Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 6, 2013

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,603 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Ontario Regulations Coming into Force on January 1, 2013 (Government of Ontario) - December 31
2. The Ontario Community Start Up and Maintenance Benefit : An update (Government of Ontario) - January 5
3. Scrapping Welfare : The case for guaranteeing all Canadians an income above the poverty line (Hugh Segal in the Literary Review of Canada) - December 2012
4.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, December 2012 - January 4

International content

5. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
6. [U.S. Minimum Wage]
And at the Bottom of the Wage Scale ... (New York Times) - January 4
7. [U.S.] Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity Weekly E-Newsletter - January 4, 2013
----- Breaking Down Barriers to Build Assets
----- A Bipartisan Nation of Beneficiaries
----- Improving Economic Mobility Through Increased Savings

----- How marginal tax rates affect families at various levels of poverty

8. The quest to end poverty - Eight TED Talks (videos) (from TED - Ideas worth spreading)
- No Childcare Resource and Research Unit this week
- No Poverty Dispatch this week
9. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Gilles
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm ]
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. Ontario Regulations Coming into Force on January 1, 2013 - December 31, 2012
(Government of Ontario)

From the
Office of the Premier of Ontario:

Ontario Regulations Coming into Force on January 1, 2013
http://news.ontario.ca/opo/en/2012/12/ontario-regulations-coming-into-force-on-january-1-2013.html
December 31, 2012
Backgrounder
Excerpts:

(...)

3. The Ministry of Community and Social Services is amending a regulation under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act to add requirements to increase accessibility in public spaces. These would apply to the government, the broader public sector (e.g., universities, hospitals) and the private sector, with a phased implementation beginning in 2015 with the public sector.

4. The Ministry of Community and Social Services is amending a regulation under the Ontario Disability Support Program Act and the Ontario Works Act to remove the Community Start-Up and Maintenance Benefit [see below] from social assistance regulations and transfer 50 per cent of its funding to the new Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative, as announced in the 2012 Budget. Ontario will provide one-time transitional funding of $42 million total to municipalities as they develop their new community homelessness prevention plans. Changes also would be made to exempt payments made to social assistance clients as income under the new initiative.

5. The Ministry of Community and Social Services is amending a regulation under the Ontario Disability Support Program Act to remove the Home Repairs Benefit from the Ontario Disability Support Program.

6. The Ministry of Community and Social Services is amending a regulation under the Ontario Works Act to retain authority to provide emergency hostel services by First Nations delivery agents.

7. The Ministry of Community and Social Services is amending a regulation under the Services and Supports to Promote the Social Inclusion of Persons with Developmental Disabilities Act to deem named groups of individuals with developmental disabilities as eligible for ministry-funded adult developmental services.

(...)

30. The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is amending a regulation under the Housing Services Act to exempt, as income, payments under the new Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative for the purposes of calculating a tenant's rent based on their monthly household income.

31. The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is amending a regulation under the Housing Services Act to update the Household Income Limits (HILs) and associated High Need Income Limits (HNILs). Changes to HILs are technical matters to reflect information received from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. HILs are used, for example, to determine eligibility for rent geared to income assistance and eligibility for certain provincially funded programs.

(...)

50. The Ontario Seniors' Secretariat is amending a regulation under the Retirement Homes Act to maintain the exclusion of domiciliary hostels and emergency hostels from the definition of a "retirement home" under new Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative.

51. The Ontario Seniors' Secretariat is enacting part of a regulation under the Retirement Homes Act to update requirements related to care standards, safety plans, assessment and care plans for new residents and staff training.

Source:
Office of the Premier
http://www.premier.gov.on.ca/home/index.php?Lang=EN

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- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

2. The Ontario Community Start Up and Maintenance Benefit : An update - January 5
(Government of Ontario)

The Ontario Community Start Up and Maintenance Benefit : An update

From the
Ministry of Community and Social Services:

Enhancing Housing and Homelessness Supports:
McGuinty Government Providing Transition Funding to Help Most Vulnerable Ontarians
http://news.ontario.ca/mcss/en/2012/12/enhancing-housing-and-homelessness-supports.html
News Release
December 27, 2012
Ontario will help municipalities deliver housing and homelessness programs through additional one-time assistance in 2013-14. The funding will assist eligible municipalities as they develop and implement their Community Homelessness Prevention Initiative (CHPI) plans [ PDF - http://goo.gl/z24aw ]. Funds will be allocated to meet the needs of the most vulnerable Ontarians - including social assistance recipients - to ensure their stability through this period of transition as plans are developed. Announced in the 2012 Budget, the prevention initiative combines five housing and homelessness programs into a single, municipally delivered program to better address local priorities. It supports the McGuinty government's goal of ensuring all Ontarians have access to safe and affordable housing.

With this one-time investment of $42 million, municipalities will have additional funds to meet the needs of people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

Source:
Ministry of Community and Social Services (MCSS)

http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/

Related MCSS link:

Ontario Integrating Housing and Homelessness Supports
http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/social/housing_bulletin_june.aspx
Bulletin
June 8, 2012
Ontario is integrating housing and homelessness support programs to better meet peoples’ needs. As outlined in the 2012 Budget (see the next link below), the government is combining funding from social assistance programs and other sources to create an integrated program. Low-income earners and people in need will not have to be receiving social assistance in order to access these supports.

---

2012 Ontario Budget
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/budget/ontariobudgets/2012/index.html

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From the
Wellesley Institute:
http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/

Ontario’s holiday gift to Toronto restores some of housing and homeless funding that was cut
http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/news/ontarios-holiday-gift-to-toronto-restores-some-of-housing-and-homeless-funding-that-was-cut/
January 4, 2013
By Michael Shapcott
Toronto will get a $12.3 million holiday gift from the province – partial repayment, for one year only, of $21 million in housing and homelessness funding cuts that took effect on January 1st. The Ontario government rushed out its announcement of $42 million in transitional housing and homelessness funds to municipalities in the middle of the holiday season, just days before major cuts to provincial housing and homelessness funding were due to take place. While the new funds are one-time only and only a partial replacement for the funds that were cut, municipal and community advocates are welcoming the news as a partial victory in their campaign to restore funding for the cuts to Community Start Up and Maintenance Benefit [ http://goo.gl/jDMBi ] and other provincial housing and homeless funding.

Source:
Wellesley Institute:
http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/

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Related media links from Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC):

Media and Policy News for 3 January 2013
http://goo.gl/aIAQr

Click the above link to access any of the articles below.

Top Story : $42 Million Reprieve on the Community Start Up and Maintenance Benefit

On December 27, the Ontario government announced a last-minute, $42 million fund to "ease the transition" to consolidated housing and homelessness funding.
(CBC coverage).
Note that ISAC will be circulating information about the impact of the transition fund in the coming days - subscribe to our main ISAC E-List to receive this info - see below.

Some responses to the government announcement:

* Hamilton Community Legal Clinic
* Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction
* Ontario Coalition Against Poverty (OCAP) and the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)
* Wellesley Institute
*
Impacts by Community:
---
Bruce County instituting a Housing Stability Fund
--- Guelph-Wellington gets $115K
--- Hamilton gets $3.19M more
--- Hamilton councillor says it’s a “pyrrhic victory”
--- London gets $1.4M
--- Niagara gets $1.9M [But still wants CSUMB back...]
--- Ottawa gets $2.5M
--- Peterborough gets $1.5M
--- Sault Ste. Marie gets $650K more
--- Halton Region won’t get any of the $42M, as CHPI gives them more than before
--- Peel Region doesn’t get any either, for the same reason
--- Waterloo Region reflects on the past year ( note they are suggesting a special property tax levy to address the shortfall

Coverage Just Prior to the Dec 27 Announcement

* Activists meet in Hamilton for Ontario Communities Uniting
* Hamilton Spectator editorial :improve social assistance in 2013, not more cuts
* London Free Press opinion piece :Ontarians have been left on their own
* Belleville
* Brant
* Cornwall
* Hamilton
* London
* Niagara
* Nipissing
* Northumberland
* Peel
* Sault Ste. Marie
* Sudbury
* Toronto
* Toronto - campout at Glen Murray’s office:
* Waterloo

Source:
Jennefer Laidley
Policy & Research Analyst
Income Security Advocacy Centre

http://www.incomesecurity.org/

Check the Media and Policy News archive:
http://goo.gl/I32FD
(Back to August 2012, but doesn't include a table of contents for each issue)

Subscribe to ISAC's Latest Media and Policy News mailing list:
http://goo.gl/XEGZg

Subscribe to the main ISAC E-List (to receive info on ISAC's law reform work, the social assistance review, and other OW / ODSP -related information):
http://goo.gl/j3gzt

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- Go to the Income Security Advocacy Centre Weekly Media Scan page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/isac_media_scan.htm

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

3. Scrapping Welfare : The case for guaranteeing all Canadians an income above the poverty line - December 2012
(Hugh Segal in the Literary Review of Canada)

Scrapping Welfare : The case for guaranteeing
all Canadians an income above the poverty line
http://reviewcanada.ca/essays/2012/12/01/scrapping-welfare/
By Hugh Segal
December 2012
Federal and provincial governments have argued for decades that poverty is a complex problem. “Complex” is a code word for a problem no one wants to face directly. Poverty is a complex issue, but in the end it is about one thing—a person not having enough money to meet basic needs of food, shelter, clothing and transportation for self or family.
(...)
A basic income floor, or refundable income tax credit, or basic annual income credit, or guaranteed annual income—call it what you like—would put a floor under all Canadians beneath which they could not fall, one that would see them through to working and earning again. Putting limits on what one can achieve is not what the state should do. We can agree that is excessive overreach. But putting a floor below which no one can fall is both achievable and necessary. In a mixed free market Canadian economy where enterprise, risk, diligence and hard work matter, equality of opportunity is essential if fairness about access to the economic mainstream is to be real for all. A guaranteed annual income would be a serious pillar of that opportunity, as important to us as universal education, safe communities and health insurance.

[ Author Hugh Segal is an Ontario senator and former president of the Institute for Research on Public Policy. ]

Source:
Literary Review of Canada
http://reviewcanada.ca/

Related link:

A guaranteed income for Canadians would eliminate poverty
http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/Barbara+Yaffe+guaranteed+income+Canadians+would/7767845/story.html
By Barbara Yaffe
January 2, 2013
While a Canada without poor people may sound like a pipe dream, in fact it is an achievable goal.
So says Conservative Sen. Hugh Segal, who makes an argument for a poverty-free country in the Literary Review of Canada. It’s worth noting that Segal, a former chief of staff to Brian Mulroney appointed to the Senate by Paul Martin, is more Red Tory than Harper-style Conservative.

Source:
Vancouver Sun
http://www.vancouversun.com/

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- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

4. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, December 2012 - January 4

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

January 4, 2013
Labour Force Survey, December 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130104/dq130104a-eng.htm
Employment rose by 40,000 in December, the fourth increase in five months. December's increase was all in full-time work. The unemployment rate declined 0.1 percentage points to 7.1%, the lowest in four years.



Check past issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select a month and year from the two drop-down menus to access all issues of The Daily for a particular month.


Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

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- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit:
The latest CRRU alert was dated December 22, 2012.
CRRU will resume operations on January 7.

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

The latest CRRU alert was dated December 22, 2012.
CRRU will resume operations on January 7, 2013.

See Research, policy & practice:
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

See Child care in the news:
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

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CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

5. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

No recent Poverty Dispatches.
Good time to check out the Tags
:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/

---

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page: [ http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/ and click on a date in the calendar in the top right-hand corner of the page. Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page and click on a category or a tag in the right-hand margin.
4. See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm (more complete listing, but only goes back to December 2011)

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Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

6. [U.S. Minimum Wage] And at the Bottom of the Wage Scale ... - January 4
(New York Times)

[U.S. Minimum Wage] And at the Bottom of the Wage Scale ...
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/05/opinion/meanwhile-at-the-bottom-of-the-wage-scale.html
January 4, 2013
Editorial
Nearly a million low-wage workers in 10 states will get a modest raise this year. (...) By contrast, the federal minimum wage has been stuck at $7.25 an hour since 2009. In all, 19 states and the District of Columbia set their minimums above that level, providing a much needed lift for the lowest-paid workers. But state efforts are no substitute for a higher federal minimum because the ability to earn a minimally acceptable income should not depend on where a worker lives.
(...)
Raising the minimum wage is always a fight. Congress has approved legislation to do so only three times in the last 30 years. President Obama promised to take on this fight back in 2008, when he called for a federal minimum wage of $9.50 an hour by 2011, indexed to inflation. It is past time to keep the promise.

Source:
New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/

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- Go to the Minimum Wage / Living Wage Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

7. [U.S.] Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity Weekly E-Newsletter - January 4, 2013
----- Breaking Down Barriers to Build Assets
----- A Bipartisan Nation of Beneficiaries
----- Improving Economic Mobility Through Increased Savings

--- How marginal tax rates affect families at various levels of poverty

Four new offerings from the January 4 (2013) weekly E-Newsletter
http://goo.gl/LfpM1
of
Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity:

[ http://www.spotlightonpoverty.org/ ]
NOTE : Only the first link below is from Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity.
The other three links are to outside sites, but they are featured in this weekly e-newsletter .

---

From
Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity:

Breaking Down Barriers to Build Assets
http://www.spotlightonpoverty.org/ExclusiveCommentary.aspx?id=a22b0bbb-3e1d-46f8-8328-5e7b236aed29
By Marybeth Foster (Iowa Credit Union Foundation)
January 2, 2013
Individual Development Accounts, or IDAs, were developed as a means to help low-income families develop financial assets. In 1993, Iowa was the first state in the nation to pass IDA legislation, ahead of 34 other states that eventually followed. Even so, 19 years later, IDAs are still not widely known or utilized in Iowa. Although IDAs are a proven strategy for asset development, they have not been deployed at a greater level in Iowa and nationally. This is due to the fact that they face challenges with sustainability and a lack of longitudinal evidence of their positive impact.
(...)
The barriers to IDAs are real, but our experiences have proven that they can be overcome. Making IDAs available not only encourages saving and financial literacy, it is a solid community and economic development tool, rural or urban, large or small.

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From
Pew Research Center:

A Bipartisan Nation of Beneficiaries
http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/12/Benefits_FINAL_12-20.pdf
By Paul Taylor et al.,
December 18, 2012
A new national survey by the finds that a majority of Americans (55%) have received government benefits from at least one of the six best-known federal entitlement programs. The survey also finds that most Democrats (60%) and Republicans (52%) say they have benefited from a major entitlement program at some point in their lives. So have nearly equal shares of selfidentifying conservatives (57%), liberals (53%) and moderates (53%).
Source:
Pew Research Center
http://www.pewresearch.org/

---

From the
Heritage Foundation:

Improving Economic Mobility Through Increased Savings
HTML version : http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2012/12/improving-economic-mobility-through-increased-savings
PDF version (508K, 7 pages) : http://thf_media.s3.amazonaws.com/2012/pdf/CPI_DP_06.pdf
By Diane Calmus
December 21, 2012
Since the recession began, Americans’ rate of savings has been on the rise. Yet too many still do not have savings to buffer them against an emergency.
This is especially true for low-income Americans, far too many of whom are just a medical bill or broken-down car away from financial ruin. Fortunately, our better understanding of the role of savings in mobility, together with interesting experiments and programs to foster savings, could enable us to make a significant difference in the accumulation of financial capital in poorer households. Innovative programs of the sort outlined in this
paper could engage Americans in setting aside money to plan for large purchases, unexpected emergencies, and retirement.

Source:
Heritage Foundation

http://www.heritage.org/

---

From the
Urban Institute:

How marginal tax rates affect families at various levels of poverty
http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412722-How-marginal-Tax-Rates-Affect-Families.pdf
By Elaine Maag et al.
High marginal tax rates can make moving above poverty very difficult for low-income families. These high tax rates result from increasing direct taxes (both state and federal) as well as decreasing transfer payments (including both Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program bene? ts and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families). Depending on which state a person lives, a single parent with two children can face an average marginal tax rate of over 100 percent or as low as 26.6 percent as they move from the poverty level of income to 150 percent of the poverty level. If her earnings are limited to only six months of the year, she may retain transfer benefits for the remaining six months, lowering her marginal rate over the same income
range to between 66.0 percent and –17.7 percent for those additional earnings. Our analysis shows how sensitive marginal tax rates are to assumptions about earnings patterns and program participation.

Source:
Urban Institute
http://www.urban.org/

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- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

8. The quest to end poverty - Eight TED Talks (videos)
(TED - Ideas worth spreading)

The quest to end poverty (8 TED Talks - videos)
http://www.ted.com/playlists/67/the_quest_to_end_poverty.html
It's the challenge of our age: How do we end poverty?
Hear ideas and results from economists, philanthropists, activists working -- in labs and on the ground -- to wipe it out.

Click the link above to access any of the videos below.
Speaker bios are provided for each video.

Videos:

1. Jacqueline Novogratz on escaping poverty (March 2009, duration 07:30)
2. Paul Collier on the "bottom billion" (May 2008, duration 16:51)
3. Richard Wilkinson: How economic inequality harms societies (October 2011, duration 16:54)
4. Esther Duflo: Social experiments to fight poverty (May 2010 - duration 16:47)
5. Niall Ferguson: The 6 killer apps of prosperity (September 2011, duration 20:19)
6. Jessica Jackley: Poverty, money -- and love (October 2010, duration 18:33)
7. Josette Sheeran: Ending hunger now (July 2011, duration 19:10)
8. Gordon Brown: Wiring a web for global good (July 2009, duration 16:43)

Source:
TED - Ideas worth spreading
http://www.ted.com/

---

Most viewed TED Talks videos
http://goo.gl/rJuLz

---

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

9. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)

Below is the latest issue of CRINMAIL (#1308):

4 January 2013 - CRINMAIL issue 1308
2012 CRIN Annual Report
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4531
In this issue, you'll find the annual recap of the highs and lows for children's rights in the past year.
This report includes sections on the following:
* Juvenile justice (some States have lowered or proposed lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility well under the age of 18).
* Inhuman sentencing of children, understood to include corporal punishment, life imprisonment and the death penalty.
* Human and children's rights defenders continue to be targeted for their activism.
* Governments continued to repress children's rights to freedom of expression and association in response to their demands.
* More govt. obstacles to children’s freedom to exercise their civil and political rights, notably their right to receive and access information.
* Corporal punishment of children (a number of African States are setting a pioneering example to those that still authorise corporal punishment of children by banning corporal punishment in all settings, including the home.
* The public outcry against covering up of child sexual abuse and the demand for accountability have led to new precedents around the world, with key court rulings and convictions along with large scale inquiries into alleged abuse in some countries.
* The UN Secretary-General’s “list of shame”, a list of the countries that violate international standards on children and armed conflict, has grown considerably over the past years.
* Some improvements in international justice.
* Children's rights in 2013 ("new changes, challenges and opportunities").

---

For a more in-depth recap of CRIN's work in the past year and the
events that shaped it, read our 2011-2012 Annual Report here:

CRIN Annual Report 2011-2012 (PDF - 412 K, 43 pages)
http://www.crin.org/docs/CRIN_Annual_Report_2011-12_final.pdf
January 2013
Contents:

Introduction
About CRIN – Our mission
Chapter 1 – A global overview of children’s rights
Chapter 2 – How we responded to global challenges
Chapter 3 – Working with others
Chapter 4 – CRIN Resources
Chapter 5 – Ethical work practices
Chapter 6 – Who we are

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CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1: (WITH table of contents)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010

Option 2: (WITHOUT table of contents)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- On the CRINMAIL website --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

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NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

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You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

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Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

17 Pairs of Contradictory Proverbs

1. Look before you leap
He who hesitates is lost

2. If at first you don't succeed, try, try again
Don't beat your head against a brick wall

3. Absence makes the heart grow fonder
Out of sight, out of mind

4. Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today
Don't cross the bridge until you come to it

5. Two heads are better than one
Paddle your own canoe

6. More haste less speed
Time waits for no man

7. You're never too old to learn
You can't teach an old dog new tricks

8. A word to the wise is sufficient
Talk is cheap

9. It's better to be safe than sorry
Nothing ventured, nothing gained

10. Don't look a gift horse in the mouth
Beware of Greeks bearing gifts

11. Do unto others as you would have others do unto you
Nice guys finish last

12. Hitch your wagon to a star
Don't bite off more than you can chew

13. Many hands make light work
Too many cooks spoil the broth

14. Don't judge a book by its cover
Clothes make the man

15. The squeaking wheel gets the grease
Silence is golden

16. Birds of a feather flock together
Opposites attract

17. The pen is mightier than the sword
Actions speak louder than words

Source:
Anon.

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And, in closing...

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78 ways to fix the way we do politics
http://www.ipolitics.ca/fixtheway/?page_id=982
- from iPolitics.ca
iPolitics.ca

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The Daily Beast (animal photo section of the Toronto Star)
http://thestar.blogs.com/dailybeast/
My favourites are the vertical fox, the 155-lb (70.3 kilos) Great Dane and the cheetah mom and her kitten

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22 Things You're Doing Wrong
http://www.buzzfeed.com/peggy/22-things-youre-doing-wrong
My favourites are cleaning the blender, breaking in new shoes painlessly and the correct way to enjoy a large bag of chips if you're too challenged to empty the bag into a large bowl.

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The changing borders of Europe and the Middle East from the year 1000 AD to the present (video, duration 3:23)
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=f54_1337075813
("...a dynamic, animated historical atlas showing over 9,000 border changes" covering a period of 1000+ years)

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