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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
August 9, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,069 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. Report on New Brunswick poverty reduction dialogue sessions released (New Brunswick Social Development) - August 6
2. Premiers Agree on EI Reforms and Call for a Retirement Income Summit (Council of the Federation) - August 6
3. Now, more than ever, Canadians count on Premiers' leadership to reduce poverty (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - August 5
4. Finance Ministers to Discuss Economy and Retirement Income Adequacy at December Meeting (Finance Canada) - August 5
5. What's new from Social Planning Toronto:
---Toronto and Ottawa Raise Their Voices on Housing! - Housing Network of Ontario Update - Posted August 4
--- Submit a Brief to Federal Pre-Budget Consultations - Posted August 4
--- Toronto’s Social Landscape – 10-Year Trends, 1996-2006 - June 2009
6.
How to make recovery quicker and less painful for those hurting most (By Roy Romanow in the Globe and Mail) - August 3
7. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, July 2009 - August 7
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours, May 2009 - August 7
--- Canadian Social Trends, August 2009 online edition - August 6
--- Study: Update on long-term trends in Canada's productivity performance, 1961 to 2008 - August 4
8. Pundits' Guide to Canadian Federal Elections
9. Media roundup
10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - August 9

International content

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
12. Homes Not Handcuffs: The Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities (National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty and National Coalition for the Homeless) - July 2009
13. [U.S.] A report on Hate Crimes and Violence Against People Experiencing Homelessness, 2008 (National Coalition for the Homeless) - August 2009
14. OECD Factbook eXplorer (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)
15. Australian Policy Online
16. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - Summer 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. Report on New Brunswick poverty reduction dialogue sessions released - August 6
(New Brunswick Social Development)

New from New Brunswick Social Development:

Report on poverty reduction dialogue sessions released
August 6, 2009
FREDERICTON (CNB) - The leadership team of the New Brunswick Poverty Reduction Initiative has released A Choir of Voices - The What Was Said Report. The report summarizes public dialogue sessions held last winter as the first phase of Bringing the pieces together, the comprehensive public engagement initiative that aims to develop a poverty reduction plan for the province. (...) A Choir of Voices is the basis of discussions being held during Phase II of the initiative, during which participants in round-table sessions will develop options for how poverty can be reduced. This process is intended to ensure that the voices of New Brunswickers are heard.

A Choir of Voices - The "What Was Said" Report (PDF - 1MB, 57 pages)
June 2009
In preparation for moving ahead with Phase II of the public engagement initiative to develop a poverty reduction plan for New Brunswick, this report presents a summary of the input received from New Brunswick residents who participated in Phase I – The public dialogue. The comments are based on personal experiences. Throughout the dialogue a lack of education, income, job opportunities, and information about community supports and resources were heard often as the causes of poverty. In addition, many great solutions were suggested, and are summarized in this report.

Related links:

Dialogue Sessions – Winter 2009 (Jan-Mar)
Phase I of the public engagement initiative to develop a poverty reduction plan for New Brunswick
- scroll to the bottom of the page for links to dialogue session notes from 16 meetings around the province
- the Choir of Voices report is a synopsis of testimonials from these sessions.

Public engagement initiative:
Developing a poverty reduction plan
The official website of the New Brunswick government's initiative to establish a poverty reduction plan

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

2. Premiers Agree on EI Reforms and Call for a Retirement Income Summit - August 6
(Council of the Federation)

Premiers Agree on EI Reforms and Call for a Retirement Income Summit (PDF - 27K, 2 pages)
August 6, 2009
REGINA – Premiers agreed on the urgent need to modernize the Employment Insurance system to support a modern workforce in a modern economy and called for a national summit on retirement income
Source:
Council of the Federation

On December 5, 2003, Canada’s Premiers proudly announced in Charlottetown the creation of the Council of the Federation. It is a new institution for a new era in collaborative intergovernmental relations. The Council of the Federation was created by Premiers because they believe it is important for provinces and territories to play a leadership role in revitalizing the Canadian federation and building a more constructive and cooperative federal system.

Related links:

This time, Ottawa isn't the target
August 7, 2009
By Jim Coyle
(...) As they formally opened the Council of the Federation yesterday, Canada's premiers had an uncharacteristically meaty agenda and unusually kind words for their own federal government. Instead, the hottest blasts were aimed at the United States and the protectionist Buy America initiatives there that threaten Canadian access to those markets. (...) The premiers have sketched out principles to modernize the employment insurance scheme, reviewed stimulus spending of levels unimaginable when they met a year ago, and endorsed McGuinty's call for a national summit on pensions.
Source:
Toronto Star

Grits, Tories squabble over EI costs:
Cost has become the latest flashpoint between Conservatives and Liberals
in their potentially election-provoking squabble over employment insurance reform.

Federal officials claimed Thursday that a Liberal proposal to ease access to jobless benefits would cost more than $4 billion a year to implement. But Liberals charged the governing Tories have "grossly inflated" the number of unemployed who'd be eligible for EI under their plan, thereby producing "astronomical costs" to justify their flat rejection of the proposal.
Source:
CBC

Lorne Gunter: The scam we call 'Employment Insurance'
August 7, 2009
By Lorne Gunter
There is almost nothing about Canada's Employment Insurance (EI) program that is as it appears. Even its name is a dodge. The plan does not insure against employment; that would be absurd. It insures against unemployment. Yet, in keeping with the disingenuous nature of the program, the name was changed to EI (from Unemployment Insurance) more than a decade ago in the naive hope that somehow the superficial switch in branding would encourage beneficiaries to find and keep jobs.
Source:
National Post

There's jobless, and officially jobless
When Statscan issues its jobs data today [see related link below], it won't tally those who have given up or postponed their searches
By Tavia Grant
August 7, 2009
(...) When Statistics Canada reports its monthly job count today, many unemployed people (...) who have either postponed or given up their job search won't be tallied. That's because people who haven't hunted for jobs in the past month aren't counted as unemployed or as part of the labour force. The gap between the actual unemployment rate and the official statistics is likely to widen in the coming months, as more people give up their job search to go back to school, or wait until jobs are more abundant, economists say. Many more workers will settle for part-time jobs, even though they want full-time positions. (...) When involuntary part-time workers are factored into the equation, Canada's unemployment rate would have been 11.3 per cent in June, according to Statscan's so-called R8 series on "underutilized" labour, which is not seasonally adjusted. That's well above the 8.1-per-cent level it showed in the same month last year, though down from the 12.4 per cent it reached in March.
Source:
Globe and Mail
[ Related link:
Labour Force Survey, July 2009 - Statistics Canada, August 7, 2009 ]

EI benefits at record levels
Ontario, Alberta show biggest hike
July 29, 2009
The number of people receiving regular employment insurance benefits jumped to the highest level on record in May, with Alberta and Ontario showing the biggest increases, Statistics Canada said Tuesday.
EI beneficiaries were up 9.2 per cent to 778,700 during the month, after a 3.7 per cent rise in April, the federal agency said.
Source:
Financial Post

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

3. Now, more than ever, Canadians count on Premiers' leadership to reduce poverty - August 5
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Now, more than ever, Canadians count on Premiers' leadership to reduce poverty
Editorial
By Laurel Rothman & Trish Hennessy
August 5, 2009
Canada has been plunged into a worldwide recession that is harsher than any economic downturn since the Great Depression. Now, more than ever, citizens are counting on their governments for vision, compassion, and leadership. This week’s upcoming Premiers’ talks create a vital opening to start now on an economic recovery plan that reduces poverty, prevents more Canadians from falling into poverty, and puts all of Canada’s provincial economies back on steady footing. The recession hit Canada last October, and since then, about 370,000 Canadians have been thrown out of work. But the federal Employment Insurance (EI) program isn’t there for half (52%) of the nation’s unemployed. As Premiers, the fallout from this recession is landing squarely on their shoulders. Without an adequate EI program, Canada’s unemployed will be turning to social assistance, food banks, homeless shelters, and other provincially funded programs. Provincial poverty rates are bound to soar – with dizzying speed in some regions.
Authors:
Laurel Rothman works at Family Service Toronto and is National Coordinator, Campaign 2000.
Trish Hennessy is director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Inequality Project.
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Related link:

Premiers setting national agenda
August 4, 2009
Editorial
The premiers gather tomorrow in Regina for their annual conference. With federal politics devoted mostly to name-calling and finger-pointing these days, the premiers' conference can perform an important agenda-setting function for the whole nation by refocusing debate on neglected issues of public policy.
Source:
Toronto Star

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

4. Finance Ministers to Discuss Economy and Retirement Income Adequacy at December Meeting - August 5
(Finance Canada)

Federal, Provincial and Territorial Finance Ministers
to Discuss Economy and Retirement Income Adequacy at December Meeting

August 5, 2009
News Release
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today announced that he will meet with his provincial and territorial counterparts December 17-18, 2009, in Whitehorse, to discuss continuing progress in strengthening Canada’s economy and to receive the report of the Research Working Group on Retirement Income Adequacy. (...) At their last meeting on May 25, 2009, federal, provincial and territorial finance ministers agreed to create the Research Working Group on Retirement Income Adequacy to expand the knowledge base underpinning the subject of retirement income adequacy. This group, chaired by Ted Menzies, parliamentary secretary to Minister Flaherty, and supported by research director Jack Mintz and finance ministers from British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and Nova Scotia, is to report to finance ministers and ministers responsible for pensions by the end of 2009. The first meeting of this group was held on July 22, 2009, in Calgary and participants agreed to a work plan, which will culminate in a report to ministers.
Source:
Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

5. What's new from Social Planning Toronto:
---Toronto and Ottawa Raise Their Voices on Housing! - Housing Network of Ontario Update - Posted August 4
--- Submit a Brief to Federal Pre-Budget Consultations - Posted August 4
--- Toronto’s Social Landscape – 10-Year Trends, 1996-2006 - June 2009

What's new from
Social Planning Toronto:

Toronto and Ottawa Raise Their Voices on Housing!
Housing Network of Ontario Update
Posted August 4, 2009
Low-income tenants and affordable housing advocates raised their voices in support of a meaningful, long-term plan to address the housing crisis in Ontario at four consultations held in the past week in Scarborough, downtown Toronto and Ottawa. Housing Network of Ontario members and supporters came out in force, with capacity crowds at each of the housing consultation meetings.

---

Submit a Brief to Federal Pre-Budget Consultations
Posted August 4, 2009
The federal budget consultation process is accepting briefs from individuals and community organizations until August 14th. This is a great opportunity to speak out for EI reform and pensions. The deadline to submit a written brief is August 14, 2009 and they can be sent to Jean-Francois Page, Clerk of the Standing Committee on Finance, at fina@parl.gc.ca

---

Toronto’s Social Landscape – 10-Year Trends, 1996-2006
June 2009
Complete report (PDF - 4.2MB, 49 pages)
Executive Summary
Toronto’s Social Landscape is a new resource for organizations and community groups that use demographic and socio-economic data in their work – to assist in program planning, needs assessments, funding submissions, advocacy initiatives, public policy development and research projects. This report draws on 10 years of Census data, and additional data sources, to paint a picture of Toronto’s population and the major trends impacting its residents and institutions.

---

Source:
Social Planning Toronto is committed to independent social planning at the local and city-wide levels in order to improve the quality of life for all people in Toronto. It is committed to diversity, social and economic justice, and active citizen participation in all aspects of community life.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

6. How to make recovery quicker and less painful for those hurting most - August 3
(By Roy Romanow in the Globe and Mail)

How to make recovery quicker and less painful for those hurting most
By Roy Romanow (in the Globe and Mail)
August 3, 2009
The Bank of Canada recently declared an end to the recession. There’s a world of difference, however, between an end to economic decline as measured by GDP and a real recovery as felt by Canadians. And when we look behind the numbers, we can’t avoid the fact that the costs of the recession are profoundly unequally shared, as those who suffer most will be those who can bear it least – unemployed and poor Canadians. History has a lot to tell us about the difference between the technical end of a recession and real economic recovery, and about the economic consequences for lower-and middle-income Canadians.
Source:
Globe and Mail
Found on the website of
The Atkinson Charitable Foundation

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

7. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, July 2009 - August 7
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours, May 2009 - August 7
--- Canadian Social Trends, August 2009 online edition - August 6
--- Study: Update on long-term trends in Canada's productivity performance, 1961 to 2008 - August 4

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

August 7, 2009
Labour Force Survey, July 2009
Following little change in June, employment declined by 45,000 in July, with losses in both full- and part-time work. The unemployment rate remained unchanged at 8.6%, as fewer people participated in the labour market.

---

August 7, 2009
Employment, Earnings and Hours, May 2009
HTML version
PDF version
(2MB, 327 pages)
Highlights* (HTML)
Total non-farm payroll employment fell by 64,000 in May, down 0.4% from April, bringing total losses to 423,900 since the peak in October 2008. The proportion of industries experiencing job losses edged down in May to 63%.
---
* The Highlights page includes three charts:
Total payroll employment
Proportion of industries experiencing a month-to-month change in payroll employment, May 2008 to May 2009
Non-farm payroll employment of the Survey of employment payrolls and hours and total employment of the Labour force survey
---
[ earlier issues of Employment, Earnings and Hours - back to 2000 ]
Related StatCan links:
Employment, Earnings and Hours (Click "View" for the latest issue)
[ more Labour studies and stats ]

---

August 6, 2009
Canadian Social Trends, August 2009 online edition
The August online edition of Canadian Social Trends, released today, features two articles. The first, "Online activities of Canadian boomers and seniors", examines how Canadian seniors (those aged 65 and older) use the Internet compared with baby boomers (those aged 45 to 64). It looks at the closing gap between Internet use rates, and describes differences in the types of online activities, as well as in the intensity of Internet use. The second article, entitled
"2008 General Social Survey Report : Social networks help Canadians deal with change", uses the 2008 General Social Survey on social networks to examines social networks, especially family, played an important role in dealing with changes in people's lives.
[ earlier issues of Canadian Social Trends - links to 1000+ articles! ]

---

August 4, 2009
Study: Update on long-term trends in Canada's productivity performance, 1961 to 2008
Over the past 50 years, productivity in the Canadian business sector has increased at a slightly slower rate on average than it has in the United States. Between 1961 and 2008, productivity in Canada rose 2.0% a year on average, compared with 2.3% in the United States.
Report:
Productivity Performance in Canada, 1961 to 2008:
An Update on Long-term Trends

HTML version
PDF version
(397K, 37 pages)

Related subjects:
o Economic accounts
o Productivity accounts

---

The Daily Archives - select a year and month from the drop-down menu to view releases in chronological order
[ Statistics Canada ]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

8. Pundits' Guide to Canadian Federal Elections

Pundits' Guide to Canadian Federal Elections
A personal project of Alice Funke, on leave from the federal public service.
- includes an extensive list of "pundit metrics" (Riding / Region Election Stats - Riding Election Metrics - Party Election Metrics - Financial Metrics)
- links to * Home * Pundit Metrics * Search the Database * FAQ * Links * About * Contact * Browse Regions * Browse Elections * Browse Parties * Browse Candidates * Search...

- Go to the 2008 Federal Election and General Political Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2008_fed_election.htm

9. Media Roundup

[Ontario] Star editorial: Province fiddles while legal aid burns
http://www.thestar.com/article/677529

Poverty Reduction Strategy being formulated through public consultation in New Brunswick:
* http://telegraphjournal.canadaeast.com/rss/article/753507
* http://dailygleaner.canadaeast.com/rss/article/753612
* http://www.news889.com/news/local/article.jsp?content=20090807_064355_9184

New unemployment numbers released:
* http://www.cbc.ca/money/story/2009/08/07/unemployment-july.html

Hidden unemployment in the unemployment stats:
* http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2009/08/07/hidden-unemployment/

The recession is far from over:
* http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2009/08/07/recession-far-from-over/

Premiers tackle EI on second day of conference:
* http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2009/08/06/ei-premiers.html

Info on the person appointed to lead the federal-provincial review of pensions:
*
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2009/08/06/jack-mintz-research-and-pensions/

Toronto mayor pledges to run again, expand anti-poverty programs:
* http://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/2009/08/05/miler-reelection.html

Researcher in Regina says anti-panhandling bylaws likely violates the Charter:
*
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/saskatchewan/story/2009/08/04/sask-bylaw-panhandling.html

BC baby taken from parents because they are poor:
* http://www.chtv.com/ch/cheknews/story.html?id=1861548

Advocate in New Brunswick says minimum wage hike is not enough:
* http://dailygleaner.canadaeast.com/rss/article/751036

Jack Layton says Harper ignoring the needs of seniors:
* http://www.vocm.com/newsarticle.asp?mn=2&id=773&latest=1

***

Thanks to Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC) for sharing these media links. Visit the ISAC website for a large collection of Ontario resources.
The Income Security Advocacy Centre works with and on behalf of low income communities in Ontario to address issues of income security and poverty.

10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - August 9

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

August 9, 2009

Canada’s growing gap explained
5 Aug 09
- Video from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives describing the growth of the income gap between rich and the rest over the past few years.

Children: The best investment for a sustainable future
5 Aug 09
- Pre-2010 budget submission from First Call BC recommending greater investment in early childhood development and reducing income inequality.

Children’s centres: Making them happen on a small budget
5 Aug 09
- Report from the Department for Children, Schools and Families, Government of UK on the setting up of a mini-Sure Start in the UK.

PreK-3rd: Teacher quality matters
5 Aug 09
- Report from The Foundation for Child Development on why effective teaching matters for outcomes, how schools can organize and what high-quality instruction is.

About Canada: Childcare
24 Jun 09
- Just published – a new book co-authored by CRRU director Martha Friendly and University of Manitoba Sociologist Susan Prentice.

With our best future in mind: Implementing early learning in Ontario
17 Jun 09
- Report to the Premier of Ontario from Charles Pascal, the Premier's Special Advisor on Early Learning.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· New York tops mag’s list of best places in U.S. for women to have a career- and child

[US] 5 Aug 09

· Childcare is a disgrace
[AU] 4 Aug 09

· Nation looks to premiers to lead fight against poverty
[CA] 4 Aug 09

· Poverty is poison
[US] 18 Feb 08

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

August 7
Funding for Legal Aid - Massachusetts
July 2009 Unemployment Rate
Stimulus Spending and Youth Employment
Need for Food Assistance - Detroit, MI

August 6
Agriculture Spending Bill and Food Stamp Funding
Census Data on the Uninsured
State Health Insurance Plans
Computer Errors Affecting Program Recipients - Nevada, New York City

August 5
Children’s Health Insurance Coverage - Oregon
Privatization of Social Services - Indiana
Budget Cuts to Social Services - California
Hunger and Food Security in Nigeria

August 4
State Unemployment Funds - Nevada, West Virginia
Medicaid Cuts - Louisiana
Cuts to Foster Care Program - Arizona

August 3
Promise Neighborhoods Program
Extension and Exhaustion of Unemployment Insurance Benefits
Stimulus Funding and Weatherization - Indiana
Payday Lending Regulation - Wisconsin
California Budget Cuts and Children’s Health Insurance Coverage
Funding for Legal Aid Offices - Iowa

---
To subscribe or unsubscribe,
please send an email request
(mention the "Poverty Dispatch") to
irppubs@ssc.wisc.edu

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

12. Homes Not Handcuffs: The Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities - July 2009
(National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty and National Coalition for the Homeless)

Homes Not Handcuffs: The Criminalization
of Homelessness in U.S. Cities
(PDF - 811K, 194 pages)
July 2009
Homes Not Handcuffs is the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty’s (NLCHP) ninth report on the criminalization of homelessness and the National Coalition for the Homeless’ (NCH) fifth report on the topic. The report documents cities with the worst record related to criminalizing homelessness, as well as initiatives in some cities that constitute more constructive approaches to street homelessness. The report includes the results of research regarding laws and practices in 273 cities around the country; as well as descriptions of lawsuits from various jurisdictions in which those measures have been challenged.
[ News Release - July 14/09 ]

Sources:

The National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty (NLCHP)
The mission of NLCHP is to prevent and end homelessness by serving as the legal arm of the nationwide movement to end homelessness.
[ NLCHP Publications ]

The National Coalition for the Homeless (NCH)
The National Coalition for the Homeless is a national network of people who are currently experiencing or who have experienced homelessness, activists and advocates, community-based and faith-based service providers, and others committed to a single mission. That mission, our common bond, is to end homelessness.
[ NCH Publications ]

Related link:

Is It Now a Crime to Be Poor?
By Barbara Erenreich
August 8, 2009
It’S too bad so many people are falling into poverty at a time when it’s almost illegal to be poor. You won’t be arrested for shopping in a Dollar Store, but if you are truly, deeply, in-the-streets poor, you’re well advised not to engage in any of the biological necessities of life — like sitting, sleeping, lying down or loitering. City officials boast that there is nothing discriminatory about the ordinances that afflict the destitute, most of which go back to the dawn of gentrification in the ’80s and ’90s. “If you’re lying on a sidewalk, whether you’re homeless or a millionaire, you’re in violation of the ordinance,” a city attorney in St. Petersburg, Fla., said in June, echoing Anatole France’s immortal observation that “the law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges.”
Source:
New York Times

NOTE:
The above article by Barbara Erenreich is the third in a series; links to her two earlier
op-eds appear below.
[You must register as a NY Times member to access the content below; it's free, and they won't send you any SPAM nor share your email address.]

* A Homespun Safety Net
By Barbara Erenreich
July 12, 2009

* Too Poor to Make the News
By Barbara Erenreich
June 14, 2009

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

13. [U.S.] A report on Hate Crimes and Violence Against People Experiencing Homelessness, 2008 - August 2009
(National Coalition for the Homeless)

New from The National Coalition for the Homeless (U.S.):

New Report Documents 10 Years of Anti-Homeless Violence
Press release
August 7
Washington, DC– Today the National Coalition for the Homeless (NCH) released the 2008 numbers of hate crimes and violent attacks against people experiencing homelessness. The numbers are from a new report entitled Hate, Violence, And Death on Main Street USA, 2008.
Key findings include:
* The total number of attacks for 2008: 106.
* The number of fatal attacks is the second highest since 2001: 27 deaths.
* 73 percent of the attacks were committed by individuals who were ages 25 and younger.
* Florida ranked #1 for the fourth year in a row for most attacks, California was second.

The new report:

Hate, Violence, and Death on Main Street USA:
A report on Hate Crimes and Violence Against People Experiencing Homelessness, 2008

August 2009
HTML version - table of contents and links to each chapter
PDF version (2.7MB, 98 pages)

[ All NCH Publications ]

Source:
The National Coalition for the Homeless (NCH) is a national network of people who are currently experiencing or who have experienced homelessness, activists and advocates, community-based and faith-based service providers, and others committed to a single mission.

Media coverage:

Attacks on Homeless Bring Push on Hate Crime Laws
By Eric Lichtblau
August 7, 2009
WASHINGTON — With economic troubles pushing more people onto the streets in the last few years, law enforcement officials and researchers are seeing a surge in unprovoked attacks against the homeless, and a number of states are considering legislation to treat such assaults as hate crimes. This October, Maryland will become the first state to expand its hate-crime law to add stiffer penalties for attacks on the homeless. At least five other states are pondering similar steps, the District of Columbia approved such a measure this week, and a like bill was introduced last week in Congress.A report due out this weekend from the National Coalition for the Homeless documents a rise in violence over the last decade, with at least 880 unprovoked attacks against the homeless at the hands of nonhomeless people, including 244 fatalities. (...) Sometimes, researchers say, one homeless person attacks another in turf battles or other disputes. But more often, they say, the assailants are outsiders: men or in most cases teenage boys who punch, kick, shoot or set afire people living on the streets, frequently killing them, simply for the sport of it, their victims all but invisible to society.|
Source:
The New York Times

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

14. OECD Factbook eXplorer
(Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development - OECD)

OECD Factbook eXplorer
http://stats.oecd.org/oecdfactbook/
The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has partnered with Linköping University to create this rather powerful analytical tool which they call the OECD Factbook eXplorer. First-time visitors can start using the site by going over to the "Dashboard" area on the right-hand side of the page and clicking one of the thematic "stories". These "stories" contain brief introductions to several key issues: labor market policies and labor participation fertility. Visitors can read through these themes to learn about the scatter plot screen, the time-series data, and the interactive map on the far left-hand side of the screen. After that, visitors can use the "Indicators" tab on the top of the homepage to load up one of the data files from the OECD and display it via the interactive map and the scatter plot screen. There's also a "Help" feature that can help users navigate the various options presented on this site. Overall, the eXplorer site will take time getting used to, but it will be most useful to policy analysts and others with an interest in development issues.
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report
http://scout.wisc.edu/
Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2009

Related link:

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
OECD brings together the governments of countries committed to democracy and the market economy from around the world to:
* Support sustainable economic growth * Boost employment * Raise living standards * Maintain financial stability * Assist other countries' economic development * Contribute to growth in world trade.
The Organisation provides a setting where governments compare policy experiences, seek answers to common problems, identify good practice and coordinate domestic and international policies.

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

15. Australian Policy Online

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

16. CRINMAIL - Summer 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

6 August 2009 - CRINMAIL 1097
CAMPAIGN: The future of children's rights – in whose hands?
They wield considerable power and influence, and can change the lives of thousands, maybe millions of children. Those nominated to exalted positions within the world of child rights can make a massive difference. But who are they? How are they chosen? And, most importantly, are they the best people for the job? Today, CRIN is launching a campaign on this crucial issue. Our aim? To stimulate open and transparent appointment processes in order to identify leaders with the appropriate commitment, skills and experience to work effectively for children’s rights. We have identified an initial list of key global child rights positions, listed in order of their due date for renewal or reappointment.

19 June 2009 - CRINMAIL 1094 - Human Rights Council special edition
* Complaints mechanism: Council takes first step
* Alternative care: Guidelines edge towards New York

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Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com




***********************************************

Best of the Worst Song Titles

***********************************************

 (These are ACTUAL song titles.)

1. Get Your Biscuits In The Oven And Your Buns In The Bed

2. Her Teeth Were Stained, But Her Heart Was Pure

3. How Can I Miss You If You Won't Go Away?

4.  I Changed Her Oil, She Changed My Life

5.  I Don't Know Whether To Kill Myself Or Go Bowling

6. I'd Rather Have A Bottle In Front Of Me Than A Frontal Lobotomy

7.  I've Been Flushed From The Bathroom Of Your Heart

8.  If You Don't Leave Me Alone, I'll Go And Find Someone Else Who Will

9.  If You Leave Me, Can I Come Too?

10.  She Got The Gold Mine And I Got The Shaft

11. Velcro Arms, Teflon Heart

12. You Can't Have Your Kate And Edith Too

13. You Can't Roller Skate In A Buffalo Herd

14. You're The Reason Our Kids Are So Ugly

And that universal favourite:

15. Here's a Quarter, Call Someone Who Cares

Source:
http://www.c4vct.com/kym/humor/c-w.htm
(Click the link for  30 more song titles)


Can't get enough of those  funny song titles?
http://funny2.com/songs.htm


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And, in closing...

*****************

Two of life's great secrets revealed:

Cadbury's Caramilk Bar Secret
How do they get the Caramel in the Caramilk bar?

How do they get Stripes in Stripe Toothpaste?

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100 Things Your Kids May Never Know About

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Top 10 Amazing Animal Videos
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/11/top-10-amazing/
..
My favourites are  Ninja Cat (ROFL) and Polar Bears Playing With Dogs

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AutoBeef - "What's wrong with your car?"
http://www.carcomplaints.com/

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World Digital Library
http://www.wdl.org/en/