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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 7,  2008

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1931 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy : Breaking the Cycle (Govt. of Ontario) - December 4
2. Major Milestones in Poverty Reduction in Ontario (Open Policy - John Stapleton) - December 2008
3. International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (Nov. 25) + National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada (Dec. 6)
4. Government of Canada Releases Explanatory Notes for Tax Improvements Tabled on November 28, 2008 (Finance Canada) - December 4
5. International Day of Persons with Disabilities : New Study explores barriers faced by Canadians with Disabilities (Canadian Labour Congress) - December 3
6. Ontario Hunger Report 2008: The Leading Edge of the Storm (Ontario Association of Food Banks) - December 2008
7. Poverty is making us sick : A comprehensive survey of income and health in Canada (Wellesley Institute and others) - December 2008
8. The Forgotten Fundamentals [social programs as part of an economic stimulus package] (Caledon Institute of Social Policy) - December 2008
9. Ontario Supports RDSPs : McGuinty Government Helps Families Save For Children With Disabilities (Ontario Community and Social Services) - November 30
10. PollutionWatch Fact Sheet:An examination of pollution and poverty in the Great Lakes Basin - November 27
11.
What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
--- Labour Force Survey, November 2008 - December 5
--- Study: Seniors in rural Canada, 1986 to 2006 - December 5
--- Leading causes of death, 2000 to 2004 - December 4
--- Study: Internet use and social and civic participation, 2003 to 2007 - December 4
--- Satellite account of non-profit institutions and volunteering, 1997 to 2005 - December 3
--- Aboriginal Peoples Survey: Inuit health and social conditions, 2006 - December 3
--- Canadian economic accounts, third quarter 2008 and September 2008 - December 1

12. Liberal/NDP Coalition crisis stories (CBC News)
13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - December 3

International  content

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
15. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content
16. CRINMAIL (December 2008) - (Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Have a great week!

Gilles Séguin
Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy : Breaking the Cycle - December 4
(Government of Ontario)

On December 4, 2008, the Government of Ontario committed itself to
reducing the number of children living in poverty by 25 per cent over the next 5 years.
**WELL DONE, ONTARIO!!!

The poverty reduction paper:
Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy : Breaking the Cycle (PDF - 1.3MB, 45 pages)
December 4, 2008
Chapter 1: Stronger, Healthier Kids and Families
Chapter 2: Stronger, Healthier Communities
Chapter 3: Opportunity for All
Chapter 4: Smarter Government
Chapter 5: Measuring Our Progress
Chapter 6: Moving Forward
Chapter 7: The Federal Role
Chapter 8: The Municipal Role
Chapter 9: All Hands on Deck

Highlights (PDF - 199K, 2 pages)

Source:
Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy
- this is the Ontario Government's poverty reduction website.
- intro and links to : * The Vision * Where We've Been * Our Strategy * Targets and Measures * Ontario Child Benefit * Education and Early Learning * Stronger Communities * Smarter Government * Long-Term Commitment
[ Government of Ontario ]

Ontario Sets Target To Reduce Child Poverty 25 Per Cent Over 5 Years
News Release
December 4, 2008
- includes a backgrounder with more info and a selection of reactions to the paper from individuals and organizations mostly drawn from the Toronto social advocacy / social justice community, but also including notable reviewers as the mayor of Toronto, Roy Romanow and Don Drummond (V-P of TD Financial Group). Now THAT's buy-in.
Source:
Ontario Newsroom [Hosted by CNW Group Ltd.]

---

Related links from the Toronto Star:

Rewriting welfare rules
Editorial
December 7, 2008
Welfare is supposed to be the net that catches people when everything else in their life fails. It's supposed to help set them back on their feet. But what it often does is trap people with a sense of shame as deep as their poverty. That gives them yet another hurdle to overcome. "The rules shackle people," says anti-poverty activist Pat Capponi. That's why it's such welcome news that the province has committed to conducting a review of social assistance in an effort to remove barriers and increase opportunities for training programs and jobs.

Too many gaps in poverty plan, advocates say
Focus on kids a good start, but breaking down stats by race called key to knowing who needs help
December 7, 2008
By Tanya Talaga
"Ontario's $1.4 billion anti-poverty strategy must take a hard look at the "colour of poverty" and include indicators used to measure who is poor that are broken down by race, gender and disability, some advocates say. (...) Many things were missing in the poverty report --- there were no programs for the homeless, the aged, aboriginals. No programs or statistics collected that are race based.The focus was only one key issue – eradicating poverty in children."

'First step' on poverty draws praise
December 5, 2008
By Laurie Monsebraaten and Tanya Talaga
Anti-poverty activists are cheering Ontario's ambitious $1.4 billion plan to cut child poverty by 25 per cent in five years, but vow to ensure the Liberal government lives up to its promise. "This is a fundamental first step that should be applauded. We should say: Congratulations. Thank you. Now let's get down to implementing it," said Toronto United Way President Frances Lankin. That may be easier said than done...
NOTE: at the top of this article, you'll find a feature called "Poverty in Ontario - Milestones", which is an overview of 10 poverty reduction initiatives from 1792 to 2008. This feature, prepared by John Stapleton is a truncated version of a more detailed presentation on John's website, Open Policy; the link to this detailed presentation appears further below, and I highly recommend it, whether you're a student of poverty reduction initiatives or of Ontario social history

Two cheers for anti-poverty plan
Editorial
December 5, 2008
Ontario has taken a vital step toward breaking that cycle with a focused poverty reduction strategy. Announced yesterday, it seeks to reduce child poverty by 25 per cent within 5 years. That mean 90,000 children and their families would escape poverty.Unfortunately, the strategy is far too dependent on the willingness of Ottawa to contribute an additional $1.5 billion a year to boost the federal child tax benefit and the working income benefit.

Ontario backs '25-in-5' poverty plan
Reduce child poverty by one-quarter in five years
December 4, 2008
The Ontario government will promise today to reduce child poverty by 25 per cent within the next five years – a target activist groups say is critical to a meaningful poverty strategy. The Liberal government, led by Children and Youth Minister Deb Matthews, is expected this afternoon to deliver its much-anticipated strategy on how to improve the lives of needy Ontarians.

Historic day for poverty activists: Province to release poverty plan
December 3, 2008
By Carol Goar
As economic times darken and the poorest feel the pinch, relief might be on the way with the introduction tomorrow of Ontario's long-awaited poverty reduction plan. Tomorrow is the day poverty activists have worked for, fought for and longed for. But it comes with a daunting challenge. Nothing in the poverty reduction plan the Ontario government is set to unveil will help the tens of thousands of Ontarians who are skimping on food, facing eviction and staring at layoff notices right now.

Toronto Star War on Poverty Series

---

Related links from Poverty Watch Ontario:

Re. welfare review:
"Today the government announced it will undertake a review of social assistance with the goal of reducing barriers and increasing opportunity. (...) As an initial step, signaling the direction of the government’s promised social assistance review, the plan will immediately change three rules which function as barriers for people on social assistance.
* First, the plan pledges to fully exempt the earnings of any person on social assistance participating in post-secondary education.
* The second change extends the upfront child care benefits to allow parents to continue their participation in employment and employment assistance activities.
* The third change is an extension of the time to request internal reviews of social assistance decisions from ten to thirty days
Source:
25 in 5 Backgrounder

Poverty Plan Lays Foundation For Action
December 4, 2008
"TORONTO - Ontario is on track to becoming a leader in poverty reduction in a plan that is not only crucial to the province’s economic recovery but is also the right thing to do, says the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction. (...)
- “Today, Ontario is turning a corner on poverty,” says Pat Capponi of Voices from the Street.
- “Today’s announcement signals an understanding that poverty reduction is smart economics,” says Jacquie Maund, Campaign 2000 Ontario Coordinator.
- “Thousands of Ontarians asked for a plan with targets, timelines and accountability. The government listened,” says 25 in 5 spokesperson Cindy Wilkey.
- “We expect poverty reduction to become a central feature in the next five provincial budgets - and the 25 in 5 Network will continue to hold our government to its promise to make this plan a reality,” says Peter Clutterbuck, executive director, Social Planning Network of Ontario.

How does the government’s plan perform against the Five Tests?
25 in 5 Backgrounder on the Poverty Reduction Strategy Announcement

December 4, 2008
The 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction is a multi-sectoral coalition of more than 350 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working to eliminate poverty. In October 2008, the 25 in 5 Network produced Five Tests for Success of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. See how the Ontario plan matches up to each of the five tests.

Source:
Poverty Watch Ontario ("To monitor and inform on cross-Ontario activity on the poverty reduction agenda")
Poverty Watch Ontario is keeping an eye on the provincial poverty reduction consultations and poverty reduction events in Ontario.
Poverty Watch Ontario is a joint venture of Social Planning Network of Ontario, Ontario Campaign 2000, and the Income Security Advocacy Centre.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. Major Milestones in Poverty Reduction in Ontario - December 2008
(Open Policy - John Stapleton)

Major Milestones in Poverty Reduction in Ontario
December 2008
By John Stapleton
Brief overview of 10 significant poverty reduction initiatives in Ontario, from the First Upper Canada Statute in 1792 to the 2008 Poverty Reduction Strategy
.
[this is a more detailed version of the feature that appeared in the Toronto Star on December 5 just above the article entitled 'First step' on poverty draws praise.
Source:
Open Policy (John Stapleton's website)

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

3. International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (November 25) + National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada (December 6)

International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women
25 November
By resolution 54/134 of 17 December 1999, the General Assembly designated 25 November as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, and invited governments, international organizations and NGOs to organize activities designated to raise public awareness of the problem on that day.

The Government of Canada Calls for an End to Violence against Women
News Release
November 25, 2008
OTTAWA – The Honourable Helena Guergis, Minister of State (Status of Women), in recognition of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on November 25, called for an end to violence against women. (...) November 25 commemorates the 1960 murders of the Mirabal sisters in the Dominican Republic. Worldwide it also marks the beginning of 16 Days of Activism against Gender Violence, including Canada’s National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women on December 6.

National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada
December 6 is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada. Established in 1991 by the Parliament of Canada, this day marks the anniversary of the murders in 1989 of 14 young women at l'École Polytechnique de Montréal. They died because they were women.
Source:
Status of Women Canada

Google.ca News Search Results:
"National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women"
Google Web Search Results:
"National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women"
Source:
Google.ca

- Go to the Canadian Government Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/women.htm
- Go to the Links to International Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womeninternat.htm

4. Government of Canada Releases Explanatory Notes for Tax Improvements Tabled on November 28, 2008 - December 4
(Finance Canada)

Government of Canada Releases Explanatory Notes for Tax Improvements Tabled on November 28, 2008
December 4, 2008
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released explanatory notes for the provisions included in the detailed Notice of Ways and Means Motion that was tabled on November 28, 2008. The Motion includes a number of tax initiatives outstanding from the 2008 budget as well as other tax changes, most of which were released in July 2008 in draft form for consultation (see News Release 2008-054). As proposed in the 2008 Economic and Fiscal Statement, the Motion also includes provisions to reduce by 25 per cent the minimum amount that an individual must withdraw from his or her Registered Retirement Income Fund in 2008. Under these provisions, if more than the new reduced minimum amount has already been withdrawn, the excess (up to the original minimum amount) can be re-contributed. Similar rules will apply to variable benefit money purchase Registered Pension Plans. The explanatory notes also include details of relieving refinements to the Department of Finance’s guidelines on the "normal growth" limits that apply to specified investment flow-through entities and partnerships.

Related document

* Explanatory Notes relating to the Income Tax
Act, the Excise Act, 2001 and the Excise Tax Act

Source:
Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

5. International Day of Persons with Disabilities : New Study explores barriers faced by Canadians with Disabilities - December 3
(Canadian Labour Congress)

International Day of Persons with Disabilities
3 December 2008
2008 Theme: "Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Dignity and justice for all of us"
Dignity and justice for all of us is the theme of this year’s International Day for Persons with Disabilities, as well as for the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
Source:
UN Enable : Rights and Dignity of Persons with Disabilities
[ United Nations ]

Related link from
the Canadian Labour Congress:

New Study explores barriers faced by Canadians with Disabilities
Release marks International Day of Persons with Disabilities
December 3, 2008
OTTAWA – The Canadian Labour Congress has released a new study on the employment realities of Canadians with disabilities to mark today, December 3, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. The paper outlines the barriers to equal participation in society that Canadians with disabilities face, including exclusion from the workplace and a lack of accommodation in the workplace. (...) The study concludes by calling for changes to income support programs, which often leave people trapped in a choice between low benefits and working for poverty wages. The study also calls for new supports and services in the workplace, home and community as well as support from both employers and government for workplace accommodation.

Complete study:

Toward Inclusion of People with Disabilities
in theWorkplace
(PDF - 45K, 14 pages)
December 2008

- Go to the Disability Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm

6. Ontario Hunger Report 2008: The Leading Edge of the Storm - December 2008
(Ontario Association of Food Banks)

Ontario Hunger Report 2008: The Leading Edge of the Storm (PDF - 2MB, 24 pages)
December 2008
"(...) Key Trends:
1. Hundreds of thousands of Ontarians are forced to turn to food banks every month.
2. Working Ontarians, Ontario’s children, and Ontarians with disabilities are hit hard by hunger.
3. We have witnessed an alarming increase in the number of Ontarians turning to food banks this fall.
4. The price of food and energy has risen substantially in the past year and is the likely cause of increased usage coupled with economic decline.
5. Many food banks are struggling to meet demand."
Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB)
The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) is the umbrella organization for food banks across the province, representing over 100 members in communities across Ontario.

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

7. Poverty is making us sick : A comprehensive survey of income and health in Canada - December 2008
(Wellesley Institute and others)

Poverty is making us sick : A comprehensive survey
of income and health in Canada
(PDF - 522K, 39 pages)
By Ernie Lightman Ph.D, Andrew Mitchell and Beth Wilson
December 2008
"(...) the poorest one-fifth of Canadians, when compared to the richest twenty percent, have:
• more than double the rate of diabetes and heart disease;
• a sixty percent greater rate of two or more chronic health conditions;
• more than three times the rate of bronchitis;
• nearly double the rate of arthritis or rheumatism."
Source:
Partners in this report include:
Social Assistance in the New Economy
Wellesley Institute
Community Social Planning Council of Toronto

Related Toronto Star article:

Higher pay, better health
December 2, 2008
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Poverty is making Canadians sick, robbing thousands of their health and creating huge costs to the public health-care system, says a new report to be released today. But boosting incomes of the poor – even by $1,000 per year – can lead to significant health improvements, says the report by the University of Toronto's Social Assistance in the New Economy program. (...) The study, based on the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, found that every $1,000 increase in income for the poor resulted in nearly 10,000 fewer chronic health care problems.
Source:
healthzone.ca
[ part of the Toronto Star ]

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

8. The Forgotten Fundamentals [social programs as part of an economic stimulus package]- December 2008
(Caledon Institute of Social Policy)

The Forgotten Fundamentals (PDF - 47K, 5 pages)
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
December 2008
Strong social programs can play a vital part in an economic stimulus package. Ottawa has at its disposal several effective social programs that can play an important part in an economic stimulus package to combat the recession. Boosting three geared-to-income programs – the Canada Child Tax Benefit, refundable GST credit and Working Income Tax Benefit – would put additional money into the hands of lower-income households who are most likely to spend it immediately. Employment Insurance, which now serves only four in ten unemployed Canadians, must be restored and strengthened. Ottawa should also bolster its transfers to the hardest hit provinces and territories so that they do not bear the full burden of social assistance and other recession-linked cost increases.

[ All Caledon Institute reports - by date ]

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy does rigorous, high-quality research and analysis; seeks to inform and influence public opinion and to foster public discussion on poverty and social policy; and develops and promotes concrete, practicable proposals for the reform of social programs at all levels of government and of social benefits provided by employers and the voluntary sector.

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

9. Ontario Supports Registered Disability Savings Plans : McGuinty Government Helps Families Save For Children With Disabilities - November 30
(
Ontario Community and Social Services)

Ontario Supports Registered Disability Savings Plans
McGuinty Government Helps Families Save For Children With Disabilities

November 30, 2008
News Release
Ontario is making it possible for social assistance recipients to take advantage of Registered Disability Savings Plans (RDSPs). Like the Registered Education Savings Plan, RDSPs allow family members and loved ones to save money tax free until withdrawal. The program helps people plan for the future needs of children and adults with disabilities. Changes to Ontario’s social assistance rules will make sure that both RDSP assets and withdrawals are fully exempt.
This means:
* RDSP contributions do not impact eligibility for social assistance
* People on social assistance can take money out of an RDSP without affecting their social assistance payments. To further help social assistance recipients with disabilities save for their future, Ontario is also increasing the amount they can receive as a gift or payment from a trust from $5,000 to $6,000 a year.
Source:
Ontario Community and Social Services

Context:
In the determination of financial eligibility for needs-tested welfare or disability benefits, each province and territory decides how it will treat assets and income from various sources, both at the point of application and on an ongoing basis. The next link below opens a PDF file that provides a current (Dec. '08) overview of the treatment of the RDSP in all Canadian provinces and territories, and it includes links to the relevant source material in each jurisdiction

Provincial/Territorial Updates
Registered Disability Savings Plan
(PDF - 205K, 5 pages)
December 2008

Source:
Registered Disability Savings Plan
The Registered Disability Savings Plan is a savings plan designed specifically for people with disabilities in Canada. The first of its kind in the world, this new tax-deferred savings vehicle will assist families in planning for the long - term financial security of their relatives with disabilities.
- incl. links to : What is it? - How do I qualify? - Where do I get it?

Registered Disability Savings Plan Blog
"...everything you wanted to know about the RDSP"

Related links:

Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network (PLAN) is the non-profit organization that proposed, researched, and campaigned for the RDSP.
PLAN created and maintains the RDSP website and the RDSP Blog.

Registered Disability Savings Plan - from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
- incl. links to info about the Canada Disability Savings Grant, the Canada Disability Savings Bond and the RDSP
- also includes a link to Budget 2007 (Oct. 30/07) when the RDSP was first announced, and more...

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm
- Go to the Disability Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

10. PollutionWatch Fact Sheet: An examination of pollution and poverty in the Great Lakes Basin - November 27

An Examination of Pollution and Poverty in the Great Lakes Basin
November 2008
This PollutionWatch study examines the links between reported industrial air releases and income throughout the Great Lakes basin.
- incl. short abstract of the study and links to the complete report and fact sheets (all of which appear below)

People Living in Low Income Communities Likely to Face Greater Pollution Releases
New study examines links between pollution and poverty in Great Lakes basin and Toronto
News Release
November 27, 2008
Toronto, ON – People living in poverty in the Great Lakes basin may be experiencing an increased burden of high air pollution from industrial facilities in their communities, says a new study released today by the Canadian Environmental Law Association and Environmental Defence through the groups’ PollutionWatch project. The study, An Examination of Pollution and Poverty in the Great Lakes Basin, found 37 communities, known as census subdivisions, in the Great Lakes basin have high poverty rates at or above the national average (11.8%) and high releases of toxic air pollutants (over 100,000 kg) from industrial facilities.

Complete report:

An Examination of Pollution and Poverty
in the Great Lakes Basin
(PDF - 12.3MB[*see note below], 69 pages)
November 2008

Fact sheets:

PollutionWatch Fact Sheet:
An examination of pollution and poverty in the City of Toronto
(PDF - 5.2MB, 19 pages)

PollutionWatch Fact Sheet:
An Examination of Pollution and Poverty
in the Great Lakes Basin
(PDF - 2.1MB, 17 pages)
November 2008

Source:
PollutionWatch

Related link:

Poorest areas also most polluted, report shows
Study finds low-income families, already facing low levels of health, are placed at further risk
November 27, 2008
By Moira Welsh
Many of Toronto's poorest residents live near industries that spew the highest levels of toxic chemicals and pollutants into the air, a groundbreaking report has found. Low-income families, many already facing diminished health from stress, bad nutrition, diabetes and poor dental care, are placed at further risk because they breathe air contaminated with pollutants suspected of causing cancer and reproductive disorders, say the authors of the report.
Source:
The Toronto Star

*COMMENT re. filesizes:
According to the Download Speed Calculator, a 12.3MB file will take just over 30 minutes to download on a 56K dialup connection.
Sure, most of us who surf the Net using a broadband Internet connection will only wait three minutes or so (!?!) for this file to download, but it's possible to optimize PDF files for the Web so that they're smaller and easier to download for everyone, but especially for people with slower connections. Here's a 96-page report on health indicators (PDF - 96 pages) that's just over 2MB in size to prove that even complex pages can be converted into PDF without bloating the file size. My gratuitous advice to website administrators : if you see that your PDF file is larger than a few megs, try to strip down some of the fluff (colours, special fonts, etc.) to reduce the size of the final product.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

11. What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
---
Labour Force Survey, November 2008 - December 5
--- Study: Seniors in rural Canada, 1986 to 2006 - December 5
--- Leading causes of death, 2000 to 2004 - December 4
--- Study: Internet use and social and civic participation, 2003 to 2007 - December 4
--- Satellite account of non-profit institutions and volunteering, 1997 to 2005 - December 3
--- Aboriginal Peoples Survey: Inuit health and social conditions, 2006 - December 3
--- Canadian economic accounts, third quarter 2008 and September 2008 - December 1

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

December 5, 2008
Labour Force Survey, November 2008
Following little change in October, employment fell by 71,000 in November, with the decrease split between full- and part-time work. The unemployment rate rose 0.1 percentage points to 6.3%.
[ Labour Force Information ]
NOTE: the above link wasn't accessible on December 7 due to a database error on the StatCan server.

December 5, 2008
Study: Seniors in rural Canada, 1986 to 2006
Canada's rural population is aging faster than its urban population in terms of the share of senior citizens. Between 1996 and 2006, the number of rural seniors increased by 19%, compared with 23% for their urban counterparts.
[ Seniors in rural Canada ]
NOTE: the above link wasn't accessible on December 7 due to a database error on the StatCan server.

December 4, 2008
Leading causes of death, 2000 to 2004
Cancer and heart disease, the two leading causes of death for Canadians, were responsible for just over one-half (52.4%) of all deaths in 2004. However, the leading causes of death varied widely by age group.

December 4, 2008
Study: Internet use and social and civic participation, 2003 to 2007
Canadian Internet users tend to have large personal networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend less time face-to-face with others, and more time online. Many are using the World Wide Web in ways that facilitate social and civic participation, such as making contact with others and finding out about their communities.
[ Complete study ]
NOTE: the above link wasn't accessible on December 7 due to a database error on the StatCan server.

December 3, 2008
Satellite account of non-profit institutions and volunteering, 1997 to 2005
Economic output in the core non-profit sector increased 4.7% in 2005, slower than the 6.5% growth in the nation's economy as a whole.
[ Complete report ]
NOTE: the above link wasn't accessible on December 7 due to a database error on the StatCan server.

December 3, 2008
Aboriginal Peoples Survey: Inuit health and social conditions, 2006
For adults in all age groups, Inuit were less likely to report excellent or very good health than were their counterparts in the total Canadian population. There were no differences between Inuit men and women.
[ Complete article ]

December 1, 2008
Canadian economic accounts, third quarter 2008 and September 2008
Real gross domestic product increased 0.3% in the third quarter, after remaining essentially flat over the first half of the year. Most of the third quarter gain occurred in July. Economic activity edged up 0.1% in September following a decline in August.
[ Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review ]

The Daily Archives - select a month from the drop-down menu to view releases for that month in chronological order

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

12. Liberal/NDP Coalition crisis stories
(CBC News)

Liberal/NDP Coalition crisis stories
50+ links to CBC articles going back to November 20, 2008.
Everything you wanted to know about the current Canadian Parliamentary crisis.
And more.
Source:
CBC News

COMMENT:
Gilles' Fantasy Alternate Scenario and Outcome:
* Finance Minister tables economic statement (Nov. 27): Opposition parties do the requisite public huffing and puffing, but they're working discreetly behind the scene negotiating an agreement for a coalition that includes both Liberals and NDP, with Bloc québécois commitment of support on matters of confidence. All parties concur that the draft agreement will remain confidential until it is needed, and that the "stock answer" to media enquiries about coalitions will be that political parties work together all the time on a wide range of issues, including on contingency plans in the event of a non-confidence defeat of the government.
* Dec. 8 - First non-confidence motion : Unified Opposition parties defeat the Conservative government. (Yay!)
* Dec. 9 - Prime Minister asks Governor-General to dissolve Parliament and call an election.
* Dec. 9 - Opposition parties present to the G-G the agreement that they signed (Libs, NDP) or supported (BQ)
* G-G deems that the coalition is offering political stability in a time of turmoil and recognizes the Coalition leader as new Prime Minister.
And everyone lives happily ever after.
(Or at least those of us in the "poverty industry"...)
The difference between my fantasy and reality?
In my fantasy there's no fanfare, no rhetoric, and no public document or coalition announcement until the result of the non-confidence vote triggers the whole coalition process and details are made public.
(Oh yeah - that, AND replace hapless Stéphane Dion --- soon. I'm just sayin'.)
Parliamentary democracy at its finest.

- Go to the 2008 Federal Election and General Political Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2008_fed_election.htm

13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - December 3

From the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):

December 3, 2008

Why Canada can’t work without good child care: How early childhood education and care supports the economy
3 Dec 08
- New BRIEFing Note from CRRU discussing the economic benefits of an accessible, good quality early childhood education and care system.

The forgotten fundamentals
3 Dec 08
- Report from The Caledon Institute of Social Policy on how social programs can act as fundamental supports for both the economic and society.

Making the road as we go: Parents and professional partners managing diversity in early childhood education
3 Dec 08
- Report from the Bernard van Leer Foundation discussing the experiences of the Parents and Diversity project carried out in the Netherlands.

Let’s put a national child care strategy back on the agenda
3 Dec 08
- Article and press release from the Canadian Paediatric Society urging governments to develop a national strategy on early childhood education and care.

Well Beings: A guide to health in child care
3 Dec 08
- New guide from Caring for Kids with the latest information, evidence and best practices in child care.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Constitution and precedent are on coalition’s side [CA]
3 Dec 08

· Child poverty soars in suburbs [CA-ON]
2 Dec 08

· Should child care be at mercy of market? [AU]
28 Nov 08

· Canada is put to shame … but do we care? [CA]
27 Nov 08

· The view from the west [CA]
26 Nov 08

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(
Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S). ===> the content of this link changes twice a week
IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches twice a week. Each issue of the dispatch provides links to U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media.

December 4, 2008
* State Budgets and the Economy
* Increasing Need for Food Assistance
* Funding for School Lunch Program - California
* State Medicaid Programs - Kentucky, Nevada
* Homeless Families - Florida, Michigan
* Foster Care Programs
* Report: Self-Sufficiency Standard - Colorado
* Report: Affordability of Higher Education
* Poverty Reduction Plan - Ontario, CA
* Paid Family Leave
* Report: U.S. Health Rankings

December 1, 2008
* States and Federal Aid
* Cuts to Social Service Programs and Agencies
* Eligibility Process for Social Services - Indiana
* Trends in Poverty Rates
* Poverty Measurement - Tucson, AZ
* Editorials: Economic Crisis and the Poor
* Food Stamp Program
* Homelessness and Housing
* Child Care Costs and the Low-income
* State Medicaid Programs, Premiums, and Copays
* State Health Insurance Programs
* Health of Children Displaced by Hurricane Katrina
* Poor School Districts and Qualified Teachers
* Report: Assessment of Charter Schools - Minnesota
* Foreclosures and Evictions

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

If you wish to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail,
please send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

15. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content

APO Weekly Briefing
The content of this page changes each week, and it includes links to a few book/report reviews, about two dozen new reports, a few job ads and 60 events (mostly conferences) of interest to social researchers...
Source:
Australian Policy Online (APO) - home page
With nearly 120 member centres and institutes, Australian Policy Online offers easy access to much of the best Australian social, economic, cultural and political research available online.
NOTE: the APO home page includes links to the five most popular reports on the APO website, and this list is updated each week.

APO Archive
The APO archive is grouped into 23 subject areas, with entries appearing in reverse chronological order.
* Ageing *Asia and the pacific * Citizenship and the law * Disability * Economics and trade * Education * Employment and workplace relations * The environment * Foreign policy and defence * Gender and sexuality * Health * Housing * Families and households * Immigration and refugees * Income, poverty and wealth * Indigenous * Media, communications and cultural policy * Politics and government * Population, multiculturalism and ethnicity * Religion and faith * Rural and regional * Science and technology * Social policy * Urban and regional planning * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

16. CRINMAIL - November 2008
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

4 December 2008 - CRINMAIL 1039
* UNITED KINGDOM: Police DNA database violates children's privacy rights says European Court [breaking news]
* CLUSTER BOMBS: 92 nations sign ban; US, Russia don't [news]
* EGYPT: Forced religious conversion of children under scrutiny of African Commission's [news]
* UN HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL: Questionnaire on human rights education and training [call for information]
* SEXUAL EXPLOITATION: Recovery and reintegration of children [publication]
* EURONET: Stop corporal punishment [campaign]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

2 December 2008 - CRINMAIL 1038
* WORLD AIDS DAY: 20th anniversary [news]
* AFRICA: Break the silence - prevent sexual exploitation and abuse in and around schools in Africa [publication]
* GUANTANAMO BAY: US acknowledges it held 12 juveniles at Guantanamo [news]
* KENYA: Torture Committee addresses violence against children [news]
* WORLD CONGRESS III closes on unfinished business [news]
* SUDAN: Arbitrary arrest and detention, including of children, rife [publication]
* UNITED STATES: Mini-grants available for programmes on positive discipline [call for applications]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 300+ earlier weekly issues
, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


*************************

More New Vocabulary...

*************************

CARPERPETUATION (kar' pur pet u a shun) n. The act, when vacuuming, of running over a string or a piece of lint at least a dozen times, reaching over and picking it up, examining it, then putting it back down to give the vacuum one more chance.

DISCONFECT (dis kon fekt') v. To sterilize the piece of candy you dropped on the floor by blowing on it, somehow assuming this will "remove" all the germs.

ECNALUBMA (ek na lub' ma) n. A rescue vehicle which can only be seen in the rearview mirror.

EIFFELITES (eye' ful eyetz) n. Gangly people sitting in front of you at the movies who, no matter what direction you lean, follow suit.

ELBONICS (el bon' iks) n. The actions of two people maneuvering for one armrest at a movie theater.

ELECELLERATION (el a cel er ay' shun) n. The mistaken notion that the more you press an elevator button the faster it will arrive.

FRUST (frust) n. The small line of debris that refuses to be swept onto the dust pan and keeps backing a person across the room until he finally decides to give up and sweep it under the rug.

LACTOMANGULATION (lak' to man gyu lay' shun) n. Manhandling the "open here" spout on a milk container so badly that one has to resort to the "illegal side ".

PEPPIER (pehp ee ay') n. The waiter at a fancy restaurant whose sole purpose seems to be walking around asking diners if they want ground pepper.

PHONESIA (fo nee' zhuh) n. The affliction of dialing a phone number and forgetting whom you were calling just as they answer.

PUPKUS (pup' kus) n. The moist residue left on a window after a dog presses its nose to it.

TELECRASTINATION (tel e kras tin ay' shun) n. The act of always letting the phone ring at least twice before you pick it up, even when you're only six inches away.

Source:
http://www.c4vct.com/kym/humor/mnvocab.htm

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And, in closing...

***************************

H. M., an Unforgettable Amnesiac, Dies at 82
December 4, 2008
http://tinyurl.com/5z36my
(Groundhog Day and Fifty Dates rolled into one!)

TIME's Best Inventions of 2008
http://tinyurl.com/6palq5

YouTube:
Playing For Change: Song Around the World "Stand By Me"
http://www.playingforchange.com/

The Best of the Internet Today
http://www.jimmyr.com/