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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 6, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,157 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.  National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women - December 6
2. New from the Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- Developing a Deprivation Index: The Research Process - December 2009
--- Testing the Validity of the Ontario Deprivation Index - December 2
3. National housing summit: Ministers give themselves a collective pat on the back as millions suffer in poor homes (Wellesley Institute) - December 4
4. [Manitoba] Poverty statistics misleading (By Harvey Stevens in the Winnipeg Free Press) - December 5
5. Canada's Economic Action plan: A Fourth Report to Canadians (Government of Canada)
- December 2
6. Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy, 2009 Annual Report (Government of Ontario) - December 2
7.
Making Good on the Promise: Evaluating Year One of Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy (25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction) - December 2
8.
Ontario welfare news from the Toronto Star:
--- Ontario appoints welfare review advisory group
- December 2
--- Welfare reform creeps at snail's pace - November 30

9. Pandemic Planning and Homelessness Research Network (Homeless Hub) - December 1
10. Canada must soon report to the UN on poverty and violence against women (Georgia Straight) - November 26
11.
Boom and Bust: The Growing Income Gap in Saskatchewan (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - September 2009
12.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, November 2009 - December 4
--- Ontario Material Deprivation Survey, 2008 - December 4
--- Survey of Older Workers, 2008 - December 4

13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - December 6

International content

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin-Madison)
15. Poverty keeps growing in the U.S. but the press is almost blind to it (Nieman Watchdog) - November 30
16. The State of World Population 2009 (United Nations Population Fund) - November 18
17.
Australian Policy Online - recent content:
|--- Australia's welfare 2009 - November 17
--- How expensive is the welfare state? - December 1

18.  CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - December 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1.  National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women - December 6

December 6:
National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women
Did you know that December 6 is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada? Established in 1991 by the Parliament of Canada, this day marks the anniversary of the murders in 1989 of 14 young women at l'École Polytechnique de Montréal. They died because they were women. As well as commemorating the 14 young women whose lives ended in an act of gender-based violence that shocked the nation, December 6 represents an opportunity for Canadians to reflect on the phenomenon of violence against women in our society.
Source:
Status of Women Canada

Government of Canada urges Canadians to help end violence against women
December 1, 2009
The Honourable Helena Guergis, Minister of State (Status of Women), participated in a Rose Ceremony with her colleagues in the foyer of the House of Commons on December 1, 2009, to commemorate the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women.

Helena Guergis: Twenty years later, honouring the École Polytechnique victims
December 05, 2009

In related news...

MPs vote to abolish long-gun registry
November 5, 2009
The Conservatives have long opposed the gun registry, brought in by the former Liberal government in response to the killing of 14 women at Montreal's L'École Polytéchnique in 1989.
Source:
CBC

And let's not forget...

September 2006 federal cuts
to Women's programs in Canada

Related links:

From Statistics Canada:

Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile 2009
The 2009 edition of Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile is a profile of shelters that provide residential services to women and children fleeing abusive situations. The 2009 edition also presents fact sheets, data tables and figures on spousal violence, family violence against children and youth, family violence against seniors aged 65 and older, and family-related homicides. ]

United Nations Link:
International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, 25 November
- includes links to further resources
Source:
United Nations

November 25 : International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Women's activists have marked November 25 as a day against violence since 1981. On December 17, 1999, the United Nations General Assembly designated 25 November as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

- Go to the Canadian Government Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/women.htm

2. New from the Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- Developing a Deprivation Index: The Research Process - December 2009
--- Testing the Validity of the Ontario Deprivation Index -
December 2

What's new from the Daily Bread Food Bank and the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Developing a Deprivation Index: The Research Process (PDF - 548K, 27 pages)
December 2, 2009
This paper tells the story of the development of the Ontario Deprivation Index by the Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy. A ‘deprivation index’ is a list of items which are widely seen as necessary for a household to have a standard of living above the poverty level so that most households not in poverty are likely to have these items, but households in poverty are likely to find some of them unaffordable and so not have all those items. The index should therefore contain those items that distinguish the poor from the non-poor in the prevailing social and economic conditions.

A three-stage community-based research process was used to develop the measure, engaging those with lived experience of poverty. Statistics Canada has now refined this list and incorporated it as a supplement to their Labour Force Survey, under the sponsorship of the Government of Ontario. The result of the process was the creation of the Ontario Deprivation Index, which constitutes one part of the multi-indicator “Child and Youth Opportunity Wheel” in the Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy. This is the first poverty measure to be developed through a unique partnership of a community organization, a policy think tank, government and Statistics Canada. It is also the first time a deprivation index has been developed in North America . The deprivation index is an innovative way of measuring poverty, different than all the other measures now used in Canada .

Testing the Validity of the Ontario Deprivation Index (PDF - 122K, 13 pages)
December 2, 2009
Using an empirical methodology based on a series of surveys and focus groups, Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy have developed a deprivation index for Ontario . A ‘deprivation index’ is a list of items which are widely seen as necessary for a household to have a standard of living above the poverty level so that most households not in poverty are likely to have these items, but households in poverty are likely to find some of them unaffordable and so not have all those items. The index should therefore contain those items that distinguish the poor from the non-poor in the prevailing social and economic conditions.

This paper is a preliminary test of the validity of the Ontario Deprivation Index using the results of a Statistics Canada survey of 10,000 Ontario households. We look at the performance of the index against 6 variables: income, education, employment status, immigration, family type and housing tenure. A similar method for testing the validity of the new Irish deprivation index was also used, although in this paper we are presenting only the most basic tests. Based on this early analysis, the Ontario Deprivation Index fully meets the tests of validity in relation to these variables.

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank

and
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
[NOTE: You'll also find links to both reports on the Caledon Institute website.]

Related links:

Ontario Material Deprivation Survey, 2008
December 2, 2009
Data from the Ontario Material Deprivation Survey are now available for 2008.
For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, click the link for contact information.
Source:
The Daily [Statistics Canada]

---

New measure for the pain of poverty
December 3, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten and Tanya Talaga
One in eight Ontario children live in families that can't afford fresh fruits and vegetables every day, or can't afford to replace a broken appliance or share the occasional meal with friends or family.
These are a few of the 10 indicators listed in a new provincial poverty measure called the Ontario Deprivation Index, introduced Wednesday by Children's Minister Laurel Broten as part of the government's first annual report on the province's poverty reduction plan. The 10 "deprivation indicators" are not intended to be a comprehensive list. Instead, they are a sample of items and activities common to most Ontarians but out of reach for poor households, the report says.
Source:
Parent Central
[ Toronto Star ]

---

Where are you on the Deprivation Index?
By Laurie Monsebraaten
December 2, 2009
One in eight Ontario children is living in poverty, according to a new provincial measure released Wednesday that looks at whether families can afford items on a list of basic necessities. Families not able to afford two or more items from a list of 10 indicators on the Ontario Deprivation Index are considered as "having a poverty level standard of living," the McGuinty government says in its first annual report on Ontario's poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
Toronto Star

---

National Post editorial board: A new way to overstate poverty
December 4, 2009
(...) The McGuinty government has chosen to use a measure of relative poverty known as a “deprivation index,” popular in England, Scotland, New Zealand and elsewhere. Any Ontarian unable to eat fresh fruit and vegetables daily, or meat, fish or “a vegetarian equivalent” every second day is considered poor. (...) We have long argued that Statistics Canada’s Low-Income Cut Off (LICO) — a commonly cited measurement of poverty in Canada — was a useless, relativist index. But we think Ontario’s deprivation index is even worse. No doubt, however, the bureaucrats like it just fine — for it justifies the case for more government intervention in the economy.
Source:
National Post

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm
- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

3. National housing summit: Ministers give themselves a collective pat on the back as millions suffer in poor homes - December 4
(Wellesley Institute)

News from national housing summit:
Ministers give themselves a collective pat on the back as millions suffer in poor homes

December 4, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
The official communiqué from the federal provincial and territorial housing ministers (included in this blog posting) is little more than a collective pat on the back. The Ministers met Friday, December 4, in Gatineau for their first national housing summit since 2005. With a record 1.5 million Canadian households in core housing need, and another two million living in substandard housing, the comments about “significant progress” and “good progress” seem to fall short of the reality. (...) The lack of progress in moving towards a comprehensive and fully-funded national housing plan underlines the urgent need for Bill C-304, draft legislation that is being reviewed by a Commons committee.
Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ Wellesley Institute ]
Related link:
Stableandaffordable.com

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

4. [Manitoba] Poverty statistics misleading - December 5
(By Harvey Stevens in the Winnipeg Free Press)

Manitoba

Poverty statistics misleading
By Harvey Stevens
December 5, 2009
The recently released November 2009 Manitoba Child and Family Poverty Report Card 2009 (PDF - 458K, 25 pages) states that "Manitoba is once again the Child Poverty Capital of Canada, tied with British Columbia for having the highest number of citizens under the age of 18 living in poverty." It goes on to show how Manitoba has held that highest ranking for eight of the last 19 years and second highest ranking for an additional five of those years. Unfortunately, these are very misleading statistics which are extremely unfair to Manitoba because they are based on a faulty yardstick -- the pre-tax low income cutoffs (LICOs) developed by Statistics Canada more 40 years ago.
Source:
Winnipeg Free
[ Harvey Stevens is a retired civil servant who worked for 18 years as a senior policy analyst with Manitoba Family Services and Housing. His area of expertise is poverty measurement and income assistance policy. He tried championing the use of the MBM for setting welfare rates while in government but was unsuccessful. ]

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Manitoba Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm

5. Canada's Economic Action plan: A Fourth Report to Canadians - December 2
(Government of Canada)

Canada's Economic Action plan: A Fourth Report to Canadians
December 2, 2009
The Fourth Report to Canadians shows that 97 per cent of stimulus funding in Canada's Economic Action Plan has been committed to more than 12,000 infrastructure and housing projects. About 8,000 or 66 per cent of these projects have already begun in the 10 months since the two-year plan was launched.
[ News Release ]
[ Backgrounder ]
[ Speech on the release of the report - Winnipeg, Manitoba ]

Related links:

* A Third Report to Canadians - September 2009
* A Second Report to Canadians - June 2009
* A First Report to Canadians - March 2009

ActionPlan.gc.ca
- incl. links to:
* THE CHALLENGE * WHAT HAS BEEN DONE * THE PLAN * THE ROLLOUT * WHAT THEY'RE SAYING

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

- Go to the 2009 Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm
- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

6. Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy, 2009 Annual Report - December 2
(Government of Ontario)

Ontario Making Progress On Poverty Reduction
McGuinty Government Releases First Annual Report
News Release
December 2, 2009
Ontario is delivering on its poverty reduction strategy by making historic investments in low-income families during challenging economic times. The first annual report on the Breaking the Cycle strategy released today highlights three pillars that the government has delivered on:
* Accelerating the Ontario Child Benefit
* Moving forward with full-day learning for four and five year olds
* Tax fairness for low-income families

Complete report:

Breaking the Cycle: The First Year
Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy, 2009 Annual Report

HTML version
PDF version
(1.2MB, 23 pages)

---

Ontario Deprivation Index
December 2, 2009
A 'deprivation index' is a list of items or activities considered necessary to have an adequate standard of living, but those who are poor are unlikely to be able to afford. The items in a deprivation index are not a comprehensive list of basic needs since in a wealthy society such as Ontario most households, even the poor, are likely to have most of the basic necessities. The items in the index are intended to distinguish the poor from the non-poor. According to research, the items in Ontario's index are all widely seen by Ontarians as being necessary for a household to have a standard of living above the poverty level. (...) Ontario's deprivation index was developed through a unique partnership with the Ontario government, the Daily Bread Food Bank, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy and Statistics Canada.

Source:
Ministry of Children and Youth Services
[ Government of Ontario ]

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

7. Making Good on the Promise: Evaluating Year One of Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy - December 2
(25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction)

Making Good on the Promise:
Evaluating Year One of Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy

December 2, 2009
HTML version
PDF version
(221K, 27 pages)
A year ago, as Canada plunged into one of the sharpest recessions since the Great Depression, the Ontario government assumed long-awaited leadership to tackle poverty. On December 4, 2008 it promised to enact a plan to reduce child and family poverty by 25 per cent by 2013. Making good on that promise would lift more than 90,000 Ontario children and their families out of poverty within five years. This report evaluates what has been done so far and how much further they'll have to go to meet the goal.

Source:
25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction
25-in-5: Network for Poverty Reduction is a multi-sectoral network comprised of more than 100 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working on eliminating poverty. (...) We are asking our government for a plan to reduce Ontario poverty levels by 25% in 5 years and by 50% before 2018.

Related links:

Report calls for stronger anti-poverty measures
By Laurie Monsebraaten
December 02, 2009
A year after Ontario released a landmark plan to fight poverty in the midst of a global economic meltdown, activists are calling for "visionary leadership and unwavering political commitment" from Queen's Park to ensure everyone reaps the benefits of recovery. 'The most pressing challenge is to not repeat the mistakes of the 1990s . . (when) governments of all levels allowed prosperity to pass right by the poor,' says a report by the 25-in-5 Poverty Reduction Network released Wednesday at Queen's Park. (...) The report, which reviews provincial action in the first year of Ontario's five-year commitment to cut child poverty by 25 per cent by 2013, praises the government for allocating almost $2 billion in increased child benefits and social housing. But much more is needed to ensure the province reaches its goal of lifting 90,000 children out of poverty in the next four years, says the network, a coalition of more than 100 groups and individuals that pushed for the anti-poverty plan and is now monitoring provincial progress.
Source:
Toronto Star

Ontario risks missing poverty reduction targets: report
Anti-poverty campaigners say Ontario risks missing its targets just one year into its plan to reduce child poverty by 25 per cent by 2013.
December 2, 2009
The 25 in 5 Poverty Reduction Network says some good steps have been taken but warns that without immediate public support, the province's poverty rate will "explode."
In a report released ahead of the province's own update, the group also says that repeating the mistakes of the 1990s recession — especially making cuts to public sector programs and services — will make it harder for people to move out of poverty. It wants the province to review its rules around social assistance and make increases to the Ontario Child Benefit, affordable housing and the minimum wage.
Source:
CBC

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

8. Ontario welfare news from the Toronto Star:
--- Ontario appoints welfare review advisory group
- December 2
--- Welfare reform creeps at snail's pace - November 30

Advisers aim to fix Ontario's welfare 'quagmire'
By Laurie Monsebraaten
December 2, 2009
Ontario has appointed the head of Toronto's Daily Bread Food Bank to head a panel of anti-poverty advocates to advise the government on a long-awaited review of its welfare system, the Star has learned."If this group can't make the proper recommendations, then nobody can," said food bank executive director Gail Nyberg. Almost 800,000 Ontarians – including about 236,000 children and about 260,000 disabled people – live on provincial welfare and disability supports that leave most of them trapped in grinding poverty and despair. (...) The advisory panel, which will meet with Community and Social Services Minister Madeleine Meilleur before Christmas, will help the government finalize the scope of the review and start work in the New Year on both short- and long-term changes, the source said. The review is expected to be complete by the end of 2010. Other members of the advisory panel are Pedro Barata of the Atkinson Foundation; Colette Murphy of the Metcalf Foundation; former senior provincial social services bureaucrat John Stapleton; Michael Oliphant of the Daily Bread Food Bank; Michael Mendelson of the Caledon Institute and Kira Heineck of the Ontario Municipal Social Services Association.
Source:
Toronto Star

---

Welfare reform creeps at snail's pace
Little provincial action since 2008 pledge to review regulations on clawbacks, savings
Laurie Monsebraaten
November 30, 2009

Key promises for first year of Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy:

• Law committing Ontario to draft five-year anti-poverty plans
Action taken: Passed unanimously May 6, 2009

• Review social assistance
Action taken: No action

• Affordable housing strategy
Action taken: Public consultations complete. Plan promised for spring of 2010

• All-day learning for 4- and 5-year-olds
Action taken: $1.5 billion committed for six-year rollout starting fall of 2010

• Temporary worker legislation
Action taken:
Became law Nov. 6, 2009

• $10 million to hire employment standards officers
Action taken:
$4.5 million in March 2009 budget

• $10.25 minimum wage
Action taken:
Takes effect April 1, 2010

• Raise Ontario Child Benefit
Action taken:
Increased to maximum of $1,100 (from $600) per child in July 2009

• New provincial poverty measure
Action taken:
Expected this week

Source:
Toronto Star

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

9. Pandemic Planning and Homelessness Research Network - December 1
(Homeless Hub)

Pandemic Planning and Homelessness Research Network
As an extension of the Homeless Hub, this network allows people who are interested in homelessness and pandemic planning to come together in a collaborative on-line environment. This dynamic website features a library of resources and documents from governments and community agencies that can be accessed from one user-friendly site. Researchers, service providers, government officials and others are invited to share information and documents, participate in discussion forums, and collaborate on strategies to minimize the likelihood and impact of the spread of infectious disease among people who are homeless. To join, simply visit http://homelesshub.apps01.yorku.ca/network/cphrt, register and request membership. Once your membership has been confirmed, you will gain access to a large collection of pandemic plans, community documents, research articles, guides and best practices, and news articles from Canada and around the world.
For further information please contact Kristy Buccieri at kristy_buccieri@edu.yorku.ca

Source:
The Homeless Hub
[ www.homelesshub.net/ ]
This site is a supplement to the www.homelesshub.ca site to encourage as much online collaboration, networking and information-sharing among stakeholders doing work on homelessness and poverty-related issues as possible.

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

10.Canada must soon report to the United Nations on poverty and violence against women - November 26
(Georgia Straight)

United Nations human-rights panel wants action on women
Canada must soon report to the UN on poverty and violence
against women, but advocate Shelagh Day argues that the report will have nothing to say.
November 26, 2009
By Carlito Pablo
Canada appears to be dragging its heels in responding to a demand from a United Nations human-rights panel. It probably won’t be until December 2014 that the country will file its next report regarding its compliance with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, an international treaty ratified in 1981. However, when the CEDAW committee met in Geneva in 2008, the panel was so concerned about poverty and violence here that it asked Canada to report within one year—and not wait until its next scheduled report in 2014—about how it is dealing with these issues. The UN panel made the request when it released its observations on Canada’s treaty compliance on November 7, 2008. According to women’s-rights advocate Shelagh Day, the report is due by the end of November. But the codirector of the Poverty and Human Rights Centre and member of the B.C. CEDAW monitoring group says she doubts that Canada has much to say.
Source:
Georgia Straight

Related links:

From the
United Nations Office of the Commissioner for Human Rights
:

Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women
The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) is the body of independent experts that monitors implementation of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)
New York, 18 December 1979
- complete text of the Convention + introduction
"(...) The implementation of the Convention is monitored by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). The Committee's mandate and the administration of the treaty are defined in the Articles 17 to 30 of the Convention. The Committee is composed of 23 experts nominated by their Governments and elected by the States parties as individuals 'of high moral standing and competence in the field covered by the Convention'. At least every four years, the States parties are expected to submit a national report to the Committee, indicating the measures they have adopted to give effect to the provisions of the Convention.

---

Poverty & Human Rights Centre
The Poverty and Human Rights Centre is committed to eradicating poverty and promoting social and economic equality through human rights.

The Role of International Social and Economic
Rights in the Interpretation of Domestic Law in Canada

February 1, 2008
This Law Sheet, produced by the Poverty and Human Rights Centre, is concerned with the role that international human rights law can play in the interpretation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and other laws in Canada. It is intended to assist lawyers in their advocacy work before courts and tribunals. It is also intended to assist non-governmental organizations who rely on the human rights framework in their work to assist members of vulnerable groups. It is specifically focused on the domestic enforcement of social and economic rights.

Factum Library
The Factum Library section contains factums, pleadings and other litigation documents from selected Canadian Charter of Rights and statuatory human rights cases. The materials are organized by case name, parties, and document date.

---

Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action
The Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action (FAFIA) is a dynamic coalition of over 75 Canadian women’s equality-seeking and related organizations. FAFIA’s mandate is to further women’s equality in Canada through domestic implementation of its’ international human rights commitments.

---

CEDAW Report Card 2009 (PDF - 112K, 8 pages)
First annual CEDAW report card released: Province gets a “D” in women’s equality
British Columbia fares badly in the first annual West Coast Legal Education and Action Fund CEDAW Report Card.
October 6, 2009
The Report Card grades the BC government on how well it has adhered to the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). The Report Card monitors BC’s compliance between CEDAW’s 4-year reporting periods, in order to hold the government accountable both to UN standards and BC women. Measurements include a number of important legal and policy areas that fall within provincial jurisdiction, such as access to justice and violence against women.
Source:
West Coast Legal Education and Action Fund
The West Coast Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF) formed when the equality guarantees of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms came into force. Our mission is to achieve equality by changing historic patterns of systemic discrimination against women through BC-based equality rights litigation, law reform and public legal education.

---

- Go to the United Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/un.htm
- Go to the Links to International Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womeninternat.htm

11. Boom and Bust: The Growing Income Gap in Saskatchewan - September 2009
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
)

Boom and Bust: The Growing Income Gap in Saskatchewan
September 2009
Complete report
(PDF - 4.7MB, 59 pages)
Summary
(PDF - 130K, 19 pages)
For the past thirty years, the richest in the province have secured the lion’s share of Saskatchewan’s economic growth, while those at the lower end of the income spectrum have made few or no gains over the same period. That is the conclusion of the Saskatchewan CCPA’s new report: Boom and Bust: The Growing Income Gap in Saskatchewan.The report’s author - Paul Gingrich retired professor of Sociology and Social Studies at the University of Regina - finds that the gap between the richest and poorest families in Saskatchewan has increased dramatically over the past generation and has mushroomed since 2000 – during the best of economic times.
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Related link:

Wage disparity widens in Saskatchewan
By Jason Warick
December 4, 2009

(...) Despite Saskatchewan's image as a bastion of social equality, the separation between high- and low-income earners continues to widen. "The gap between the richest and poorest families in Saskatchewan has increased dramatically over the past generation and has mushroomed since 2000 -- during the best of economic times," former University of Regina sociology professor Paul Gingrich wrote in his study Boom and Bust: The growing income gap in Saskatchewan. According to the study, released in September, Saskatchewan's income gap is now the largest of all provinces. The richest 10 per cent of Saskatchewan families take home 28 per cent of all income, while those in the entire bottom half earned 20 per cent.(...) A growing income gap will lead to a divided society, higher crime rates and poorer overall health, Gingrich said.
Source:
Saskatoon Star-Phoenix

- Go to the Saskatchewan Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/skbkmrk.htm

12. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour Force Survey, November 2009 - December 4
--- Ontario Material Deprivation Survey, 2008 - December 4
--- Survey of Older Workers, 2008 - December 4

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

December 4, 2009
Labour Force Survey, November 2009
Employment rose by 79,000 in November, bringing the unemployment rate down 0.1 percentage points to 8.5%. Despite November's gain, employment was 321,000 (-1.9%) below the peak of October 2008.
- includes the following tables:
* Labour force characteristics by age and sex
* Employment by class of worker and industry
* Labour force characteristics by province
[ Related link : Labour Force Information, November 8 to 14, 2009 ]

Related subjects:
o Labour
o Employment and unemployment

---

December 2, 2009
Ontario Material Deprivation Survey, 2008
Data from the Ontario Material Deprivation Survey are now available for 2008.
For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, click the link for contact information.

Related subjects:
o Income, pensions, spending and wealth
o Household, family and personal income
o Low income and inequality

---

December 2, 2009
Survey of Older Workers, 2008
Data from the Survey of Older Workers supplement are now available for 2008. The Survey of Older Workers was conducted in the fall of 2008 on behalf of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. As a Labour Force Survey supplement, its objective is to understand the components that are integral in the decision to either continue working or retire as perceived by older workers in the 10 provinces. The data was collected between October and November 2008 from just over 10,000 respondents.For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, click the link for contact information.
Survey of Older Workers

Related subjects:
o Labour
o Work transitions and life stages

---

Check The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - December 6

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

December 6, 2009

Every child, every opportunity: Curriculum and pedagogy for the Early Learning Program
2 Dec 09
- Compendium report to the Early Learning report by Charles Pascal describing the curriculum and pedagogy required for the Early Learning Program.

Cross-Canada tour for public child care
2 Dec 09
- Resources provided by CUPE focusing on publicly delivered ECEC.

Daycare Trust national conference 2009: Future childcare investment, who cares who pays
2 Dec 09
- British conference features speech by Peter Moss calling for early childhood education to be made a public responsibility and free like schools.

Provision of childcare
2 Dec 09
- Report from the Australian Senate examines the impact of the rise and fall of ABC Learning Centres and provides recommendations for strengthening child care in Australia.

Full day learning in Ontario: A foundation's influence on public policy
2 Dec 09
- Newsletter from the Margaret & Wallace McCain Family Foundation looking at the Atkinson Charitable Foundation's role in developing Early Learning in Ontario.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· PQ accuses Liberals of bias in daycare contracts
[CA-QC] 2 Dec 09

· ArcherCapital is frontrunner to buy ABC Learning Centres
[AU] 1 Dec 09

· Counterpoint: The power of positive spending
[CA] 1 Dec 09
NOTE: This piece by Laurel Rothman of Campaign 2000 is a rebuttal to an editorial that appeared in the National Post on November 26 entiled Money can't end poverty. The editorial takes a number of shots at Campaign 2000's proposals to end child and family poverty, claiming "that throwing money at the problem is never going to be the solution." Campaign 2000 disagrees, and the weight of the evidence supports the Campaign 2000 perspective. Analysis of strategic spending of public funds in many jurisdictions has demonstrated the power that smart social policies have to improve the lives of low-income children and their families. Recommended reading!

· Charities aiming to rebrand ABC Learning childcare centres Good Start
[AU] 30 Nov 09

· Do not abandon early learning idea
[CA-ON] 29 Nov 09

· UVic board nixes for-profit daycare model
[CA-BC] 28 Nov 09

· Unravelling over 'seamless' day for kids
[CA-ON] 28 Nov 09

· Minnows nip at ABC carcass
[AU] 27 Nov 09

· Report damns profit-driven child care in wake of ABC empire's fall
[AU] 24 Nov 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

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Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

December 4:
Unemployment Rate and Jobless Benefits
Food Stamp Program Enrollment - Pennsylvania
State Cuts to Medicaid - Mississippi, Oklahoma

December 3:
Racial and Socio-economic Achievement Gaps
Report: Poverty and Social Exclusion - Britain
Food Stamp Program Enrollment - South Dakota, Louisiana
Child Homelessness - New Jersey, Indiana
Access to Banking for the Low-income

December 2:
State Health Insurance Plans - Florida, Tennessee, North Carolina
Climate Change and Aid to Poor Nations
Drought and Poverty - India
Health Care Reform and Low-income Families - Virginia
States and Privatization of Food Stamp Program

December 1:
States and Privatization of Food Stamp Program
Safety Net for the Long-term Unemployed
State Unemployment Insurance Funds
Unemployment and COBRA Health Insurance Subsidy
H1N1 and Sick Leave
Weatherization Program - Wisconsin
Effectiveness of Charter Schools

November 30:
Food Stamp Program Enrollment
Infant Mortality Rates
Census Small Area Poverty Estimates
Shift from TANF to Other Assistance Programs - Louisiana

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To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

15. Poverty keeps growing in the U.S. but the press is almost blind to it - November 30
(Nieman Watchdog)

Poverty keeps growing in the U.S. but the press is almost blind to it
November 30, 2009
By John Hanrahan
Jeffrey Sachs, a leading figure on world poverty, says the American press follows the lead of politicians by zeroing out coverage of poverty at a time when ‘the U.S. has the greatest income inequality, highest per capita prison population and worst health conditions of all high-income countries.’

Source:
Nieman Watchdog - "Questions the press should ask"
The NiemanWatchdog Journalism Project is an initiative of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism (founded in 1938) at Harvard University. It seeks to encourage more informed reporting by putting journalists in contact with authorities who can suggest appropriate, probing questions and who can serve as resources. There are already many very good journalism Web sites. We think our function at NiemanWatchdog.org – suggesting questions the press should ask – sets us apart.

NOTE:
The above article is part of the following series in the Nieman Watchdog:
Reporting the Economic Collapse - links to 19 articles on the economic situation in the U.S.

Another sample article by John Hanrahan in the same series:

Rein in entitlements? No. Increase them, says James Galbraith.
October 08, 2009
It's time the press stopped falling for false, ongoing efforts to portray Social Security and Medicare as going broke, says economist James Galbraith. To the contrary, increases in entitlement program benefits would provide a major boost to economic recovery. For reporters and editors Galbraith's message is: Separate propaganda from facts.
[ James Galbraith article ]

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

16. The State of World Population 2009 - November 18
(United Nations Population Fund)

Women central to efforts to deal with climate change, says new UNFPA report (Word file - 69K, 2 pages)
18 November 2009
LONDON -Women bear the disproportionate burden of climate change, but have so far been largely overlooked in the debate about how to address problems of rising seas, droughts, melting glaciers and extreme weather, concludes The State of World Population 2009, released today by UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund.
Source:
Media Outreach Kit
- includes links to reports, news releases, videos, charts and contacts for media enquiries

Complete report:

State of World Population 2009
Facing a Changing World:
Women, Population and Climate
(PDF - 4.3MB, 104 pages)
As greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere, droughts, severe storms and rising seas threaten to take an especially heavy toll on women, who make up a large share of the world’s poor.

At the Frontier:
Young People and Climate Change
(PDF - 2.5MB, 56 pages)
Youth supplement to State of World Population report

- Go to the United Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/un.htm
- Go to the Links to International Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womeninternat.htm

17. Australian Policy Online - recent content:
--- Australia's welfare 2009 - November 17
--- How expensive is the welfare state? - December 1

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Two noteworthy recent releases:

Australia's welfare 2009
Published 17 November 2009
Australia's welfare 2009 is the ninth biennial welfare report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. It is the most comprehensive and authoritative source of national information on welfare services in Australia. Topics include children, youth and families; ageing and aged care; disability and disability services; carers and informal care; housing and housing assistance; and homelessness.
Source:
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

NOTE: I skimmed this report to cite a few factoids or statistics about welfare in Australia, but I couldn't find any information on an Australian financial assistance program of last resort.
That's because they don't have one.

"The crucial fact about the Australian system is that there are no social insurance programmes at all [bolding added]. This means that it is very hard to define what constitutes social assistance in the Australian (and New Zealand) context. At one extreme, it could be argued that virtually all payments are a form of social assistance, and at the other, that only the Special Benefit going to around one per cent of all recipients is social assistance. Either extreme would be misleading, however, since benefits to the unemployed and short-term sick are virtually identical in structure to Income Support in the United Kingdom."
[ Source: Social Assistance in OECD Countries (1996) (PDF - 4.8MB, 499 pages ]

See this article on Social Security in Australia from Wikipedia for more information on the range of programs under the Australian Social Security Act and the Student Assistance Act, including maternity and parenting payments, allowances to those caring at home for a relative with a disability, disability- and age-related pensions, youth allowance, Special Benefit and more.

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How expensive is the welfare state?
By Willem Adema and Maxime Ladaique
01 December 2009
This paper presents information on trends and composition of social expenditure across the OECD, and accounts for the effects of the tax system and private social expenditure. Gross public social expenditure on average across OECD increased from 16% of GDP in 1980 to 21% in 2005, of which public pensions (7% of GDP) and public health expenditure (6% of GDP) are the largest items. After accounting for the impact of taxation and private benefits, social expenditure (1) amounts to over 30% of GDP at factor cost in Belgium, Germany, and France and (2) ranges within a few percentage points of each other in Austria, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal and the United States. Australia is included in the analysis

Complete report:

How Expensive is the Welfare State?
Gross and Net Indicators in the OECD Social Expenditure Database (SOCX)
(PDF - 1.6MB, 98 pages)

Coverage Australia, Europe, North America, New Zealand, UK

Source:
Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs
[ Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development ]

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

18. CRINMAIL - December 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

3 December 2009 - CRINMAIL 1131
* COMPLAINTS MECHANISM: Next steps
* AFRICA: News from 2nd NGO forum, and 10th anniversary of the ACRWC [news]
* CRC: Following up Concluding Observations [publication]
* CHILD RIGHTS: Cairo Declaration on the CRC and Islamic Jurisprudence
[publication]
* GLOBAL: Children of the drug war - call for proposals [news]
* QUESTIONNAIRE: Harmful traditional practices
* EMPLOYMENT: ECPAT - Plan
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

1 December 2009 - CRINMAIL 1130
* WORLD AIDS DAY: Children still falling through the cracks [news]
* KENYA: A Question of Life or Death: Treatment Access for Children Living With HIV in Kenya [publication]
* SOUTH AFRICA: Govt vows to treat all babies with HIV [news]
* AFRICA: 10th anniversary of child rights charter [news]
* CHILD FRIENDLY JUSTICE: Guidelines open for consultation [news]
* IRELAND: Church 'routinely covered up' child sexual abuse for 30 years [news]
* GUATEMALA: Sex education, family planning finally available [news]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

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Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



*****************************************************

A Few More of Life's Unanswered Questions

*****************************************************


1. What is a 'free' gift? Aren't all gifts free?

2. What was the best thing before sliced bread?

3. What's the speed of dark?

4. When sign makers go on strike, do they carry blank signs?

5. Where do forest rangers go to get away from it all?

6. Where in the nursery rhyme does it say Humpty Dumpty is an egg?

7. Whose cruel idea was it to put the 's' in lisp?

8. If a stealth bomber crashes in a forest, will it make a sound?

9. Why aren't there ever any GUILTY bystanders?

10. Why can't you make another word using all the letters in 'anagram'?

11. Why do fat chance and slim chance mean the same thing?

12. Why do gas stations lock their bathrooms? Are they afraid that someone is going to clean them?

13. Why do hot dogs come ten to a package and hot dog buns only eight?

14. Why do we press harder on a remote-control when we know the battery is dead?

15. If atheists say there is no God, who do they think pops up the next Kleenex in the box?

Source:
http://coolsig.com/lifes_questions.html
(Click the link for more)

----------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------

Gift suggestions:

Charity Village Marketplace
http://www.charityvillage.com/cv/marketplace/holidaygg.html

- links to 150 worthy Canadian and international charities offering online goods and services and/or seeking your support


World Vision Catalogue

https://catalogue.worldvision.ca/gifts/Forms/preHome.aspx?mc=4136586&lang=en


Grameen Foundation
2009-2010 Gift Catalog

http://www.grameenfoundation.org/catalog
Grameen Foundation, a nonprofit organization headquartered in Washington DC, was founded in 1997 by friends of Grameen Bank to help microfinance practitioners and spread the Grameen philosophy worldwide. We share the ideas of 2006 Nobel Peace Laureate Muhammad Yunus.


Gizmodo's Best Gadgets of 2009 - Christmas suggestions...
http://gizmodo.com/5411442/the-best-gadgets