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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
February 6, 2011


Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,381 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:


Canadian content

1.  2011 Federal Election Resources:
---
Catch 22 strategy aims to vote out Stephen Harper government - February 3
--- CBC News Inside Politics Blog
--- Registered Political Parties' Fourth Quarter Financial Returns for 2010 Now On-line - February 1
2. [British Columbia] What Happened to Welfare Applicants Who Dropped from Radar? - February 3
(The Tyee)
3. Cuts Coming to the Canada Health Transfer and the Canada Social Transfer? - February 1
4. How to Make $57 Billion Disappear : The Canada Employment Insurance Financing Board (Scott Clark and Peter DeVries, 3D policy blog) - October 13 (2010)
5. The New Solitudes - By Erna Paris in the March 2011 issue of The Walrus Magazine
6. The Hennessy Index : Inequality (Trish Hennessy - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - February 1
7. Naufragés des villes - Radio-Canada (10-part series on welfare in Montreal and Canada) - available only in French
8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, January 2011 - February 4
--- New terminology for "urban areas" -
February 3
--- Annual Demographic Estimates: Subprovincial Areas as of July 1, 2010 -
February 3
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours, November 2010 -
February 2
--- Retirement, health and employment among those 55 plus
- January 31
--- Seniors' self-employment
- January 31
9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - February 6

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
11. Poverty in Numbers: The Changing State of Global Poverty from 2005 to 2015 (The Brookings Institution) - January 2011
12. Food Security Portal (International Food Policy Research Institute - IFPRI)
- January 31
13. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content
14. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]



1. 2011 Federal Election Resources:
---
Catch 22 strategy aims to vote out Stephen Harper government - February 3
--- CBC News Inside Politics Blog
--- Registered Political Parties' Fourth Quarter Financial Returns for 2010 Now On-line - February 1

2011 Federal Election and General Political Links page:NEW
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2011_fed_election.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Early coverage
of the upcoming 2011 federal election:
_____________________________

Catch 22 strategy aims to vote out Stephen Harper government
By Carlito Pablo
February 3, 2011
In 2008, the Straight said strategic voting could stymie Stephen Harper. Prime Minister Stephen Harper is facing a “Catch 22”. But this isn’t the kind of double bind situation meant by the phrase taken from Joseph Heller’s 1961 novel Catch-22. It’s a grassroots campaign that seeks to drive the Harper government out of Ottawa. The game plan: unseat at least 22 Conservative MPs by endorsing an opposition candidate who has the best chance of winning a seat in the next election. Going by the name Catch 22 Harper Conservatives, the movement’s list has grown to 32 Conservative-held ridings across the country, including four in B.C.
[ Comments (22) ]
Source:
The Georgia Straight

Related link:

Catch 22
Catch 22 Harper Conservatives is a national, grassroots, pro-democracy campaign to help defeat the Conservative government in the next election. The campaign is not affiliated with any political party or organization. See the Campaign FAQ for answers to common questions about our campaign.

---------------------------------------------

CBC News Inside Politics Blog

---------------------------------------------

Registered Political Parties' Fourth Quarter Financial Returns for 2010 Now On-line
February 1, 2011
News Release
OTTAWA, Tuesday, February 1, 2011 — The Chief Electoral Officer of Canada, Marc Mayrand, announced today that the registered parties' fourth quarter financial returns for 2010 are now available on the Elections Canada Web site.
Source:
Elections Canada

------------------------------------

Go to the 2011 Federal Election and General Political Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2011_fed_election.htm

2. [British Columbia] What Happened to Welfare Applicants Who Dropped from the Radar? - February 3
(By Andrew MacLeod in The Tyee)

What Happened to Welfare Applicants Who Dropped from Radar?
Government failed to track those who stopped applying, then didn't file tax returns.
By Andrew MacLeod
February 3, 2011
Many people who started applying for welfare in British Columbia but didn't finish the application process made more money than they would have had they received assistance, a British Columbia government study said. [See the link to the study below). But the study only included people who filed income tax returns for three years in a row, leading one welfare observer to conclude the government still knows little about how changes to the system in 2002 affected the most vulnerable. At that time the government introduced, among other changes, a three-week delay in the process where applicants were expected to look for work.
(...)
In a March 2009, report called "Last Resort," (PDF - 2.2MB, 132 pages), the B.C. ombudsperson's office said the ministry had agreed to find out whether people who discontinue their application process move on to employment or educational programs within two months, and to report their findings publicly. While the government's outcomes report obtained by The Tyee confirms many people fail to complete the application process, it adds little to what's known about what happens to those people. "After the [2002] change in the application process, 58 per cent of applicants that were not exempted from the three-week work search requirement did not return for the second stage of the application process," the report said.

Source:
The Tyee

----------------------

The BC Government study:

Outcomes of BC Employment and Assistance (BCEA) Applicants that* do
not Complete the Application Process
(PDF - 516K, 16 pages)
January 2011
The analysis in this report uses tax data in Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD) to examine the income of applicants that did not complete the income assistance application process over the period 2000 to 2004.
Specific findings of the report are:
- The median after-tax income of non-returning applicants is higher than what they would have received on full-time, full-year income assistance.
- The median income of non-returning applicants increases over the two-year follow-up period, indicating that they are financially better off in the years after their uncompleted application for income assistance.
Source:
Ministry reports
[ BC Ministry of Social Development ]

------------------------------------------------
* Grammar Police Comment:
There appears to be a collective inability in the BC Ministry of Social Development to tell the difference between "that" and "who".
In the title of this study, the fragment "Applicants that do not complete..." should be "Applicants WHO do not complete..."
'Who' refers to people. 'That' and 'which' refer to groups or things.
Source:
http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/whoVwhVt.asp
------------------------------------------------

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

3. Cuts Coming to the Canada Health Transfer and the Canada Social Transfer? - February 1

Cuts Coming to the Canada Health Transfer
and the Canada Social Transfer?

[ Email alert from Rob Rainer of Canada Without Poverty ]
February 1, 2011

A rapidly emerging issue of immense public interest is the future of the Canada Health and Canada Social transfers. Critical decisions are coming about these transfers that could greatly shape the health and social security of Canadians in the coming years – and thus the very fabric of Canada. Through these transfers of many billions of dollars, the federal government helps support provinces and territories in the delivery of health care and social security services.

The legislation authorizing these transfers expires March 31, 2014.

In a remarkable open letter on January 25 to federal Finance Minister, Jim Flaherty, former senior Department of Finance officials Scott Clark and Peter DeVries lay out the stark implications of this issue. This lengthy open letter (requires 20-30 minutes to read but well worth it), with detailed analysis, closes with these words and questions (bold lettering added here for emphasis):

The decision you, or any government, will take with respect to the CHT and CST will set the course of the federal government and federal/provincial relations for many years to follow. Is it not possible to engage Canadians in this debate before a final decision is taken? In the past you have supported the analysis and recommendations of the IMF [International Monetary Fund], and quite rightly so. We would strongly recommend that you support the IMF conclusion in its recent report on " the importance of increasing transparency and communication about these challenges (demographic) and their long-run implications, (and) to increase public awareness and contribute to a debate about possible solutions.

Read the
complete open letter:

Pre-Budget 2011 Submission: Confronting the Structural Deficit
To: Minister of Finance The Honourable J. Flaherty:
From: Scott Clark and Peter DeVries
2011-01-25
Source:
3D policy
[ About the authors ]
NOTE: click the 3D policy link above to read over a dozen other blog entries since September 2010 by two former senior Finance Canada insiders in the federal budget process.

------------------

Rob Rainer is Executive Director of
CANADA WITHOUT POVERTY / CANADA SANS PAUVRETÉ
Working in alliance with the
CWP Advocacy Network / Réseau de revendication CSP

------------------

Canada Without Poverty (CWP)
Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization dedicated to the elimination of poverty in Canada.(...) One of the special characteristics of Canada Without Poverty is that, since our inception in 1971, we have always been governed by people with direct, personal experience of living in poverty, whether in childhood or as adults. This lived experience informs and helps to guide our work. (...) Acting from the belief that poverty is a violation of human rights and that poverty elimination is a human rights obligation, our work includes raising awareness about poverty, participating in research to generate new knowledge about poverty, and striving to influence public policy to prevent and alleviate poverty.

CWP Advocacy Network
The CWP Advocacy Network is a new national non-profit but non-charitable organization. It exists to directly lobby politicians and other public policy makers, at all levels of government in Canada, for policies and legislation that help prevent, alleviate and eliminate poverty in Canada.

Dignity for All - Support the campaign for a poverty-free Canada
Dignity for All is a multi-year, multi-partner, non-partisan campaign. This campaign’s vision is to make a poverty-free and more socially secure and cohesive Canada a reality by 2020. The conviction behind this campaign is that Canadians must respect and defend the right of every person to dignity and security.

- Go to the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

4. How to Make $57 Billion Disappear : The Canada Employment Insurance Financing Board - October 13 (2010)
(Scott Clark and Peter DeVries, 3D policy blog)

Also by Scott Clark
and Peter DeVries:

How to Make $57 Billion Disappear:
The Canada Employment Insurance Financing Board

October 13, 2010
In this blog posting, former senior Finance Canada officials Clark and DeVries note that the Canada Employment Insurance Financing Board (CEIFB) was created as a Crown Corporation in the 2008 federal Budget. The stated objectives of the CEIFB were to (1) enhance the independence of the premium rate setting and (2) to ensure that employment insurance (EI) premiums are used exclusively for the EI program. However, Clark and DeVries explain in detail in this article that "the creation of this Crown corporation does neither."

So why was the CEIFB created, you ask?

"The only reason was to get rid of the cumulative surplus in the EI Account, which as of March 31, 2009 stood at $57.2 billion. Although notional in nature, this balance has been an ongoing embarrassment to the government. The creation of the CEIFB effectively wipes out this massive cumulative balance and replaces it with a cash reserve of $2 billion, under the pretense of creating a more independent process. In her Opinion on the 2009-10 condensed financial statements, the Auditor General noted that she would be commenting in more detail on “significant accounting changes to the accounts for the Employment Insurance program”, which she wanted to draw to Parliament’s attention. There was no debate on this when the legislation that created the CEIFB was approved by Parliament. It is doubtful that the current members of the CEIFB were even aware of this when they were appointed."

Source:
3D policy
[ About the authors ]
NOTE: click the 3D policy link above to read over a dozen other blog entries since September 2010 by two former senior Finance Canada insiders in the federal budget process.

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

5. The New Solitudes - By Erna Paris in the March 2011 issue of The Walrus Magazine

The New Solitudes
Canada was once defined by the schism between English and French.
Today, our divide is increasingly ideological.
Can it be bridged?

By Erna Paris
(...)
Referring to Globe and Mail writer Lawrence Martin, author of “Harperland” (biography of Stephen Harper), Erna Paris states:

"Martin’s “march of audacities” exposes the new norms of Canadian political life, and it is no exaggeration to observe that the most egregious among his chosen examples point to bold changes that are shaking the pillars of Canada’s democracy. These include appointing an unelected party worker, Michael Fortier, to the federal cabinet to secure representation from Montreal; eliminating the Access to Information database; reducing and controlling government contact with the media; obliging cabinet ministers and public service officials to speak from scripts approved by the Prime Minister’s Office, thereby increasing the executive power of the PMO in new ways; twice proroguing the House of Commons, narrowly averting a constitutional crisis; wrongly identifying the proposed Opposition coalition as “undemocratic”; and axing financial support to dozens of NGOs whose messages run counter to conservative ideology."
(...)
"We need a renewed national conversation about proportional representation. The system isn’t complicated: the percentage of seats a party wins is proportional to the vote it receives. And it is fair: the 2008 election results would have given the Liberals and the NDP approximately thirty-five seats in Western Canada, for example, compared with the twenty-one they actually received. Elizabeth May’s Green Party would have earned five or six seats in the region. A federal parliament created by proportional representation would be a clear improvement over the juvenile shouting matches in the House of Commons, since co-operation would serve as the arbiter of success. Representing voters’ choices more equitably might even lower the anger index in the country."

Source:
March 2011 issue of The Walrus
[ The Walrus Magazine ]

6. The Hennessy Index : Inequality - February 1
(Trish Hennessy - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

The Hennessy Index- "A number is never just a number"
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives' Trish Hennessy has long been a fan of Harper Magazine's one-page list of eye-popping statistics, Harper's Index. Instead of wishing for a Canadian version to magically appear, she's created her own -- a monthly listing of numbers about Canada and its place in the world. Hennessy's Index -- a number is never just a number -- comes out on the first of each month.

Inequality (February 1, 2011)
[ PDF version - 67K, 1 page ]
Excerpts:
===> $6.6 million = The average compensation of Canada’s best-paid 100 CEOs in 2009.
===> $42,988 = The average wage for Canadians working full-time, year-round.
===> 155 times = How much the best-paid 100 CEOs earn more than average wage.
===> 0 = The number of women among the best-paid 100 CEOs in Canada in 2009.
===> 20th = Canada ranks 20th, behind the U.S., in a global ranking of women’s equality

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
(CCPA)
The CCPA is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice.

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

7. Naufragés des villes - Radio-Canada

Available in French only (see English text below):

Naufragés des villes *
Série de dix émissions hebdomadaires débutant lundi le 24 janvier à 20h, heure de l'est à RDI.
Les dix émissions seront diffusées tous les lundis à 20h et rediffusées les samedis à 21h 30.
Peut-on vivre à Montréal avec 19,47 $ par jour?
Autrement dit, est-il possible de survivre avec une prestation d'aide sociale?
Cette question est à l'origine de la série documentaire Naufragés des villes qui suit pendant deux mois deux volontaires livrés à eux-mêmes au coeur de Montréal avec la somme de 19,47 $ par jour.
[ * Cliquez le lien ci-dessus pour plus de renseignements au sujet
de la série et pour visionner les épisodes en entier sur votre ordinateur. ]
Source:
Radio-Canada

---------------------------

English:

Naufragés des villes (available in French only)
U
nofficial translation : Urban Castaways

Ten-part series starting January 24 about life on welfare in Montreal.
All programs in the series will be broadcast on Mondays at 8pm Eastern Time on RDI and re-broadcast on Saturdays at 9:30pm
.
If you click on the program website link, you'll find a link to each episode after it's broadcast, so you can watch anytime on your computer.
If you understand French, I highly recommend the series, because there will be many comparisons throughout the ten programs between life on welfare in Montreal and elsewhere in Canada.
English abstract:
What exactly does it mean to be poor in Canada today?
We find out as two volunteers leave behind their status, résumé, network of friends and bank cards. Throughout the two-month experiment, they will have no financial resources except the $19 a day we provide them – the equivalent of welfare benefits for a person living alone. With handpicked experts and social workers watching and analyzing, their journey will be the main focus of a 10-episode series documenting their efforts to find housing, food, medical care, clothing, jobs . . . and deal with prejudice. Using hidden cameras and daily check-ins, we document their progress.
Source:
Radio-Canada (French home page)

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm
- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, January 2011 - February 4
--- New terminology for "urban areas" -
February 3
---
Annual Demographic Estimates: Subprovincial Areas as of July 1, 2010 - February 3
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours, November 2010 -
February 2
--- Retirement, health and employment among those 55 plus
- January 31
--- Seniors' self-employment
- January 31

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

February 4, 2011
Labour Force Survey, January 2011
Employment rose for the second consecutive month in January, with a gain of 69,000. At the same time, the unemployment rate increased by 0.2 percentage points to 7.8%, as more people searched for work. Compared with January 2010, employment was up 1.9% (+327,000).
- includes links to three tables:
* Labour force characteristics by age and sex
* Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS)
* Labour force characteristics by province

Related report:
Labour Force Information, January 9-15, 2011
1. Highlights - includes a chart showing Employment and unemployment rates, Canada, seasonally adjusted
2. Analysis — January 2011
3. Tables
4. Charts
5. Data quality, concepts and methodology
6. User information
7. Related products
8. PDF version (435K, 60 pages)

[ earlier reports in this series ]

Source:
Labour Force Information - main product page*
This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:
Labour
Employment and unemployment


February 3, 2011
New terminology for "urban areas"
Statistics Canada is introducing new terminology that it will use with respect to geographic areas that have in the past been referred to as "urban areas". Effective immediately, the term "population centre" will replace "urban area". Population centres will be classified into one of three groups, based on the size of their population. The term "rural area" and its definition will not change. Rural area will continue to be used for areas outside these population centres. These changes are designed to improve the interpretation of Statistics Canada's data.


February 3, 2011
Postcensal estimates of population for census divisions,
census metropolitan areas and economic regions as of July 1, 2010

Annual demographic estimates by age and sex for census metropolitan areas, census divisions and economic regions as of July 1 are now available from 2007 to 2010.
Source:
Annual Demographic Estimates: Subprovincial Areas - Product main page
This publication presents annual estimates of population for census metropolitan areas, economic regions and census divisions of Canada as well as estimates of the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and inter-provincial and intra-provincial migration.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues

Related link:

Annual Demographic Estimates: Canada, Provinces and Territories - product main page
This publication presents annual estimates of the total population and annual estimates by age and sex for Canada, provinces and territories. It also presents estimates of the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and inter-provincial migration, the latter by origin and destination. As in the case of population estimates, the components are also available for the total population and by age and sex.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Ethnic diversity and immigration
* Immigrants and non-permanent residents
* Population and demography
* Population estimates and projections


February 2, 2011
Employment, Earnings and Hours, November 2010
* Highlights
* Note to users
* Tables
* Data quality, concepts and methodology
* User information
* Related products
* PDF version (2.8MB, 387 pages)

Source:
Employment, Earnings and Hours - product main page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE:
Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month after this report first appears in The Daily.
* On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Hours of work and work arrangements
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings


January 31, 2011
Two articles from
Perspectives on Labour and Income - January 2011 issue:

1. Retirement, health and employment among those 55 plus

Study: Retirement, health and employment among older Canadians, 2009
Older workers end their employment careers in different ways and for a variety of reasons. Many stay on the job past the point when others retire; others opt for partial retirement, while some who have retired subsequently re-enter the workforce. And, of course, many will fully retire from the world of work. Using data from the 2009 Healthy Aging cycle of the Canadian Community Health Survey, this study examined Canadians age 55 and over who had fully retired, those who had partially retired, those who had retired and returned to work, and those who had never retired. Each of the four groups faces different circumstances.

Highlights

Full article:
* HTML
* PDF
(242K, 14 pages)

---

2. Seniors' self-employment
A substantial proportion of working seniors are self-employed. This article uses census data to study self-employment among senior men and women. Trends in self-employment rates and categories are presented, along with occupational and industrial profiles. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with self-employment.

Highlights

Full article:
* HTML
* PDF
(272K, 14 pages)
Abstract: A substantial proportion of working seniors are self-employed. This article uses census data to study self-employment among senior men and women. Trends in self-employment rates and categories are presented, along with occupational and industrial profiles. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with self-employment.

---

Source:
Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues

Related subjects:
* Health
* Lifestyle and social conditions
* Population and demography
* Population aging
* Seniors
* Health and disability among seniors

-------------------------------------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

-------------------------------------------------------

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - February 6

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

-------

February 6, 2011

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number : Inequality
2 Feb 11
- New monthly feature from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives "highlights statistics found in the news and in CCPA research about Canada and its place in the world."

Vouchers again? Recent experience with early education vouchers in Hong Kong
2 Feb 11
- Presentations from a seminar at the International Centre for the Study of the Mixed Economy of Childcare at the University of East London.

Enhanced early childhood education pays long-term dividends in better health
2 Feb 11
- Study by Columbia University researchers "is the first randomized, controlled trial to show that early educational enrichment can bring improved health and healthier behaviors in early adulthood."

250 Sure Start children's centres face closure within a year
2 Feb 11
- Press release from Britain's Daycare Trust says a national survey suggests 60,000 families will be affected by Sure Start cuts; staff at 1,000 centres issued 'at risk of redudancy' notices.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· Minister Finley defends child-care remarks
[CA] 4 Feb 11

· Child care: Would you prefer benefit cheques or a national child care system?
[CA] 4 Feb 11

· It's about choice, Diane Finley says, not disdain for daycare
[CA] 4 Feb 11

· Conservatives draw fire over comment on child care
[CA] 3 Feb 11

· Government serves families another kick with ECE cuts
[NZ] 1 Feb 11

· The children must play: What the United States could learn from Finland about education reform
[FI] 28 Jan 11

· Cuts will force 250 Sure Start centres to close, say charities
[GB] 28 Jan 11

· Daycare needs cash boost
[CA-ON] 28 Jan 11

· Eddy Groves pleads not guilty to ABC Learning criminal charge
[AU] 28 Jan 11

· Child development not linked to length of parental leave, government argues
[CA] 28 Jan 11

· Numbers finally start to add up as operators go back to basics
[AU] 22 Jan 11

· Voluntary census deletes questions about unpaid work
[CA] 28 Jul 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

February 4:
States and Medicaid Costs
January 2011 US Unemployment
Funding for Social Services - Hawaii
Tax Cuts and the Working Poor
Nongovernmental Organizations in Haiti

February 3:
States and Medicaid Costs
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation
Child Care Subsidies - California, Colorado

January 31:
States and Medicaid Cuts
Exhaustion of Jobless Benefits
Child Care Subsidies - Washington

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. Poverty in Numbers: The Changing State of Global Poverty from 2005 to 2015 - January 2011
(The Brookings Institution)

Poverty in Numbers: The Changing State of Global Poverty from 2005 to 2015
By Laurence Chandy and Geoffrey Gertz
January 2011
Poverty reduction lies at the core of the global development challenge. For the international development community, this objective serves not only as a source of motivation, but as a defining theme across its work. Many of the world’s most prominent aid organizations cite poverty reduction as their overarching goal. (...) How many poor people are there in the world, and how many are there likely to be in 2015? In which countries and regions is poverty falling? How is the composition of global poverty changing and where will poverty be concentrated in the future? These are central questions for which we currently have few, if any, answers. This policy brief attempts to fill this gap by providing a best approximation in response to each of these questions, before offering policy recommendations based on these findings.

Complete report (PDF - 2.3MB, 23 pages)
Executive Summary (PDF - 26K, 1 page)

Source:
The Brookings Institution
The Brookings Institution is a nonprofit public policy organization based in Washington, DC. Our mission is to conduct high-quality, independent research and, based on that research, to provide innovative, practical recommendations that advance three broad goals:
1. Strengthen American democracy;
2. Foster the economic and social welfare, security and opportunity of all Americans, and
3. Secure a more open, safe, prosperous and cooperative international system.

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm
- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

12. Food Security Portal - January 31
(
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI))

New at the
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI):

Food Security Portal
This open access policy information portal has been established to provide comprehensive and detailed information country-by-country on food policy developments. We note that currently a lot of information is being collected in an un-coordinated fashion by different international and regional organizations. This portal is designed to pool such information in structured ways and check for data quality and relevance.

The portal will contain relevant food crisis response information initially on its 20 partner countries (mostly in Sub-Sahara Africa, but also in Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean) and shall be expanded beyond these pre-selected countries in the context of the project.

The Food Security Portal is facilitated by the
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

13. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

Most viewed this week (ending February 6) on APO:

1. Australian Youth Forum
2. POLITICS - Coalition still favourite for the poll
3. Garma Festival 2009 key forum address
4. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
5. Where men stand: men’s roles in ending violence against women

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Most viewed this week (ending February 6)
in the Social Policy section:

1. Australian Youth Forum
2. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
3. Where men stand: men’s roles in ending violence against women
4. 7th Annual Demographia International housing affordability survey: 2011
5. Constitutional reform and Indigenous peoples: Options for amendment to the Australian Constitution

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

--------------

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

14. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL
(children's rights newsletter):

2 February 2011, CRINMAIL issue 1211
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Social unrest and political turmoil: Egypt, Algeria & Sudan
- Curbing child recruitment and prostitution: Afghanistan
- Child marriages escalate: Morocco
- Questioning HIV testing in schools: South Africa
- Limiting birthright citizenship: United States
- Child detention: Israel
- Promoting children rights in schools
Employment
Jargon of the Week
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRINMAIL)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.ht

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


****************************

More new words
and expressions

****************************


New words from The Washington Post's Style Invitational

Reintarnation: Coming back to life as a hillbilly.
Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.
Dopeler effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to seem smarter when they come at you rapidly.
Balderdash: a rapidly receding hairline.
Coffee : a person who is coughed upon.
Flabbergasted: appalled over how much weight you have gained.
Flatulence: the emergency vehicle that picks you up after you are run over by a steamroller
Negligent: a condition in which you absent-mindedly answer the door in your nightgown.
Oyster : a person who sprinkles his conversation with Yiddish expressions.
Pokemon: a Jamaican proctologist.
Rectitude : the formal, dignified demeanor assumed by a proctologist immediately before he examines you.
Testicle: a humorous question on an exam.
Non-English phrases
The Globe & Mail's Globe Challenge asked readers to add a letter to a non-English expression and redefine it. Some gems:
Stout le monde: Is everyone getting fatter these days?
Tour de forcep: a long and difficult birth
Inter alias: among other false names
Smuchas gracias: thanks for the kisses
Chile con carnet: permission to emigrate
Armor vincit omnia: Tanks beat everything
Patter familias: I recognize your footsteps
Coupe d'état: government limo
Tubermensch: Mr. PotatoHead
In vino verbitas: Drunks talk too much
Souse-chef: cooking with alcohol

Source:
http://www.trh.bc.ca/fun/define.html


-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------


Best Free Photo Editing Software Of 2010
http://goo.gl/h4JZ7

------------------------------

 Top 10 Best Free Online Virus Scan And Removal
http://goo.gl/hr5Th

------------------------------


Five Grammatical Errors that Make You Look Dumb
http://goo.gl/LX5A

--------------------------


I'm Yours, Over the Rainbow  (a capella)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYdZvQBl6sk&NR=1&feature=fvwp
By Straight No Chaser


-----------------------------

Perfect name for the job!
http://tinyurl.com/4c2fc6l

(Reminds me of Andrew Pipe, founding Chair of Physicians for a Smoke-free Canada...)