Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 8, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,513 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Ontario : Latest welfare statistics (November 2011) and analysis by John Stapleton - January 6
2. SPARmonitor : January 4, 2012 (SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto)
--- Paid and Unpaid Work over Three Generations
--- The Recession’s Ongoing Impact on America’s Children
--- Canada’s CEO Elite 100: The 0.01%
--- Income Inequality in Western Canada
--- Common Ground: A Strategy for Moving Forward on Poverty Reduction
--- Ending Violence against Aboriginal Women and Girls
3. Canada's CEO Elite 100 : The 0.01% (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) -

4. Recent blog posts from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):
---
Social Insurance Benefits Increase for 2012, by Andrew Jackson
--- Flaherty’s Christmas List — all Mixed Up, by Toby Sanger
--- Is Money Enough? The Meaning of 6% and Flaherty’s Health “Plan”, by Armine Yalnizyan
--- Government intervention needed to address youth unemployment, by Graham Cox
--- Sitting on the Sidelines: Young People Miss Out on the Recovery
--- A Progressive Alternative to the Harper Agenda
, by Andrew Jackson
January 3
5. BC Poverty Reduction Coalition - new site launched
6. [British Columbia] Surrey MLA Starts Month on Welfare (Raise the Rates) - January 6
7. MyPermissions.org - a great new privacy tool (for Facebook, Twitter, etc.)

8.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour Force Survey, December 2011 - January 6
--- Do Relative Canada/U.S. Prices Equate to the Exchange Rate? - January 4
--- New Evidence on Exchange-rate-adjusted Prices in Canada - January 4

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
11. The Latest on Inequality from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities - January 4
12. LIS (formerly known as the Luxembourg Income Study)
13. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm



1. Ontario : Latest welfare statistics (November 2011) and analysis by John Stapleton

Ontario : Latest welfare statistics (November 2011) and analysis by John Stapleton
January 6, 2012

Ontario Works provides employment and financial assistance to people who are in temporary financial need.
The Ontario Disability Support Program was designed to meet the income and employment support needs of people with disabilities.

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NOTE : For more information about how welfare works in Ontario,
see the Guide to Welfare in Ontario page:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onwelf.htm

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The caseload reports:

Ontario Works (OW) Caseload, November 2011 (PDF - 156K, 1 page
http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/documents/en/mcss/social/reports/OW_EN_2011-11.pdf
- OW caseloads and Beneficiaries by family structure, April 2009 to November 2011

Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Caseload, November 2011 (PDF - 156K, 1 page)
http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/documents/en/mcss/social/reports/ODSP_EN_2011-11.pdf
- ODSP caseloads and Beneficiaries by family structure, April 2009 to November 2011

Source:
Social assistance in Ontario: Reports
http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/social/reports/index.aspx
Ministry of Community and Social Services
http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss

------------------------------------------------------

Analysis of the November OW and ODSP
caseload statistics by John Stapleton:

It is worth repeating that as we watch Ontario Works caseloads come into post recession equilibrium in 2011, the total increase in percentage of population receiving social assistance starting in October 2008 (beginning of the recession) is one percentage point from 5.5% to 6.5% of Ontario's population, making the Great Recession of 2008-09 roughly equal to the recession of 1980 -82 in welfare caseload growth terms. (see attached excel)

The puzzle to solve is why, from a welfare perspective, the two big caseload run ups were in the Great Depression (15.5% of population in July 1935) and the 1990-92 recession (13.9% of population in March 1994).

Level of unemployment doesn't fully solve the puzzle as unemployment stood at 10.4% of population in 1983 when 5.2% of population received social assistance, with unemployment rates almost as high as in 1992 and 1993 (10.8% and 10.9% respectively).

EI changes don't solve the puzzle as EI was much easier to get in the early 1990's than it is now.

Social assistance rates don't solve the puzzle as rates rose sharply ahead of inflation in the 1970's and early 1980's and were (adjusted for inflation) much higher than they are now and were only slightly higher in real terms in the early 1990's.

Changes in eligibility requirements may partially give us answers but there just does not appear to be enough to explain why the 1990's run-up almost equaled levels we only saw in the mid 1930's. Eligibility was easier in the early 1990's but only slightly easier than the early 1980's. Eligibility is much tougher now but it's also tougher to get EI.

Although it was always clear this time around that the Depression-like extreme increases in caseloads the 1990's would not be repeated, the degree to which the latest recession resulted in such (relatively) benign changes in caseload (relative to unemployment and other economic indicators) is nothing short of breathtaking.

The only two real changes one can point to remain:
- increases to the minimum wage relative to social assistance rates - the single welfare rate was 70% of minimum wage in 1991 and about 36% now; and
- the spectacular structural changes taking place within the caseloads - the upsurge in singles relative to continued reductions in family and sole support parent cases would still appear to be the largest single key to solving the puzzle over the last 31 years (that we report on here) and the three major recessions during that time.

Source:
John Stapleton
Open Policy
http://www.openpolicyontario.com/

[ John Stapleton worked for the Ontario Government in the Ministry of Community and Social Services and its predecessors for 28 years in the areas of social assistance policy and operations.]

---

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. SPARmonitor : January 4, 2012
(SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto)
--- Paid and Unpaid Work over Three Generations
--- The Recession’s Ongoing Impact on America’s Children
--- Canada’s CEO Elite 100: The 0.01%
--- Income Inequality in Western Canada
--- Common Ground: A Strategy for Moving Forward on Poverty Reduction
--- Ending Violence against Aboriginal Women and Girls

From the
City of Toronto:

SPAR Monitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]
This bi-weekly bulletin is a quick inventory of recent social research information. Its purpose is to promptly
disseminate the most current external and internal research relevant to social policy.

SPARmonitor : January 4, 2012 (PDF - 136K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_71.pdf
Table of contents of this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)
* Paid and Unpaid Work over Three Generations
* The Recession’s Ongoing Impact on America’s Children
* Canada’s CEO Elite 100: The 0.01%
* Income Inequality in Western Canada
* Common Ground: A Strategy for Moving Forward on Poverty Reduction
* Ending Violence against Aboriginal Women and Girls
Source:
SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/spar-archives.htm
- includes links to bulletins from January to March 2011 (more to come) and to all 33 issues of SPARmonitor for 2010.

[ Social Development, Finance & Administration
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/index.htm ]

[ City of Toronto:
http://www.toronto.ca/ ]

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

3. Canada's CEO Elite 100 : The 0.01% - January 3
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

 

From the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

CEOs vs the 99%: No contest when it comes to pay
http://goo.gl/g4L4R
News Release
January 3, 2012
TORONTO—The highest paid 100 CEOs on Canada’s TSX Index had reason to cheer the New Year: By noon January 3, they had already pocketed $44,366 – what it takes the average wage earner an entire year to make.
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ (CCPA) annual look at CEO compensation reveals Canada’s Elite 100 CEOs pocketed an average $8.38 million in 2010 – a 27% increase over the average $6.6 million they took in 2009.

The first link below this box is to the CCPA report.

[Click anywhere in the above screen for a 40-second video from CCPA : The Clash for the Cash ]

Canada's CEO Elite 100 : The 0.01% (PDF - 694K, 21 pages)
http://goo.gl/OenI0
By Hugh Mackenzie
January 3, 2012
Excerpt from p. 14:

Ed Broadbent, the originator of Canada’s commitment to end child poverty in 1989, has argued higher taxes on excessive compensation could provide the financial resources to fund a targeted plan to reduce, and potentially eliminate, the depth of poverty among Canadian families with children. But even without taking the step of raising taxes for Canada’s well-compensated CEOs, there is one simple thing Canada could do to curb CEOs’ enthusiasm—and their take-home pay. We could end the public subsidy of excessive CEO pay packages by getting rid of the loophole that allows the proceeds from cashing in stock options to be taxed as if they were capital gains—at half the normal rate—rather than as ordinary income.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The CCPA is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice.

-----------------------

Related links:

Richest CEOs earn 189 times average Canadian
Top 100 executives earned about $8.38M each in 2010

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2012/01/03/business-ceo-pay.html
January 3, 2012
Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/

---

Top Canadian CEOs got 27 per cent pay hike
http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1109514--highest-paid-canadian-ceos-got-27-per-cent-pay-hike
January 2, 2012
By noon on Tuesday, Jan. 3, the highest-paid chief executives officers in Canada will have earned as much as the average Canadian makes in an entire year, according to a new report.
The top 100 Canadian CEOs were paid an average of $8.4 million in 2010, a 27 per cent increase over the previous year, the report published Tuesday by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives says. In comparison, the average Canadian earned $44,366 that year, or 1.1 per cent more than in 2009, the report called Canada’s CEO Elite 100 notes.
Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

- Go to the Banks and Business Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bookmrk3.htm

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

4. Recent blog posts from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):
---
Social Insurance Benefits Increase for 2012, by Andrew Jackson
--- Flaherty’s Christmas List — all Mixed Up, by Toby Sanger
--- Is Money Enough? The Meaning of 6% and Flaherty’s Health “Plan”, by Armine Yalnizyan
--- Government intervention needed to address youth unemployment, by Graham Cox
--- Sitting on the Sidelines: Young People Miss Out on the Recovery
--- A Progressive Alternative to the Harper Agenda
, by Andrew Jackson

Recent blog posts from the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

CCPA's national blog, Behind the Numbers [ http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/ ], delivers timely, progressive commentary on issues that affect Canadians, including the economy, poverty, inequality, climate change, budgets, taxes, public services, employment and much more. Throughout December, our bloggers were busy!

Go behind the numbers with these latest posts:

* Social Insurance Benefits Increase for 2012, by Andrew Jackson
December 31st, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/31/social-insurance-benefits-increase-for-2012/

* Flaherty’s Christmas List — all Mixed Up, by Toby Sanger
December 23rd, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/23/flahertys-christmas-list-all-mixed-up/

* Is Money Enough? The Meaning of 6% and Flaherty’s Health “Plan”, by Armine Yalnizyan
December 21st, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/21/is-money-enough-the-meaning-of-6-and-flahertys-health-plan/

* Government intervention needed to address youth unemployment, by Graham Cox
December 20th, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/20/government-intervention-needed-to-address-youth-unemployment/

* Sitting on the Sidelines: Young People Miss Out on the Recovery, by Andrew Jackson
December 15th, 2011
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/12/15/sitting-on-the-sidelines-young-people-miss-out-on-the-recovery/

* A Progressive Alternative to the Harper Agenda, by Andrew Jackson
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/2011/11/18/progressive-alternative-harper-agenda/
November 18, 2011

Source:
Behind the Numbers.ca --- A blog from the CCPA
http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

5. BC Poverty Reduction Coalition - new site launched

The BC Poverty Reduction Coalition has recently re-launched is website --- check it out!

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/
We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour organizations, and social policy groups. We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness.

25 Member organizations of the Coalition:
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/about-2/coalition-members/
(List only, no links)

350 supporting organizations that have
joined the call for a poverty reduction plan:
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/about-2/organizations/
(List only, no links)

Join the Call for a comprehensive and
accountable poverty reduction plan in British Columbia:
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/take-action-2/join-the-call/
Join others, including over 350 organizations with a collective membership of over 300,000 people throughout the province, who are asking for a poverty reduction plan. Together we can make a difference!

Recommended targets and timelines:
*
Reduce BC’s poverty rate by 30% within four years, and by 75% within 10 years.
* Ensure the poverty rate for children, lone-mother households, single senior women, Aboriginal people, people with disabilities and mental illness, and recent immigrants and refugees likewise declines by 30% in four years, and by 75% in ten years, in recognition that poverty is concentrated in these populations.
* Within two years, ensure that every British Columbian has an income that reaches at least 75% of the poverty line.
* Within two years, ensure no one has to sleep outside, and end all homelessness within eight years (ensuring all homeless people have good quality, appropriate housing).

Provincial Poverty Reduction Plans
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/poverty-reduction-plans/
Recommended reading!
---- includes information and many links to related documents for all provinces and territories with a poverty reduction plan
---- breakdown of poverty plans across Canada, and highlights the fact that BC is one of the last provinces without one and we still have the highest rate of poverty in Canada. Other places are saving money and lives by tackling the issue of poverty head-on and it's time for us to step up too.

The Cost of Poverty
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/cost-of-poverty/
- includes : * Inequality * Health * Housing * Crime * Children
- outlines the cost of poverty BC faces as a province and emphasizes that poverty reduction is cheaper in the long-run than paying for all the negative consequences of poverty

Reports and studies about poverty in BC (from various sources)
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/learn-more/resources/
- links to key reports about the effects of poverty in BC

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/BCPovertyReductionCoalition

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

6. [British Columbia] Surrey MLA Starts Month on Welfare - January 6
(Raise the Rates)

Surrey MLA Starts Month on Welfare
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/2012/01/surrey-mla-starts-month-on-welfare/
January 6, 2012
When Raise the Rates [ http://www.raisetherates.org/ ] challenged any BC MLA to live on welfare for one month, only one MLA took up the call. Surrey NDP MLA Jagrup Brar started his month on welfare on January 1st with a backpack and two quarters. He has to find a place to live and survive on $610 a month, the income assistance amount designated for a single person who is expected to work. He plans on spending half the month in Surrey and the other half in a single room in the Downtown Eastside.

You can follow his journey on MLA Welfare Challenge [ http://mlaonwelfare.com/ ],
where he posts a daily blog about his experience and the people he meets.

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/

BC Poverty Reduction Coalition Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/BCPovertyReductionCoalition

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

7. MyPermissions.org - a great new privacy tool (for Facebook, Twitter, etc.)

MyPermissions.org - a great new privacy helper for (selected) social media networks
http://mypermissions.org/

Do you have an account with Facebook, Twitter, Google, Yahoo, Linkedin, etc.?
Do you value your privacy?
I value my privacy.
Here's why I don't trust Facebook anymore:

"Any application that gets permission to access your profile information potentially puts that information at risk. And, in the case of Facebook, it could put your friends' information at risk, as well. Any permissions can be dangerous, but Facebook is particularly worrisome, given the high number of users who are happy to give their personal information to strangers. (...) That personal information can be used for identity theft. It can be used for a mind-boggling array of other nastiness, as well. Bill Pringle has a nice compilation page of Facebook security issues, but lest we forget, the other social media sites can be used in similar mischievous ways."
Source:
SOPHOS
http://www.sophos.com/en-us/
[ Internet security service --- news, opinion, advice and research on computer security issues and the latest internet threats]

MyPermissions.org [ http://mypermissions.org/ ] helps you to control the horde of applications and sites to which you've granted permission to access your personal information on Twitter, Facebook and more.

More information from SOPHOS about MyPermissions
http://goo.gl/tA1c6

---
Personal testimonial: This tool works like a charm - I didn't even realize that over time, I'd given permission to access my profile information to over a dozen different apps --- and that means over a dozen companies, most with products to sell and some with malware to distribute. I wiped them all out in 30 seconds. I heartily recommend MyPermissions.org !

Start 2012 by Taking 2 Minutes to Clean Your Apps Permissions!
http://mypermissions.org/

---

Special security information for Facebook users:

Facebook security issues
http://billpringle.com/home/facebook.html
* Never type anything into a computer that you wouldn't want your mother to read.
* Don't put sensitive information in your profile
* Refuse to let any application access your profile
(bolding added)
* Don't click on any link
* Don't use Internet Explorer

To my Facebook Friends who occasionally post a message on
my Wall inviting me to play a game or access a greeting card (sorry, Maxine...):
In order to play or access that card, I'm required to grant permission to the application to access my profile information. The author of the above article on Facebook security presents a compelling case for fewer Facebook permissions, or none. I agree. If that means that I can't join you in a game of Scrabulous or open your greeting card, I'm sorry. But you can always reach me by email - my address is at the bottom of each page on my site and on my weekly newsletter...
By Gilles

---

- Go to the Web Authoring and Editing Tools page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/webkmrk.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour Force Survey, December 2011 - January 6
--- Do Relative Canada/U.S. Prices Equate to the Exchange Rate?
- January 4
--- New Evidence on Exchange-rate-adjusted Prices in Canada - January 4

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

-----------------------------

January 6, 2012
Labour Force Survey, December 2011

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120106/dq120106a-eng.htm
Following two months of declines, employment rose slightly in December, up 18,000. The unemployment rate edged up to 7.5% as more people participated in the labour market. Over the past 12 months, employment growth totalled 1.2% (+199,000), with nearly all of the gains in the first half of the year.
- includes links to three tables:
* Labour force characteristics by age and sex
* Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS)
* Labour force characteristics by province

Related report:

Labour Force Information
December 4 to 10, 2011

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/71-001-x/71-001-x2011012-eng.htm
Table of contents:
Highlights
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/71-001-x/2011012/aftertoc-aprestdm1-eng.htm
Analysis — December 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/71-001-x/2011012/part-partie1-eng.htm
Tables
Charts
Data quality, concepts and methodology
User information
Related products
PDF version (440K, 60 pages)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/71-001-x/71-001-x2011012-eng.pdf

[ earlier reports in this series:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=71-001-X&chropg=1&lang=eng ]

Source:
Labour Force Information - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=71-001-X&lang=eng
This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=2621&lang=eng&more=0

* Employment and unemployment
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2621&id=1803&lang=eng&more=0

January 4, 2012
Study: Comparing Canadian and US price levels
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120104/dq120104a-eng.htm
Canada and the United States share one of the longest borders in the world, their economies are intertwined, and trade between them is extensive. Consequently, Canadian consumers have a widely held expectation that the prices they pay for many products should be roughly equal to US prices, after adjusting for the exchange rate.

Two studies released today examine comparative price levels between the two countries.

1. Do Relative Canada/U.S. Prices Equate to the Exchange Rate?
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-626-x/11-626-x2012003-eng.htm
... analyses the extent to which relative differences in prices between the two countries have reflected the market exchange rate over the last 40 years. It is based on concepts and methods from the Purchasing Power Parity Program.

2. New Evidence on Exchange-rate-adjusted Prices in Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-626-x/11-626-x2012002-eng.htm
... examines the Canada–United States comparative price level. This is defined as the ratio of the final selling price in Canada to the final selling price in the United States, adjusted for differences in the exchange rate.

Source:
Economic Insights - product main page
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=11-626-XWE&lang=eng
Articles in the Economic Insights series highlight issues related to the growth and development of Canada's economy. In some cases, these articles synthesize the results of previous research carried out by Statistics Canada; in others, they provide contextual information that accompanies the release of new data. The Economic Insights series features concise examinations of economic events, trends, and important structural changes in the economy.

Similar studies from the Economic Analysis Division:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/economicanalysis

Related subjects:

* Economic accounts
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3764&lang=eng&more=0

* Prices and price indexes
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3956&lang=eng&more=0

* Intercity and international price comparisons
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=3956&id=3965&lang=eng&more=0

The Daily Archives
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

January 7, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

A historical snapshot of inequality in Canada
http://goo.gl/Vm4XX
6 Jan 2012
This week's Know Thy History looks back at the inequalities between various groups that have been constant themes in Canada; a universal system of high quality ECEC has a key role to play in addressing these inequities.

The impact of austerity measures on households with children (U.K.)
http://goo.gl/QvOgg
6 Jan 2012
Report from Family & Parenting Institute analyses the impact of tax and benefit changes in the UK; findings show "low-income households with children, particularly non-working lone parent households, lose more as a percentage of income on average from tax and benefit changes."

The next six years: The first six years: Start Strong Ireland conference 2011
http://goo.gl/qHMUN
5 Jan 2012
Presentations from the annual conference of Start Strong Ireland; a wide range of organisations and individuals discuss current issues and future strategies for ECEC.

Starting strong III: A quality toolbox for early childhood education and care
http://goo.gl/kFe5V
4 Jan 2012
Major new publication from OECD focuses on quality issues; aims to define quality and outlines five policy levers that can enhance it in ECEC.

Canada's CEO elite 100: The 0.01% 3 Jan 2012
http://goo.gl/EHWEk
In CCPA's annual look at CEO compensation, Hugh Mackenzie argues that "the gap between Canada’s CEO Elite 100 and the rest of us is growing at a fast and steady pace, to date impervious to a tumultuous global economic reality with no signs of abating."

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Couples with children to be hardest hit by coalition tax and benefit changes
http://goo.gl/8ObQS
4 Jan 2012 Europe

People think good policies happen almost by magic
http://goo.gl/N7Qag
4 Jan 2012 Europe

End tax break for Canadian executives’ stock options, report urges
http://goo.gl/YLdMv
3 Jan 2012 Canada

The high cost of poverty
http://goo.gl/XZybt
3 Jan 2012 Ontario

Early schooling is a good thing
http://goo.gl/7H6Uh
3 Jan 2012 Canada

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

January 6:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/06/
Economic Mobility in the US
Joblessness and Unemployment
Child Support Formula - Illinois

January 5:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/05/
Jobless Benefits and Unemployment - Wisconsin, Michigan
Medicaid Enrollment - Colorado

January 4:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/04/
Incarceration for Child Support Debt - Georgia
Food Banks and SNAP - Georgia
Child Welfare Reform

January 3:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/03/
Welfare Reform - California
State Medicaid Programs
State Minimum Wages

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date. (Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.)
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that will allow you to scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

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NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. The Latest on Inequality from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities - January 4

From the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities'
Off the Charts Blog:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/

The Latest on Inequality
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/the-latest-on-inequality/
January 4, 2012
As our colleague Jared Bernstein has discussed (see links below), an informative new report by the Congressional Research Service (CRS) [ http://www.loc.gov/crsinfo/ ] analyzes the rise in income inequality between 1996 and 2006. Like other recent reports, CRS found that income growth at the top far outpaced growth elsewhere on the income ladder.
The CRS report finds:
* The single biggest contributor to the growth of inequality during that period was the growth in capital gains and dividend income, which are highly concentrated at the top of the income scale.
* The tax system did less to alleviate rising inequality in 2006 than it did a decade earlier.
The CRS study echoes findings by the Congressional Budget Office that income inequality has grown dramatically in the past three decades.
- includes links to several more studies, both American and international.

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By Jared Bernstein:

Another Excellent Inequality Study
http://jaredbernsteinblog.com/another-excellent-inequality-study/
January 1, 2012

Dividends, Capital Gains, and the Growth of Income Inequality
http://jaredbernsteinblog.com/dividends-capital-gains-and-the-growth-of-income-inequality/
January 2, 2012

---

The Congressional Research Service report:

Changes in the Distribution of Income Among Tax Filers Between 1996 and 2006:
The Role of Labor Income, Capital Income, and Tax Policy
(PDF - 364K, 22 pages)
http://taxprof.typepad.com/files/crs-1.pdf
By Thomas L. Hungerford
December 29, 2011

---

Exploring Income Inequality Series:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/tag/income-inequality-series/
Part 1: Overview
(November 28, 2011)
Part 2: The Loss of Shared Prosperity
(November 29, 2011)
Part 3: Widening Inequality Since the 1970s
(November 30, 2011)
Part 4: More on the Widening of Inequality Since the 1970s
(December 1, 2011)
Part 5: The Concentration of Income and Wealth
(December 2, 2011)

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

12. LIS (formerly known as the Luxembourg Income Study)

LIS (Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg)
http://www.lisproject.org/
LIS, formerly known as The Luxembourg Income Study, is a data archive and research center dedicated to cross-national analysis.
Our mission is to enable, facilitate, promote, and conduct cross-national comparative research on socio-economic outcomes and on the institutional factors that shape those outcomes. LIS is home to two databases, the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) Database, and the Luxembourg Wealth Study (LWS) Database. The Luxembourg Income Study Database (LIS), under constant expansion, is the largest available database of harmonised microdata collected from multiple countries over a period of decades. The newer Luxembourg Wealth Study Database (LWS), is the only cross-national wealth microdatabase in existence.
[ The LIS Database : http://www.lisdatacenter.org/our-data/lis-database/ ]
[ The LWS Database : http://www.lisdatacenter.org/our-data/lws-database/ ]

Selected site content:

Policies to Reduce Child Poverty :
Chilld Allowances VS Tax Exemptions for Children
(PDF - 208K, 15 pages)
http://www.lisdatacenter.org/wps/liswps/558.pdf
By Steven Pressman (Professor of Economics & Finance, Monmouth University, West Long Branch, NJ)
March 2011
In 2009, 20.7% of US children were officially poor. Since the late 1970s, child poverty in the US has averaged 20%, far exceeding the poverty rates for other age groups; it also exceeds child poverty in other developed countries (Smeeding and Torrey 1988; Pressman 2010).  (...) This paper looks at how the state can help reduce child poverty. It examines two policies that aid families with children-- child allowances and tax exemptions for children. It then calculates the poverty-reducing impact of both, and simulates the impact of some possible child allowance programs on child poverty in the US.
Source:
LIS Working Papers
http://www.lisdatacenter.org/working-papers/

Browse or search 600+ LIS working papers
http://www.lisdatacenter.org/lis-wp-webapp/app/search-workingpapers
TIP: narrow your search for papers by series, author, year, keyword or country
OR click on the Send button without checking any boxes to see the whole collection of papers.

Source:
LIS
http://www.lisproject.org/

---

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

13. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/

Children's rights Wiki - from CRIN
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php
The Children's Rights Wiki assembles all information about children's rights in every country in one place. The purpose of the project is to make the huge volume of information that exists on children's rights more accessible, assist children's rights advocates in identifying persistent violations, and inspire collective action. This is a web-based, multi-lingual and interactive project.
More about the project:
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php?title=Questions_and_Answers

---

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter
Latest issue:

-----------------------------------------------

4 January 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1257
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4030
[Detailed month-by-month news of challenges and accomplishments in the area of of children's rights in the world during 2011 --- includes links for further study.]
In this issue:
Dear Readers,
Welcome to 2012 and our yearly look back at the highs and lows for children's rights in the past year. From the rise of landmark global instruments to the fall of long-standing dictatorships, 2011 brought momentous developments. While we celebrate positive legal reform in some areas of human and children’s rights, we also lament notable regressions. But, not letting these cloud our hopes for children’s rights in the year ahead, we look forward to what it has in store for CRIN and for children’s rights globally, including the mission to get States to ratify the complaints mechanism for children under the CRC! For a more in-depth recap of CRIN's work in the past year and the events that shaped it, check out our 2010-2011 annual report:

CRIN Annual Report 2010-2011 (PDF - 700K, 38 pages)
http://www.crin.org/docs/CRIN_Annual_2010-2011.pdf

-----------------------------------------------

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)
http://www.crin.org/email/

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://www.crin.org/

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

TOP 25 PUNS CHOSEN BY
THE READERS OF "PUN OF THE DAY'

1. I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. Then it hit me.

2. I'm reading a book about anti-gravity. It's impossible to put it down.

3. Did you hear about the guy whose whole left side was cut off? He's all right now.

4. It's not that the man did not know how to juggle, he just didn't have the balls to do it.

5. I couldn't quite remember how to throw a boomerang, but eventually it came back to me.

6. There was a sign on the lawn at a drug re-hab center that said 'Keep off the Grass'.

7. I was going to look for my missing watch, but I could never find the time.

8. I used to have a fear of hurdles, but I got over it.

9. A hole has been found in the nudist camp wall. The police are looking into it.

10. Police were called to a daycare where a three-year-old was resisting a rest.

11. To write with a broken pencil is pointless.

12. He drove his expensive car into a tree and found out how the Mercedes bends.

13. Atheism is a non-prophet organization.

14. I did a theatrical performance about puns. Really it was just a play on words.

15. I used to be addicted to soap, but I'm clean now.

16. Show me a piano falling down a mineshaft and I'll show you A-flat minor.

17. A bicycle can't stand on its own because it is two-tired.

18. Need an ark to save two of every animal? I noah guy.

19. A new type of broom came out, it is sweeping the nation.

20. A small boy swallowed some coins and was taken to a hospital. \\\
When his grandmother telephoned to ask how he was a nurse said 'No change yet'.

21. The new weed whacker is cutting-hedge technology.

22. Some people's noses and feet are built backwards: their feet smell and their noses run.

23. When William joined the army he disliked the phrase 'fire at will'.

24. Did you hear about the guy who got hit in the head with a can of soda?
He was lucky it was a soft drink.

25. There was once a cross-eyed teacher who couldn't control his pupils.

Source:
http://www.punoftheday.com/

----------------------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

The 25 Most Common Mistakes in Email Security
http://www.itsecurity.com/features/25-common-email-security-mistakes-022807/

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Spanish Love Song (video, duration 1:45)
http://www.break.com/break-originals/other-funny-stuff/Spanish-Love-Song.html

---

Don Cherry's Piano Desk (video, duration 1:54)
http://www.fazed.org/out/?id=19346

---

Gay Scientists Isolate Christian Gene (video, duration 1:16)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCzbNkyXO50

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50 Little Things You Can Do to Empower Other People
http://goo.gl/DAixZ