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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
September 7, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,078 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

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HAPPY LABOUR DAY!
http://www.canadianlabour.ca/news-room/statements/2009-labour-day-message

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IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.   Time for a “Made in Ontario” Working Income Tax Benefit (Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity and Open Policy Ontario) - September 2
2. The Fraser Institute and the Flat Earth Society
(National Union of Public and General Employees) - September 3
3. BC September Budget Update 2009 (Government of British Columbia) - September 1
4. Women’s Poverty and the Recession (Monica Townson, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - September 2009
5. Government of Canada supports women's economic security (Minister of State , Status of Women) - September 2
6. B.C. about to have lowest minimum wage in Canada (BC Federation of Labour) - August 31
7.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, August 2009 - September 4
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours June 2009 - September 2
--- Canadian economic accounts, second quarter 2009 and June 2009 - August 31
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, June 2009 - August 28

8. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - September 7

International content

9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
10. [U.S.] Out of Work, Too Down to Search On, and Uncounted (New York Times) - September 7
11. [U.S.] Nearly 1 in 5 older Americans believed to be in poverty --- almost double the official rate (Grand Forks Herald) - September 4
12. Doing Better for Children (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) - September 1
13. Australian Policy Online
14. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - September 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Time for a “Made in Ontario” Working Income Tax Benefit - September 2
(Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity and Open Policy Ontario)

Time for a “Made in Ontario”
Working Income Tax Benefit

Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity and Open Policy Ontario
call for improvements to Working Income Tax Benefit design in Ontario to help low-income earners escape welfare.
September 2, 2009
Press Release
Toronto – The government of Ontario should accept the invitation from the federal government to modify the design of its Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB). WITB benefits should be re-oriented to support low-income earners when they work more, thereby easing their move from social assistance onto full-time employment when welfare benefits are lost.

Complete report:

Time for a “Made in Ontario”
Working Income Tax Benefit
(PDF - 897K, 28 pages)
September 2009
Open Policy Ontario
John Stapleton, Principal
"Low-income Ontarians who are attempting to break out of poverty to achieve financial sustainability often find barriers in their way. In fact, many who try to break away from welfare and find employment face strong disincentives to work. They continue to struggle with insufficient work, low wages, and little-to-no wage progression. (...) This report is not about addressing the full range of welfare reform; rather, it seeks to merge the WITB and Ontario’s welfare system and thus provide greater incentives for low-income Ontarians to achieve full-time employment by reducing the barriers created by the welfare wall. (...)

Authors:

James Milway and Katherine Chan,
Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity
The Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity is an independent, not-for-profit organization that deepens public understanding of macro and microeconomic factors behind Ontario’s economic progress. We are funded by the Government of Ontario and are mandated to share our research findings directly with the public. The Institute serves as the research arm of the Task Force on Competitiveness, Productivity and Economic Progress. The mandate of the Task Force, announced in the April 2001 Speech from the Throne, is to measure and monitor Ontario’s competitiveness, productivity, and economic progress compared to other provinces and US states and to report to the public on a regular basis.

John Stapleton,
Open Policy Ontario
John Stapleton is Metcalf Innovations and St Christopher House policy fellow and an expert on social policy and income issues.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. The Fraser Institute and the Flat Earth Society - September 3
(National Union of Public and General Employees)

The Fraser Institute and the Flat Earth Society
By Larry Brown, National Secretary-Treasurer
Ottawa (3 Sept. 2009)
Pointing out that the Fraser Institute has released a perverse study ignoring established facts in order to make its case is a bit like pointing out that the sun rises in the east. It’s kind of self-evident. But the institute's latest bit of silliness is over the top even for the notoriously fact-averse Fraserites. In a report released in late August [ Labour Relations Laws in Canada and the United States, 2009 Edition ] comparing labour laws in Canada and the U.S., the institute argues that our labour laws are too “tilted in favour of unions”. This “imbalance” is a problem because, it claims, “empirical evidence from around the world indicates that jurisdictions with more flexible labour markets enjoy better labour market performance.” Empirical evidence? It’s possible. There actually is a Flat Earth Society claiming to prove that the earth is flat. And some people still claim to have seen Elvis alive. But most people expect proof of a theory to be based on a bit more substance.
Source:
National Union of Public and General Employees (NUPGE)

A Cautionary Tale:

Here's an excerpt from the conclusion of the above article:
"(...) Of course, the Fraser Institute has received millions of dollars from the Donner Canadian Foundation and the Max Bell Foundation. These groups are known for their devotion to right-wing ideological causes in Canada, such as anti-union laws, for-profit health care, private schools and the private delivery of social services. The Fraser Institute also routinely collects money from big oil and gas companies, such as EnCana and Sabre Energy, and big pharmaceutical companies, such as Pfizer. One could suggest that the Fraser Institute, therefore, is only doing what its sponsors want, irrespective of the facts. That might suggest that this report was deliberately slanted to reflect the views of its right-wing corporate sponsors and once more attack laws that protect employees. But let’s be fair to the Fraser Institute. If you believe the world is flat you aren’t going to venture out to the edge for fear of falling off."
---
According to the Fraser Institute website's Who We Are page, "[T]he Fraser Institute is a registered non-profit organization. We depend entirely on donations from people who understand the importance of impartial research and who support greater choice, less government intervention, and more personal responsibility."

After I finished giving my head a shake about Fraser's status as a registered non-profit organization, I had to smile (y'know, the jaundiced smile...) when I read the words "impartial research". How can research be touted as impartial, I wondered, when it's funded by the big corporations that stand to benefit most from 'supportive' research? [Never mind - it's a rhetorical question...]
Ya gotta dance wit de one dat brung ya, eh...

The reference to Big Pharma and Pfizer in the above NUPGE excerpt reminded me of a surprising (to me, at least...) CBC report back in the mid-nineties stating that the Fraser Institute was endorsing not only the legalization of marijuana in Canada, but also its regulation and taxation, based on a June 2004 study entitled Marijuana Growth in British Columbia, funded by the Fraser Institute.
[ See also Fraser Institute study calls for legal pot (June 2004) - CBC ]
After reading the Fraser study, though, I concluded that it was perfectly logical for the Fraser Institute (Motto: "A free and prosperous world through choice, markets and responsibility") to favour an option that reduced government control over people's lives. Because that's what Fraser and their kindred libertarian spirits (Donner, Max Bell, etc.) are all about --- getting government out of people's faces and reducing taxes.

When I saw the reference to Pfizer in the NUPGE article, I was curious what Fraser was saying about the legalization of pot these days. Supporters of legalized pot have long maintained that the biggest barrier to legalization is the sustained pressure on government by several industries that are concerned about the impact on their sector if hemp in all its forms (including marijuana) is made legal. Given the increasing volume of evidence and testimonials about the medicinal advantages of marijuana over traditional medicine for treatment of certain conditions and illnesses, it stands to reason that big drug companies like Pfizer would have the required motivation to lobby government against any form of decriminalization of pot. Indeed, when I went to the Fraser Institute's home page while writing this and did a search for "marijuana", the most recent content on the subject from Fraser is the 2004 study that advocated legalization. According to the CBC story, Fraser issued a second press release the same day, to emphasize that the recommendation to legalize pot were from the author, not the Institute. Gee, I wonder how long it took the folks at Pfizer to contact Fraser to demand the second release to distance themselves from the views of the author...

Suffice to say that 2004 (the year of the pot study and recommendations) appears to be the last time Fraser dared say anything substantive about marijuana on their site. Funny thing about that.
(Now I need a Valium, a coffee and a smoke.)

[Aside: The issue of decriminalization of marijuana is one of those 800-lb gorillas - like abortion, universal day care and the death penalty - that cut across political party lines and that can polarize a roomful of social advocates OR a meeting of the Canadian Taxpayers' Federation.]

So what's the "cautionary" part of all of this?
1. Be wary of websites of organizations that describe themselves or their work as "impartial".
2. Be wary of websites of organizations that strive for a free and prosperous world through choice, markets and responsibility.

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (II) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research2.htm

3. BC September Budget Update 2009 - September 1
(Government of British Columbia)

British Columbia
September Budget Update 2009

Protecting Vital Services, Building for the Future (PDF - 99K, 2 pages)
News Release
September 1, 2009
VICTORIA — The B.C. government is protecting vital services and positioning British Columbia for renewed economic growth, Finance Minister Colin Hansen announced today as he released the September Budget Update 2009.
(...) The Budget Update contains revised deficit forecasts of $2.8 billion in 2009/10, $1.7 billion in 2010/11, and $945 million in 2011/12.

September Budget Update 2009
Government of British Columbia
- main budget page, includes links to the Budget Speech and all budget papers (backgrounders, budget and fiscal plan, estimates, Ministry service plans, and more).

September Budget Update
2009/10 – 2011/12
(PDF - 2.2MB, 172 pages)
September 1, 2009
- the principal budget document; it lays out the Province’s three-year fiscal plan, including economic outlook, revenues, spending, tax measures, and forecasting risks and assumptions.

Ministry Service Plans
- provides an overview of every ministry, including how they intend to achieve their service goals and how they support the direction laid out in the Government Strategic Plan.
[ Ministry of Housing and Social Development Service Plan (PDF - 891K, 28 pages) - Ministry responsible for welfare in BC ]
[ Ministry of Children and Family Development (PDF - 135K, 20 pages) - Ministry responsible for child and family services in BC ]
(Click the Ministry Service Plans link above to access service plans for other ministries)

Government Strategic Plan (PDF - 7.5MB, 24 pages)
- sets out an overarching vision, goals and priority actions for the Province of British Columbia for the next 10 years.

Budget in Brief (PDF - 415K, 8 pages)

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Related links (analysis/critique):

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B.C. heads for $2.8B deficit
September 1, 2009
The B.C. government is forecasting its biggest annual deficit ever — $2.8 billion — Finance Minister Colin Hansen announced Tuesday in the legislature as he tabled his first budget update since the May election. Despite that shortfall, Hansen said funding for health care, education and social services will all increase, while both personal and small-business taxes will be cut to the lowest levels in Canada.
NOTE: in the right-hand margin of the page with the CBC article, you'll find links to at least a half-dozen more BC Budget articles.
Source:
CBC News

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B.C. increases budget for welfare, kindergarten and forest fires
By Rebecca teBrake
September 1, 2009
The provincial government will spend more on welfare, kindergarten and forest fires despite announcing $3.4 billion in spending cuts. Tuesday’s budget update was a sombre affair for the most part, with Finance Minister Colin Hansen announcing a $2.8-billion deficit and $3.4 billion in budget cuts over the next three years. But the province will increase spending to the tune of $1.1 billion in priority areas including welfare, emergency homeless shelters, prosecutions, forest fires, municipal infrastructure, treaties, tourism and kindergarten.
Source:
Vancouver Sun

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Record Deficit a Big Surprise, Say BC Liberals
During May's election Hansen glimpsed red ink, but lacked a 'crystal ball'.
By Andrew MacLeod
British Columbia Finance Minister Colin Hansen is projecting a record deficit of $2.8 billion, according to a budget update he presented today. It's a figure five times larger than the $495 million projected in February and insisted upon by Premier Gordon Campbell during the election campaign.
Source:
TheTyee.ca

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BC's Bizarre Fiscal Plan
The government seems to be jamming its feet on both the brake pedal and accelerator.
September 1, 2009
By Will McMartin
"(...)The Campbell government clearly understands that fiscal and economic stimulus is a good and necessary thing during the current economic downturn. And, yet, the BC Liberals also appear to have a perverse obsession about cutting government spending — no matter the cost to British Columbia's 'general interest'."
Source:
TheTyee.ca

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Take Two: BC Budget 2009 September Update
By Marc Lee
September 1, 2009
The September BC Budget is a new look at a budget most have come to see as a fake. February’s budget was not passed through the legislature due to the May election, and up to E-Day the government maintained the fiction that it had a small-ish deficit of just under half a billion dollars. Since that time, the government has moved out of denial about the recession and revealed that it could not in fact meet its deficit target, accompanied by loud noises about expenditure cuts through the summer.
Source:
Progressive Economics blog

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September 1, 2009
Budget Deficit and Deceit
The Campbell government plans to balance its budget by 2013-2014. That plan calls for tabling a budget in February 2013, holding an election in May 2013 and having a new replacement budget in September 2013. It looks like the B.C. Liberals think voters will fall for the 2009 trick again and again. Between now and the next election, all of the budgets that will be tested by audited financial statements, Public Accounts, will show deficits, beginning with a deficit of $2.8 billion this year. You won't find it in the government's budget highlights, but Finance Minister Colin Hansen's September budget update announced an 18% increase in MSP premiums. BC has set several Canadian records: the highest child poverty, the lowest minimum wage and the only province to use regressive premiums to fund health care.
Source:
Strategic Thoughts.com

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Related Web/News/Blog links:

Google Search Results Links - always current results!
Using the following search terms (without the quote marks):
"British Columbia budget 2009"
- Web search results page
- News search results page
- Blog Search Results page
Source:
Google.ca

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- Go to the BC Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the 2009 Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm

4. Women’s Poverty and the Recession - September 2009
(Monica Townson,. Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Recession sidelines polices to address women’s poverty: study
Press Release
September 1, 2009
OTTAWA—Canada still has shockingly high rates of women’s poverty but the recession seems to have sidelined anti-poverty policies, says a new study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). Women’s Poverty and the Recession reveals even after taking into account government transfers and tax credits, almost one-quarter(24%) of Canadian women raising children on their own and 14% of single older women are poor, compared to 9 % of children. “Child poverty seems to win political points but Canadian governments are ignoring the very real and private struggle of women on their own who are living in poverty at shockingly high levels,” says CCPA Research Associate Monica Townson.

Complete report:

Women’s Poverty and the Recession (PDF - 662K, 54 pages)
September 2009
By Monica Townson
"(...) In Canada, the groups most vulnerable to poverty are Canadians from racialized communities, recent immigrants (many of whom are also from racialized communities), Aboriginal people, and persons with disabilities. Most of these groups have much higher rates of poverty than the general population. But in all the vulnerable groups, poverty rates for women are higher than those for men.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Related media links:

Women: Poorest of the poor
September 5, 2009
By Monica Townson
Only 9 per cent of all Canadians were considered poor in 2007. It was the lowest rate of low income in 30 years. But that was before the recession hit last fall. We don't yet have income data for 2008 but, if past experience is anything to go by, poverty rates will go up again as declining economic growth shows up in the numbers. And that's bad news for women, whose high rates of poverty remain unaddressed.
Source:
Toronto Star

Bid to tackle women's poverty sidelined
Policy centre puts the blame on recession
By Norma Greenaway
September 2, 2009
OTTAWA — Efforts to address poverty in Canada, especially the "shockingly high" rates suffered by many women, seem to have been sidelined by the economic recession, says a report being released Wednesday. The report, prepared by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, urged federal and provincial governments to rework their initiatives for coping with the recession to pay particular attention to women struggling to raise children on their own.
Source:
Global News (TV)

- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

5. Government of Canada supports women's economic security - September 2
(Minister of State , Status of Women)

Government of Canada supports women's economic security
in Quebec, Nunavut, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia
THUNDER BAY, ON, Sept. 2 /CNW Telbec/
The Honourable Helena Guergis, Minister of State (Status of Women), today announced support for the Women's Economic Council, for its project to address women's economic security and leadership. Minister of State Guergis also acknowledged the hard work and dedication of Council volunteers by providing certificates of appreciation. The project, entitled Leadership and Women's Economic Security: A Sustainability Approach, will focus the efforts of eight women-centred, community-based, economic development enterprises in Quebec, Nunavut, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia, to help 570 low-income women find and maintain employment, and enhance their leadership and financial skills.
Source:
Canada Newswire

Related links:

Status of Women Canada

Women's Economic Council (WEC)
WCE, formerly the Canadian Women’s Community Economic Development Council, was founded in 2002 to advance women-centred community economic development to improve the lives of women, their families and communities.
[ Links - excellent collection, includes readings on women and poverty ]

- Go to the Canadian Government Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/women.htm
- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

6. B.C. about to have lowest minimum wage in Canada - August 31
(British Columbia Federation of Labour )

From the
BC Federation of Labour:

From best to last--young workers call frozen minimum
wage an embarrassment as BC set to claim last place

August 31, 2009
Victoria-Tomorrow British Columbia will become the lowest minimum wage province in all of Canada as New Brunswick raises its minimum wage to $8.25. A group of young workers gathered in front of the provincial legislature called BC's minimum wage freeze an embarrassment.
Source:
British Columbia
Federation of Labour

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Related article:

B.C. about to have lowest minimum wage in Canada
August 31, 2009
VICTORIA — The B.C. Federation of Labour is painting British Columbia as an embarrassment as the province is on the eve of having the lowest minimum wage in Canada. The federation said when New Brunswick raises its minimum wage to $8.25, B.C. will join Prince Edward Island as the only province in Canada still holding to an $8 minimum.
Source:
Canada.com

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Related links from the
Labour Program, Human Resources and Social Development Canada:

Current And Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates For Adult Workers in Canada
(this is the best resource for info on current and upcoming minimum wage levels)

Minimum Hourly Wages for Canadian Adult Workers since 1965
NOTE: this information is broken up into five files - one for each decade.
The link takes you to the latest decade (2005 to 2014); click the date links at the top of the page for pages for earlier decades.

Source:
Minimum Wage Database
[ Employment Standards Legislation in Canada ]
[ Labour Program, Human Resources and Social Development Canada ]

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Minimum Wage /Living Wage Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

7. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour Force Survey, August 2009 - September 4
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours June 2009 - September 2
--- Canadian economic accounts, second quarter 2009 and June 2009 - August 31
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, June 2009 - August 28

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

September 4, 2009
Labour Force Survey, August 2009
Employment increased by 27,000 in August, led by part-time work and among private sector employees. The unemployment rate edged up 0.1 percentage points to 8.7% as more people participated in the labour market.
- includes four tables:
* Labour force characteristics by age and sex * Employment by class of worker and industry * Labour force characteristics by province * Labour force characteristics by province
Related link : Labour Force Information, August 9 to 15, 2009

September 2, 2009
Employment, Earnings and Hours June 2009 (PDF - 2.2MB, 387 pages)
Total non-farm payroll employment fell by 47,000 in June, down 0.3% from May, bringing total losses to 442,600 since the peak in October 2008. The proportion of industries experiencing job losses in June edged down to 60%.
[ earlier issues of Employment, Earnings and Hours - back to July 2000]

August 31, 2009
Canadian economic accounts, second quarter 2009 and June 2009
Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased 0.1% in June, the first monthly increase since July 2008. For the second quarter as a whole, real GDP decreased 0.9%, a less pronounced rate of decline than the 1.6% drop in the previous quarter. Final domestic demand increased 0.1% in the second quarter.
Related links:
* National Income and Expenditure Accounts: Data Tables (Click "View" for latest issue)
* Estimates of Labour Income: Data Tables (Click "View" for latest issue)

August 28, 2009
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, June 2009
Total non-farm payroll employment fell by 47,000 in June, down 0.3% from May, bringing total losses to 442,600 since the peak in October 2008. The proportion of industries experiencing job losses in June edged down to 60%.
- includes tables on number of employees and average earnings


- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

8. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - September 7

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

September 7, 2009

Unanticipated gains: Origins of network inequality in everyday life
2 Sep 09
- Video and news from the University of Chicago discussing research findings on networking benefits and building social capital in child care centres.

What does economics tell us about early childhood policy?
2 Sep 09
- Report from the RAND Corporation on how the human capital theory and monetary payoffs provide science-based guidance for early childhood policy.

Toronto First Duty Phase 2, 2006-2008: Final research report
2 Sep 09
- Final report on the Toronto First Duty project that integrated early childhood programs phase 2 from 2006-2008.

Disability and inclusion: Changing attitudes-changing policy
2 Sep 09
- Chapter from Our Schools/Our Selves by Debra Mayer discussing the concepts of inclusion, accessibility and universality in Canada and legislation.

About Canada: Childcare
24 Jun 09
- Just published – a new book co-authored by CRRU director Martha Friendly and University of Manitoba Sociologist Susan Prentice.

With our best future in mind: Implementing early learning in Ontario
17 Jun 09
- Report to the Premier of Ontario from Charles Pascal, the Premier's Special Advisor on Early Learning.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Class size matters, especially in kindergarten
[US] 2 Sep 09

· High public spending fails to improve child welfare, says report
[BG] 1 Sep 09

· ABC Learning receivers start sell off
[AU] 31 Aug 09

· Overworked, overextended and overstressed
[US] 26 Aug 09

· Iglulik needs a daycare
[CA-NU] 21 Aug 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

September 4:
Poverty Measurement and Poverty Rate of Seniors
Unemployment Rates and Exhaustion of Jobless Benefits
Health Care Reform and Safety Net Hospitals
State Worker Furloughs and Cuts to Services
Fire Departments Responding to Medical Calls

September 3:
Stimulus Spending and Health Clinics - Colorado
Unemployment and Homelessness in Japan
Low-income Home Energy Assistance Program - Pennsylvania
Trachoma Treatment and Disease Prevention - Africa
OECD Child Welfare Report

September 2:
Low-wage Workers and Wage Violations by Employers
Health Care Access and Immediate Care Clinics
Healthy Indiana Plan
Growth of Charter Schools - Los Angeles, CA
Blighted Neighborhoods and Redevelopment - Los Angeles, CA

September 1:
OECD Child Welfare Report
Unemployment and Poverty - Janesville, WI
Stimulus Spending on Weatherization Program - Indiana
Massachusetts Health Insurance Plan and Immigrants
Medicaid Enrollment - Arizona

August 31:
Medicaid and Incentives for Preventive Care - Indiana
Food Stamp Program and Nutrition - Tennessee
State Unemployment Insurance System - Michigan
Stimulus Spending on Unemployment Insurance Programs

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To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

10. [U.S.] Out of Work, Too Down to Search On, and Uncounted - September 7
(New York Times)

Out of Work, Too Down to Search On, and Uncounted
By Michael Luo
September 7, 2009
They were left out of the latest unemployment rate, as they are every month: millions of hidden casualties of the Great Recession who are not counted in the rate because they have stopped looking for work. But that does not mean these discouraged Americans do not want to be employed. As interviews with several of them demonstrate, many desperately long for a job, but their inability to find one has made them perhaps the ultimate embodiment of pessimism as this recession wears on. Some have halted their job searches out of sheer frustration. Others have decided it makes more sense to become stay-at-home fathers or mothers, or to go back to school, until the job market improves. Still others have chosen to retire for now and have begun collecting Social Security or disability benefits, for which claims have surged...
Source:
New York Times

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

11. [U.S.] Nearly 1 in 5 older Americans believed to be in poverty --- almost double the official rate - September 4
(Grand Forks Herald)

Nearly 1 in 5 older Americans believed
to be in poverty --- almost double the official rate

September 4, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The poverty rate among older Americans could be nearly twice as high as the traditional 10 percent level, according to a revision of a half-century-old formula for calculating medical costs and geographic variations in the cost of living.
The National Academy of Science's formula, which is gaining credibility with public officials including some in the Obama administration, would put the poverty rate for Americans 65 and over at 18.6 percent, or 6.8 million people, compared with 9.7 percent, or 3.6 million people, under the existing measure. The original government formula, created in 1955, doesn't take account of rising costs of medical care and other factors.
Source:
Associated Press

NOTE: for 500+ links to resources on the subject of poberty measurement in the U.S.,
go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

12. Doing Better for Children - September 1
(Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)

New from the
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD):

Spend early on children, says OECD
News Release
1 September 2009
Governments should invest more money on children in the first six years of their lives to reduce social inequality and help all children, especially the most vulnerable, have happier lives, according to the OECD’s first-ever report on child well-being in its 30 member countries. Doing Better for Children shows that average public spending by OECD countries up to age six accounts for only a quarter of all child spending. But a better balance of spending between the “Dora the Explorer” years of early childhood and the teenage “Facebook” years would help improve the health, education and well-being of all children in the long term, according to the report.

Complete report:

Doing Better for Children
This link takes you to the main page of this OECD report.
I don't generally promote books for sale, but this report is worth spotlighting because it contains a lot of free resources, such as the complete content of two chapters and links to complementary info and sources, along with highlights for 12 countries (including Canada). Check it out - you may find that it's worth the $29 (E-book) or $42 (paper copy).

Table of Contents (PDF - 104K, 4 pages)

Comparative Child Well-being across the OECD (PDF - 1.1MB, 43 pages)
Chapter Two presents a child well-being framework and compares outcome indicators for children in OECD countries across six dimensions: material well-being; housing and environment; education; health; risk behaviours; and quality of school life.

Doing Better for Children: The Way Forward (PDF - 206K, 29 pages)
Chapter 7 offers a range of policy recommendations for improving child well-being.

Doing Better for Children
Country Highlights : Canada
(PDF - 117K, 1 page)
2009
"Canada receives solid marks in “Doing Better for Children”, the OECD’s first report on the well-being of children. But there are areas which may need policy attention to improve the lives of Canadian children, including reducing child poverty and youth risk-taking, and ensuring timely immunisations. (...) Child poverty rates in Canada in 2005 were at the higher end of the OECD, with 15% of children living in poor households versus an OECD average of 12.4%." [Bolding added]

OECD links to child well-being research related websites
- incl. dozens of links to : International Organisations - European Organisations - NGOs and International Research Projects - Government & Ministries - Statistical Offices - Universities

Related link:

High spending fails to improve child welfare, says OECD report
UK's levels of teenage pregnancy, drunkenness and unemployment are among highest out of 30 countries
1 September 2009
Source:
The Guardian (U.K)

- Go to the International Children, Families and Youth Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chn2.htm
- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

13. Australian Policy Online

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

14. CRINMAIL - September 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

3 September 2009 - CRINMAIL 1105
* COUNCIL OF EUROPE: Flawed enforcement of court decisions undermines the trust in State justice [viewpoint]
* INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION: Session 135 [event]
* SWITZERLAND: Asylum policy "disregards rights of children" [news]
* TASMANIA: Children in adult psychiatric wards a 'human rights breach' [news]
* CAMPAIGN: The future of child rights - in whose hands? [campaign update]
* **FROM THE FRONTLINE** Bosire Monari Mwebi [interview]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

1 September 2009 - CRINMAIL 1104
* CAMPAIGN: The future of children's rights - in whose hands?
* EUROPE: Innocenti Social Monitor 2009: Child well-being at a crossroad. Evolving challenges in Central and Eastern Europe and CIS [publication]
* UNITED KINGDOM: Govt under fire for locking up immigrant children [news]
* GLOBAL: Witches in the 21st Century - statement by UN expert Philip Alston [publication]
* AWARDS: San Marino-Alexander Bodini Foundation Children's Awards
* UNITED STATES: 18th ISPCAN International Congress on Child Abuse and Neglect [event]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

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Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com




***********************************************

Riddle me THIS, Smarties!

***********************************************
    (Answers are below.)

   1. Which is faster, hot or cold?

   2. Two fathers and two sons went duck hunting. Each shot a duck but they shot only three ducks in all. How come?

   3. What can you put in a wood box that will make it lighter?

   4. What is it that everybody does at the same time?

   5. A doctor and a nurse have a baby boy. But the boy's father is not the doctor and the mother is not the nurse. How can that be?

   6. What is so fragile even saying its name can break it?

   7. The more you take the more you leave behind.

   8. What turns everything around, but does not move?

   9. What is the best month for a parade?

  10. What's white when it’s dirty?

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Answers:



1.Hot’s faster. You can't catch a hot.

2. The hunters were a man, his son and his grandson.

3. Holes

4. Grow older.

5. The doctor is the mother (female doctor) and the nurse is the father (male nurse).

6. Silence

7. Footsteps

8. A mirror

9. March

10. A blackboard

Source:
Guess


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And, in closing...
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11 Hilarious (and Very Necessary) Newspaper Corrections
http://www.11points.com/News-Politics/11_Hilarious_(and_Very_Necessary)_Newspaper_Corrections

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Walk buttons at pedestrian crossings - I just knew it!!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Placebo_button

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And, speaking of buttons...
http://www.amishdonkey.com/big-red-button.php

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The Best of YouTube this past week:
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/technology/youtube/index.html

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Create a font from your own handwriting
http://www.fontcapture.com/
...or pick up a frikkin' pencil!