbying government.” — Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada
---

The Sixth Estate Lobbyists Watchlist tracks one particularly disturbing sector on Parliament Hill: professional lobbyists. Lobbyists are individuals who make their living attempting to sell access and influence in government to the highest bidder. There are few other professions whose very reason for being is to subvert the democratic process. At its worst, lobbyists involves an insidious revolving door between political parties and the private sector, with staffers moving from positions of influence over government policy into positions trying to influence that policy on behalf of their mostly big corporate clients, and then back again into the party.
(...)
This list exists, then, to track the influence of lobbyists on Parliament Hill. I’m particularly interested in the growing number of Conservative insiders who are skirting the five-year prohibition in one way or another. Most of these individuals are documented hypocrites, having helped elect and support a government which campaigned on the principle that politics was not, in Harper’s words, “a stepping stone to a lucrative career in lobbying.” Now they’re lobbying anyways. The following chart identifies 45 such individuals, and it is a partial and growing list.
[Click the link above to see the list of 45 hypocrites, including Ken Boessenkool, Stockwell Day, Janet Ecker, Deborah Grey ...]

--------------------------------------------------------

Patronage List
http://sixthestate.net/?page_id=1381
Updated to December 30, 2011

Patronage Jobs since May 2011:
84 (40%)

Appointees From Other Parties since May 2011:
7 Liberals (4%)

Patronage Jobs since 2006:
806

Since 2006, the general trend is to hire a disproportionate number of people who are notably Conservative or who have no apparent party loyalties. Stephen Harper once denounced this system as the Prime Minister rewarding his “buddies,” but while in office has been uninterested in changing the system. Instead he has continued to appoint party insiders and supporters at a frenzied pace, even to the Senate, which he once demanded be fully democratized through elected Senators with term limits.
(...)
The following table spans the Harper Government™ and is a woefully incomplete work in progress. I want to stress that it does not prove that these people are incompetent or corrupt in any way whatsoever; it simply establishes that there is a clear pattern in which people who appear to have supported or worked for the Conservative Party receive a disproportionate number of government positions. Why that pattern exists, you can decide for yourself.

The Patronage List (806 names/affiliations and counting) tracks a specific subset of the Crown appointments announced biweekly in the Canada Gazette. It does not include promotions and reappointments to people already holding patronage appointments, or appointments filled by civil servants or military officers, provincial nominees, etc. In this way, it tracks only those jobs which are given to those outside of government, theoretically on the basis of merit.

Source:
Sixth Estate

http://sixthestate.net/
Ottawa blogger David Vogt
Recommended reading!

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

14. Indicators of Well-being in Canada
(Human Resources and Skills Development Canada)

Indicators of Well-being in Canada
http://www4.hrsdc.gc.ca/h.4m.2@-eng.jsp
This report gathers data from different sources and presents a comprehensive, up-to-date picture of the well-being of Canadians and Canadian society. It also shows how this picture may be changing over time. (...)
You will find a wide range of indicators, or statistical measures, that show how things are going for Canadians. For example, there are data on how many hours we work each week, our education levels compared with the levels in other countries, the affordability of housing, and much more.

Areas of well-being that are covered in this report include:
*
Work * Learning * Financial Security * Family Life * Housing * Social Participation * Leisure * Health * Security * Environment

Each of these areas is further broken down into sub-groups.
For example, "Financial Security" [ http://www4.hrsdc.gc.ca/d.4m.1.3n@-eng.jsp?did=4 ] includes:
Standard of Living - Family Income - Retirement Income - Low Income Incidence - Low Income Persistence - Net Worth (Wealth) - Life events - Personal Bankruptcies - Key influences - Income Distribution

Recommended reading!
The timeliness of the information and statistics in this HRSDC sub-site varies by area and sub-group --- some analysis dates back to 2007 and earlier, but most of the stats and trend analysis are for the year 2009. The content of certain sections is more recent --- for example, the What's New page [ http://www4.hrsdc.gc.ca/c.4nt.2nt@-eng.jsp?cid=28 ] shows that on September 8, 2011, "t
he following indicators have been updated with the latest data: Life Expectancy at Birth - Infant Mortality - Patient Satisfaction - Low Birth Weight - Victims of Property Crime - Victims of Violent Crime - Age of Mother at Childbirth"

Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml

---

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

15. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Statscan to abandon no-layoff policy as budget cuts loom - January 30
--- Labour Force Survey, January 2012 - February 3
--- Adult and youth correctional services: Key indicators, 2010/2011 - January 31

--- Seniors returning to Canada- January 30

Statscan to abandon no-layoff policy as budget cuts loom
http://goo.gl/zh4OH
By Tavia Grant
January 30, 2012
Statistics Canada is abandoning its long-standing no-layoff practice as the agency faces budget cuts, though its chief statistician says reductions will not erode the quality of its data.
In a memo to senior managers, the Ottawa-based agency effectively abandons its no-layoff approach, which had been in place since the 1980s. Statscan, which employs nearly 5,000 full-time workers, has been asked, along with other federal departments, to submit proposals for a potential budget cut of up to 10 per cent.

Comments (196)
http://goo.gl/wYUJo

Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

February 3, 2012
Labour Force Survey, January 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120203/dq120203a-eng.htm
Employment was virtually unchanged in January, and the unemployment rate edged up 0.1 percentage points to 7.6% as more people searched for work. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment rose by 129,000 (+0.7%), with most of the growth occurring in the first six months of this period.
- includes links to three tables:
* Labour force characteristics by age and sex
* Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS)
* Labour force characteristics by province

Related report:

Labour Force Information
January 8 to 14, 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/71-001-x/71-001-x2012001-eng.htm
Table of contents:
Highlights
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/71-001-x/2012001/aftertoc-aprestdm1-eng.htm
Analysis — January 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/71-001-x/2012001/part-partie1-eng.htm
Tables
Charts
Data quality, concepts and methodology
User information
Related products
PDF version (399K, 60 pages)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/71-001-x/71-001-x2011012-eng.pdf

[ earlier reports in this series:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=71-001-X&chropg=1&lang=eng ]

Source:
Labour Force Information - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=71-001-X&lang=eng
This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

See also:

Tables by subject: Labour
http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/ind01/l2_2621-eng.htm

Labour
Commuting to work
Employment and unemployment
Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
Hours of work and work arrangements
Industries
Non-wage benefits
Occupations
Unionization and industrial relations
Wages, salaries and other earnings

Related subjects:

* Labour
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=2621&lang=eng&more=0

* Employment and unemployment
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2621&id=1803&lang=eng&more=0

 

January 31, 2012
Adult and youth correctional services: Key indicators, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120131/dq120131g-eng.htm
Data from the Corrections Key Indicator Report for Adults and Young Offenders are now available for 2010/2011.
The survey monitors trends in correctional populations, describes the utilization of correctional services and provides a basis for calculating incarceration rates. Data in this release were collected by correctional service officials, reported on a fiscal-year basis and are based on daily counts of adults and youth in custodial facilities and monthly counts of offenders under community supervision.

Available on CANSIM:

* Tables 251-0004 to 251-0006
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=251-0004..251-0006&p2=31

* Table 251-0008
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=251-0008&p2=31

Related subjects:

* Children and youth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Crime and justice (youth)
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20002&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Crime and justice
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2693&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Correctional services
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2149&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

 

January 30, 2012
Perspectives on Labour and Income - January 2012 online edition
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/75-001-x2012001-eng.htm

The January 2012 online edition of Perspectives on Labour and Income, released today, features one article.

Seniors returning to Canada
January 2012

Highlights:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2012001/article/11618/11618hl-fs-eng.htm

Full article:

HTML version
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2012001/article/11618-eng.htm

PDF version (231K, 14 pages)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2012001/article/11618-eng.pdf
This article uses census data to address several questions related to Canadian residents who previously emigrated to other countries: Do seniors account for a large proportion of returned emigrants? From where do older emigrants return? Do the characteristics of older returned emigrants differ from those of older Canadians who did not live abroad? Do the amounts and sources of income received in old age differ between these groups? How do all these results differ for Canadian-born versus immigrant returnees?

Source:
Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=75-001-X&lang=eng
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

 

The Daily Archives
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

16. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

February 5, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Open letter to Prime Minister Harper re. the Universal Child Care Benefit
http://goo.gl/zM3TB
4 Feb 2012 | Canada
Today—six years since the announcement of the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB)—the Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada and Campaign 2000 call on the Harper government to redirect the $2.5 billion annual UCCB fund to ECEC programs and the National Child Benefit for low and modest income families.

Ensuring access to early childhood education and child care for all Canadians
http://goo.gl/7SD0Y
1 Feb 2012 | Canada
NDP leadership candidate Peggy Nash releases child care plan "based on evidence which consistently confirms that Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programs support women's equality, help lift families out of poverty, and strengthen communities."

A life raft for women's equality
http://goo.gl/MjXAB
1 Feb 2012 | Europe
Report from the Fawcett Society (UK)"details 'targeted, achievable policies' to defend women's rights"; argues that austerity measures are "turning back time on women’s equality."

Investing in public programs matters: How state policies impact children's lives
http://goo.gl/PG2nU
30 Jan 2012 | United States
Report includes new findings about the strength of relationships between state policies and selected economic and demographic factors indicative of child well-being.

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Lise St-Denis named Liberal Critic for Early Learning and Childcare
http://goo.gl/m3KvQ
1 Feb 2012 | Canada

Harper Needs to Put Women and Children First
http://goo.gl/BXp27
1 Feb 2012 | Canada

Ottawa daycares don't use centralized list: Only half of children on centralized list find daycare spot in capital
http://goo.gl/wzR3h
1 Feb 2012 | Ontario

The child care crisis in Parkdale-High Park prompts town hall
http://goo.gl/IS1aC
30 Jan 2012 | Ontario

Lost in babyland
http://goo.gl/8nxT9
30 Jan 2012 | Canada

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

17. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

February 3:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/03/
State Minimum Wages
State Medicaid Programs - Louisiana, Kentucky
Homeless Families - New York City
January 2012 US Unemployment
No Child Left Behind Waiver Requests

February 2:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/02/
States and Jobless Benefits
Earned Income Tax Credit

February 1:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/01/
Eliminating Disease in Poorest Nations
Infant Death Rate - Scotland
State SNAP Policies - Florida, Kansas, New York
Rural Poverty in the US

January 31:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/31/
State Medicaid Programs
Asset-Poor Households in the US

January 30:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/30/
State Minimum Wage - New York
Medicaid Patients and Dental Care
State Medicaid Program - Colorado

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Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

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NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

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Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

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- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

18. UNdata (United Nations)

UNdata
http://data.un.org
UNdata is a statistics database service that provides users with quick and easy access to a wide range of data that cover themes including agriculture, crime, education, energy, industry, labour, national accounts, population and tourism. UNdata is part of the “Statistics as a Public Good” project launched by the United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD) that aims to provide free access to global statistics, assist National Statistical Offices of member countries with strengthening their data dissemination capabilities, and educate users on the importance of statistics in evidence-based policy and decision making.

Source:
United Nations
http://www.un.org

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- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

19. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter
Latest issue:

1 February 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1261
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4074

In this issue:
Internet Freedom: Call to reject
the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement
Latest news and reports
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Italy
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL"page (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Children's rights Wiki - from CRIN
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php
The Children's Rights Wiki assembles all information about children's rights in every country in one place.

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)
http://www.crin.org/email/

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://www.crin.org/

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Fast Food and Salt:
A Cautionary Tale by the
Canadian Social Research Links Guy

[By Gilles]

I've always taken pride in the fact that I avoid adding salt to my food (except for corn on the cob, natch!), and I think I'm probably a bit healthier for it. However, I do enjoy the occasional foray into the world of fast food from time to time, and I try to make healthy food choices, at least once in awhile...

Last week, my wife and I ate lunch at Tim Horton's, and I was curious how much salt we'd ingested as part of our nutritous meal. When I got home, I searched online for salt content in our Timmy's meal. My findings blew me away.

According to the Institute of Medicine, the recommended sodium intake for adults aged 51 to 70 is 1300 mg.

Our Timmy's lunch:

My lunch:
- small beef noodle soup: 820mg sodium (130 calories)
- toasted chicken club sandwich, whole wheat : 870mg sodium (360 calories)
Total sodium : 1690mg
[ For the sake of comparison, a McDonald's Quarter-pounder with cheese has 1190mg of salt and 510 calories. ]
Total calories : 490

My wife's lunch:
- chicken salad wrap : 540mg sodium (190 calories)
- small mushroom soup : 740mg sodium (150 calories)
Total sodium : 1280mg (340 calories)
Total calories : 340

Timmy's Nutrition Calculator:
http://www.timhortons.com/ca/en/menu/nutrition-calculator.html

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Fast Food Nutrition Facts Calculator
http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/fastfood/l/bl_restaurants.htm

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The Fast Food Explorer
http://www.fatcalories.com/

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CalorieKing
http://www.calorieking.com/

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The Calorie Counter
http://calorielab.com/index.html

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NOTE TO SELF:

Time to switch to pizza.
Hold the salt.

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And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

Mitt Romney speaks French?? (video, duration 2:07)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyP2M0DTch8

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My two favourite time-wasters:

Best of the Internet
http://www.jimmyr.com/

DUMP.COM - Family friendly videos
http://www.dump.com/

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Dumber Than a Bag of Hammers
...and other arcane expressions
:
http://bryanrobertson.hubpages.com/hub/Dumber-Than-a-Bag-of-Hammers

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So he thinks he can dance (video, duration 3:56)
http://youtu.be/IxPbgnO81sQ
Catchy.