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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 9, 2011


Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,371 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:


Canadian content

1. New from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- People’s Review Panel: Getting the Ontario Social Assistance Review issues straight… from people with lived experiences of poverty - January 2011
--- Social Inclusion Consultation Workbook - January 2011
--- Provincial/Territorial Policy Updates, December 2010
2. [Ontario] To the Lankin-Sheikh Social Assistance Review (Reuel S. Amdur in The Canadian Charger) - January 5

3.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, December 2010 - January 7
--- Study: Labour market outcomes of Canadian doctoral graduates, 2007 - January 6
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours, October 2010 - January 5

4. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - January 9
5. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
6.
[U.S.] Census Bureau Releases Alternative Income and Poverty Estimates - January 6 +++ Supplemental Poverty Measure papers - January 8
7. The United States of Inequality (Slate Magazine) - September 2010
8. [Guaranteed Annual Income] To Beat Back Poverty, Pay the Poor (New York Times) - January 3
9. Australian Policy Online - selected content
10. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]



1. New from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- People’s Review Panel: Getting the Ontario Social Assistance Review issues straight… from people with lived experiences of poverty - January 2011
---
Social Inclusion Consultation Workbook - January 2011
--- Provincial/Territorial Policy Updates, December 2010

New from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

People’s Review Panel: Getting the Ontario Social Assistance Review issues straight
… from people with lived experiences of poverty
(PDF - 49K, 5 pages)
By Anne Makhoul and Richard Matern
January 2011
A People’s Review Panel composed of 18 members from across Ontario will provide input into Ontario ’s Social Assistance Review. People with lived experience of poverty are working with Voices from the Street and Daily Bread Food Bank to record, analyze and summarize the policy barriers which currently impede them.

---

Social Inclusion Consultation Workbook (PDF - 34K, 22 pages)
Sherri Torjman and Anne Makhoul
January 2011
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy has been asked by the Community Services Department of the City of Hamilton to prepare a Social Inclusion Vision in respect of their role as co-host of the 2015 Pan-Am Games. A draft Consultation Workbook was prepared to help kick start the community conversations about social inclusion.

---

Provincial/Territorial Policy Updates, December 2010 (PDF - 58K, 4 pages)
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
December 2010
Caledon regularly scans provincial and territorial government websites in order to follow policy developments related to its core work and interests. This tracking is intended to inform Caledon's analysis of policy trends.
- includes a range of topics such as education, income security, poverty reduction, seniors, youth, etc.

---

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

The Caledon Institute of Social Policy does rigorous, high-quality research and analysis; seeks to inform and influence public opinion and to foster public discussion on poverty and social policy; and develops and promotes concrete, practicable proposals for the reform of social programs at all levels of government and of social benefits provided by employers and the voluntary sector.

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

2. [Ontario] To the Lankin-Sheikh Social Assistance Review - January 5
(Reuel S. Amdur in The Canadian Charger)

To the Lankin-Sheikh Social Assistance Review
January 5, 2011
By Reuel S. Amdur
(...) The current government has still not reversed Mike Harris’ cut of 21.6% to Ontario Works rates. Effectiveness is not only measured in terms of “getting people into jobs” and “providing security for those who cannot work.” It also needs to be measured in terms of how well the program meets the needs of recipients. Currently, five provinces and the territories all have higher rates than for a single person on Ontario Works. The gap in Ontario between the person who in Ontario is on Ontario Works and the person receiving the disability amount is the greatest in Canada.
Ontario governments of all stripes have consistently refused to examine rates in terms of what it costs to function in society. They have refused to rely on home economists and nutritionists to help in setting rates. There is no indication whatever that this government is even vaguely interested in doing so. (...) One wishes Frances Larkin and Dr. Sheikh good luck in their endeavor. They will need it. And the rest of us will not be holding our breath.
[ Author Reuel S. Amdur is a member of the Ontario Association of Social Workers (OASW) and the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers. ]
Source:
The Canadian Charger - Canada's National Weekly

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

3. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, December 2010 - January 7
--- Study: Labour market outcomes of Canadian doctoral graduates, 2007 - January 6
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours, October 2010 - January 5

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

January 7, 2011
Labour Force Survey, December 2010
Employment edged up for the second consecutive month in December, with an increase of 22,000. The unemployment rate held steady at 7.6%. Compared with December 2009, employment increased by 2.2% (+369,000), following a decline of 1.1% the previous year.
- includes links to three tables:
* Labour force characteristics by age and sex
* Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS)
* Labour force characteristics by province

Related report:
Labour Force Information, December 5 to 11, 2010
1. Highlights - includes a chart showing Employment and unemployment rates, Canada, seasonally adjusted
2. Analysis — December 2010
3. Tables
4. Charts
5. Data quality, concepts and methodology
6. User information
7. Related products
8. PDF version (442K, 59 pages)

[ earlier reports in this series ]

Source:
Labour Force Information - main product page*
This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:
* Labour
* Employment and unemployment


January 6, 2011
Study: Labour market outcomes of Canadian doctoral graduates, 2007
In 2005, about 4,200 candidates earned a doctorate degree in Canada, roughly one-tenth of the 43,400 doctorates awarded in the United States. By 2007, 12% of doctoral recipients who had graduated from a Canadian university in 2005 were living in the United States. The majority of those graduates were planning to return to Canada.

The study:

Expectations and Labour Market Outcomes of Doctoral Graduates from Canadian Universities
By Louise Desjardins and Darren King
January 2011
HTML version
PDF version
(429K, 60 pages)
The study provides a profile of doctoral holders two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics as well as their expectations at the time of graduation. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification as compared to the graduates' expectations.

Related subjects:
* Education, training and learning
* Fields of study
* Outcomes of education
* Labour
* Employment and unemployment

Source:
Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics: Research Papers

[Click "View" to see the latest research paper online;
click "Chronological index" for earlier research papers.]


January 5, 2011
Employment, Earnings and Hours, October 2010
* Highlights
* Note to users
* Tables
* Data quality, concepts and methodology
* User information
* Related products
* PDF version (2.7MB, 387 pages)
Source:
Employment, Earnings and Hours - product main page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
* On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Hours of work and work arrangements
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings

-------------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

4. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - January 9

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

-------

January 9, 2011

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

In the best interests of children and families: Early childhood education and care in Alberta
5 Jan 11
- Report from the Muttart Foundation provides an overview of the current funding and delivery of ECEC in Alberta and an alternate vision for ECEC that can better meet the needs of Alberta's children and their families.

Letters to UBC President re: UBC child care and Kids and Company
5 Jan 11
- Correspondence between the Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC and University of British Columbia regarding UBC's use of a for-profit child care service.

Beyond centers and homes: The workforce in three California early childhood infrastructure organizations
5 Jan 11
- Report from the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at University of California at Berkeley examines the career backgrounds and professional development needs of 1,588 staff in three organizations.

Australia's paid parental leave scheme: Supporting working Australian families
5 Jan 11
- January 1, 2011 marked the start of Australia's new paid parental leave, which provides 18 weeks of leave paid at the national minimum wage of $570 a week before tax.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· Paid parental leave icing on the cake for new mothers
[AU] 2 Jan 11

· Sure Start children's centres axed by Tories despite David Cameron's pledge to protect them
[GB] 1 Jan 11

· Mom says no time to job hunt while on maternity leave
[CA-NB] 30 Dec 10

· Record on education is Ontario Premier's best case for re-election
[CA-ON] 22 Dec 10

· Travel ban on ABC Learning founder for another 11 weeks
[AU] 17 Dec 10

· Our kids are not for sale
[US] 16 Nov 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

5. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

January 7:
US Unemployment Rate
Recession and State Budgets
Welfare and Residency Requirements - Maine
Homeless Families and Housing - Michigan, Texas

January 6:
Achievement Gap - New Jersey
2009 US Health Care Spending

January 5:
Poverty Measurement in the US
Medicaid Expansion - Minnesota
Michigan Education System
Microlending in Developing Nations

January 4:
US Metro Unemployment
Homeless College Students

January 3:
Medicaid Funding - Massachusetts, Tennessee
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - Ohio
Foster Care Reimbursement Rates - Missouri
State Minimum Wage Increases

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

6. [U.S.] Census Bureau Releases Alternative Income and Poverty Estimates + Supplemental Poverty Measure papers - January 6

From the
Washington Post:

Census releases alternative formulas for gauging poverty
By Carol Morello
January 5, 2011
The Census Bureau took a baby step toward redefining what is considered poor in America on Tuesday when it released several alternative measurements of poverty, fundamentally revising a one-size-fits-all formula developed in the 1960s by a civil servant.Under a complex series of eight alternative measurements, the Census Bureau calculated that in 2009, the number of Americans living in poverty could have been as few as 39 million or as many as almost 53 million. Under the official calculation, the census estimated that about 44 million were subsisting on incomes below the poverty line of about $21,750 for a family of four. The alternatives generally set the poverty threshold higher, as much as $29,600 for a couple with two children.

From the
Census Bureau:

Census Bureau Releases Alternative Income and Poverty Estimates
News Release
January 6, 2011
The Census Bureau has released alternative income and poverty estimates covering calendar year 2009, including breakdowns by age, sex and race. These estimates do not revise or replace the official 2009 income and poverty estimates released Sept. 16, 2010. The official estimate of the national poverty rate remains at 14.3 percent. The Census Bureau has released alternative measures of poverty for many years based on the recommendations of Congress and the National Academy of Sciences. The purpose of these alternate measures is to show the effect on income and poverty measures when factoring in a range of poverty thresholds and different assumptions about income sources (such as subsidized housing or free or reduced-price school lunches).
Source:
Census Bureau

Related links - Census Bureau:

* Effect of Benefits and Taxes on Income and Poverty: Research and Development Tables
* National Academy of Sciences Poverty Measures (1995) - includes 2009 poverty thresholds using NAS recommendations

------------------------------------------

Also from the Census Bureau,
still on the subject of poverty measurement:

Supplemental Poverty Measure Latest Research:
Papers prepared for the Allied Social Science Associations Annual Meeting
– Denver, CO
Society of Government Economists
January 8, 2011
Click the link above to access any of the papers below
(all dated December 2010 or January 2011):
* Developing Thresholds for the Supplemental Poverty Measure
* Medical Out-of-Pocket Expenses, Poverty, and the Uninsured
* Supplemental Poverty Measure: Geographic Adjustments from the American Community Survey
* Who is Poor? A New Look with the Supplemental Poverty Measure
* A Comparison of Child Support Paid from CPS and SIPP
* Estimating the Value of Federal Housing Assistance for the Supplemental Poverty Measure
* Research on Commuting Expenditures for the Supplemental Poverty Measure
* Unit of Analysis for Poverty Measurement: A Comparison of the Supplemental Poverty Measure and the Official Poverty Measure
Source:
Census Bureau

------------------------------------------

Related links from the
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics:

Experimental Poverty Measures
Since the mid-1990’s, research within the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has focused on the development of new poverty thresholds. These thresholds are based on a 1995 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report (Measuring Poverty: A New Approach, Citro and Michael 1995) and a 2010 Interagency Technical Working Group (ITWG) document with guidelines for Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure (PDF - 150K, 8 pages).
NOTE: Click the Experimental Poverty Measures link above to access a collection of 30 research papers and conference presentations on various topics related to poverty measurement.

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

7. The United States of Inequality - September 2010
(Slate Magazine)

The United States of Inequality:
Trying to understand income inequality,
the most profound change in American society in your lifetime

September 2010
By Timothy Noah
The author kicked off this series by looking at whether race, gender, or the breakdown of the nuclear family affected income inequality, and then he examined immigration, the technology boom, federal government policy, the decline of labor unions, international trade, whether the ultra wealthy are to blame, and what role the decline of K-12 education has played. In conclusion, Noah explained why we can't ignore income inequality.

Table of contents for the series:
(Click the link above to access all of these articles.)
Part 1 - Introducing the Great Divergence: Trying to understand income inequality.
Part 2 - The Usual Suspects Are Innocent: Neither race nor gender nor the breakdown of the American family created the Great Divergence.
Part 3 - Did Immigration Create the Great Divergence? Why we can't blame income inequality on the post-1965 immigration surge.
Part 4 - Did Computers Create Inequality? No. The tech boom's impact was no greater than that of previous technological upheavals during the 20th century.
Part 5 - Can We Blame Income Inequality on Republicans? Yes, but for the very richest beneficiaries the trend has been bipartisan.
Part 6 - The Great Divergence and the Death of Organized Labor: How has the decline of the union contributed to income inequality?
Part 7 - The Great Divergence and International Trade: Trade didn't create inequality, and then it did.
Part 8 - The Stinking Rich and the Great Divergence: Executive compensation took off in the 1980s and 1990s. Is it to blame?
Part 9 - How the Decline in K-12 Education Enriches College Graduates: When the workforce needed to be smarter, Americans got dumber.
Part 10 - Why we can't ignore growing income inequality: It undermines the ideal of e pluribus unum.
Source:
Slate Magazine

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

8. [Guaranteed Annual Income] To Beat Back Poverty, Pay the Poor - January 3
(New York Times)

Guaranteed Annual Income

To Beat Back Poverty, Pay the Poor
January 3, 2011
By Tina Rosenberg
(...) A single social program is transforming how countries all over the world help their poor. The program, called Bolsa Familia (Family Grant) in Brazil, goes by different names in different places. In Mexico, where it first began on a national scale and has been equally successful at reducing poverty, it is Oportunidades. The generic term for the program is conditional cash transfers. The idea is to give regular payments to poor families, in the form of cash or electronic transfers into their bank accounts, if they meet certain requirements. The requirements vary, but many countries employ those used by Mexico: families must keep their children in school and go for regular medical checkups, and mom must attend workshops on subjects like nutrition or disease prevention. The payments almost always go to women, as they are the most likely to spend the money on their families. The elegant idea behind conditional cash transfers is to combat poverty today while breaking the cycle of poverty for tomorrow. (...) Outside of Brazil and Mexico, conditional cash transfer programs are newer and smaller. Nevertheless, there is ample research showing that they, too, increase consumption, lower poverty, and increase school enrollment and use of health services.
Source:
New York Times Opinion pages

Related links:

Bolsa Familia
This site is in Portuguese - use Google Language Tools to translate.
Source:
[Brazil] Ministry of Social Development and Fight Against Hunger

Oportunidades (English home page)
Source:
Government of Mexico (English Home Page)

------------

From Wikipedia,
the free encyclopedia:

* Bolsa Familia (Brazil)
* Oportunidades (Mexico)

------------

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

9. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

Most viewed this week (ending January 9) on APO:

1. POLITICS - Coalition still favourite for the poll
2. Ampe Akelyernemane Meke Mekarle "Little children are sacred": Report of the NT Board of Inquiry into the protection of Aboriginal children from sexual abuse
3. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
4. Garma Festival 2009 key forum address
5. The Rudd government: Australian Commonwealth administration 2007–2010

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Most viewed this week (ending January 9)
in the Social Policy section:

1. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
2. Social media and young adults
3. Belonging, being and becoming - the early years learning framework for Australia
4. Teens and social media
5. Top Social Policy reports 2010

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

---

On the APO Home Page:
* Top Economics reports 2010 * Top Justice reports 2010 * Top Environment & Planning reports 2010 * Top Politics reports 2010 * Top Indigenous reports 2010 * Top Social Policy reports 2010 * Top Creative & Digital reports 2010 * Top International reports 2010 * Top Education reports 2010 * Top Health reports 2010

---------------

Top Social Policy reports 2010
Australian Policy Online
The five most read reports and commentary pieces in the Social Policy area in 2010 were:
1. Who will benefit from the 1 July 2010 tax cuts?
2. Asylum seekers and refugees: what are the facts?
3. Boat arrivals in Australia since 1976: January 2010 update
4. Poverty versus inequality (July 2009)
5. Welfare quarantining: reversing the burden of truth (February 2010)
Source:
New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

--------------

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

10. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issues of CRINMAIL
(children's rights newsletter):

End of the year special:
Children's rights round-up 2010
5 January 2011, CRINMAIL issue 1207
In this issue:
Dear Readers,
Welcome to 2011 and our yearly look back at the trials and triumphs of children's rights advocacy; from the dawn of new instruments, and the struggle to enforce them, to the accomplishments of joint campaigning efforts, there is much to reminisce! We also hope to stir up some collective inspiration for the year ahead to move beyond mirroring the world around us to forge an ever stronger advocacy network together with the members who make up CRIN.
Happy reading!
The CRIN Team
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

---

[No CRINMAIL for the week ending January 2, 2011.]

---

22 December 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1206
In this issue:
* Top story : CRC election results
* Latest news and reports
--- Violence against children (Yemen, China, Indonesia)
--- Forced labour (Uzbekistan, Romania)
--- Legal action (Nigeria, India)
--- Budget cuts and child poverty (Europe)
Employment : Save the Children Finland

NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRINMAIL)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


****************************

Sixteen Yogi Berra Quotes

****************************

"This is like deja vu all over again."

"You can observe a lot just by watching."

"He must have made that before he died." -- Referring to a Steve McQueen movie.

"You've got to be very careful if you don't know where you're going, because you might not get there."

"I knew I was going to take the wrong train, so I left early."

"If you can't imitate him, don't copy him."

"You better cut the pizza in four pieces because I'm not hungry enough to eat six."

"Baseball is 90% mental -- the other half is physical."

"It was impossible to get a conversation going; everybody was talking too much."

"Slump? I ain't in no slump. I just ain't hitting."

"A nickel isn't worth a dime today."

"Nobody goes there anymore; it's too crowded."

"It gets late early out there." -- Referring to the bad sun conditions in left field at the stadium.

"I take a two hour nap, from one o'clock to four."

"If you come to a fork in the road, take it."

"You give 100 percent in the first half of the game, and if that isn't enough in the second half you give what's left."

Source:
http://www.rinkworks.com/said/yogiberra.shtml
(Click the link for a dozen more...)


-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------


Misused Quotation Marks are “Bad”

http://goo.gl/OG0a8


------------------------------


Extreme repurposing : ReubenMiller
http://goo.gl/h5vo



-------------------------------

Advertisement for ballet classes
http://i.imgur.com/uosiV.jpg


-------------------------------


Donald Rumsfeld and the Strange History of Aspartame
http://goo.gl/A4gMb
Bye-bye,  Diet Ginger Ale.