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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
July 9, 2006

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1620 subscribers.
Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.


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IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. Ontario Court ruling strikes down Lower Court's ruling on Autism Therapy for children six years of age and older - July 7
2. What's New from Statistics Canada:

--- Labour Force Survey, June 2006 - July 7
--- Overview of Canadians' Eating Habits 2004
- July 6
--- Youth in Transition Survey: Update of the education and labour market pathways of young adults, 2004
- July 5
--- Employment, earnings and hours, April 2006
- July 4
3. The Dynamics of Welfare Participation in Québec
(EconPapers) - August 1998
4. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (University of Toronto) - July 7

International Content

5. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
6. The Social Security Debate in the United States (Parliament of Canada Research Service Publications) - August 2005

Steve Harper and I would like to wish you a great week...
BRAVO  ITALIA!!

Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. Ontario Court Ruling Strikes Down Lower Court's Ruling
on Autism Therapy for children six years of age and older
- July 7

Ontario Court Ruling Strikes Down Lower Court's
Ruling on Autism Therapy

July 8, 2006
Ontario Court of Appeal rules that the provincial refusal to fund therapy for autistic children older than five does not constitute age discrimination.
- large collection of online resources on this issue going back to April 2005
Source:
DAWN-Ontario (DisAbled Women's Network-Ontario)

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

2. What's New from Statistics Canada:
--- Labour Force Survey, June 2006 - July 7
--- Overview of Canadians' Eating Habits 2004 - July 6
--- Youth in Transition Survey: Update of the education and labour market pathways of young adults, 2004 - July 5
---
Employment, earnings and hours, April 2006 - July 4

What's New from The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

July 7, 2006
Labour Force Survey, June 2006
Following large gains the previous month, employment was little changed in June, leaving the unemployment rate at a 32-year low of 6.1%. Since the start of the year, employment is up 1.3% or 216,000, more than double the growth of the first half of 2005.

July 6, 2006
Canadian Community Health Survey: Overview of Canadians' eating habits,2004
According to the most recent survey of what Canadians are eating, many people do not have a balanced diet. The Canadian Community Health Survey: Nutrition, which asked more than 35,000 people to recall what they had eaten during the 24 hours before they were interviewed, shows that Canadians face some nutritional challenges.

Complete report:

Overview of Canadians' Eating Habits 2004 (PDF file - 347K, 47 pages)
by Didier Garriguet

July 5, 2006
Youth in Transition Survey: Update of the education and labour market pathways of young adults, 2004
More and more youth have undertaken postsecondary education, either at college, university or a private institution, and have taken their place in the labour market, according to a four-year study of major transitions in the lives of Canada's young people. The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), which tracked movements between high school, postsecondary education and the labour market, interviewed young people and measured their activities at three stages: in 1999, 2001 and 2003.

Complete report:

Follow-up on Education and LabourMarket Pathways
of Young Canadians Aged 18 to 20 – Results from YITS Cycle 3
(PDF file - 391K, 47 pages)
July 2006
By Danielle Shaienks, Judy Eisl-Culkin and Patrick Bussière

July 4, 2006 [New Products]
Employment, earnings and hours, April 2006 (PDF file - 2.3MB, 520 pages)

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

3. The Dynamics of Welfare Participation in Québec - August 1998
(EconPapers)

The Dynamics of Welfare Participation in Québec (PDF file - 314K, 29 pages)
August 1998
by Jean-Yves Duclos, Bernard Fortin, Guy Lacroix and Hélène Roberge
Department of Economics and CRÉFA, Université Laval
Abstract
"Few studies have examined the dynamics of participation in welfare in Québec and elsewhere in Canada. This paper sheds some light on that important topic, which is crucial for the understanding of the features and of the effects of welfare programmes, and for the analysis of possible reforms. For this, we use a large representative sample of welfare participants between 1979 and 1993. We find that the majority of new spells last for less than one year. Nevertheless, that a large proportion of ongoing spells are of long duration. We estimate for instance that the 50% shortest spells account for only 10% of total welfare spending. Overall, single men leave welfare more rapidly than single women, young people faster than their elders, and more educated individuals sooner than the less educated. The welfare reform of 1989 appears to have reduced significantly the rate of exit among participants under 30. Returns onto welfare generally occur shortly after exit, and at a rate which diminishes rapidly with time. Finally, we propose a measure of welfare dependence which comes up being almost twice as large for single-parent families as for all other categories."

Source:
EconPapers
EconPapers use the RePEc bibliographic and author data, providing access to the largest collection of online Economics working papers and journal articles.

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm

4. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - July 7
(University of Toronto)

What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is selected content from the most recent issue of the notifier.

7-Jul-06

---------------------------------------------------
What's New
---------------------------------------------------

>> LEARNING FROM EACH OTHER: EARLY LEARNING AND CHILD CARE EXPERIENCES IN CANADIAN CITIES
by Mahon, Rianne & Jenson, Jane
Report for the City of Toronto examines the local provision of children's services in 11 Canadian cities; finds provision is insufficient.

>> POLITICS, POLITICAL PLATFORMS AND CHILD POVERTY IN CANADA
by Raphael, Dennis
Article from Policy Options "explores first the reasons why Canadians should care at all about poverty and then prospects for improvements."

>> THE ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF HIGH-QUALITY EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS: WHAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE?
by Galinsky, Ellen
Report from Family and Work Institute (US) discusses what characteristics of successful early childhood programs make a long-term difference.

>> EQUAL ACCESS? APPROPRIATE AND AFFORDABLE CHILDCARE FOR EVERY CHILD
by Stanley, Kate; Bellamy, Kate & Cooke, Graeme
Report from the Institute for Public Policy Research (UK) sets out a plan for Britain to "shape a childcare and early years system that combines quality, affordability and appropriateness for all children and families."

--------------------------------------------------
Child Care in the News
---------------------------------------------------

>> City's day-care future grim following changes in funding: Current
spaces for 16,000 leave 8,000 waiting
[CA-ON]
by Rupert, Jake / Ottawa Citizen , 7 Jul 06

>> Day-care increases on P.E.I. gobble up federal allowance [CA-PE]
CBC News, 6 Jul 06

>> Daycare lacking for needy: Study [CA]
by Monsebraaten, Laurie / Toronto Star, 5 Jul 06

>> Child care falls short in 11 cities, study finds [CA]
CBC News, 5 Jul 06 Source CBC News

>> A dilemma for city's day cares [CA-ON]
by Harrison, Brock / Kingston Whig-Standard, 5 Jul 06

>> The Canadian workforce requires regulated child care [CA]
by Gorbet, Maud / Record (Kitchener, Cambridge and Waterloo), 5 Jul 06

--------------------------------------------------
Events
---------------------------------------------------

RETHINKING PEDAGOGY IN ECEC: INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES
Where: Elliott Building, Room 168, University of Victoria, Victoria
When: 10 Aug 06 to 11 Aug 06 (all day events)
REACH (an interdisciplinary group of investigators, including faculty, research associates, and graduate students, based at the University of Victoria and in the community) is pleased to announce an open Institute. This two-day Institute features some of the most creative and innovative thinkers currently working internationally in early childhood education and care pedagogy. They bring a broad range of experience from around the world in the areas of practice, training, and professional development. The Institute will consist of a series of panel discussions from the presenters, and the choice of one specialized workshop led by the presenters.

Presenters include:
- Dr. Gunilla Dalhberg, Stockholm Institute of Education
- Dr. Patrick Hughes, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia
- Ms. Wendy Lee, Director of the Educational Leadership Project
- Dr. Glenda Mac Naughton, University of Melbourne
- Dr. Beth Blue Swadener, Arizona State University

There is no charge to attend this Institute, but registration is required.

Download conference details (PDF - 186K)
Download registration form (PDF - 178K)

Related link:
http://reach.uvic.ca/

Contact:
Ana-Elisa Armstrong de Almeida

Fax: 250-721-8977
Email: anaelisa@uvic.ca

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This message was forwarded through the Childcare Resource
and Research Unit e-mail news notifier. For information on the
CRRU e-mail notifier, including instructions for (un)subscribing,
see http://www.childcarecanada.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Related Links:

What's New? - Canadian, U.S. and international resources
Child Care in the News - media articles
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm
- Go to the Work-Life Balance Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/work_life_balance.htm

5. Poverty Dispatch:
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs

Poverty Dispatch - U.S.
- links to news items from the American press about poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
NOTE: this is a link to the current issue --- its content changes twice a week.

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 1 (2006) when the Dispatch acquired its own web page and archive.

Poverty Dispatch Digest Archive - weekly digest of dispatches from August 2005 to May 2006
For a few years prior to the creation of this new web page for the Dispatch, I was compiling a weekly digest of the e-mails and redistributing the digest to my mailing list.
This is my own archive of weekly issues of the digest back to August 2005, and most of them have 50+ links per issue. I'll be deleting this archive from my site gradually, as the links to older articles expire and "go 404"...

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

6. The Social Security Debate in the United States - August 2005
(Parliament of Canada Research Service Publications)

The Social Security Debate in the United States
18 August 2005
By Marc LeBlanc, Economics Division
[PDF version - 111K, 19 pages]

Table of Contents:

* Introduction
* Origins and Development of Social Security in the United States
--- Origins
--- Key Developments
*Current Systems
* Proposed Reforms
* The Social Security Debate
--- Is Social Security in Crisis?
--- Personal Savings Accounts
------ Ownership
------ Investment
------ Transition Costs
--- Addressing Social Security’s Actuarial Deficit
------ Increase Revenue
------ Decrease Benefits
--- The Need for Political Consensus
* The Canadian Experience
* Conclusion

Source:
Parliamentary Information and Research Service Publications <<<=== Check this out - links to 400 studies!
[ Parliament of Canada ]

Related Links:

Social Security History
"In this extensive collection of history-related materials, we present both the institutional history of the Social Security Administration and the history of the Social Security program."
Source:
Social Security Online

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research
Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com

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Prison vs Working

IN PRISON ... you spend the majority of your time in an 8x10 cell.
AT WORK ... you spend the majority of your time in one 6x8.

IN PRISON ... you get three meals a day.
AT WORK ... you only get a break for one meal and you have to pay for it.

IN PRISON ... you get time off for good behaviour.
AT WORK ... you get rewarded for good behaviour with more work.

IN PRISON ... the guard locks and unlocks all the doors for you.
AT WORK ... you carry around a security card and open all the doors yourself.

IN PRISON ... you can watch TV and play games.
AT WORK ... you get fired for watching TV and playing games.

IN PRISON ... you get your own toilet.
AT WORK ... you have to share with some idiot who pees on the seat.

IN PRISON ... they allow your family and friends to visit.
AT WORK ... you can't even speak to your family.

IN PRISON ... you must deal with sadistic wardens.
AT WORK ... they're called managers.

IN PRISON ... all expenses paid by taxpayers; no work required.
AT WORK ... you get to pay all the expenses to go to work, and then they deduct taxes from your salary to pay for prisoners.

IN PRISON ... you spend your life looking through bars from the inside, wanting to get out.
AT WORK ... you spend most of your time wanting to get out and go inside bars.

(Found online somewhere. No --- I made it up myself. Yeah, that's the ticket. I made it all up myself. Good, eh.)


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Mansong/Womansong:

<speakers>

http://humor.beecy.net/menwomen/mansong/
http://humor.beecy.net/menwomen/womansong/

http://humor.beecy.net/politics/bushisms/