Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 11, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,505 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Third Annual Progress Report on Poverty Reduction in Ontario (25 in 5 Poverty Reduction Network) - December 5
2. International Human Rights Day 2011 - December 10
3. National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women - December 6
4. Ontario Auditor General's report 2011 - December 5
5. [New Brunswick] Open letter to Minister Martine Coulombe - NB minimum wages (NB Common Front for Social Justice) - December 1
6. Measuring social exclusion in Canada : an Explanatory Study on Cumulative Disadvantage (Joël Gauthier and Myriam Fortin) - November 2011
7. Sifting through the sands. Unpacking the hourglass [Toronto labour market analysis) (Toronto Workforce Innovation Group) - November 2011
8 . Government-Assisted Housing in the Northwest Territories and the Role of the Federal Government (Nick Falvo in How Ottawa Spends) - November 24
9.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour productivity, hourly compensation and unit labour cost, third quarter 2011 - December 9
--- Population projections by Aboriginal identity in Canada, 2006 to 2031 - December 7
--- Charitable donors, 2010
- December 5
10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
12. The Robin Hood Tax (New York Times) - December 6
13. Divided We Stand : Why Inequality Keeps Rising (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) - December 2011

14. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm



1. Third Annual Progress Report on Poverty Reduction in Ontario - December 5
(25 in 5 Poverty Reduction Network)

Child poverty easing in Ontario, report says
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1096936
December 4, 2011
By Laurie Monsebraaten
A 2009 decision to boost the Ontario Child Benefit to cushion struggling families during the recession helped pull 19,000 children out of poverty, advocates say in a new report on the province’s anti-poverty efforts. But on the third anniversary of Ontario’s Dec. 4, 2008 pledge to cut child poverty by 25 per cent by 2013, more action is needed if the province hopes to meet its target, warns the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction in a report being released Monday.
Source:
Toronto Star

From 25 in 5 Poverty Reduction Network:

Progress Made on Child Poverty: All Parties Must Work Together to Meet the Goal, Advocates Urge
http://25in5.ca/progress-made-on-child-poverty-all-parties-must-work-together-to-meet-the-goal-advocates-urge/
News Release
December 5, 2011
TORONTO– Ontario must redouble its efforts in order to meet its commitment to reduce child poverty by 25% by 2013, says a new report by the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction. Common Ground: A Strategy for Moving Forward on Poverty Reduction tracks the government’s progress at the third anniversary of the Province’s poverty reduction promise. The report shows that while some progress has been made, it’s critical that all three parties work together to lift 90,000 Ontario children out of poverty by 2013. The report also identifies ten areas of common ground that emerged across parties during the 2011 election campaign, and urges government to work with the opposition parties to take action on these commitments right away.

The report:

Common Ground: A Strategy for Moving Forward on Poverty Reduction
Third Annual Progress Report on Poverty Reduction in Ontario
(PDF - 264K, 32 pages)
http://25in5.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/25-in-5-Common-Ground-final.pdf
December 5, 2011
Ontario has officially passed the halfway point to its promised target date of reducing child poverty by 25 per cent by December 2013. Much has happened since December 4, 2008, the date the Ontario government announced its first five-year poverty reduction commitment. But, especially in light of ongoing economic turmoil, much more needs to be done in order to meet the target.
(...)
During the 2011 election campaign, common ground on poverty reduction emerged in ten distinct areas. Taking action on these “Common Ground Commitments” would go a long way in reducing child and family poverty in Ontario by 25% in 2013.
1. Introduce a new Housing Benefit: Housing
2. Reform Social Assistance
3. Support Transition to Work
4. Raise the Ontario Child Benefit
5. Take Action on Minimum Wages
6. Step up for Fair Employment
7. Build New Affordable Housing
8. Make Early Learning Vision a Reality
9. Support Affordable Education
10. Set the next target.
(...)
In addition, 25 in 5 recommends action in six further areas, which must be on the radar screen of all Ontario’s political parties:
1. Raise social assistance incomes
2. Invest in community-based services that Ontarians turn to when they need help and support
3. Build a public education system that focuses on equitable outcomes
4. Introduce a strategy for disproportionately poor communities
5. Introduce dental care for all low-income
6. Create a transit infrastructure for opportunity.

Source:
25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction
http://www.25in5.ca/
25-in-5: Network for Poverty Reduction is a multi-sectoral network comprised of more than 100 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working on eliminating poverty. We have organized ourselves around the call for a Poverty Reduction Plan with a goal to reduce poverty in Ontario by 25% in 5 years and 50% in 10 years.

Related links:

Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy
http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/breakingthecycle/index.aspx
- this is the Ontario Government's poverty reduction website.
- incl. links to reports and news releases, along with "Help for Families" : * Education and early learning * Employment *
Financial support * Tax benefits for families * Housing * Health and wellness * Children's Activities
Source:
Ministry of Children and Youth Services
http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/index.aspx

[ Government of Ontario
http://www.gov.on.ca/ ]

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Poverty Free Ontario (PFO)
http://www.povertyfreeontario.ca/
The mission of Poverty Free Ontario is to eliminate divided communities in which large numbers of adults and children live in chronic states of material hardship, poor health and social exclusion. An Ontario free of poverty will be reflected in healthy, inclusive communities with a place of dignity for everyone and the essential conditions of well-being for all.

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Commission for the Review
of Social Assistance in Ontario
http://www.socialassistancereview.ca/
Led by Frances Lankin and Munir A. Sheikh, the Commission is charged with examining social assistance in Ontario through engagement, research and analysis to provide the government with a concrete action plan to improve the system for the people who need it.

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Social Assistance Review
http://sareview.ca/
This is the Income Security Advocacy Centre's sub-site on the Ontario social assistance review.
Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre

http://www.incomesecurity.org/

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- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. International Human Rights Day 2011 - December 10

From Canada Without Poverty:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

International Human Rights Day 2011
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2011/12/december-10th-international-day-for-human-rights/
December 10, 2011
Saturday, December 10, marks International Human Rights Day for 2011. This occasion “commemorates the day in 1948 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights [ http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Pages/UDHRIndex.aspx ]. Although the Declaration with its broad range of political, civil, social, cultural and economic rights is not a binding document, it inspired more than 60 human rights instruments [ http://www2.ohchr.org/english/law/ ] which together constitute an international standard of human rights.

Canada Without Poverty (formerly the National Anti-Poverty Organization or NAPO) has worked on poverty as a human rights issue since our founding in 1971. We have appeared several times before UN bodies to give testimony on Canada’s performance with respect to economic and social rights. We aspire to step up our efforts in economic and social rights education and advocacy, the latter through our sister organization, the CWP Advocacy Network [ http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2011/12/cwp-advocacy-network/ ]. You can help strengthen our voice for eradicating poverty as a human rights obligation by donating now through Canada Helps [ http://www.canadahelps.org/Home.aspx ] or calling 613-789-0096 (1-800-810-1076). For more information, please contact us [ info@cwp-csp.cainfo@cwp-csp.ca ].

Source:
Canada Without Poverty:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca
Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization dedicated to the elimination of poverty in Canada

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From the
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights:
http://www.ohchr.org/

International Human Rights Day for 2011
[ http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Day2011/Pages/HRD2011.aspx ]
On Human Rights Day 2011 we pay tribute to all human rights defenders and ask you to get involved in the global human rights movement.
- incl. links to:
* Events in Geneva and New York * Statements and messages * Visual designs * Videos * Stories

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From the
United Nations:
http://www.un.org/

International Human Rights Day 2011
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2011/
December 10, 2011
This year, millions of people decided the time had come to claim their rights. They took to the streets and demanded change. Many found their voices using the internet and instant messaging to inform, inspire and mobilize supporters to seek their basic human rights. Social media helped activists organize peaceful protest movements in cities across the globe - from Tunis to Madrid, from Cairo to New York - at times in the face of violent repression
- incl. links to:
* About Human Rights Day * Secretary-General's Message * High Commissioner's Message * UNESCO's Message * Op-Ed: The Tunis Imperative
Events * Join the Party! * Conversation on Human Rights * Videos * The Universal Declaration of Human Rights * Publicize the Day! * Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights * Past Human Rights Days

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- Go to the Human Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm

3. National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women - December 6, 2011

National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women
December 6, 2011

From
Status of Women Canada:
http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/index-eng.html

Statement from the Honourable Rona Ambrose,
Minister of Public Works and Government Services
and Minister for Status of Women

http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/med/sta-dec/2011/1206-eng.html
December 6, 2011
"I call on all Canadians today to observe Canada's National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. "It was on this day, December 6, 1989, that 14 young women at l'École Polytechnique de Montréal lost their lives in an act of gender-based violence that shocked the nation."

The 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence:
November 25 – December 10

http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/dates/vaw-vff/index-eng.html
TIP : Click the "Today" tab under the graphic to see features for each of the 16 days.
Excerpt : "[December 6] is a day on which communities can consider concrete actions* to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls."

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* With its 615,000 members across Canada, the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) [ http://cupe.ca/ ] is by far Canada's largest community of workers. CUPE reminds us that the gun registry is a concrete action to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls.

From CUPE:

Support the call to end violence against women
December 6, 2011
http://cupe.ca/women/dec-6-support-call-violence-women
On the 22nd anniversary of that tragic day, CUPE is calling on the Harper Conservative government to stop putting the safety of women and frontline workers across the country at risk with the proposed elimination of the gun registry.


Submission by the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) to the
Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security
(PDF - 72K, 5 pages)
November 24, 2011
http://cupe.ca/ckfinder/userfiles/files/SubmissionBillC-19-Rev-Eng.pdf
CUPE recently made a submission to the standing committee on public safety and national security against Bill C-19 and in support of keeping the gun registry.

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The tragic, joyous meanings of December 6
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1097416
By Sarah Blackstock
December 5, 2011
How does a feminist celebrate her daughter's seventh birthday and commemorate the École Polytechnique massacre, both on December 6?
Sarah Blackstock, director of advocacy and communications at YWCA Toronto, explains what the day means for her and how she can find balance in this day of extremes for her.
Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

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- Go to the Canadian Government Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/women.htm

- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

4. Ontario Auditor General's report 2011 - December 5

Ontario undermining its own restraint efforts, auditor’s report reveals
http://goo.gl/2V28V
By Karen Howlett
December 5, 2011
TORONTO—The Ontario government has paid richer fees to family doctors, with little proof patients are getting more access to their services. The government fast-tracked its flagship green energy projects without putting in place appropriate checks and balances.
Both policies are leading to higher health care and electricity costs in Ontario, but the bad news does not end there, according to the provincial auditor. Consumers also pay too much to drown their sorrows.
Source:
Globe and Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

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From the
Office of the Auditor General of Ontario:
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/default.htm

Annual Report of the Auditor General of Ontario for 2011
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_2011_en.htm
- incl. links to the complete report in one PDF file and a table of contents with links to individual chapter sections in PDF format

2011 Annual Report News Releases
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/news_en/11newsreleases.htm
Links to 15 news releases on various themes covered in the 2011 report : auto insurance - renewable energy - electricity debt retirement charges - fnunding for doctors - specialists' pay - Liquor Control Board of Ontario - legal aid - more...

Complete report (PDF - 4.7MB, 462 pages)
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_en/en11/2011ar_en.pdf

Selected sections of the report:

Chapter 2 : Public Accounts of the Province (pdf 404kb)
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_en/en11/200en11.pdf

Chapter 3.10 : Office of the Children's Lawyer (pdf 383kb)

Chapter 3.14 : Supportive Services for People with Disabilities (pdf 295kb)
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_en/en11/314en11.pdf

Chapter 4: Follow-up on 2009 Value-for-money Audits, includes:
4.01 Assistive Devices Program (pdf 218kb)
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_en/en11/401en11.pdf
4.04 Education Quality and Accountability Office (pdf 191kb)
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_en/en11/404en11.pdf

4.09 Ontario Disability Support Program (pdf 207kb)
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_en/en11/409en11.pdf
4.11 Ontario Works Program (pdf 224kb)
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_en/en11/411en11.pdf
4.12 Social Housing (pdf 176kb)
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_en/en11/412en11.pdf

4.14 Unfunded Liability of the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (pdf 179kb)
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_en/en11/414en11.pdf

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Related links:

Refresher on how welfare works in Ontario

According to the 2011
Annual Report of the Auditor General of Ontario:
(December 5, 2011)

Ontario Works (OW)
The Ontario Works program is delivered on behalf of the Ministry by 47 Consolidated Municipal Service Managers and District Social Services Administration Boards as well as 101 First Nations, all referred to as service managers. A service manager is typically either a large municipality or a grouping of smaller ones, and each is accountable to one of the Ministry’s nine regional offices. The Ministry and the service managers share the total financial and employment assistance costs of the Ontario Works program. The Ministry, which currently pays 81% of these costs, has committed to start gradually increasing its share in 2010 until it pays 100% in 2018. Administrative costs will continue to be shared on a 50/50 basis.

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Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP)
The Ministry of Community and Social Services (Ministry) administers the Ontario Disability Support Program Act (Act), which provides income and employment support to more than 270,000 individuals with eligible disabilities as defined by the Act. Total annual Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) benefit payments made in the 2010/11 fiscal year amounted to over $3.5 billion ($3 billion in 2008/09—which was a 42% increase since the time of our last audit in 2004). ODSP income support is intended to assist with
basic living expenses such as food, shelter, clothing,
and personal-needs items
Source:
2010 Annual Report of the Auditor General of Ontario
http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_2011_en.htm

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- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Guide to Welfare in Ontario page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onwelf.htm

- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

5. [New Brunswick] Open letter to Minister Martine Coulombe (NB minimum wages) - December 1
(New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice)

New Brunswick

Open letter to Minister Martine Coulombe (NB minimum wages) (PDF - 64K, 2 pages)
http://www.frontnb.ca/Document/letter_2011-12-01.pdf
December 1, 2011
Minister Coulombe, You are undertaking a so-called “online consultation” to gather the opinion of the public regarding the “possible introduction of a special New Brunswick minimum wage for servers earning tips”. With this online survey, you hope that New Brunswickers will share their thoughts on “the tip differential issue, as well as on minimum wage in general”. We, the undersigned, hereby denounce this approach and believe it is absolutely unacceptable to use information received electronically and anonymously to justify a lower minimum wage for workers who receive tips.

Source:
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice
http://www.frontnb.ca/
The Common Front for Social Justice is one of the largest democratic and popular organizations in New Brunswick, with close to 75,000 group and individual members. The Common Front brings together individuals as well as local, regional and provincial organizations to work towards the eradication of poverty.

Related link:

Open letter calls calls for public hearings on minimum wage
http://telegraphjournal.canadaeast.com/news/article/1461421
December 6, 2011
By John Chilibeck

FREDERICTON - Eleven anti-poverty and social justice organizations have signed an open letter to the provincial Tory government denouncing its consultation process on a two-tiered minimum wage. The groups say it's unacceptable to use information received electronically and anonymously to justify a lower minimum wage for workers who receive tips.

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Version française:

Lettre ouverte à la ministre Martine Coulombe (fichier PDF - 72Ko., 2 pages))
http://www.frontnb.ca/Document/lettre_2011-12-01.pdf
Le 1er décembre 2011
Madame Coulombe, Vous avez entrepris « une consultation publique » et ce, par Internet afin de connaître l’opinion du public à l’égard d’une « éventuelle création d’un salaire minimum particulier au Nouveau-Brunswick pour les serveurs recevant des pourboires ». Au moyen d’un sondage par Internet, vous cherchez l’opinion des Néo-Brunswickois et des Néo-Brunswickoises sur deux points : « la compensation par le pourboire et le salaire minimum en général ». Nous soussignés dénonçons cette démarche et disons qu’il est tout à fait inacceptable d’utiliser de l’information reçue électroniquement et anonymement pour justifier un salaire minimum inférieur aux personnes qui reçoivent des pourboires.
Source:
Front commun pour la justice sociale
http://www.frontnb.ca/fr/home_fr.htm

Le Front commun pour la justice sociale est un des plus importants organismes démocratiques et populaires au NB. Il compte environ 75 000 membres individuels et collectifs. Il regroupe des individus et des organisations locales, régionales et provinciales travaillant ensemble à l'élimination de la pauvreté.

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- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Nouveau-Brunswick :
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbf.htm

6. Measuring social exclusion in Canada : an Explanatory Study on Cumulative Disadvantage - November 2011
(
Joël Gauthier and Myriam Fortin)

[ NOTA : Le français suit la version anglaise ci-dessous.]

Measuring social exclusion in Canada:
an Explanatory Study on Cumulative Disadvantage

Joël Gauthier and Myriam Fortin presented major findings from their research on social exclusion at the International Conference on poverty reduction and poverty measurement in Montreal (November 30 - December 2, 2011 - see the link below).

The objectives of this research were to propose an operational definition of social exclusion, then, using this definition, to explore the extent of social exclusion in Canada and identify some characteristics that significantly increase the probability of being excluded. Using data from the first six cycles of the National Population Health Survey and seven dimensions to investigate exclusion (weak labour force attachment, low income, low level of education, poor health, food insecurity, dissatisfaction with neighbourhood and weak social support), this research found that over 1994 to 2004, 8.5% of working-age Canadians accumulated disadvantages on at least three of those dimensions of exclusion (and as such are considered 'excluded' according to our working definition), while another 3.6% accumulated at least four (and are considered 'deeply excluded'). The characteristics that most increase the probability of exclusion and deep exclusion are being a member of a lone parent family, being unattached, having experienced serious traumas during childhood (e.g. physical abuse), and living in Eastern Canada.

By Gilles:
I'm told that the conference proceedings, including the presentation by Gauthier and Fortin, will "soon" be available in electronic format from Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal [ http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/ ] and other digital bookstores. When the book is available, you'll find links to bookstores where you can purchase a copy on the website of the Quebec Inter-University Centre for Social Statistics [ http://www.ciqss.umontreal.ca/en/whatsNew.html ]

For more information, please contact Myriam Fortin of Human Resources and Social Development Canada:
myriam.fortin@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

Social Statistics, Poverty and Social Exclusion:
Perspectives from Quebec, Canada and Abroad

International Conference on poverty reduction and
poverty measurement in Canada and the world

http://www.ciqss.umontreal.ca/conf_statsoc_2011/presentation_en.html
November 30 - December 2, 2011
Montreal
The main objective of this international conference was to take stock of the state of current research and identify knowledge gaps.

Preliminary program (PDF - 805K, 6 pages)
http://www.ciqss.umontreal.ca/conf_statsoc_2011/program.html

Organizing Institutions:

* Quebec Inter-University Centre for Social Statistics
http://www.ciqss.umontreal.ca/en/whatsNew.html

* Ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale (English home page)
http://www.mess.gouv.qc.ca/Index_en.asp

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Version française:

Mesurer l'exclusion sociale au Canada:
exploration du cumul des désavantages
Joël Gauthier et Myriam Fortin
ont présenté les faits saillants de leur recherche sur l'exclusion sociale dans le cadre de la conférence internationale sur les statistiques sociales, la pauvreté et l'exclusion sociale qui a eu lieu à Montréal du 30 novembre au 2 décembre 2011 (voir le 2e lien ci-dessous).

Le livre sera disponible sous peu sur format numérique sur le site de l’éditeur ( Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal [ http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/ ] ) ainsi que sur les sites de plusieurs librairies numériques (Archambault, Apple book, ...). Vous trouverez un lien à ces sites sur le site web du CIQSS dès que le livre sera disponible..

Conférence internationale Statistiques sociales, exclusion sociale et pauvreté :
perspectives québécoises, canadiennes et internationales
http://www.ciqss.umontreal.ca/conf_statsoc_2011/presentation.html
30 novembre - 2 décembre 2011
Montréal
L'objectif principal de la Conférence internationale Statistiques sociales, pauvreté et exclusion sociale: perspectives québécoises, canadiennes et internationales était de faire le point sur l'état des connaissances dans le domaine de la pauvreté et de l'exclusion sociale et d'identifier les lacunes à combler à cet égard.

Programme préliminaire (PDF - 805Ko., 6 pages)
http://www.ciqss.umontreal.ca/conf_statsoc_2011/program.html

Pour tout autre renseignement pertinent, vous pouvez joindre Myriam Fortin à l'adresse courriel suivante à Ressources humaines et Développement des compétences Canada : myriam.fortin@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

Institutions organisatrices:

* Centre interuniversitaire québécois de statistiques sociales
http://www.ciqss.umontreal.ca/

* Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale
http://www.mess.gouv.qc.ca/Index.asp

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- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm

- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

7. Sifting through the sands. Unpacking the hourglass (Toronto labour market analysis) - November 2011
(
Toronto Workforce Innovation Group)

Toronto Labour market analysis

Sifting through the sands. Unpacking the hourglass (PDF - 2.4MB, 54 pages)
http://www.workforceinnovation.ca/sites/workforceinnovation.ca/files/SiftingThroughTheSandsWeb_0.pdf

November 2011
By Tom Zizys
This report deepens the analysis of our first report:
An Economy out of Shape: Changing the Hourglass (April 2010, PDF - 1.1MB, 56 pages):
http://www.workforceinnovation.ca/sites/workforceinnovation.ca/files/AnEconomyOutofShape.pdf
...by expanding the categories and comparing knowledge workers to those in entry-level occupations. The purpose of the report is to unpack the two ends of the labour market — the Knowledge Work and Entry-level jobs categories. The results of this analysis point to even greater polarization in the labour market in Toronto and a need for interventions that create career pathways and greater opportunities.

Author Tom Zizys is a Toronto-based labour market specialist and consultant.

Source:
Toronto Workforce Innovation Group (TWIG)
http://www.workforceinnovation.ca
TWIG is a leading edge research and partnership organization promoting advancement of Toronto’s workforce development processes and outcomes. TWIG identifies workforce issues in our local community and provides collaborative solutions by engaging stakeholders and working with partners.

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

8. Government-Assisted Housing in the Northwest Territories and the Role of the Federal Government - November 24
(Nick Falvo in How Ottawa Spends)

Government-Assisted Housing in the Northwest Territories
and the Role of the Federal Government

On November 24, Frances Abele and Nick Falvo presented findings from their respective chapters in How Ottawa Spends 2011-12: Trimming Fat or Slicing Pork?
at an official launch and panel discussion in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories
.

In the November 27 issue (3rd item) of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal/news271111.htm
... you'll find links to a blog posting by author Nick Falvo in the Progressive Economics Forum about the project, to a summary of and presentation notes on Nick's work, and to a summary of Frances Abele's chapter in How Ottawa Spends on the subject of the Conservatives’ Northern Development Strategy. The link below is to the complete 19-page chapter by Nick in How Ottawa Spends.

---

Government-Assisted Housing in the Northwest Territories
and the Role of the Federal Government
(PDF - 460K, 19 pages)
http://www.mqupblog.com/falvo.pdf
Nick Falvo
[Excerpt:]
This chapter [of How Ottawa Spends] examines the housing situation in the Northwest Territories, especially as it affects low-income residents.
Topics discussed in this chapter include the manner in which government-assisted housing is administered in the NWT, as well as the uniqueness of government-assisted housing in the NWT. Building costs, forms of government-assisted housing, recent policies of senior levels of government, and other emerging issues in the NWT combine to create a unique public policy study.
Source:
How Ottawa Spends, 2011-2012
Trimming Fat or Slicing Pork?
http://mqup.mcgill.ca/book.php?bookid=2697
By Christopher Stoney and G. Bruce Doern
A critical examination of the Harper Conservative's fiscal austerity strategies in the wake of Budget 2011-2012 and the often bitter politics of continued minority government.

[ Table of contents of the book:
http://mqup.mcgill.ca/extra.php?id=1179 ]
[ McGill-Queen's University Press
http://mqup.mcgill.ca/ ]

---

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

- Go to the Northwest Territories Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ntbkmrk.htm

9. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour productivity, hourly compensation and unit labour cost, third quarter 2011 - December 9
--- Population projections by Aboriginal identity in Canada, 2006 to 2031 - December 7
--- Charitable donors, 2010
- December 5

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

December 9, 2011
Labour productivity, hourly compensation and unit labour cost, third quarter 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/111209/dq111209b-eng.htm

December 7, 2011
Population projections by Aboriginal identity in Canada, 2006 to 2031
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/111207/dq111207a-eng.htm
All growth scenarios considered, the Aboriginal identity population in Canada could be between 1.7 million and 2.2 million by 2031, representing between 4.0% and 5.3% of the total population.

December 5, 2011
Charitable donors, 2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/111205/dq111205a-eng.htm
Canadian taxfilers reported making charitable donations of just under $8.3 billion in 2010, up 6.5% from 2009. At the same time, the number of donors increased 2.2% to just over 5.7 million. Data are based on income tax returns filed for 2010. Nationally, 23.4% of all taxfilers claimed charitable donations on their tax return, in line with previous years. Manitoba (26.3%) had the highest percentage declaring a donation, followed by Prince Edward Island (25.3%) and Saskatchewan (25.3%).

Related subjects:

* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3868&lang=eng&more=0

* Household spending and savings
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=3868&id=2180&lang=eng&more=0

* Society and community
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=75&lang=eng&more=0

* Volunteering and donating
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=75&id=80&lang=eng&more=0

The Daily Archives
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

-----------------------------

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

December 11, 2011

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

The budget for Europe 2020: Demands, challenges and opportunities for children in the EU budget
http://goo.gl/NkKMh
7 Dec 2011
Position paper from Eurochild urges EU to create a children's budget; funding should "target further early childhood education and care."

Workplace flexibility in the United States: A status report
http://goo.gl/5vt1v
7 Dec 2011
Report from the Families and Work Institute shows that "workplace flexibility results in increased employee job satisfaction and lower turnover for employers of all sizes and industries."

RIP Windsor Ontario's municipal child care: 1968-2010
http://goo.gl/yANBP
7 Dec 2011
This week's Know Thy History looks at the rise and fall of Windsor Ontario's directly-operated child care. Will the rest of Ontario's public child care become history too?

Welcoming newcomer children: The settlement of young immigrants and refugees
http://goo.gl/N9TL8
6 Dec 2011
New book by Judith A. Colbert "explores [immigrant and refugee] settlement from the perspective of the child" and "offers a new perspective on child settlement".

Divided we stand: Why inequality keeps rising
http://goo.gl/p8mBU
5 Dec 2011
New OECD report analyzes increasing income inequality in member countries; argues that "providing freely accessible and high-quality public services" is critical for fostering equality.

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Budget Committee Deputations: Day two
http://goo.gl/bkkLz
8 Dec 2011 Ontario

Ford compared to the Grinch by parents in need of child care
http://goo.gl/LrL8D
8 Dec 2011 Ontario

A $2 daily head tax on children
http://goo.gl/XQZMM
8 Dec 2011 Ontario

EU urged to create children's budget
http://goo.gl/nSKUH
7 Dec 2011 Europe

Cuts in social programs hurt women, councillor says
http://goo.gl/gM8gX
7 Dec 2011 Ontario

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

December 9:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2011/12/09/
Jobless Benefit Claims
Medicaid Program - Wisconsin
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Healthcare Spending - California

December 8:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2011/12/08/
Medicaid Program - Louisiana
Census Data on Racial Income Gap

December 7:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2011/12/07/
National Assessment of Educational Progress
Medicaid Reform - Florida

December 6:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2011/12/06/
Series on Poverty in Central Ohio

December 5:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2011/12/05/
Extension of Jobless Benefits
Census Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

12. The Robin Hood Tax - December 6, 2011
(New York Times)

The Robin Hood Tax
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/07/business/global/micro-tax-on-financial-trades-gains-advocates.html

By Steven Greenhouse and Graham Bowley
December 6, 2011
They call it the Robin Hood tax — a tiny levy on trades in the financial markets that would take money from the banks and give it to the world’s poor. And like the mythical hero of Sherwood Forest, it is beginning to capture the public’s imagination. Driven by populist anger at bankers as well as government needs for more revenue, the idea of a tax on trades of stocks, bonds and other financial instruments has attracted an array of influential champions, including the leaders of France and Germany, the billionaire philanthropists Bill Gates and George Soros, former Vice President Al Gore, the consumer activist Ralph Nader, Pope Benedict XVI and the archbishop of Canterbury.

Comments (387)
http://goo.gl/OOt60

Source:
New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/

Related links:

Robin Hood tax - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood_tax

Canada:

robinhoodtax.ca
Every so often, a proposal comes along that would transform everything. Every so often, activists and people in power end up on the same side of an issue. Every so often, the solution isn’t complicated … just brilliant. Every so often, we get the chance to be part of something huge. We have that chance right now, and it’s called The Robin Hood Tax. A tiny fee on the trade in financial transactions – paid by banks, not by people – it would raise billions of dollars for fighting poverty and climate change at home and around the world.

* How the Robin Hood Tax works

* Act Now

Note : The Robin Hood Tax was created as part of the At the Table campaign at the 2010 G8 and G20 summits in Toronto").
The At the Table Campaign website is no longer available.

---

From the
Globe and Mail:

The Canadian behind the new Robin Hood tax
http://goo.gl/1EJBI
By Campbell Clark
November 6, 2011
Rodney Schmidt seems an unlikely Robin Hood. He started his career at the federal Finance department, and his big contribution to the current global debate was fuelled by studies of the micro-structure of financial markets.But the new version of what some call the Robin Hood tax, pushed by aid activists and now others, stems in no small part from Mr. Schmidt’s economics and his argument that a technology revolution in financial markets, which has allowed currency trading to boom, now makes it feasible to tax that trading, one tiny tranche each time.

Related articles
from the Globe and Mail:

* Desperate Sarkozy tries to revive transactions tax (November 3)
http://goo.gl/kyNvr

* Will the Tobin tax make or break Europe? (September 28)
http://goo.gl/Bqrfw

* Abolish corporate tax – it has been a worldwide failure (Aptil 16)
http://goo.gl/pghhT

Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

---

United States:

U.S. lawmakers to introduce Robin Hood Tax bill
The lawmakers proposal follows a similar measure being discussed by the European Union (EU).
http://robinhoodtax.ca/story/us-lawmakers-to-introduce-robin-hood-tax-bill
3 Nov. 2011
Two U.S. lawmakers have announced that they intend to introduce companion bills to tax U.S. financial transactions at a rate of 0.03 per cent and encouraged the congressional deficit-reduction panel to more closely consider their proposal. The tax would apply the tax to stocks, bonds and all derivatives contracts and would take effect on Jan. 1, 2013. The lawmakers proposal follows a similar measure being discussed by the European Union (EU). The EU proposal is for 0.1 per cent tax on trading of stocks and bonds among the 27 member nations. (...) [The same two Senators have introduced transaction tax measures in the past two years they have yet to be considered by either chamber.

---

United Kingdom

The Robin Hood Tax
http://robinhoodtax.org/
Basically, what we're after is a tax that raises billions of pounds annually from the financial sector, and which generates revenue to fight poverty worldwide and to tackle climate change.
Currently, the main proposals are:
* A Financial Transaction Tax (FTT) - A tiny tax of about 0.05% on transactions like stocks, bonds, foreign currency and derivatives.
* A Bank Levy - Basically a flat-rate levy imposed on large financial institutions.
* The Financial Activities Tax (FAT) - Taxing excess profit and remuneration
Source:
Everything you need to know

http://robinhoodtax.org/how-it-works/everything-you-need-to-know

---

- Go to the The Tobin Tax / Robin Hood Tax Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/tobin.htm

13. Divided We Stand : Why Inequality Keeps Rising - December 2011
(
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development )

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
report finds income inequality rising in Canada
http://goo.gl/RbStb
December 5, 2011
A new report finds that the gap between the rich and the poor just keeps getting wider in Canada. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development released a report on Monday looking at the rise of inequality in countries around the world. Particularly since the mid-1990s in Canada, the report states, the disparity between the rich and the poor has been growing.
Source:
CTV.ca
http://www.ctv.ca/

From the OECD:

Society: Governments must tackle record gap between rich and poor, says OECD
http://www.oecd.org/document/40/0,3746,en_21571361_44315115_49166760_1_1_1_1,00.html
News Release
December 5, 2011
The gap between rich and poor in OECD countries has reached its highest level for over over 30 years, and governments must act quickly to tackle inequality, according to a new OECD report.
Divided We Stand: Why Inequality Keeps Rising” finds that the average income of the richest 10% is now about nine times that of the poorest 10 % across the OECD.

Divided We Stand:
Why Inequality Keeps Rising
(US$ 105)
December 2011
Free preview of the first 100 pages of the report:
http://goo.gl/ix6xH

Divided We Stand
Why Inequality Keeps Rising
An Overview of Growing Income
Inequalities in OECD Countries:
Main Findings (PDF - 244K, 25 pages)
http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/40/12/49170449.pdf

Purchase the report from the OECD Bookshop: (US$ 105)
http://www.oecdbookshop.org/oecd/display.asp?sf1=identifiers&st1=9789264111639
Scroll down the page to see the table of contents.

Country note : Canada (PDF - 500K, 2 pages)
http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/50/52/49177689.pdf
Income inequality among working-age persons has been rising in Canada, particularly since the mid-1990s. According to the latest data, the level of inequality is above the OECD average but still below that of the US.

All country notes:
http://goo.gl/unxGD
- includes Australia - Canada - France (en Français & English) - Germany - Italy (in Italian & English) - Japan (in Japanese & English) - Mexico (in Spanish & English) - Spain (in Spanish & English) - United Kingdom - United States

Source:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
http://www.oecd.org/

---

Related links:

From the
Globe and Mail:

Income inequality: deep, complex and growing
http://goo.gl/Yw1tV
By Jeffrey Simpson
December 9, 2011
(...) Inequality has been growing in Canada for many years; correcting for it will not be easy or fast. The factors making Canada a less equal society are deep and complex. Some are beyond the reach of government. Canada is not alone in becoming more unequal. A comprehensive report by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has just explained how inequalities have been widening in almost all of its member countries, even the Scandinavian ones.

[ 200 comments : http://goo.gl/L4tLv ]

OECD calls time on trickle down theory
http://goo.gl/5Wyaq
By Nicholas Timmins
December 5, 2011
Trickle down theory is dead. The belief fostered by Ronald Reagan in the U.S. and Margaret Thatcher in the U.K. in the 1980s, that if the rich got richer, their income and wealth would trickle down the income scale so that a rising tide lifted all the boats, has had the last rites pronounced on it – by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

And now, for something completely different,
from the poison pen of Margaret Wente:

The poor are doing better than you think
http://goo.gl/jMTqg
By Margaret Wente
December 10, 2011
The news on income and inequality is depressing. The rich are getting richer, the poor are getting left behind, and the middle class is getting shafted. For most people, real incomes have been flat for decades – or so we’re told. This week, the OECD weighed in with a new report that Canada’s wealth gap is at a 30-year high. (...) In Ontario, ... 65 per cent of the bottom fifth of families by income have air conditioning. Seventy per cent have DVD players, 65 per cent have cable TV, 56 per cent have home computers and 98.9 per cent have colour TVs."

[ 555 comments : http://goo.gl/LjEsN ]
My favourite comment (by Gilles):
"Color TV, Car and wow...I guess compared to some Bedouin, our poor are doing great !! (...) I used to read the Globe as a counterbalance to some of the other papers but with this type of dimwitted, elitist, self serving, morally bankrupt drivel being put to post, I really have to wonder if the G&M has finally gone around the bend of reality. Shame on her and more importantly shame on the Globe & Mail for continuing to humour this woman by paying her to write nonsense."

Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

---

A Modest Reply to "horrifically brain-dead stupid" Margaret Wente
http://sixthestate.net/?p=3031
December 11th, 2011
Quote-of-the-day award goes to Sixth Estate [ sixthestate.net ]:
"I think the real problem is that Margaret Wente is an ignorant, patronizing, useless purveyor of plagiarized bullshit who singularly makes her mostly dim-witted columnist colleagues on the increasingly neuron-starved editorial page of the Grope & Flail look like Albert Einstein."
(Like he said. - Gilles)

Oh, and one last comment:

According to Wente, "...the incomes of U.S. middle-class families rose by more than 50 per cent in real terms between 1980 and 2009. Poor families fared almost as well."

According to this U.S. inflation calculator:
http://www.westegg.com/inflation/
...and this Canadian inflation calculator:
http://www.bankofcanada.ca/rates/related/inflation-calculator/
...the cost of living went up by 150% from 1980 to 2009 in both the U.S. and Canada.
[So much for fair and balanced reporting. G&M = Fox News North]

---

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

14. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter
Latest issue:

7 December 2011 - CRINMAIL Issue 1254
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=3991
In this issue:
Latest news and report
- Death and crucifixion for carjacking
- 'I don't own the country, they're not my forces'
- Petition against child labour cotton
- Parent-child communication key to stop abuse
- A government cover-up
- From the Middle Ages to the modern day
- Children conditioned for bias
- Causes of August riots revealed
- UN news
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

---------

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)
http://www.crin.org/email/

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://www.crin.org/

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter alert using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)
.
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail alert for this newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter alert.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Fourteen More Questions That
I Need to Answer Before I Die

---------------------------------------

What if you're in hell, and you're mad at someone, where do you tell them to go?

What is a "free" gift? Aren't all gifts free?

What is a refried bean? Why do they have to fry it twice?

What is shaved ice? Did it have hair on it before it was shaved?

What is the speed of dark?

What kind of fruit is in Juicy Fruit gum?

What was the best thing before sliced bread?

Whatever happened to preparations A through G?

What's the synonym for thesaurus?

When cheese gets its picture taken, what does it say?

When cows laugh, does milk come out of their noses?

When dog food is new and improved tasting, who tests it?

When people lose weight, where does it go?

When they first invented the clock, how did they know what time it was to set it to?

Source:
Darned if I can remember.

----------------------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

Stress reduction therapy for your pooch: (video, duration 00:52)
http://www.wimp.com/dogrelaxes/

---

The complete 14 Batman Window cameos (video, duration 12:24)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=d85gkOXeXG4

---

Georgia on my Mind, like you've never heard it before: (video, duration 2:34)
http://www.wimp.com/whistlingguy/
CAUTION : mullet alert!

---

"What A Wonderful World" with David Attenborough (video, duration 2:04)
http://videosift.com/video/What-A-Wonderful-World-with-David-Attenborough
Beautiful videography!!

... but I prefer the Louis Armstrong version : (video, duration 2:25)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5TwT69i1lU

---

Home Maintenance schedule
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/co/maho/gemare/gemare_003.cfm
Women: You're welcome.
Men : My wife made me post this.