Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 9, 2014

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,739 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Welfare in Canada 2013 (Caledon Institute of Social Policy) - November 3
2. Low-income Canadians hit by banking frills : November is Financial Literacy Month - November 3
3. Bill C-626 : An Act to amend the Statistics Act (appointment of Chief Statistician and long-form census)
(Parliament of Canada website) - November 7
4. HungerCount 2014 (Food Banks Canada) - November 4
5. Harper's Canada: Using omnibus budget bills to deny health and social assistance to refugees (rabble.ca) - November 3
6. The staying power of unions (Trish Hennessy, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - November 1
7. Narrowing the Gap : The Difference That Public Sector Wages Make (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - October 29
8. Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne a social justice premier? (Reuel S. Amdur in The Canadian Charger) - October 25
9. Ontario : total income of single parents working at minimum wage went from $20K to $34K per year between 2013 and 2014 because of poverty reduction plan!! (Government of Ontario)
10.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour Force Survey, October 2014 - November 7
--- Overview of the Canadian Government Finance Statistics - November 7
--- Canadian Financial Capability Survey, 2014 - November 6
--- Provincial/territorial economic accounts and more - November 5
--- Study: University graduates with lower levels of literacy and numeracy skills, 2012 - November 4
--- Business and employment dynamics data, for each province and the territories, 2001 to 2012 - November 4

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
13. London (U.K.) Living Wage increases by 35p to £9.15 per hour (BBC) - November 3
14. NewsFlash, October 2014 (Basic Income Earth Network)
15. Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm ]
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. Welfare in Canada 2013 - November 3
(Caledon Institute of Social Policy)

New from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Welfare in Canada 2013
News Release
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/Detail/?ID=1057
November 3, 2014
This report focuses on the incomes of four different households living on social assistance, commonly known as welfare. It is a continuation of the welfare incomes series published regularly by the former National Council of Welfare.

Total welfare incomes consist of the sum of two main components:
1. social assistance
2. provincial/territorial and federal child benefits as well as relevant
provincial/territorial and federal tax credits.
- incl. highlights of the report

Complete report:

Welfare in Canada 2013 (PDF - 255K, 93 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1057ENG.pdf
November 2014
By Anne Tweddle, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman

Table of contents:
*
Introduction
* What is welfare?
* Assets
* Income
* Earnings exemption provisions
* Welfare incomes by province/territory
* Adequacy of welfare incomes by province/territory
* Poverty measures (Low income cut-offs, Market Basket Measure)
* Income measures (After-tax average incomes, After-tax median incomes)

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

Comment (by Gilles):
A GREAT BIG THANK-YOU to Caledon Institute of Social Policy
for maintaining this invaluable resource for welfare researchers of every stripe!
For more information on Caledon's rescue of Welfare Incomes in Canada, click the link below to the 2012 edition of this report and scroll halfway down the page to "Historical/Contextual information."

--------------------------------------------------

Earlier editions of this report:

Welfare in Canada 2012
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare_in_canada_2012.htm
By Anne Tweddle, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
December 2013
(This edition was also prepared by Caledon.)

---

2011 Welfare Incomes by province/territory
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare_incomes_2011.htm
The 2011 edition of Welfare Incomes consisted mainly of an update to the numbers from the previous (2009) edition.

---

Welfare in Canada : The Tangled Safety Net
(PDF - 2.7MB, 131 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1987_tangled_safety_net.pdf
1987
This was the first report of the National Council of Welfare that presented interprovincial welfare rate comparisons (for 1986). All information was vetted by provincial/territorial officials before finalizing the report. The model and the methodology have remained constant for every subsequent edition of the report (with the exception of the Person with a Disability category, which was added in as of the 1989 edition.

Publications Canada search results page for "Welfare incomes"
http://goo.gl/dnp4O
This is a collection of links to the complete Welfare Incomes series of reports.

---

- Go to the Welfare in Canada 2013 page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare_in_canada_2013.htm

2. Low-income Canadians hit by banking frills : November is Financial Literacy Month - November 3

Low-income Canadians hit by banking frills
http://www.thestar.com/business/personal_finance/2014/11/03/lowincome_canadians_hit_by_banking_frills_roseman.html
Banks like to champion financial literacy in November. But their expensive products sold with high-pressure pitches can be a problem, not a solution.
By Ellen Roseman
November 3, 2014
(...)
John Stapleton works as a volunteer to educate low-income people about their finances. I did a presentation with him at the Toronto Reference Library, showcasing his work about retirement planning on a low income. He sent me a link to his new report (the next link below) based on the lessons learned giving a financial literacy course to marginalized people on behalf of Houselink Community Homes in Toronto.

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

---

Welcome to the Financial Mainstream?
The Hazards Facing Low Income People When Navigating the Financial World
(PDF - 7.2MB, 36 pages)
http://openpolicyontario.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/jsbb-report-FINAL_Hires-1-1.pdf
By John Stapleton for Houselink (with Max Wallace)
November 2014
In the winter of 2013/2014, Houselink Community Homes, an agency serving marginalized people with mental health issues, responded to a need they had observed over decades. They offered an eight-week financial literacy course for their members and staff.
(...)
The report has two purposes. The first is to document some of the lessons learned from conducting a financial literacy course on behalf of Houselink Community Homes over the winter of 2013/14. (...) The second purpose is to shine some light on issues we are often unaware of when we design financial literacy courses. Not all of these issues can be resolved by teaching yet more financial literacy.

Houselink Community Homes
http://www.houselink.on.ca/

---

Related links:

Retiring on a low income Toolkit (PDF - 1.1MB, 19 pages)
http://openpolicyontario.com/retiring-on-a-low-income-3/
By John Stapleton

WoodGreen Presentation:
Retiring on a Low Income:
Why it is Different….
http://openpolicyontario.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Retiring-on-a-Low-Incomejune11.pdf
By John Stapleton
June 11, 2014

Open Policy (John Stapleton's website/blog)
http://openpolicyontario.com/

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Financial Literacy Month
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/financialLiteracy/initiativesProjects/flm/Pages/home-accueil.aspx
November is Financial Literacy Month in Canada, and the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada is proud to play a role in raising awareness and mobilizing organizations across Canada to take part. Financial literacy means having the knowledge, skills and confidence to make responsible financial decisions.

Source:
Financial Consumer Agency of Canada
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/Pages/home-accueil.aspx
The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) is an independent body working to protect and inform consumers of financial products and services. We were established in 2001 by the federal government to strengthen oversight of consumer issues and expand consumer education in the financial sector. In July 2010, FCAC was also tasked with the oversight of payment card network operators and their commercial practices.

---

- Go to the Banks and Business Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bookmrk3.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (O-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk4.htm

3. Bill C-626 : An Act to amend the Statistics Act (appointment of Chief Statistician and long-form census) - November 7
(Parliament of Canada website)

Bill C-626
An Act to amend the Statistics Act (appointment of Chief Statistician and long-form census)
[Reinstatement of the long-form Census questionnaire]
http://openparliament.ca/bills/41-2/C-626/
November 7, 2014
- includes a link to the full text of the Bill [ http://goo.gl/dmGqlt ] , the transcript of the House debate of November 7 (Click the tiny "see more" link in the left margin beside each speaker for the full text) and the complete statement by Ted Hsu upon tabling the Private Member's Bill on September 22, 2014.

Sponsor:
Ted Hsu, Liberal

Introduced on September 22nd, 2014, as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status:
Second reading (House), as of Nov. 7, 2014

Summary:
This enactment amends the Statistics Act to establish a process to appoint the Chief Statistician of Canada. It also prescribes additional duties for the Chief Statistician and increases the independence of the Chief Statistician in carrying out his or her duties.

Further, it provides for a long-form questionnaire to be used for taking the census of population under that Act.

Elsewhere
All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Source:
Open Parliament

http://openparliament.ca/

---

Related links:

Good Decisions Need Good Numbers:
Take action today to bring back the long-form census!
https://evidencefordemocracy.ca/census
Right now (Nov. 9, 2014), there is a bill before parliament that proposes to amend the Statistics Act in order to reinstate the long form census and expand the authority of the Chief Statistician of Canada. MP Ted Hsu introduced Bill C-626 as a private member’s bill in September 20141. The bill is currently up for debate and will come to a vote this winter.
- Click the link above, then scroll halfway down the page to send an email message to your M.P. and the federal party leaders.
("Bring back the long-form census!" is the Subject Line of the prepared email message.)
If you scroll down past the message portion of the page, you'll find some background info on the mandatory long form census questionnaire and the National Household Survey. Near the bottom of the same page, you'll find links to 15 related articles and media releases.

Source:
Evidence for Democracy
https://evidencefordemocracy.ca/
Evidence for Democracy (E4D) advocates for the transparent use of science and evidence in public policy and government decision-making.A national, non-partisan, and not-for-profit organization, E4D formed out of concern over recent government cuts to important science institutions, and policies that restrict the flow of scientific information to the public.

"LIKE" the E4D Facebook page to receive
the most up-to-date information Bill C-626:

https://www.facebook.com/E4Dca

.

Reinstatement of the Long-Form Census – Bill C-626
http://datalibre.ca/2014/11/06/reinstatement-of-the-long-form-census-bill-c-626/
- includes links to a collection of helpful resources from Tracey Lauriault of datalibre.ca [ http://datalibre.ca/ ]

.

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page [ 400+ related links! ]:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

4. HungerCount 2014 - November 4
(Food Banks Canada)

November 4, 2014
HungerCount 2014 offers a deep look at the root causes of the need for food banks
The report shows that in a typical month, food banks in Canada now provide food and other supports to more than three quarters of a million separate individuals – 841,000 people. This means 170,000 more people each month are seeking assistance, compared to when the economic downturn started in 2008 – a 25% increase.

HungerCount 2014 (PDF - 23.6MB, 40 pages)
http://goo.gl/WYT1v5
841,191 Canadians turn to food banks every month.
In a country as wealthy as Canada, close to a million people need food banks just to make ends meet each month. Why have we not seen any significant change to this situation after so many years, and after so much has been written about hunger? HungerCount 2014 uncovers the hard data on food bank use, tells the story behind the numbers, and digs deep to explore the root causes of hunger in our country. It then provides our recommendations to bring about real and lasting change.

Food Banks Canada: HungerCount 2014 (YouTube video, duration 1:26)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0GB_YDamjQ

Food Bank use in Canada by the numbers (JPG file, 3.5MB)
http://goo.gl/hmLU17
Graphic showing food bank use in March 2014, by province and territory

What Food Banks Do (Infographic)
http://goo.gl/9OENtK

HungerCount 2014 Infographic
http://goo.gl/5ATnwY

Earlier editions of HungerCount (back to 2008)
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/HungerCount
[Scroll down just past the video on the home page.]

Source:
HungerCount
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/HungerCount
The HungerCount report is the only comprehensive study of food bank use in Canada.It offers a snapshot of the people helped by food banks and other charitable food programs, looks at the causes of hunger and food insecurity, and offers recommendations to reduce hunger.

HungerCount is a project of
Food Banks Canada
http://www.foodbankscanada.ca/
Food Banks Canada supports a unique network of over 3,000 food-related organizations in every province and territory, assisting more than 800,000 Canadians each month. Together our network shares over 200 million pounds of essential, safe, quality food annually, provides social programs that help to foster self-sufficiency, and advocates for policy change that will help create a Canada where no one goes hungry

--

Related links

From CP24:

Food banks side with NDP in debate over child care versus tax benefits
http://www.cp24.com/news/food-banks-side-with-ndp-in-debate-over-child-care-versus-tax-benefits-1.2085524
November 4, 2014
OTTAWA -- Canadian food banks are wading into the hot political debate over how best the federal government can help families with kids: give them tax breaks, as the Conservatives are doing, or invest in regulated child care, as the NDP proposes. In its annual HungerCount report, Food Banks Canada comes down squarely on the side of the NDP.
It says the use of food banks remains 25 per cent higher than it was before the devastating global recession in 2008 and that 37 per cent of those helped are children.
According to the report, almost half of the households helped are families with kids and nearly half of those are two-parent families.
(...)
According to the HungerCount 2014 report, 841,191 people received food from a food bank in Canada last March, a month that is considered average for food bank use. That's up one per cent over the same period last year and remains 25 per cent higher than in 2008.

Source:
CP24

http://www.cp24.com/

---

From
PressProgress:

November 5, 2014
Jason Kenney and the child poverty report that didn't quite say what he says it said
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/jason-kenney-and-child-poverty-report-didnt-quite-say-what-he-says-it-said
You can criticize Jason Kenney for a lot of things.
But you can't criticize the Employment Minister for lacking in wishful thinking.
This week in the House of Commons, the Opposition asked Kenney about the rise in the number of people visiting food banks since 2008.
(...)
Kenney's response? He rejected the "premise of the question," and turned to a recent report from UNICEF, claiming it showed the Conservative government as a world leader in the fight to end child poverty. But if Kenney had read the UNICEF report closely, he would have discovered it actually says that in 2013, "one-third of food bank users were children, despite representing less than a quarter of the total population." This reflects "higher poverty rates and a more difficult labour market" among marginalized groups. UNICEF's source for that statistic is Food Banks Canada -- the same organization Kenney was asked about during Question Period and tried to debunk by citing the UNICEF report.

Watch this YouTube video [ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hs3eXocZ1jM ] (duration 1:47)
to see how Kenney's attempts to tout his government's record on child poverty fall down on the facts.

Source:
PressProgress

http://www.pressprogress.ca/

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

5. Harper's Canada: Using omnibus budget bills to deny health and social assistance to refugees - November 3
(rabble.ca)

Harper's Canada: Using omnibus budget bills to deny health and social assistance to refugees
http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/council-canadians/2014/11/harpers-canada-using-omnibus-budget-bills-to-deny-health-so
By Michael Butler
November 3, 2014
This past Friday, the Federal Court of Appeal made the decision to uphold a ruling from earlier this summer which stated that the Conservative government must reverse its unconstitutional, “cruel and unusual” cuts to refugee health care. The federal government had been trying to delay having to reinstate the Interim Federal Health Program, but this ruling against the federal government gives them until November 4th to restore access to these health benefits for refugees.

People from all walks of society have been protesting these cuts to the most basic of human rights in Canada. Upholding this decision is a major victory against the xenophobia, racism and outright callousness displayed by the federal government.
(...)
Predicting that the Federal Court of Appeal would not be ruling in the Conservative government’s favour (due to the predatory nature of their bill), a private member bill - Bill C-585 -had been snaking its waythrough parliament to amend the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act. This bill would allow provinces to individually impose residency requirements for eligibility for social assistance benefits and restrict access to those benefits by refugees.
(...)
Now, the Conservative government has returned with another omnibus budget bill (Bill C-43, at almost 500 pages this time). Much like previous installments, this is what the Conservative government does when it wants to make major changes to policy and law without having serious debate or oversight. Not surprisingly, buried in this abuse of process and contempt for parliament is bill C-585 (sections 172 and 173). For a substantive and thoughtful backgrounder on what this will mean for refugee claimants, see http://www.health4all.ca/denying-refugee-claimants-social-assistance-rolled-into-budget-bill/

Source:
rabble.ca

http://rabble.ca/

---

Related links from the
Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC):

Take Action: Bill C-585 Moved into Federal Budget
ISAC appears at Senate hearing on November 6
http://goo.gl/8HHZ1y

- includes a brief history of Private Member's Bill C-585, the provisions of which got a big boost on October 23, with the tabling of the Harper Government's third (or was it fourth?) omnibus BillC-43...

Read the ISAC presentation immediately below for an analysis of the impacts of denying social assistance to refugees and the implications of a weakened national standard under the Canada Social Transfer (federal funding for provincial/territorial social assistance).

ISAC Presentation to the Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology
Bill C-43 (Budget Bill), sections 172 & 173
Amendments to the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act
(PDF - 135K, 6 pages)
http://www.incomesecurity.org/documents/C-43SenateCommitteePresentationNov62014.pdf
November 6, 2014
By Marie Chen

ISAC Staff Lawyer

Thank you for inviting us to be part of this panel. We welcome the opportunity to speak about sections 172 and 173 of Budget Bill C-43 which propose to amend the Canada Social Transfer national standard in the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act. ISAC opposes this amendment and asks that the Committee recommend that
sections 172 and 173 be rejected.
(...)
Canada has obligations under the Refugee Convention to protect refugees. People who have made claims in Canada are legally entitled to be in Canada while accessing the refugee determination process.

Take action!

Here are three things you can do to oppose this move:
1. Individuals - Sign the Petition

2. Organizations – Endorse an Open Letter
3. Forward this email right away to others who you know will also be concerned.
More info:
http://goo.gl/8HHZ1y

Also on the Take Action home page:
http://goo.gl/8HHZ1y
[Click the link above to access any of the articles below.]
*
Canadian Council for Refugees submission to the Senate Standing Committee
*
Globe and Mail: Federal omnibus Bill restricts refugee access to social assistance benefits
* Globe and Mail: Refugee advocates blast proposed changes to welfare in budget bill
* CBC: Budget Bill's cuts to refugee assistance tops the Opposition’s list of complaints
* Toronto Star: New measure would put refugees at risk, say opposition MP
* An interview with Opposition MP on CBC’s The Current
* Globe and Mail editorial says Ottawa is "omnibusted"
* Letter to the Editor of the Toronto Star: Refugee bullying reaches new low
*
Amnesty International statement on how denying social assistance to refugee claimants violates international law

Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre

http://www.incomesecurity.org/
The Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC) is a community-based legal clinic funded by Legal Aid Ontario. We have a provincial mandate to improve the income security of people living in Ontario through test case litigation, policy advocacy and community organizing.

---

BILL C-585
An Act to amend the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act (period of residence)
First reading, April 4, 2014
http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&DocId=6515312

Sections 172 & 173 of Bill C-43 (Budget Bill):
Amendments to the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act

http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&DocId=6737565&File=176#27

---

November 8, 2014 ADDENDUM
Federal government points finger at Ontario over refugee welfare reform
http://metronews.ca/news/canada/1207404/ottawa-points-finger-at-ontario-over-refugee-welfare-reform/
The Ontario government has denied a suggestion by Ottawa that the province brought up the idea of imposing minimum residency requirement to restrict refugee access to government assistance.
On Thursday, a senior federal immigration director told a Senate committee that the idea — currently embedded in an omnibus budgetary bill C-43 — “came up” during conversations with Ontario officials over the province’s policy responses to Ottawa’s refugee reforms. (...) Bill C43 will go before the parliamentary finance and immigration committees on Nov. 18 and 19, and return to the House of Commons for a final vote as soon as the end of the month.

Source:
MetroNews
http://metronews.ca/news/

---

- Go to the 2014 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2014.htm

6. The staying power of unions - November 1
(
Trish Hennessy, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

The staying power of unions
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/monitor/essay-staying-power-unions
By Trish Hennessy
November 1, 2014
The spring air, typically redolent with a sense of hope and renewal, hung over Queen's Park in May 2014 like a menacing storm cloud ready to break into a twister.
Two years of rancorous, scandal-ridden minority government had collapsed. Writ dropped, Ontarians faced a stark political reality: the prospect of a hard-right Progressive Conservative leader intent on declaring outright war on the province's labour movement.
(...)
No one ever handed unions an easy victory and no one likely ever will. Perhaps that is part of their staying power.
---
- includes a brief timeline of the evolution of the organized labour movement in Canada from the late 1800s to the Ontario Progressive Conservative leader's declaration of war on unions in the 2014 election in that province.
(...)
The challenges to collective action are constant and constantly changing. That's why unions are a great equalizer, a balancing act within capitalism, potentially even a game changer for something revolutionary. That is part of their tremendous staying power.

It's why unions matter.

[Author Trish Hennessy is the director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives–Ontario.]

Source:
The Monitor, November 2014
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/monitor/november-2014
[Click the link above to access six more articles.]

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://policyalternatives.ca

---

- Go to the Union Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/unionbkmrk.htm

7. Narrowing the Gap : The Difference That Public Sector Wages Make - October 29
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Less wage discrimination for women, aboriginals, and visible minorities in public sector, not higher salaries overall: study
https://policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/news-releases/less-wage-discrimination-women-aboriginals-and-visible-minorities-public
October 29, 2014
OTTAWA—Women, aboriginal workers, and visible minority workers experience less wage discrimination in the public sector than in the private sector, says a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).

Narrowing the Gap:
The Difference That Public Sector Wages Make
(PDF - 730K, 30 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2014/10/Narrowing_the_Gap.pdf
By Kate McInturff and Paul Tulloch
This study compares the wages of full-time public and private sector workers and finds significant gaps in the wages of women, aboriginal workers, and visible minority workers—and that those gaps are bigger in the private sector in every instance.

Version française:
Refermer l’écart : La différence que font les salaires du secteur public
(PDF - 763Ko., 32 pages)
https://policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/refermer-l%E2%80%99%C3%A9cart

Table of contents:
* Introduction
* The Gender Gap
* The Education Gap
* The Discrimination Gap
* The Bottom Line
* Appendices
* Notes

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://policyalternatives.ca

---

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

- Go to the First Nations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Union Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/unionbkmrk.htm

8. Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne a social justice premier? - October 25
(Reuel S. Amdur in The Canadian Charger)

October 25, 2014
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne a social justice premier?
http://www.thecanadiancharger.com/page.php?id=5&a=1794
By
Reuel S. Amdur
In her post-election publicity, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne promised, among other things, "better support" for those on social assistance. "We will increase Ontario Works and Ontario Disability Support Program rates. . . by one per cent in 2014-15. We will also increase benefits for single Ontario Works clients without children, giving them a total benefit increase of $30 per month in 2014, for a total increase over two years of $50."
(...)
If Wynne can’t do any better than she has on the poverty envelope, she is little more than a Mike Harris (former Ontario Premier) in a skirt. As pointed out, in constant dollars Ontario Works recipients were actually better off under Harris!

Source:
The Canadian Charger

http://www.thecanadiancharger.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

9. Ontario : total income of single parents working at minimum wage went from $20K to $34K per year between 2013 and 2014 because of poverty reduction plan!! (Government of Ontario)

NOTE (by Gilles):
Today, while I was doing a cleanup of the links on the Ontario poverty reduction links page of the Canadian Social Research Links website:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty_ontario.htm

... I came across this doozie of a statement that I had to share with you (after picking myself up off the floor...):

"Since 2003, the income of a single parent with two children [in Ontario], working full time at a minimum-wage job, has gone from less than $20,000 per year to over $34,000 per year."

Source of this quote:
Realizing Our Potential: Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy (2014-2019)
http://www.ontario.ca/home-and-community/realizing-our-potential-ontarios-poverty-reduction-strategy-2014-2019#section-3

Wow - THAT''s impressive.

What other gems will you find buried in this blueprint for the Ontario Poverty Reduction Plan from 2014 to 2019 ?
Read the complete report and find out for yourself:

By Realizing Our Potential: Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy (2014-2019)
Updated September 3, 2014
HTML version : http://www.ontario.ca/home-and-community/realizing-our-potential-ontarios-poverty-reduction-strategy-2014-2019
PDF version (PDF - 4MB, 52 pages) : https://dr6j45jk9xcmk.cloudfront.net/documents/3384/en-prs-bklt-aug-28th-approved-final-s.pdf
Table of contents:

* Executive summary
* Introduction
* Building on progress: Ontario’s first Poverty Reduction Strategy
* Poverty interrupted: continuing to break the cycle for children and youth
* Working against poverty: moving towards employment and income security
* Right at home: a long-term goal to end homelessness in Ontario
* Investing in what works: using evidence-based social policy and measuring success
* Conclusion

---

- Go to the "new & improved" Ontario Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty_ontario.htm

10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour Force Survey, October 2014 - November 7
--- Overview of the Canadian Government Finance Statistics
- November 7
--- Canadian Financial Capability Survey, 2014
- November 6
--- Provincial/territorial economic accounts and more
- November 5
--- Study: University graduates with lower levels of literacy and numeracy skills, 2012 - November 4
--- Business and employment dynamics data, for each province and the territories, 2001 to 2012
- November 4

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/a-daily-quotidien-eng.htm

Past issues of The Daily
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last

[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

November 7, 2014
Labour Force Survey, October 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141107/dq141107a-eng.htm
Employment rose for the second consecutive month, up 43,000 in October. This pushed the unemployment rate down 0.3 percentage points to 6.5%, the lowest rate since November 2008.

November 7, 2014
Overview of the Canadian Government Finance Statistics:
Latest Developments in the Canadian Economic Accounts
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/13-605-x/2014005/article/14088-eng.htm
The Canadian Government Finance Statistics Framework is compiled according to the International Monetary Fund’s 2014 Government Finance Statistics manual. Much of the information used to produce this paper has been sourced from the IMF manual.

The 2011 to 2013 revisions of the Income and Expenditure Accounts:
Latest Developments in the Canadian Economic Accounts
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/13-605-x/2014006/article/14109-eng.htm

November 7, 2014
Canadian Financial Capability Survey, 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141106/dq141106b-eng.htm
In 2014, one in three Canadian adults (33.8%) were not preparing financially for retirement either on their own or through an employer pension plan, according to data from the Canadian Financial Capability Survey. Almost 6 in 10 (59.6%) Canadian adults did not know how much money they would need to save to maintain their desired standard of living during retirement.

November 5, 2014
For the number-crunchers:
--- Provincial and territorial economic accounts, 2013
--- National gross domestic product by income and expenditure accounts: Annual revision, first quarter 2011 to second quarter 2014
--- National and provincial-territorial input-output tables, 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141105/tdq141105-eng.htm
(Click the link to access these three resources
.)

November 4, 2014
Study: University graduates with lower levels of literacy and numeracy skills, 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141104/dq141104b-eng.htm
In 2012, more than a quarter of university graduates in Canada aged 25 to 65 had a literacy score at the second level or below (out of five levels) in a survey on adult competencies led by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

November 4, 2014
Business and employment dynamics data, for each province and the territories, 2001 to 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141104/dq141104e-eng.htm
Annual data on business and employment dynamics in the private sector are now available for each province and the territories, from 2001 to 2012.

Check past issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select day / month / year to access issues of The Daily going back to 1995.

StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng
The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.
Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

November 7, 2014
What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Coming in 2020: A national child care program for Canada
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/coming-2020-national-child-care-program-canada
5 Nov 2014 | Canada
In a paper for Our schools/Our selves, Martha Friendly and Bozica Costigliola describe how and why the upcoming national child care policy conference was organized and how Canada can have a national child care program by 2020. The authors argue that "the federal government, while respecting issues of provincial/territorial jurisdiction, must step up to the plate".

Early childhood education and care for Aboriginal children in Canada
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/early-childhood-education-and-care-aboriginal-children-cana
5 Nov 2014 | Canada
Policy brief by Jane Preston discusses contextual factors that are important to quality Aboriginal early childhood education and argues that "strong collaborative efforts are needed by multi-level leaders to ensure that quality Aboriginal early childhood education is actualized throughout Canada". This policy brief is part of the Moving Child Care Forward project.

Harper announces 'Family Tax Cut' (income splitting) and increases to the UCCB and Child Care Expense Deduction
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/harper-announces-family-tax-cut-income-splitting-and-increa
5 Nov 2014 | Canada
The Harper government announced their plans to implement income splitting under their new Family Tax Cut, as well as increasing the Universal Child Care Benefit and the amount that can be claimed under the Child Care Expense Deduction. CRRU has collected current and related analysis and news of the Harper government's proposal.

The evolution of Canada's child care debates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/evolution-canadas-child-care-debates
5 Nov 2014 | Canada
In the lead up to ChildCare2020, Lisa Pasolli reflects on how "child care debates have unfolded over the past several decades, and particularly how the three previous national conferences - in 1971, 1982, and 2004 - acted as important landmarks in the sometimes-rocky landscape of Canadian child care history".

Fact or fiction? Seven persistent myths about child care
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/fact-or-fiction-seven-persistent-myths-about-child-care
5 Nov 2014 | Canada
BRIEFing Note from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit identifies seven common myths about child care and provides responses for each based on what we know from research, policy and practice.

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad

Childcare quality does not drive up costs: study
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/childcare-quality-does-not-drive-costs-study
5 Nov 2014 | Australia and New Zealand

Child care advocates say parents have clear choice in next federal election
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/child-care-advocates-say-parents-have-clear-choice-next-federal-elec
5 Nov 2014 | Canada

New rural daycare will keep Manitoba parents from crossing boarder
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/new-rural-daycare-will-keep-manitoba-parents-crossing-boarder
5 Nov 2014 | Manitoba

High quality early childhood education primes children for family income decline
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/high-quality-early-childhood-education-primes-children-family-income
5 Nov 2014 | International

Reimagining early childhood education
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/reimagining-early-childhood-education
5 Nov 2014 | United States

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CRRU Archive

All newer content from January 2013 to date is archived in a special section of the Early Childhood Development Links page of this site.
Click the link immediately below to go there:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm#crru

For links to weekly issues of this weekly alert from June 2009 to December 2012*,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

* NOTE (by Gilles):
In December 2012, my HTML editing software was crashing whenever I would open the above archive page to add or edit something.
After several hours of tinkering in a vain attempt to make everything work, I finally decided to go with Plan B : you can still click the link above to access the CRRU archive (including contents of each issue from June 2009 to December 2012), but all new content since then is archived on the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/

Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag.
Tags include:
* Academic achievement * Affordable Care Act (ACA) * Applicants * Budget cuts * California * Cash assistance * Census * Child poverty * Child welfare * Child well-being * Cities * Economic stimulus * Eligibility * Enrollment * Florida * Food insecurity * Foster care * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless families * Income * Indiana * Jobless benefits * Job losses * Jobs * Kids Count * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Michigan * Minnesota * Neighborhoods * Ohio * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Privatization * Recession * Safety net * Schools * Shelters * SNAP/Food Stamps * States * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Texas * Unemployment rate * Wisconsin

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

November 7, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/11/07/
Medicaid Reimbursement Rates
Risk Load of High-Poverty Schools
October Jobs Report (2 articles)

November 6, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/11/06/
Homeless Shelter Shortage – Washington, D.C.

November 5, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/11/05/
State Minimum Wage Increases (3 articles)
UK Cost of Living and Poor Households

November 4, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/11/04/
Workfare – New York City

November 3, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/11/03/
U.S. Child Poverty

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page: [ http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/ and click on a date in the calendar in the top right-hand corner of the page.
2. Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page and click on a category or a tag in the right-hand margin.
4. See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm (more complete listing, but only goes back to December 2011)

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

13. London (U.K.) Living Wage increases by 35p to £9.15 per hour - November 3
(BBC)

London (England)

London Living Wage increases by 35p to £9.15 per hour
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-29871300
3 November 2014
The living wage - the amount needed to cover the basic costs of living - has increased by 4% on the current £8.80. Outside London, the Living Wage will rise 20p to £7.85. In the capital, more than 400 companies have been accredited and have signed up to the voluntary scheme. About 634,000 people employed in London earned less than the new rate in 2013, a report by KPMG [ http://goo.gl/UZkp51 ] estimates.

Related links
from the BBC:

'Living wage' raised by 20p an hour
http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29873409

Thousands of low paid set for pay rise
http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29870309

Cinema company backs down over cuts
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-29838641

Source:
BBC News
http://www.bbc.com/news/

---

See also:

The Living Wage Foundation (London)
http://www.livingwage.org.uk/

The Living Wage - from KPMG (U.K.)
http://www.kpmg.com/uk/en/issuesandinsights/articlespublications/pages/living-wage.aspx

---

- Go to the Minimum Wage / Living Wage Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

14. NewsFlash, October 2014
(Basic Income Earth Network)

NEW from the
Basic Income Earth Network:

NewsFlash Volume 27, no. 77, October 2014
HTML version:
http://www.basicincome.org/bien/pdf/Flash77.html
PDF version PDF (134K, 22 pages):
http://www.basicincome.org/bien/pdf/Flash77.pdf

This is the newsletter of the Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN), which was founded in 1986 as the Basic Income European Network and expanded to become an Earth-wide Network in 2004. It serves as a link between individuals and groups committed to or interested in basic income. It fosters informed discussion on this topic throughout the world.

Table of Contents for
October 2014 issue:

1. Editorial
2. Events
--- A. New York, NY: Call for Proposals released for The 14th Annual NABIG Congress, Feb. 26 –Mar. 1, 2015: Deadline for submission: November 10, 2014
--- INTERNATIONAL: Basic Income Week Observed in Several Countries
--- CYBERSPACE: BIEN organizes Basic Income AMA Series: The 7th Annual International Basic Income Week, September 15-21, 2014
--- LONDON, UK: Citizen’s Income: A solid foundation for tomorrow’s society, 6th June 2014
3. News
--- BRAZIL: Eduardo Suplicy, long-term advocate of Unconditional Basic Income, defeated in his bid for reelection to the Brazilian Senate
--- CANADA: A Guaranteed Income is the Way of the Future, Says Minister Blais (Govt. of Québec)
--- EUROPEAN UNION: Basic Income Supporter Elected President of European Commission
4. BI Literature
5. Audio-video
6. About the Basic Income Earth Network and its NewsFlash

Subscribe to NewsFlash:
http://www.basicincome.org/bien/subscribe.php

Source:
Basic Income Earth Network

http://www.basicincome.org/bien/
Founded in 1986, the Basic Income European Network (BIEN) aims to serve as a link between individuals and groups committed to, or interested in, basic income, i.e. an income unconditionally granted to all on an individual basis, without means test or work requirement, and to foster informed discussion on this topic throughout Europe.

Related link:

Basic Income Canada Network
http://biencanada.ca/
Basic Income Canada Network / Réseau canadien pour le revenu garanti provides information on basic income, promotes the idea and educates the public and policy makers about ways to support a basic income.

---

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

15. Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://crin.org/

CRIN is a global children’s rights advocacy network. Established in 1995, we press for rights - not charity - and campaign for a genuine shift in how governments and societies view and treat children. We link to nearly 3,000 organisations that between them work on children’s rights in every country in the world and rely on our publications, research and information sharing.

Our Vision
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all their human rights guaranteed by the United Nations, regional organisations and national governments.

Link to the latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

05 November 2014 - CRINmail issue 1402
https://www.crin.org/en/home/what-we-do/crinmail/crinmail-1402
In this issue:
Latest news and report
- Call for UN study on children deprived of liberty
- Referendum used to curb LGBT rights
- Seeking equal treatment before the law
- Close abusive psychiatric facility, urge advocates
- Violence, cover-ups and discrimination
- Report looks at impact of recession on children
Access to justice for children in Estonia
Upcoming events
Employment
Also in this issue:
World news
Publications
Events
Issues
Law
Advocacy
Challenging breaches
Take action
Campaigns
Guides

---------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as in the above, back to 2009-2010

--------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to CRINMAIL English
http://www.crin.org/en/node/293
NOTE : In addition to CRINmail English, you can subscribe to the following newsletters:
* Armed Conflict CRINmail
* Child Rights at the United Nations
* Children in Court CRINmail
* CRINmail EN ESPAÑOL
* CRINmail Francais
* CRINmail in Arabic
* CRINmail in Russian
* Violence CRINmail

--------------------------------------------------

CRIN News Archive
http://crin.org/en/library/news-archive

--------------------------------------------------

CRIN Country Pages : CANADA
http://crin.org/en/library/countries/canada

--------------------------------------------------

Children's rights Wiki - from CRIN
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php
The Children's Rights Wiki assembles all information about children's rights in every country in one place. The purpose of the project is to make the huge volume of information that exists on children's rights more accessible, assist children's rights advocates in identifying persistent violations, and inspire collective action. This is a web-based, multi-lingual and interactive project.

--------------------------------------------------

Canada and Children's Rights
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php?title=Canada
- from the Children's Rights Wiki

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you don't already receive this weekly newsletter by email but would like to, you can sign up for the Canadian Social Research Newsletter on the online subscription page : http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



14 Words That Are Their Own Opposites

Here’s an ambiguous sentence for you: “Because of the agency’s oversight, the corporation’s behavior was sanctioned.” Does that mean, 'Because the agency oversaw the company’s behavior, they imposed a penalty for some transgression' or does it mean, 'Because the agency was inattentive, they overlooked the misbehavior and gave it their approval by default'? We’ve stumbled into the looking-glass world of “contronyms”—words that are their own antonyms.

1. Sanction (via French, from Latin sanctio(n-), from sancire ‘ratify,’) can mean ‘give official permission or approval for (an action)’ or conversely, ‘impose a penalty on.’
*
2. Oversight is the noun form of two verbs with contrary meanings, “oversee” and “overlook.” “Oversee,” from Old English oferseon ‘look at from above,’ means ‘supervise’ (medieval Latin for the same thing: super- ‘over’ + videre ‘to see.’) “Overlook” usually means the opposite: ‘to fail to see or observe; to pass over without noticing; to disregard, ignore.’
*
3. Left can mean either remaining or departed. If the gentlemen have withdrawn to the drawing room for after-dinner cigars, who’s left? (The gentlemen have left and the ladies are left.)
*
4. Dust, along with the next two words, is a noun turned into a verb meaning either to add or to remove the thing in question. Only the context will tell you which it is. When you dust are you applying dust or removing it? It depends whether you’re dusting the crops or the furniture.
*
5. Seed can also go either way. If you seed the lawn you add seeds, but if you seed a tomato you remove them.
*
6. Stone is another verb to use with caution. You can stone some peaches, but please don’t stone your neighbor (even if he says he likes to get stoned).
*
7. Trim as a verb predates the noun, but it can also mean either adding or taking away. Arising from an Old English word meaning ‘to make firm or strong; to settle, arrange,’ “trim” came to mean ‘to prepare, make ready.’ Depending on who or what was being readied, it could mean either of two contradictory things: ‘to decorate something with ribbons, laces, or the like to give it a finished appearance’ or ‘to cut off the outgrowths or irregularities of.’ And the context doesn’t always make it clear. If you’re trimming the tree are you using tinsel or a chain saw?
*
8. Cleave can be cleaved into two “homographs,” words with different origins that end up spelled the same. “Cleave,” meaning ‘to cling to or adhere,’ comes from an Old English word that took the forms cleofian, clifian, or clifan. “Cleave,” with the contrary meaning ‘to split or sever (something), ‘ as you might do with a cleaver, comes from a different Old English word, cleofan. The past participle has taken various forms: “cloven,” which survives in the phrase “cloven hoof,” “cleft,” as in a “cleft palate” or “cleaved.”
*
9. Resign works as a contronym in writing. This time we have homographs, but not homophones. “Resign,” meaning ‘to quit,’ is spelled the same as “resign,” meaning ‘to sign up again,’ but it’s pronounced differently.
*
10. Fast can mean "moving rapidly," as in "running fast," or ‘fixed, unmoving,’ as in "holding fast." If colors are fast they will not run. The meaning ‘firm, steadfast’ came first. The adverb took on the sense ‘strongly, vigorously,’ which evolved into ‘quickly,’ a meaning that spread to the adjective.
*
11. Off means ‘deactivated,’ as in "to turn off," but also ‘activated,’ as in "The alarm went off."
*
12. Weather can mean ‘to withstand or come safely through,’ as in “The company weathered the recession,” or it can mean ‘to be worn away’: “The rock was weathered.”
*
13. Screen can mean ‘to show’ (a movie) or ‘to hide’ (an unsightly view).
*
14. Help means ‘assist,’ unless you can’t help doing something, when it means ‘prevent.’

Source:
http://mentalfloss.com/article/49834/14-words-are-their-own-opposites
More:
http://www.dailywritingtips.com/75-contronyms-words-with-contradictory-meanings/

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Three Hours of Relaxing Music with Water Sounds Meditation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luRkeDCoxZ4

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42 Incredibly Weird Facts You’ll Want To Tell All Your Friends
http://www.buzzfeed.com/tomphillips/42-incredibly-weird-facts-youll-want-to-tell-people-down-the
My favourite:
#5. In 1923, jockey Frank Hayes won a race at Belmont Park in New York despite being dead — he suffered a heart attack mid-race, but his body stayed in the saddle until his horse crossed the line for a 20–1 outsider victory.
Gratuitous comment:
Hmmmm - Reminds me of some federal civil servants I knew in my working days...
("Good old Farquarson --- always the first in the office and last to leave. It took us 12 years to figure out that he died at his desk"

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Cable Cutter Canada
http://www.cablecutter.ca/
"Your best choice for online TV and movies. And most of it is free

---

700 Free Movies Online
http://www.openculture.com/freemoviesonline

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