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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 5,  2008

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1940 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. 2008 Federal Election Links page updated (Canadian Social Research Links)
--- Platform no longer Awol : Tories to release it on Tuesday
(National Post) - October 4
--- Europe's anti-poverty efforts put us to shame (Toronto Star)
- October 4
---
Where the major national parties stand on tackling poverty (Toronto Star) - October 4
---
Federal Leaders' Debates - media analysis (October 1-2)
--- Warning from Campaign 2000 to Federal Parties: High Child Poverty Rates Threaten Social Fabric of Canada’s Cities
(Campaign 2000) - September 29
--- PM accused of ducking poverty issue (Toronto Star) - September 29
--- On the Record about poverty - the other leaders speak out
(Make Poverty History) - September 29
--- New Democratic Party Platform 2008 - September 28
--- Bloc québécois Party Platform
2. What's new from the New Brunswick Advisory Council on the Status of Women:
--- Poverty is everybody's business in N.B.
- October 2
--- Shouldn't we have a plan to reduce poverty? A Woman's View - July 17
3. No Strings Attached: How The Tax-Free Savings Account Can Help Lower-Income Canadians Get Ahead (C.D. Howe Institute) - September 30
--- Poverty and Social Exclusion Solving Complex Issues through Comprehensive Approaches - September 2008
5. Corporate Responsibility in Canada - links
6. What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada)
7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - October 1
8. A Public Service Announcement : the National Do Not Call List

International  content

9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
10. Mollie Orshansky: Author of the Poverty Thresholds (By Gordon Fisher, in Amstat News, American Statistical Association) - September 2008
11. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content
12. CRINMAIL (September/October 2008) - (Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Have a great week!

Gilles Séguin
Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. 2008 Federal Election Links page updated (Canadian Social Research Links)
--- Platform no longer Awol : Tories to release it on Tuesday
(National Post) -
October 4

---
Europe's anti-poverty efforts put us to shame (Toronto Star) - October 4
---
Where the major national parties stand on tackling poverty
(Toronto Star) - October 4
---
Federal Leaders' Debates (October 1-2)
--- Warning from Campaign 2000 to Federal Parties: High Child Poverty Rates Threaten Social Fabric of Canada’s Cities
(Campaign 2000) - September 29
--- PM accused of ducking poverty issue (Toronto Star) - September 29
--- On the Record about poverty - the other leaders speak out
(Make Poverty History) - September 29
---
New Democratic Party Platform 2008 - September 28
--- Bloc québécois Party Platform

2008 Federal Election Links page updated (Canadian Social Research Links)

New links added in the past week:

Platform no longer Awol:
Tories to release it on Tuesday
October 04, 2008
Source:
The National Post

--------------------------------

Europe's anti-poverty efforts put us to shame
October 4, 2008
By Laurie Monsebraaten
The poor may not always be with us. It sounds like a radical idea, but that's just what three of the national political party leaders are telling voters in this federal election. Problem is, the party leading the polls and expected to win on Oct. 14 has been silent on the issue affecting some 3 million Canadians, including 880,000 children. And without a plan to tackle poverty – or even acknowledge it's a problem – Stephen Harper's Conservatives would appear to be behind the curve, say social policy experts.
Source:
2008 Federal Election Coverage
[ The Toronto Star ]

Also from The Star:

Where the major national parties stand on tackling poverty
October 4, 2008
(Excerpts only)

Conservatives:
Have not proposed any poverty-reduction plan. The Tories would introduce a $500 tax credit to help parents pay for children’s arts programs. No new initiatives on child care, employment insurance or other income supports for low-income Canadians...

Liberals:
Within five years, would reduce the number of Canadians living in poverty by at least 30 per cent and cut the number of poor children by half...

NDP:
Would introduce a Poverty Elimination Act to end poverty by 2020, with a goal of cutting overall poverty by 35 per cent and halving child poverty within five years...

Greens:
Would introduce a Guaranteed Liveable Income – a new payment to all Canadians – to ensure no one lives in poverty. Promise to eliminate income taxes for those earning less than $20,000 annually...
NOTE: See the Green Party platform (this link takes you to the 2008 election page of this site) for a Con Alert concerning the Green Party's promotion of a "liveable income" that's based on "bare subsistence levels."
[ HINT: Why would the fiscally- and socially-conservative Fraser Institute support a guaranteed liveable income?? The Devil's in the Details.]

Source:
The Toronto Star Election Special
NOTE: this resource from the Toronto Star also includes links to poverty-related news items from the campaign trail, and this section is frequently updated.

--------------------------------

Federal Leaders' Debates (October 1-2)
- this link takes you to a Google.ca news search results page with links to media analysis of the debates

------------------------

Warning from Campaign 2000 to Federal Parties:
High Child Poverty Rates Threaten Social Fabric of Canada’s Cities
(PDF -25K, 1 page)
Media Release
September 29, 2008
Toronto –Citing disturbing census data on high child and family poverty rates in major Canadian cities, the national antipoverty coalition Campaign 2000 today urged all federal party leaders to commit to a Poverty Reduction Strategy for Canada. The 2006 Census shows that in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver 1 out of every 4 children lives in poverty. In Winnipeg, St. John’s and Victoria, 1 in every 5 children lives in poverty, and for Edmonton, Hamilton and Saskatoon the rate is 1 in every 6. Across Canada, the child poverty rate was 13.1% in 2005 or 880,000 children and youth.

* Campaign 2000 Election Statement (PDF - 46K, 1 page)
* Backgrounder
(PDF - 48K, 2 pages)
* Party Grid on Poverty-Related Issues:
where do the parties stand? (PDF - 81K, 10 pages)
* Canada Map
showing child poverty rates above Canadian average in selected cities (PDF - 805K, 1 page)

Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000.

------------------------

PM accused of ducking poverty issue
Only federal leader who doesn't appear in coalition video
September 29, 2008
OTTAWA–Stephen Harper is facing criticism that he's ducking questions on how to help Canadians living in poverty, even as economic turmoil threatens to push more people over a fiscal cliff. The Prime Minister is the only major party leader not appearing in a video prepared by a national anti-poverty coalition to be officially launched today on YouTube.
Source:
The Toronto Star

The above Star article includes an embedded video news clip that provides a synopsis of the leaders' responses to the questions.
To view the complete collection of videos of all leaders who participated, click the "On the Record" link below.

------------------------

From Make Poverty History:

On The Record
Make Poverty History asked the leaders of the five main political parties a series of questions about their plans to reduce poverty, here in Canada and overseas.
Questions:
* Support for the goals of Make Poverty History
* Giving 0.7% of national income in foreign aid
* A national plan to reduce poverty
* Poverty in First Nations communities
* Support for the Kelowna accord or similar plan to reduce First Nations poverty

The promises and the costs
September 29, 2008
A list of key promises in the 2008 federal election campaign

------------------------

New Democratic Party Platform 2008:

Layton releases platform that puts families first:
Prudent plan chooses the middle-class over corporate tax cuts

September 28, 2008
TORONTO – New Democrat Leader Jack Layton released his party’s platform today at a community centre in his east-end Toronto riding. The platform focused on helping middle-class and working families make ends meet. “While Stephen Harper’s priority is a $50 billion corporate tax cut, my priority is investing in families and their children,“ said Layton. The centerpiece of the platform is the New Democrats’ new Child Benefit, an initiative that unifies, simplifies and enhances existing programs such as the Child Tax Benefit and the Universal Child Care Benefit.
Source:
New Democratic Party

NDP Platform 2008
PDF version
(617K, 46 pages) - all in one file
HTML version - scroll about halfway down the page for a table of contents and links to individual sections of the platform

Excerpts:

*Helping Families Make Ends Meet - and Ending Poverty
Jack Layton and the New Democrats will introduce a Poverty Elimination Act to eliminate poverty in Canada by the year 2020:
* This act will set firm targets, and make the government accountable for achieving these targets.
* The act will make the government accountable for eliminating poverty in Canada by 2020.
* Every five years the government will have to report on its progress and deliver an action plan, to be approved by the House of Commons.
* Initial targets will include reducing child poverty by more than 50 percent and the overall poverty rate by more than 35 percent in the first five years.
* The act will establish a poverty elimination office housed within HRDC to assume overall responsibility for implementing our poverty-reduction strategy and developing concrete poverty indicators.

* Affordable Housing: "Bring Canada Home"
To help ensure Canadians will have adequate and affordable housing, Jack Layton and the New Democrats will implement a durable, comprehensive and fully-funded affordable housing strategy that meets Canada's international obligations, as set out by the United Nations. We will build towards the 10-year goal of the One Percent Solution – with one percent of federal spending allocated for truly affordable housing.

Media analysis of the NDP platform - Google.ca search results

----------------------

Plateforme du Bloc québécois
- available only in French

----------------------

- Go to the 2008 Federal Election and General Political Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2008_fed_election.htm

2. What's new from the New Brunswick Advisory Council on the Status of Women:
---
Poverty is everybody's business in N.B. - October 2
--- Shouldn't we have a plan to reduce poverty? A Woman's View - July 17

New Brunswick:

Poverty is everybody's business in N.B.
October 2, 2008
By Elsie Hambrook
Nasty prejudices still get in the way of concerted action on poverty. Some people paint all the poor with the same brush. They think the poor are "lazy" or "irresponsible", that if they made different choices, worked harder or "smarter", they could pull themselves out of poverty. Denial is also a stumbling block, as in "I'd never go on welfare, it'll never happen to me." The reality is that many people work full-time but earn less than the poverty line, juggle part-time or seasonal jobs, education and training along with family responsibilities and still can't make ends meet. For some New Brunswickers, poverty is as close as a few missed paycheques, the result of a separation or divorce for women, or of an illness or disability that strikes before the Old Age Pension kicks in.
Source:
Times & Transcript
[ Author Elsie Hambrook is the new Chairperson of the
New Brunswick Advisory Council on the Status of Women ]

Related link:

Shouldn't we have a plan to reduce poverty?
A Woman's View
(PDF - 63K, 2 pages)
We should be hard-headed about poverty in New Brunswick – “hard-headed” as in focussed and scientific about finding and doing what works to eliminate poverty. Some current poverty programs, here and in other jurisdictions, may have the effect of keeping people poor, for all the care that goes into what gets called a “poverty program”. What is worse, effective programs may be undone by other initiatives, given the lack of coordination and of monitoring.
From the column by Ginette Petitpas-Taylor
Former Chairperson of the
New Brunswick Advisory Council on the Status of Women
in the Times & Transcript, July 17, 2008.

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

3. No Strings Attached: How The Tax-Free Savings Account Can Help Lower-Income Canadians Get Ahead - September 30
(C.D. Howe Institute)

New Tax-Free Savings Accounts Can Help Break Down
Barriers to Saving for Lower-Income Canadians: C.D. Howe Institute
Toronto, Sept. 30 – Lower-income Canadians are entangled in government programs that discourage personal saving, says a study released by the C.D. Howe Institute, and the federal government’s new Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSAs) could help correct the problem. In “No Strings Attached: How The Tax-Free Savings Account Can Help Lower-Income Canadians Get Ahead,” authors John Stapleton and Richard Shillington explain how.

Complete study:

No Strings Attached:
How The Tax-Free Savings Account Can Help
Lower-Income Canadians Get Ahead
(PDF - 176K, 5 pages)
September 30, 2008
By John Stapleton and Richard Shillington
Lower-income Canadians are entangled in government programs with clawback provisions that discourage or effectively prohibit personal saving. The federal government’s new Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSAs) can help correct the problem, provided that provinces and territories refrain from imposing new asset tests and clawbacks that undo savers’ potential gains. Governments should also consider supplementing the savings of poor Canadians, whereby TFSA savings are matched by special funds from government.

Source:
C.D. Howe Institute

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

4. What's new from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):
---
Working for a Living Wage: Ensuring Paid Work Meets Basic Family Needs in Vancouver and Victoria, 2008 - September 25
--- Poverty and Social ExclusionSolving Complex Issues through Comprehensive Approaches
- September 2008

What's new from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

Living wage shows real cost of raising a family
Would lift thousands out of poverty, share prosperity of BC’s economy

Press Release
September 25, 2008
(Vancouver) A new study calls on major public and private sector employers to pay a living wage that would lift low-income families out of poverty and severe financial stress. A living wage allows lower-income families to avoid having to make impossible choices, such as whether to buy food or heat the house, feed the children or pay the rent. The living wage calculation includes basic expenses for a two-earner family with two young children (such as housing, childcare, food and transportation), and government taxes, credits, deductions and subsidies. It finds that each parent would need to work full-time at an hourly wage of $16.74 in Metro Vancouver and $16.39 in Greater Victoria in order to pay for necessities, support the healthy development of their children and participate in the social and civil life of their communities.

Working for a Living Wage:
Ensuring Paid Work Meets Basic Family Needs in Vancouver and Victoria - 2008

Summary (PDF file - , 753K, 8 pages)
Complete report (PDF - 2.9MB, 52 pages)

Living Wage Calculation Spreadsheet (Excel spreadsheet - 56 K)
September 2008

Living Wage Calculation Guide (pdf - 738k, 24 PAGES)
- September 2008
"A technical appendix to the report Working for a Living Wage, for those seeking to calculate the living wage in their own community
Note: While this guide is most appropriate for BC communities, its methodology should be fairly easily transferable to other Canadian communities."
Calculating the Living Wage in six stages:
* Family Expenses * Government Transfers * Government Deductions and Taxes * Determining the Living Wage Amount * BC Child Care Subsidy * Verifying the Calculations

Source:
CCPA BC Office

Also from the CCPA (Manitoba Office):

Poverty and Social Exclusion
Solving Complex Issues through Comprehensive Approaches
(PDF - 249K, 4 pages)
September 2008
* Definitions of social exclusion
* Government strategies to address poverty and social exclusion (Europe - Canada - Newfoundland and Labrador - Québec - Ontario)
* Common features of poverty and social exclusion strategies (targets - timelines - citizen consultations - action plans/strategies - accountability and reporting - evaluation of progress)
* Why Manitoba needs a Strategy

Source:
CCPA Manitoba Office

CCPA National Office link:

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Manitoba Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm

5. Corporate Responsibility in Canada - links

Links to Corporate Responsibility in Canada and
Other Corporate Responsibility Resources on the Internet
40+ links organized under the following categories:
* Company Information Search Sites * General Corporate Activity Tracking Sites * Business Ethics and Ethical Investment Sites * Boycott Sites * Canadian Government Consumer Help Websites * Complain about Canadian Corporations violating OECD Guidelines * Complain About Your Bank, Trust, Insurance or Investment Company * Complain About Misleading Phone Calls from Businesses * Canadian Courts, Tribunals and Commissions and Rulings * Laws from Countries Around the World * Canadian Corporate Lobbyists Search Sites * Donations to Canadian and U.S. Political Parties and Candidates * Chemicals Released in Your Community in Canada * Media Accountability * Find Low-Cost Gasoline Across Canada

Go to Democracy Watch's Corporate Responsibility Campaign page for related information.

Source:
Democracy Watch
Democracy Watch is Canada's leading citizen group advocating democratic reform, government accountability and corporate responsibility, and the most successful national citizen advocacy group in Canada over the past 13 years in winning systemic changes to key laws.

Also from Democracy Watch:

Links to Canadian Government and
Other Government Information and Accountability Sites on the Internet

40+ links organized under the following categories:
* General Canadian Government Websites * Finding Canadian Laws, Bills, Budgets and Policies * Canadian Police and Prosecutors * Canadian Courts, Tribunals and Commissions * Laws from Countries Around the World * Canadian Governments' General Democratic Reform / Accountability Websites * Canadian Government Public Consultation Websites * Canadian Election Laws and Election System Reform * Donations to Canadian and U.S. Political Parties / Candidates * Ethics Laws, Rules and Enforcement Systems * Canadian Federal Government Cabinet Appointments * Canadian and U.S. Lobbying Laws and Registries * Canadian Government Access to Information Websites * Canadian Federal Government Spending Websites * Canadian Federal Political Parties * Other General Websites for Canadian Governments and Politics

Related link:

CSR Directory - "Resources for Promoting Global Business Principles and Best Practices"
- 700+ links to progressive companies, groups, councils, foundations (etc.) promoting corporate social responsibility, in Canada and around the world

Source:
CSRwire - Corporate Social Responsibility Newswire
"CSR is defined as the integration of business operations and values, whereby the interests of all stakeholders including investors, customers, employees, and the environment are reflected in the company's policies and actions."
- based in Vermont, U.S., but includes Canadian content

- Go to the Banks and Business Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bookmrk3.htm

6. What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
---
Canada's population estimates, second quarter 2008 - September 29

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

September 29, 2008
Canada's population estimates, second quarter 2008
Canada's population posted its highest quarterly growth since 1991 in the second quarter of 2008, with an increase of 125,800. The advance was mainly due to a rise in net international migration which, at 91,600, reached its highest level since the end of the 1980s.

The Daily Archives - select a month and a date from the drop-down menu

- Go to the Social Costs of Gambling Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gambling.htm
- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - October 1

From the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) :

October 1, 2008

Early childhood education and care in the 2008 federal election: Updates
1 Oct 08
- In preparation for the federal election on October 14th, CRRU is providing and regularly updating information useful to those who wish to follow ECEC in the campaign.

A strong economy needs good child care: Canada can’t work without it
1 Oct 08
- Backgrounder from Code Blue for Child Care explains how universal, quality ECEC services are essential for Canada’s economy.

Defining the federal government’s role in social policy: The spending power and other instruments
1 Oct 08
- Issue of IRPP’s Policy Matters offers perspectives on the federal spending power, intergovernmental relations and social policy.

Retro social policy: Child benefits under the Harper government
1 Oct 08
- Chapter by Ken Battle from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Harper Record critiques the federal government’s child benefit policy as a “social policy dinosaur”.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Investing in child care now will pay off later [CA]
2 Oct 08

· Neglecting child care now will cost us in the long run [CA]
2 Oct 08

· NDP would hike corporate taxes, put money in child care and cities [CA-BC]
2 Oct 08

· 'Get smart' on child poverty, leaders told [CA]
30 Sep 08

· Eddy Groves quits ABC Learning [AU]
30 Sep 08

· The federal election, child care: Where they stand [CA]
29 Sep 08

· YWCA gives country a failing grade on women’s issues [CA]
28 Sep 08

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

8. The National Do Not Call List - September 30

A Public Service Announcement*:

National Do Not Call List (DNCL)
The National Do Not Call List is designed to reduce the number of unwanted telemarketing calls and faxes Canadians receive. You can register your home phone, cellular and/or fax number(s) on the National DNCL.
Signing up is simple, quick and free. STARTING SEPTEMBER 30, You can sign up online at www.LNNTE-DNCL.gc.ca or by calling the toll-free numbers 1-866-580-DNCL (1-866-580-3625) or 1-888-DNCL-TTY (1-888-362-5889). Once you have signed up, many telemarketers can no longer call you starting 31 days after your registration. You must renew your registration every three years if you want your number(s) to stay on the National DNCL.

Frequently Asked Questions
About the National Do Not Call List

Cut to the chase:
Where do I register my number??
(includes a link to detailed registration instructions)

*NOTE : Yeah, I know this has nothing to do with social research.
It has to do with our right to privacy and our right to peace and quiet.
I've already registered on the website - it's very simple and user-friendly.

9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(
Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S). ===> the content of this link changes twice a week
IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches twice a week. Each issue of the dispatch provides links to U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media.

October 2, 2008
* People Living in Poverty - Muncie, IN, Duluth, MN
* State Budget Cuts and Social Services - Ohio, California
* Homelessness and Housing - Minnesota, Massachusetts
* States and Medicaid Spending
* State Health Care Plans - Massachusetts, Tennessee
* Foster Parent Recruitment
* Schools and Federal Funding - New York
* No Child Left Behind and Progress of States' Schools
* Absenteeism in Grade School and Student Achievement
* Study: Measuring Workers' Economic Distress
* U.S. Role in Fighting Global Poverty and Hunger
* Payday Lending Ballot Initiative - Ohio
* Nebraska Safe Haven Law
* Opinion: Poverty as an Issue in Political Campaigns

September 29, 2008
* People Living in Poverty - Minnesota, South Carolina
* Homelessness and Housing - Nashville, TN
* Food Stamp Program Enrollment
* Schools and Child Poverty
* Detroit Public Schools Enrollment Rate
* Child Care Costs and Subsidies - Indiana, Oregon, Minnesota
* Sex Education and Teenage Pregnancy - Montana
* Prisoner Re-entry, Training, and Education
* Study: Minimum Wage Increase and Job Loss
* Editorials: Poverty Measurement in the U.S.
* Opinions: Hunger and Food Assistance Programs
* U.N. Millennium Development Goals and Entrepreneurs
* Poverty and Disease

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

If you wish to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail,
please send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

10. Mollie Orshansky: Author of the Poverty Thresholds - September 2008
(By Gordon Fisher, in Amstat News, American Statistical Association)

Mollie Orshansky: Author of the Poverty Thresholds (PDF - 306K, 4 pages)
By Gordon Fisher
September 2008
"(...) Of the contributions to American public policy that Orshansky made during her career, the greatest by far was her development of the poverty thresholds. The poverty line has become a major feature of the architecture of American social policy. Although the measure may have its shortcomings, the poverty line gives us a means of identifying and analyzing the makeup of the groups in our society with the least resources."
Source:
Amstat News
[ American Statistical Association ]

More links to info about Mollie Orshansky and her poverty thresholds
- this link takes you to a section of the Canadian Social Research Links International Poverty Measures page.

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content

APO Weekly Briefing
The content of this page changes each week, and it includes links to a few book/report reviews, about two dozen new reports, a few job ads and 60 events (mostly conferences) of interest to social researchers...
Source:
Australian Policy Online (APO) - home page
With nearly 120 member centres and institutes, Australian Policy Online offers easy access to much of the best Australian social, economic, cultural and political research available online.
NOTE: the APO home page includes links to the five most popular reports on the APO website, and this list is updated each week.

APO Archive
The APO archive is grouped into 23 subject areas, with entries appearing in reverse chronological order.
* Ageing *Asia and the pacific * Citizenship and the law * Disability * Economics and trade * Education * Employment and workplace relations * The environment * Foreign policy and defence * Gender and sexuality * Health * Housing * Families and households * Immigration and refugees * Income, poverty and wealth * Indigenous * Media, communications and cultural policy * Politics and government * Population, multiculturalism and ethnicity * Religion and faith * Rural and regional * Science and technology * Social policy * Urban and regional planning * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. CRINMAIL - September/October 2008
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

2 October 2008 - CRINMAIL 1021
- Special edition on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs
)
* CHILD RIGHTS AND THE MDGs
**NEWS IN BRIEF**
**QUIZ: Special edition on the MDGs**

30 September 2008 - CRINMAIL 1020
* DRC: North Kivu: No end to the war against women and children [publication]
* UNITED STATES: Governor signs bill to protect child prostitutes [news]
* AUSTRIA: Children allowed to vote [news]
* ZAMBIA: Food insecurity hits schools [news]
* GLOBAL: Charity coffers face credit crunch [news]
* AWARDS: STARS Foundation - Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children
* EMPLOYMENT: Save the Children Sweden - Loyola University (US)
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 300+ earlier weekly issues
, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

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Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


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Common Misconceptions

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* Vegetarians do not eat fish, nor do they eat chicken. Because some semi-vegetarian pesco-vegetarians and pollo-vegetarians label themselves as vegetarians, this is often a subject of confusion at restaurants.

* The Great Wall of China isn't the only man-made structure visible from space.
While in a low orbit (an altitude of about 185 km), a viewer of good eyesight can see portions of the Great Wall of China from space. It isn't, however, unique in that regard. From such a height, a multitude of land features and man-made objects are visible, including: highways, ships at sea, dams, railroads, cities, fields of crops, airports, and even some individual buildings. As to the claim that it is the only man-made object visible from the Moon, this is completely false. None of the Apollo astronauts reported seeing any man-made object from the Moon, and certainly not the Great Wall.


* The North Star, Polaris, is not the brightest star in the northern hemisphere night sky. This honor is held by Sirius, with an apparent magnitude of -1.47 (Polaris in comparison is 1.97, barely making the top-50 brightest stars list). Its importance lies in its proximity to the north celestial pole, meaning its location in the sky currently marks North.


* People do not use only ten percent of their brains. This myth is thought by some to have emerged after the discovery of glial cells in the brain, or it could have been the result of some other misunderstood or misinterpreted legitimate scientific findings, or even been the result of speculation by self-help gurus.

* Shaving does not cause hair to grow back thicker or coarser. This belief is due to the fact that hair wears down over time, whereas, immediately after it has grown back, it has had no time to wear. Thus, it appears thicker, and feels coarser due to the sharper, unworn edges.

* Hair and fingernails do not continue to grow after a person dies. Rather, the skin dries and shrinks away from the bases of hairs and nails, giving the appearance of growth.

* Koalas are not bears. They are not even placental mammals; they are marsupials. The giant panda, however, is a bear, while the red panda is related to raccoons.

* The claim that a duck's quack doesn't echo is false, although the echo may be difficult to hear for humans under some circumstances.

* Plants do not metabolise CO2 into oxygen. Carbon dioxide is used by plants in order to grow. Oxygen is a byproduct of the consumption of water.

* It is not true that paper can be folded in half a maximum of seven, eight, ten, or indeed any selected number of times. However there is a loss function associated with each fold, and a practical limit of seven or eight folds for a normal sized (letter or A4) sheet of writing paper is reasonable. A football field-sized sheet of paper was folded in half eleven times on episode 72 of Mythbusters.

* Humans did not evolve from monkeys, chimpanzees, or any other modern ape. Rather, humans and other apes share a common ancestor that lived around 7 million years ago in the late Miocene epoch.

Source:
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_misconceptions

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And, in closing...

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11 Curiously Coincidental Photos
http://www.oddee.com/item_96460.aspx


The Conservative Party of Canada releases its new (?) women's policy
http://tinyurl.com/2yw5j


Canadian Editorial Cartoons
http://www.mackaycartoons.net/

Playgrounds from Hell
http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/16784