Canadian Social Research Links logo 
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 11, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,112 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. Stand Up and Take Action - End Poverty NOW. (October 16-18)
2. New Brunswick Welfare minister slams his government on poverty issues; Premier promises more cash - October 8-9
3. What Can We Do About Pensions? (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - October 8
4. 2009 Weiler Award - University of Toronto, October 14
5. What's new from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- Why We Need a First Nations Education Act - October 2009
--- Talking Turkey on Taxes - October 2009
6. No Relief in Sight This Thanksgiving: 1700 Ontarians “Do the Math” and Find Social Assistance Rates Don’t Add Up (Poverty Watch Ontario) - October 8
7. Language Portal of Canada Launched, Termium terminology and linguistic data bank now free of charge (Government of Canada) - October 8
8. How federal and provincial benefits get wiped out with wage increases (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - October 6
9. Vital Signs reports for 16 Canadian cities released (Community Foundations of Canada) - October 6

10.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, September 2009 - October 9
11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - October 11
12. The Virtual Museum of Canada
13. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
14. Social Rights (new U.S.-based international site)
15. New / recent from the U.S. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:
--- The Safety Net’s Response to the Recession - October 8
--- Policy Basics: An Introduction to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) - Revised March 19
--- Overview of the TANF Provisions in the Economic Recovery Act - February 26
--- Online Information About Key U.S. State Low-Income Benefit Programs - Revised April 27
--- Food Stamps On-Line: A Review of State Government Food Stamp Websites - Updated July 8
16. 2009 Human Development Report (United Nations Development Programme) - October 5
17. International conference papers : Social Policy Association Conference (Edinburgh, Scotland) - June 29 to July 1, 2009
--- An Approach to Canada’s Child Poverty Problem…or Not? - By Thomas Brenner
--- Universal Basic Income: Reconsidering the Administrative Factor - By Jurgen de Wispelaere and Lindsay Stirton
--- Individualization, Citizenship, and Low Income Lone Mothers’ Caring “Choices” in Canada and Great Britain: Gender, Race, and Class Still Matter
- By Amber Gazso
--- Gender and Social Citizenship in Historical Perspective: The Development of Welfare Policy in England and Wales from the Poor Law to Beveridge - By Bernard Harris
--- The Political Practices of Disjointed and Directed Incrementalism: Federal Child Benefits and Childcare in Canada - By Grant Holly
--- Citizen’s Income* and the Crash: Credit, Debt and Citizen’s Income
- By Bill Jordan
--- Supporting Sole-Support Parents on Welfare in Canada - By Tracy Peressini
--- Welfare reform, neo-liberalization and bio-politics- By Jane Pulkingham and Sylvia Fuller
---The ‘deserving’ rich? Inequality, morality and social policy - By Karen Rowlingson and Stuart Connor
--- The foundations of welfare: Bruges and Ypres - By Paul Spicker
18. Australian Policy Online - recent content
19. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - October 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Stand Up and Take Action - End Poverty NOW. (October 16-18)

Stand Up and Take Action
Last year, more than 116 million Stood Up and Took Action to end poverty and in support of the Millennium Development Goals.
This year, join the growing movement.
Stand with us.

What are you doing for STAND UP?
October 4, 2009
- incl. links to
* Five reasons why we need to Get to the Point
* Organize a Stand Up event in your community
* Stand Up 2009 Resource Toolkit
* Attend a Stand Up
* Let us know you want to be involved
* Sample Media Advisory
* STAND UP Pledge
* more...
Source:
Make Poverty History
The Make Poverty History campaign was launched in Canada in 2005 with the support of a wide cross-section of public interest and faith groups, trade unions, students, academics, literary, artistic and sports leaders. National campaigns are now active in over 100 countries. Make Poverty History is part of the Global Call to Action against Poverty (GCAP).

Also from Make Poverty History:

On October 16, 17 and 18:
Join this growing three day global mobilization and stand with us!

1. Attend a Stand Up
2. Organize a Stand Up event
3. Act Online
4. Let us know you want to be involved

Related links:

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
The MDGs offer us a roadmap to end poverty and its root causes. In September 2000, 189 world leaders adopted the MDGs as part of the Millennium Declaration, agreed to at the United Nations Millennium Summit. (LEARN MORE)
The MDG's set an unprecedented global framework for development that is a crucial step towards ending poverty and inequality by 2015.

The Millennium Developmental Goals Are:
1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
2. Achieve universal primary education
3. Promote gender equality and empower women
4. Reduce child mortality
5. Improve maternal health
6. Combat HIV/AIDs, malaria, and other diseases
7. Ensure environmental sustainability
8. Develop a global partnership for development
Source:
United Nations

Download the complete
UN Millennium Development Goals 2009 report
(PDF - 8MB, 60 pages)

Also from the U.N.:

End Poverty 2015 Millennium Campaign
"We are the generation that can end poverty"
"End poverty by 2015" is the historic promise 189 world leaders made at the United Nations Millennium Summit in 2000 when they signed onto the Millennium Declaration and agreed to meet the Millennium Development Goals.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

2. New Brunswick Welfare minister slams his government on poverty issues; Premier promises more cash - October 8
(CBC New Brunswick)

N.B. minister slams own government on poverty issues
Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock proposes changes
October 8, 2009
The New Brunswick government came under intense criticism for its handling of poverty issues Thursday, but not from the Opposition. Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock accused his own government of nickel-and-diming the poor and proposed some big, and likely expensive, changes. In an extraordinary speech to a group of Saint John business leaders, Lamrock trashed social assistance policies as being bureaucratic and designed exclusively to save money, not to help the poor.
Source:
CBC New Brunswick

GOOD ON YOU, MINISTER LAMROCK!!

Graham promises money for poverty issues
October 9, 2009
Premier Shawn Graham is committing to give Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock the money he needs to fix New Brunswick's welfare system. Lamrock criticized successive governments, including his own, in a speech Thursday in Saint John and said he wants to put an end to welfare policy that tries to push people off assistance simply to save money.

And finally, in the CBC's 22 Minutes
version of this maverick saga:

Welfare Minister Resigns, Cites "Personal Reasons"
October 12, 2009
Early today, New Brunswick's Minister of Social Development Kelly Lamrock submitted his resignation to Premier Shawn Graham, effective immediately, citing "personal reasons" for leaving politics. The Premier thanked Mr. Lamrock for his many years of service to the public and his hard work for the good of the people of New Brunswick.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

3. What Can We Do About Pensions? - October 8
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Pension system needs urgent attention: report
Press Release
October 8, 2009
OTTAWA— Canada’s pension system needs urgent attention, says a new report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The report, by CCPA Research Associate and pension expert Monica Townson, outlines some of the problems with Canada’s pension system and examines some of the options that have been proposed to deal with them.

Complete report:

What Can We Do About Pensions? (PDF - 147K, 9 pages)
By Monica Townson
October 2009

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.

 

- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

4. 2009 Weiler Award - University of Toronto, October 14

2009 Weiler Award
In memory of
Dick Weiler (1942-1995), social advocate and humanitarian

The Weiler Award is presented annually to acknowledge and honour exceptional contributions to community and social development in Canada. The award is presented in memory of Dick Weiler, who helped lay the groundwork for social policies to promote national and community values in Canada. The Award recognises outstanding dedication by individuals, groups or organisations to social development/social justice causes through co-operative linkages and collaboration among individuals, groups, agencies and organisations. The individual, group or organisation honoured by this award is involved in social development as a catalyst for co-operation, social inclusiveness and creative response to social needs in both occupational and volunteer endeavours.

The Weiler Award for 2009 will be presented on October 14 at a luncheon held by the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto.

There are two co-winners of the Weiler Award for 2009:
* Marge Reitsma-Street, Ph.D, of the Faculty of Human and Social Development at the University of Victoria, and
* Gilles Séguin, the Canadian Social Research Links Guy.

---

Oh, my.
This is awkward.
I never wanted fame and I never wanted riches, and I've been lucky in avoiding both so far in my life.
When I was notified this past spring that Marge and I were co-recipients of the 2009 Weiler Award, my immediate reaction was: "I'm not worthy."
I've long been an admirer of the work of Marge Reitsma-Street, and I really didn't feel that we were in the same league in terms of "contributions to community and social development in Canada."
She, a Ph.D. in Social Work from the University of Toronto, Professor of Social Policy at the University of Victoria, researcher, author, speaker, community facilitator, and tireless social advocate.
Me? Joe BA, English Lit. (1970, University of Ottawa!), now working part-time on my retirement project, Canadian Social Research Links and Newsletter, in the basement at home with my three kitty supervisors.
But the Weiler Award isn't so much about recognizing credentials as it is about recognizing commitment to and passion for social justice, and it's in that light that I humbly accept this award. I'll be accepting the award as an "unsung hero", on behalf of all of the other unsung heroes out there, whether they're helping with lunch at the local men's shelter, or delivering meals on wheels to shut-ins, or blogging about poverty reduction, or doing volunteer stints at the local long-term care facility and so much more.

At first, I wasn't planning to include a link to the 2009 Weiler Award in my newsletter or on my site because I'm simply not the toot-your-own-horn type. I now recognize that it is entirely appropriate for me to use my site and newsletter to acknowledge this honour from the Weiler Award Trust and my supporters and to congratulate the person who is this year's other Weiler Award recipient.
Thanks, Weiler Award Trust!!
Thanks to those who nominated and supported me!
Congratulations, Marge!!

(I'll try to be a bit more formal in my acceptance speech...)

More about Marge Reitsma-Street
- University of Victoria Faculty Profile
Scroll down to see a photo of Marge - she's the one with the Calgary Tower growing from her head...
(;-D

Curriculum Vitae (PDF - 284K, 43 pages) - Spring 2009
- includes a full publications list, some with links to access reports online

University of Victoria School of Social Work
Announcement of Marge's Award

- includes a photo of Marge when she was a member of the Sudbury Better Beginnings, Better Futures Research Demonstration Project in 1992 (!) and a more recent photo with some of her proud grad students.

Studies in Policy and Practice Program - Marge's home at the University of Victoria

Past Weiler Award winners
- this is the link to the 2009 Weiler Award page - scroll down that page for the complete list of winners right back to 1996, including another BC hero of mine, my friend Michael Goldberg (2005), former Research Director of the Social Planning and Research Council in Vancouver.

5. What's new from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- Why We Need a First Nations Education Act - October 2009
--- Talking Turkey on Taxes - October 2009

What's new from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
:

Why We Need a First Nations Education Act (PDF - 120K, 36 pages)
By Michael Mendelson
October 2009
This paper discusses the need for a First Nations Education Act. The first step in achieving ‘Indian Control of Indian Education’ was for the federal government to cede control over First Nations education, and this has largely been done. But the second and more crucial step is for First Nations to step into the vacuum and create the necessary organizational and financial infrastructure for a high-quality First Nations education system, and this has not been done. Despite many First Nations attempts to establish needed educational infrastructure, only bits and pieces of an education system have so far been set up on various reserves across Canada . For the most part, the major elements of an education system for First Nations are missing. The paper describes those missing pieces and sets out a plan for how they may be put into place across Canada . It is a proposal for a new Act of Parliament which would allow First Nations that wished to do so to establish properly funded First Nations school boards with clear legal empowerment and the necessary regional educational agencies to support them.

Talking Turkey on Taxes (PDF - 32K, 2 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
October 2009
This commentary gives thanks to the three million Canadians who provide informal care to infirm or aging parents, or to relatives with severe disabilities. While most caregivers would not want to give up their caregiving role, many admit that it can create onerous financial strains, which threaten to push them into poverty. These pressures arise from paying for basics for family members unable to work; reducing work hours or leaving employment altogether; and covering additional age- or disability-related expenses. In recognition of these three ghosts of poverty, Ottawa provides modest income tax relief through the caregiver credit and infirm dependant credit. The paper discusses the limitations of these measures and proposes preferred options for caregiver support.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy does rigorous, high-quality research and analysis; seeks to inform and influence public opinion and to foster public discussion on poverty and social policy; and develops and promotes concrete, practicable proposals for the reform of social programs at all levels of government and of social benefits provided by employers and the voluntary sector

- Go to the First Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

6. No Relief in Sight This Thanksgiving: 1700 Ontarians “Do the Math” and Find Social Assistance Rates Don’t Add Up - October 8
(Poverty Watch Ontario)

No Relief in Sight This Thanksgiving: 1700 Ontarians “Do the Math” and Find Social Assistance Rates Don’t Add Up
October 8, 2009
Press Release
October 8, 2009
TORONTO – Thanksgiving is a time to remember that everyone should have enough food to eat — if not to celebrate with an abundant meal, at the very least to meet the minimum requirements for health and dignity. But data released from a new website shows what too many people lining up at food banks this Thanksgiving already know: social assistance in Ontario does not add up. The Stop Community Food Centre recently launched a web-based budgeting tool called “Do the Math” that asks people to weigh in on what they think a person on social assistance needs to survive. More than 1,700 people have completed the survey since it launched in June 2009, and results show that even the most frugal estimates fall far short of what people receive on Ontario Works (OW) and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP).
Source:
Poverty Watch Ontario
Mission : To monitor and inform on cross-Ontario activity on the poverty reduction agenda

The Stop Community Food Centre
From its origins as one of Canada’s first food banks, The Stop has blossomed into a thriving community hub where neighbours participate in a broad range of programs that provide healthy food, as well as foster social connections, build food skills and promote engagement in civic issues.

Do the Math
Poverty in Ontario is at an all time high. As the economic crisis grows, so does the number of people relying on social assistance and food banks.
Does a single person on social assistance receive enough income to live with health and dignity?
Do The Math to find out!

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

7. Language Portal of Canada Launched, Termium Plus terminology and linguistic data bank is now FREE of charge - October 8
(Government of Canada)

Translators and Language Purists, REJOICE!
(The rest of you should probably skip to the next red bar below, because you already write good.)

Canadians now have access to a Language Portal
News Release
October 8, 2009
Today the Government of Canada is launching the Language Portal of Canada, the first national Web site to showcase Canada's language expertise. This initiative is part of the government's official language strategy as outlined in the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality. The Language Portal was established to provide Canadians free access to the language tools that will enable them to use and understand both official languages more easily.

Language Portal of Canada
- incl. links to:
* About the Portal * Site Map * What's New? * * TERMIUM Plus® * Writing Tools * Gateway to English * Quizzes * Clear and Effective Communication * Dictionaries and Publications * Languages in Canada * Language Training * Language Professions * Standardization * Francophonie * Our Contributors (Geographical Index - Articles) * Contact Us * FAQs

The Language Portal Canada is a Web site that showcases Canadian expertise in the area of language. It informs readers about Canadian resources that deal with different aspects of language.
It offers:
* free access to language tools online;
* articles and writing tips, word games and exercises (the Well Written, Well Said section);
* a collection of links to language-related works and sites (the Discover section);
* Canadian writing tools and content produced by governments, universities, and others;
* language-related articles signed by our contributors;
* information in English and French, and in some Aboriginal languages;
* and much more.
[ About this site ]

TERMIUM Plus® [direct link to search page]
One of the key features of the Portal is free access to TERMIUM Plus®, the Translation Bureau's terminology and linguistic data bank, which contains nearly 4 million terms in English, French and Spanish.
- includes the latest terminology in nearly all fields, equivalents in either official language of acronyms, initialisms and abbreviations
- lets you find an expression using keywords
- helps you improve the clarity and effectiveness of your communications and save time
[ More information about Termium Plus ]

COMMENT:
Free access to Termium Plus --- YOWZA!
For anyone who works or does research in English, in French or in Spanish, this is an incredible resource.
When I last checked about six years ago, the price of this software package was prohibitive (~$300 for access via CD or online + $300 for annual updates).
Now, for people who want an authoritative resource for translation (or, as in my case, translation verification on an occasional basis), Termium Plus is totally FREE.
THANKS, GOVERNMENT OF CANADA!!

The Canadian Style
The Canadian Style gives concise answers to questions concerning written English in the Canadian context. It covers such topics as the decimal point, abbreviations, capital letters, punctuation marks, hyphenation, spelling, frequently misused or confused words and Canadian geographical names. It also includes useful advice for drafting letters, memos, reports, indexes and bibliographies.
- Click "Search by Chapter" or "Search by Index" for a free online English refresher course!
During the 30 years I spent in the federal government, The Canadian Style was the Bible of English usage, and Termium Plus was the Bible of Translation, for use throughout the federal government.

Favourite Articles
Click "Search by title"]
Favourite Articles is a collection of articles from the Translation Bureau's periodical, Language Update, dealing with English language usage and style, translation problems and other language-related matters.
Gilles' Gratuitous Comment:
If you have a cherished, dog-eared copy of "Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation" in your bookcase as I do, you'll be pleased to learn that there are many other Anne. L. Retentives out there just like you and me. If you've read this far, you'll most likely get goosebumps when you see some of the titles in the Favourite Articles section of the Language Portal.
For example:
* That and Which : which is which?
* The Elusive Dangling Modifier
* The How-Tos of Who and Whom
* English Then and Now
* The Language of Shakespeare : Canadian English - British English Dictionary
* More...

- Go to the Reference Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/reference.htm

8. How federal and provincial benefits get wiped out with wage increases - October 6
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Now You See It, Now You Don’t
How federal and provincial benefits get wiped out with wage increases
(PDF - 123K, 3 pages)
By Michael Goldberg and Steve Kerstetter*
October 6, 2009
(...) Increases in wages are eroded or erased by a combination of increases in taxes and other payroll deductions, along with reductions in benefits from government programs that were set up mainly to help low-income people in the first place.
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
* Michael Goldberg is the former research director for the Social Planning and Research Council of B.C., and
Steve Kerstetter is the former director of the National Council of Welfare.

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

9. Vital Signs reports for 16 Canadian cities released - October 6
(Community Foundations of Canada)

Vital Signs
Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by community foundations across Canada that measures the vitality of our communities, identifies trends, and shares opportunities for action in at least ten areas critical to quality of life.
Since Toronto's first Vital Signs publication, the Report has been adopted by 16 communities across Canada and is now conducted nationally by Community Foundations of Canada.

Local Reports
Click the link for reports covering the following participating cities and regions:
* Calgary * Central Okanagan * Guelph & Wellington * Kingston & Area * Medicine Hat * Oakville
* Ottawa * Red Deer * Saint John * Sudbury * Sunshine Coast * Toronto * Victoria * Waterloo * Wolfville (NS)

NOTE : Only the link to the Toronto and Ottawa reports appear below because I live in Ottawa, and Toronto is, well, Toronto*, eh...
For all other city reports, click the above link and select a city or region to access its report.
---
* Hey, I'm not sayin' that Toronto would pick up its marbles and go home or anything if I *didn't*
include a link to their report, but the population of Toronto is larger than most of the other provinces combined (except Ontario), so there ya go...
---

Ottawa:
2009 Vital Signs Report - Ottawa (PDF - 2.9MB, 27 pages)
Source:
Community Foundation of Ottawa

Toronto:
Toronto's Vital Signs 2009 (PDF, 2.8 MB)
Source:
Toronto Community Foundation

We help people invest in Toronto, making it the best place to live, work, learn and grow. We monitor the quality of life in our city, identifying its strengths and weaknesses through our Toronto’s Vital Signs® report

Related links:

Toronto: A city of disparities
October 6, 2009
By Royson James
Sooner, rather than later, Toronto needs a strike force to confront the dangerous patterns', `This is a picture of sickness linked to poverty – a snapshot of a city moving in opposite directions, its populace increasingly polarized. (...) Since 1998, the Toronto Community Foundation has been alerting us to the changing forces in our city and region. Toronto's Vital Signs, the annual checkup of the city's social, economic, environmental and physical health continues this year to track the alerts.

Community Foundations of Canada
We are the Canadian movement for community vitality, representing 168 Community Foundations across the country. Together, we help Canadians invest in building strong and resilient places to live, work and play.

- Go to the Municipal Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/municipal.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, September 2009
- October 9

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

October 9, 2009
Labour Force Survey, September 2009
Employment increased for the second consecutive month, up 31,000 in September, driven by large full-time gains. The unemployment rate fell by 0.3 percentage points to 8.4%, the first monthly decline since the beginning of the labour market downturn in the fall of 2008.
[ Related link : Labour Force Information ]

Hmmmm.
Pretty slow week at the Mothership of Canadian government stats.
Don't believe me?
Check for yourself:
Check The Daily Archives - select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - October 11

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

October 11

Human development report 2009: Overcoming barriers—Human mobility and development
7 Oct 09
- Report from the United Nations Development Programme on migration and quality of life around the world. Overall Canada ranks fourth on the HDI.

New study shows major benefits from investing in child care
7 Oct 09
- Article from CUPE discussing Fairholm’s findings on the short- and long-term economic benefits of investing in ECEC.

Implementing early learning in Ontario conference
7 Oct 09
- Webcast of all panels from The School of Public Policy & Governance, UofT conference focusing on full-day early learning.

Education at a glance 2009: OECD Indicators
7 Oct 09
- Report from the OECD comparing education systems and representing a consensus on how to measure the current state of education internationally.

Early childhood education and care in Canada 2008
16 Sep 09
- New report from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit looks at the current state of ECEC spaces, finances and policy developments.

30 quick facts about Canadian ECEC: Trends & Analysis 2008
16 Sep 09
- Companion document to ECEC in Canada 2008 highlights important facts about Canadian child care.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE

child care in the news

· Re: The costs of “full-day learning”
[CA] 7 Oct 09

· Mr. Premier, don't drag your heels on early learning report
[CA-ON] 5 Oct 09

· Rising premature births require more support
[ON] 5 Oct 09

· Childcare rebate system abused
[AU] 4 Oct 09

· Tories want to offer parental benefits for self-employed
[CA] 3 Oct 09

· Child care missing job link
[CA] 2 Oct 09

· Canada reaches tripartite agreement to implement Jordan’s Principle
[CA-SK] 28 Sep 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

---

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

12. The Virtual Museum of Canada

The Virtual Museum of Canada
http://www.museevirtuel-virtualmuseum.ca/index-eng.jsp

A collection of collections, the Virtual Museum of Canada has items from many different museums across Canada. It can also help those who want to visit offline, as the site also includes museum news and details for those who want to visit Canada's museums. The "Virtual Exhibits", "Image Gallery", and "Teachers' Centre" tabs near the top of the homepage should not be missed. The "Virtual Exhibits" have a variety of different offerings, including exhibits on war orphans from the Holocaust, a Cariboo civilization, and a history of Olympic bids. In the "Image Gallery", a thumbnail of each image or object is provided along with its title and clickable link to the museum where it came from. Visitors should click on "More" or just on the image, to read details about the item and see an enlarged version of it. There are over 780,000 images to view, so visitors might want to bookmark the site for subsequent visits. The "Teachers' Centre" contains "Lesson Plans", "Featured Museum Learning Resources", and the ability to browse all the learning resources for grades one through university levels, and even adult learners.
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2009.
http://scout.wisc.edu/

- Go to the Canadiana Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/patriot.htm

13. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

October 9:
Incarceration Rates of High School Dropouts
Food Stamp Application Process - Texas
State Sales Tax on Food - Utah
Job Seekers and Internet Access

October 8:
Jobless Benefits Exhaustion and Extension
2010 Agriculture Spending Bill
State Health Care Scorecard

October 7:
Welfare and Work Requirements - California
States and Proposed Medicaid Expansion
Food Stamp Application Process - Texas
Medicaid and Children’s Dental Care

October 6:
School Districts and Homeless Students - Florida
Unemployment Safety Nets and Job Creation
States and Child Support Payments to Poor Families
Telecommunications in Developing Nations

October 5:
State Poverty Rate - Indiana
Access to Social Services in Suburban Areas - New York
States and Stimulus Funding for Education
States and Proposed Medicaid Expansion
Funding for Low-income Home Energy Assistance Program

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

14. Social Rights (new U.S.-based international site)

Social Rights
This website aims to give prominence to and address the major theoretical and practical issues of economic, social and cultural rights – the so-called “second generation rights”. Although most governments and international organizations claim to support the idea of the universality and indivisibility of rights, the situation on the ground is quite different. There is silent agreement that economic, social and cultural rights should be given second-class status.
- incl. links to : * Home * About Us * Submit an Article * Contact Us * List of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, Instruments and Bodies
* Topics ( Council of Europe - Democracy - European Union - Human Rights NGOs - Human Rights Theory - Legal Instruments - Philosophical Topics - Political Theory - Promoting Economic Social and Cultural Rights - Protection Mechanisms - United Nations - Workers' Rights)

- Go to the Human Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm

15. New / recent from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:
--- The Safety Net’s Response to the Recession - October 8
--- Policy Basics: An Introduction to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) - Revised March 19
--- Overview of the TANF Provisions in the Economic Recovery Act - February 26
--- Online Information About Key U.S. State Low-Income Benefit Programs - Revised April 27
--- Food Stamps On-Line: A Review of State Government Food Stamp Websites - Updated July 8

New / recent from the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
:

The Safety Net’s Response to the Recession
By LaDonna Pavetti, Director of Welfare Reform and Income Support
Testimony Before the House Subcommittee on Income Security and Family Support
October 8, 2009
[ PDF version - 8 pages]
Testimony focuses on four points:
* With recent Census data showing increases in poverty and declines in incomes even before Americans began experiencing the worst effects of the recession — and with further deterioration expected in both areas — policymakers face a serious challenge in helping low-income populations cope with the downturn.
* The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 [from Recovery.gov ] passed in February has kept this serious recession from being even worse. It has not only moderated the decline in GDP and increase in unemployment, but also prevented millions of Americans from falling into poverty and has helped some states to forgo significant cuts that would have weakened the safety net for very poor families with children.
* The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly food stamps, has responded quickly to rising need in all states, but the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance program has lagged behind and has been moderately or substantially responsive in less than half of the states.
* To help ease hardship and avoid short-circuiting an economic recovery, Congress will need to adopt policy solutions that are responsive to both immediate needs and the long-term consequences of the recession.

Related links:

Policy Basics: An Introduction to
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
*
By Liz Schott
Revised March 19, 2009
What Is TANF? Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) is a block grant created by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, as part of a federal effort to “end welfare as we know it.” The TANF block grant replaced the Aid to Families… [ more ]

Overview of the TANF Provisions
in the Economic Recovery Act

The TANF provisions in section 2101 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 create a new Emergency Contingency Fund under which states can receive 80 percent federal funding for increases (relative to a base year quarter) in certain TANF-related expenditures in federal fiscal years 2009 and 2010.

Online Information About Key
U.S. State Low-Income Benefit Programs
*
Revised April 27, 2009
Links by state to Policy Manuals, Descriptive Information, and Applications for:
* State Food Stamp Programs
* Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
* Child Care Programs
* Medicaid
* State Children's Health Insurance (SCHIP) Programs

* Recommended starting point for research on the above-mentioned programs in each American state!
[ Note: The Canadian equivalent of the above guide, for welfare programs at least, is
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm
]

Food Stamps On-Line: A Review of State Government Food Stamp Websites
Updated July 8, 2009
This paper provides links to the addresses for each state’s food stamp web pages and also provides an overview of the types of information and services that states provide.

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

16. 2009 Human Development Report - October 5
(United Nations Development Programme)

2009 Human Development Report

Overcoming barriers:
Human mobility and development

Human Development Report 2009
Human development is about putting people at the centre of development. It is about people realizing their potential, increasing their choices and enjoying the freedom to lead lives they value. Since 1990, annual Human Development Reports have explored challenges including poverty, gender, democracy, human rights, cultural liberty, globalization, water scarcity and climate change. Migration, both within and beyond borders, has become an increasingly prominent theme in domestic and international debates, and is the topic of the 2009 Human Development Report.

Complete report (PDF - 3.9MB, 229 pages)
* Summary (PDF - 739K)
* Errata (PDF - 70K)
* Flyer (PDF - 257K)

Press Releases:

In 182 countries, uneven progress
and inequality in health, wealth and education persist
(PDF - 337K, 3 pages)
Disparities in life expectancy can range up to 30 years,
says the 2009 Human Development Report

Bangkok, 5 October 2009—Despite progress in many areas over the last 25 years, the disparities in people’s well-being in rich and poor countries continue to be unacceptably wide, according to the Human Development Index (HDI) released today as part of the 2009 Human Development Report (HDR). This year’s HDI, a summary indicator of people’s well-being—combining measures of life expectancy, literacy, school enrolment and GDP per capita—was calculated for 182 countries and territories, the most extensive coverage ever.

Human Development Report
challenges common migration misconceptions
(PDF - 1.8MB, 4 pages)
Bangkok, 5 October 2009—Allowing for migration—both within and between countries—has the potential to increase people’s freedom and improve the lives of millions around the world, according to the 2009 Human Development Report launched here today.

[ 2009 Human Development Research Papers: Topical background research ]

[ Reports for earlier years ]

Source:
Human Development Reports
[ United Nations Development Programme ]

- Go to the United Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/un.htm

17. International conference papers : Social Policy Association Conference (Edinburgh, Scotland) - June 29 to July 1, 2009
--- An Approach to Canada’s Child Poverty Problem…or Not? - By Thomas Brenner
--- Universal Basic Income: Reconsidering the Administrative Factor - By Jurgen de Wispelaere and Lindsay Stirton
--- Individualization, Citizenship, and Low Income Lone Mothers’ Caring “Choices” in Canada and Great Britain: Gender, Race, and Class Still Matter
- By Amber Gazso
--- Gender and Social Citizenship in Historical Perspective: The Development of Welfare Policy in England and Wales from the Poor Law to Beveridge - By Bernard Harris
--- The Political Practices of Disjointed and Directed Incrementalism: Federal Child Benefits and Childcare in Canada - By Grant Holly
--- Citizen’s Income* and the Crash: Credit, Debt and Citizen’s Income
- By Bill Jordan
--- Supporting Sole-Support Parents on Welfare in Canada - By Tracy Peressini
--- Welfare reform, neo-liberalization and bio-politics- By Jane Pulkingham and Sylvia Fuller
---The ‘deserving’ rich? Inequality, morality and social policy - By Karen Rowlingson and Stuart Connor
---
The foundations of welfare: Bruges and Ypres - By Paul Spicker

Scotland conference - international

Policy Futures: Learning from the Past?
Social Policy Association Conference

Edinburgh, Scotland
June 29 - July 1, 2009
- incl. links to:
* Programme * Sessions programme * Full Conference Papers * Accommodation * Travel & tourist information * Booking form * Plenary speakers * SPA Postgraduate Conference 2 July

* Sessions programme - complete list of papers organized by theme (but without links to the individual papers)
* Sessions Papers - links to over 100 papers presented at the Edinburgh conference,
all in PDF format, organized in alphabetical order.
Selected papers from that collection appear below.

---

Selected papers:
(All papers were prepared for the conference which took place at the
end of June 2009, although some papers were based on earlier presentations.)

An Approach to Canada’s Child Poverty Problem…or Not? (PDF - 1MB, 33 pages)
By Thomas Brenner
(...)This study examined three national newspapers (The Toronto Star, The Globe and Mail and the National Post) over four years and three federal elections in an attempt to understand the social discourse with respect to universal childcare in Canada. What was learned is that the discourse continues to reinforce women's role as primary care providers, sidestepping the research on the benefits of early learning programs for children as a way out of poverty.

Universal Basic Income: Reconsidering the Administrative Factor (PDF - 207K, 17 pages)
By Jurgen de Wispelaere and Lindsay Stirton
This paper questions the simplistic and unthoughtful manner in which most advocates of a basic income have addressed the administrative issues that surround the decision to implement their preferred income maintenance policy. While administrative issues may impact on the decision to prefer a basic income over alternative (selective as well as universal) policies, the emphasis in this paper is on the choice of alternative ways of realising the ideal of an unconditional basic income for all.

Individualization, Citizenship, and Low Income Lone Mothers’
Caring “Choices” in Canada and Great Britain: Gender, Race, and Class Still Matter
(PDF - 104K, 30 pages)
By Amber Gazso

Gender and Social Citizenship in Historical Perspective:
The Development of Welfare Policy in England and Wales from the Poor Law to Beveridge
(PDF - 169K, 38 pages)
By Bernard Harris

The Political Practices of Disjointed and Directed Incrementalism:
Federal Child Benefits and Childcare in Canada
(PDF - 113K, 18 pages)
By Grant Holly
This paper argues that distiguishing directed incrementalism from the disjointed variety represents a promising development for the future of the incrementalist perspective.
- incl. a "survey of four periods of directed and disjointed incrementalism in federal child benefits over the last 65 years."

Citizen’s Income* and the Crash: Credit, Debt and Citizen’s Income (PDF - 92K, 25 pages)
By Bill Jordan
(...)In this paper, I want to argue that, far from closing out the debate about taxation and redistribution, the crash opens it up to a far more radical exploration of the options. This is because it raises once more questions which were fiercely disputed in the 1920s and ‘30s, about the nature of banking and credit, and it was from these contests that the UK proposal for a citizen’s income sprang. This proposal has, in recent years, won over many political philosophers and some political activists, and it has even been aired as a technical fix to tax-benefit dilemmas, for instance in Ireland. But the financial crisis seems to me a far more propitious opportunity for examining the broader implications of the proposal, and how it is related to the economy and the social order.
---
* "Citizen's Income" means the same as "guaranteed annual income"
---

Supporting Sole-Support Parents on Welfare in Canada (PDF - 532K, 18 pages)
By Tracy Peressini
Responding to vulnerable families through early intervention and family support is vital to building strong and inclusive communities. In general, the research literature indicates that the greater number of community-based programs and supports available to youth, the more likely they will develop pro-social behaviours (e.g. educational achievements, leadership, resistance skills, tolerance for diversity), avoid risk behaviours (e.g. gang participation and violence,
substance abuse, school failure, homelessness) and contribute positively to self, family and community. This study examines the impact of children’s recreational supports on family health and functioning in a mid-size Canadian city.

Welfare reform, neo-liberalization and bio-politics (PDF 238K, 28 pages)
By Jane Pulkingham and Sylvia Fuller
This paper examines contemporary welfare reforms and welfare caseload trends in British Columbia, Canada, in comparison to Ontario and NEwfoundland and Labrador, in order to explore the complex, unexpected and oftentimes contradictory ways in which neo-liberalism is constituted and reproduced in practice. Canada provides an interesting opportunity to examine contemporary processes of neo-liberalism because welfare is administered and (for the most part) financed by different provincial/territorial governments, while at the same time, provincial welfare systems operate within the same federal fiduciary, fiscal and constitutional framework.

The ‘deserving’ rich? Inequality, morality and social policy (PDF - 256K, 26 pages)
By Karen Rowlingson and Stuart Connor
There is a long tradition in social policy of discussing and critiquing the notion of ‘deservingness’ in relation to ‘the poor’. This paper will apply such debates to ‘the rich’ to consider the grounds on which ‘the rich’ might be considered ‘deserving’ including ‘just deserts’ [sic] arguments around rewarding merit/hard work/effort etc. and more consequentialist/economic arguments about providing incentives for wealth
creation. The paper also considers arguments about deservingness based around the character and behaviour of the rich.

The foundations of welfare: Bruges and Ypres (PDF - 56K, 12 pages)
By Paul Spicker
Juan-Luis Vives' De Subventione Pauperum (“On assistance to the poor”) is almost certainly the first commissioned academic report to be written on the organisation of social welfare. It was published for the City of Bruges nearly five hundred years ago, in 1526. It reviews the theoretical arguments and the literature of the time before making recommendations for the management and administration of social welfare provision. The Forma Subventionis Pauperum, published five years later for the city of Ypres, is arguably the first evaluation report. It reviewed the background, aims, methods and outcomes of social welfare policy, in an attempt to justify the provision of welfare to the religious authorities.

- Go to the Conferences and Events Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/confer.htm
- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

18. Australian Policy Online - recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

---

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

19. CRINMAIL - October 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

8 October 2009 - CRINMAIL 1115
* CRC20: Launch of UN event celebrating 20th birthday of CRC [news]
* CRC: Complaints procedure - lingering doubts tackled [news]
* PARAGUAY: Concern over candidate for post of Ombudsperson [news]
* WEST AFRICA: Ministers discuss mandate of ECOWAS court [news]
* CORPORAL PUNISHMENT: Beatings the norm for Bangladeshi children [news]
* INDIA: Child watchdog serves notice to TV channel [news]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**
**QUIZ**

6 October 2009 - CRINMAIL 1114
* GLOBAL: Human Rights Education in the School Systems of Europe, Central Asia and North America: A Compendium of Good Practice [publication]
* SEXUAL EXPLOITATION: ECPAT International Report of the World Congress III [publication]
* THAILAND: Standards of care for refugee boarding houses on the Thai-Burma border [news]
* UNICEF: Report card on child protection [publication]
* BURMA/MYANMAR: Girls sent to jail, CRC ignored [news]
* UNITED STATES: Supreme Court judgement due on life without parole for children [news]
* FRANCE: Petition to retain independent children's Ombudswoman
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

---

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



******************************************

Traditional marriage, Bible-style

******************************************

If we are to let the Bible define what "traditional marriage"
should look like, then our marriage laws should be amended as follows:


A. Marriage in the United States shall consist of a union between one man and one or more women. (Gen 29:17-28; II Sam 3:2-5)

B. Marriage shall not impede a man's right to take concubines in  addition to his wife or wives. (II Sam 5:13; I Kings 11:3; II Chron 11:21)

C. A marriage shall be considered valid only if the wife is a  virgin. If the wife is not a virgin, she shall be executed. (Deut 22:13-21)

D. Marriage of a believer and a non-believer shall be forbidden.  (Gen 24:3; Num 25:1-9; Ezra 9:12; Neh 10:30)

E. Since marriage is for life, neither this Constitution nor the constitution of any State, nor any state or federal law, shall be construed to permit divorce. (Deut 22:19; Mark 10:9)

F. If a married man dies without children, his brother shall marry the widow. If he refuses to marry his brother's widow or deliberately does not give her children, he shall pay a fine of one shoe and be otherwise punished in a manner to be determined by law. (Gen 38:6-10; Deut 25:5-10)

G. In lieu of marriage, if there are no acceptable men in your town, it is required that you get your dad drunk and have sex with him (even if he had previously offered you up as a sex toy to men young and old), tag-teaming with any sisters you may have. Of course, this rule applies only if you are female. (Gen 19:31-36)


Source:
http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2008/12/10/12118/336/767/671488


----------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------


Photos from the Basic Income Earth Network Ottawa conference (Oct. 1-2, 2009)
http://www.cpj.ca/en/blog/chandra/photos-bien-canada-ottawa-conference


Chandra's blog : BIEN Canada Ottawa conference a success!

October 5, 2009
http://www.cpj.ca/en/blog/chandra/bien-canada-ottawa-conference-success



Top 25 Most Popular Blogs

http://www.ebizmba.com/articles/blogs


Refdesk.com
http://www.refdesk.com/


The Muppet Show's 10 Weirdest Moments
http://www.toplessrobot.com/2009/09/the_muppet_shows_10_weirdest_moments.php


PLEEEEEZE give up your day job!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAO5TGfSjSQ