Canadian Social Research Newsletter
February 12, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,533 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. The “Working Poor” in the Toronto Region: Who they are, where they live, and how trends are changing (Metcalf Foundation) - February 11
2. Social Assistance Review Discussion Paper 2: Missed Opportunity, Even Backsliding, as Austerity Agenda Looms
(Poverty Free Ontario) - February 6
3.
Increasing the age of eligibility for Old Age Security:
--- Federal Finance Minister : "Old Age Security reforms not until 2020." - February 10
--- Finance Department Damage Control : "Ummmmm - He didn't mean that."- February 11
4. Alberta Budget 2012: Investing in People - February 9
5. Old Age Security: Can We Afford It?
(Monica Townson, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - February 8
6. Ontario welfare rules : Do you live with someone who might be seen as your spouse?
(CLEO - Community Legal Education Ontario) - November 2011
7. 2011 Census: Population and dwelling counts
(Statistics Canada) - February 8
8. There’s no old age security ‘crisis’ : Parliamentary Budget Officer
(Globe and Mail) - February 8
9. 2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Ontario
(Ontario Campaign 2000) - February 6
10. Calgary Homeless Foundation : The Homeless Hub Newsletter
- February 6
--- Homelessness in Calgary Down for the First Time in 20 Years
--- Housing Subsidies and Homelessness: A Simple Idea
--- Working Rough, Living Poor
--- The Housing Market and Canada's Economic Recovery
--- Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention
--- Inuit Housing and Homelessness
--- Youth on the Street and Youth Involved with Child Welfare: Maltreatment, Mental Health and Substance Use

11. Poverty Costs : An Economic Case for a Preventative Poverty Reduction Strategy in Alberta
(Action to End Poverty in Alberta and Vibrant Communities Calgary) - February 6
12. * Open Letter to the Prime Minister from Campaign 2000 & Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada re. Reprofiling the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) Fund - February 6
13. Ontario Social Assistance Review Webinar Series (Income Security Advocacy Centre) - Jan/Feb 2012
14. The Canada Social Transfer: Retrospect and Prospect (Library of Parliament Research Publications) - July 2011
15. The Federal Role in Health and Health Care (Library of Parliament Research Publications) - September 2011
16. Opening the Door : Reducing Barriers to Post-Secondary Education in Canada (Senate Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology) - December 6, 2011
17.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
CANSIM is now FREE - February 2012
--- Canadian Economic Observer, February 2012 -
February 12
---
2011 Census: Population and dwelling counts - February 8
18. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

19. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
20. Welfare in Canada vs the U.S : Apples and Oranges - New Canadian Social Research Links page - February 8
21. [U.S.] Even Critics of Safety Net Increasingly Depend on It (New York Times) - February 11
22. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm



1. The “Working Poor” in the Toronto Region: Who they are, where they live, and how trends are changing - February 11
(Metcalf Foundation
)

New from the
Metcalf Foundation:

Working Poverty Increases in Toronto Region:
New Metcalf Foundation Report: Full-time job earnings often not enough to escape poverty.
http://goo.gl/zm97k
February 11, 2012
The number of working poor in the Toronto Region increased by 42% between 2000 and 2005, according to a new study from the Metcalf Foundation. This group accounted for more than 70,000 adults in the city of Toronto and more then 113,000 in the region overall. Toronto’s working poor live in a region with the highest cost of living in Canada, and the second most expensive housing market in the country. While past reports have looked at working poverty on a national level, this report, The “Working Poor” in the Toronto Region: Who they are, where they live, and how trends are changing, is the first to look at working poverty in the Toronto Region.

The “Working Poor” in the Toronto Region:
Who they are, where they live, and how trends are changing
(PDF - 9.4MB, 54 pages)
http://metcalffoundation.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Working-Poor-in-Toronto-Region.pdf
By John Stapleton, Brian Murphy and Yue Xing
February 2012
(...) Here are some key features of the working poor in the Toronto Region:
• They most commonly work in sales and service occupations.
• They work a comparable number of hours and weeks as the rest of the working-age population.
• They are more likely to be living without an adult partner than the rest of the working-age population.
• Working-age immigrants to Canada are over-represented among the working poor.
• They are only slightly less educated on average than the rest of the working-age population.
• Fewer own their own homes.
• They tend to be younger as a group than the working-age population as a whole.
(...)
Research on working poverty in Toronto would help to shed more light on the lives of members of this hidden group and help shape appropriate policies and
resources. The following areas of study would help in understanding the situation and needs of this group:
• The income security system and working poverty
• The structure of the job market and working poverty
• Education and working poverty
• Identity and working poverty
We invite researchers to use this paper as a starting point to uncover more on this increasingly important issue for the Toronto Region.

Summary Report (PDF - 2.6MB, 28 pages)
http://metcalffoundation.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Working-Poor-in-Toronto-Region-Summary-Report.pdf

Source:
Metcalf Foundation

http://metcalffoundation.com/
The goal of the George Cedric Metcalf Charitable Foundation is to enhance the effectiveness of people and organizations working together to help Canadians imagine and build a just, healthy, and creative society.

---

Related links:

---

From the
Globe and Mail:

The poor in Toronto: They’re working but not getting any richer
http://goo.gl/FqY7R
By Anna Mehler Paperny
February 11, 2012
(...) Across Canada, a job is no longer a ticket out of poverty, or a safeguard against it. And the number of people working but unable to make ends meet is growing in the country’s most populous urban hub – far faster than in Ontario or Canada as a whole. A study by Toronto researchers provided exclusively to The Globe and Mail provides a granular glimpse of working poverty at the census-tract level. The Metcalf Foundation study, the first of its kind in Canada, documents the changing face of the Toronto area’s workforce.

Interactive Map: Explore the data behind Toronto's working poor
http://goo.gl/Fcm7q

Source:
Globe and Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

---

From the
Toronto Star:

Metcalf Foundation study: working poor numbers way up in Toronto *
http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1129631
February 11, 2012
By Laurie Monsebraaten
The legions of Toronto area workers pouring coffee, cleaning toilets and otherwise toiling for low wages in office towers and factories is growing dramatically.
Between 2000 and 2005, the area’s working poor grew by 42 per cent, to 113,000 people, according to a groundbreaking report based on Statistics Canada labour and income data. Across the region, they accounted for 6.4 per cent of the working-age population. But inside the city of Toronto, they surged to 8.2 per cent of the workforce, or 70,700 people, says the study by the Metcalf Foundation, released on Saturday.
(...) Almost three out of four [of Toronto's working poor are immigrants, and almost half are single or lone parents. More than half have some post-secondary education, about the same as the average Canadian worker.
---
* NOTE : If you scroll down past the photo in the article to the fourth paragraph, you'll find (in the text box in the left margin on the page) links to five case profiles of the working poor in Toronto. The profiles offer first-hand accounts by people who work and live in poverty in Toronto --- single people, single parents and two-parent families.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. Social Assistance Review Discussion Paper 2: Missed Opportunity, Even Backsliding, as Austerity Agenda Looms - February 6
(Poverty Free Ontario
)

Poverty Free Ontario Bulletin #9:
Social Assistance Review Discussion Paper 2: Missed Opportunity, Even Backsliding, as Austerity Agenda Looms
http://goo.gl/H1VXc
February 6, 2012
The Social Assistance Review Commissioners issued a low-key release of their “Options” paper on its web site late Thursday, February 2 (see the link below). Although promoted for months as an “Options Paper”, it is actually framed as Discussion Paper 2: Approaches for Reform. While various ways to go for reform of social assistance in the long-term are presented in a technical policy terms, the paper lacks any clear, compelling overall direction to end poverty for social assistance recipients.
Questions and problems raised are barely advanced from the first Discussion Paper of last fall and, on some issues such as establishing a poverty measure for adequacy in benefit levels, the Paper actually moves the process backwards. The Commissioners ask for further input on their discussion questions from the community by March 16. Their final report with recommendations is targeted for release in June 2012.

Source:
Poverty Free Ontario
http://www.povertyfreeontario.ca/

Related link:

Approaches for Reform : Discussion Paper 2 (PDF - 1.2MB, 77 pages)
http://goo.gl/RyvnX
February 2012
Source:
Commission for the
Review of Social Assistance in Ontario

http://www.socialassistancereview.ca/

---

From the
Hamilton Spectator:

Social assistance report not worth the three-year wait:
Lankin and Sheikh serve up old arguments that divide, rather than help, people in poverty
http://www.thespec.com/opinion/columns/article/669189
February 10, 2012
By Deirdre Pike
On February 3, a long-anticipated report from the Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario quietly appeared on its website. Promoted in advance as the “Options Paper,” it was published as “Discussion Paper 2 — Approaches for Reform.” People who are stuck relying on social assistance for income support, both Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program, have waited patiently for three years for its release.
Echoing words from various government officials, they expected “bold changes” in the recommendations. With community allies from across every sector, they waited with “great expectations” that have not been realized. As Poverty Free Ontario says, “The paper lacks any clear, compelling overall direction to end poverty for social assistance recipients” and, in some cases, has actually moved the conversation backwards.

Source:
Hamilton Spectator
http://www.thespec.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

3. Increasing the age of eligibility for Old Age Security:
--- Federal Finance Minister : "Old Age Security reforms not until 2020." - February 10
--- Finance Department Damage Control : "Ummmmm - He didn't mean that."- February 11

Pension changes won’t happen until 2020 or later, Flaherty says
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1129450
February 10, 2012
By Bruce Campion-Smith
OTTAWA—Finance Minister Jim Flaherty has good news for Canadians aged 57 and older — you won’t be hit by looming changes to Canada’s Old Age Security program. Flaherty, 62, said Friday that changes under consideration won’t likely take effect for at least eight years, ensuring that those approaching retirement in the short-term won’t be affected.
Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

Federal Finance Damage Control Unit:
"He didn't really mean that!"

Staff denies timeline for OAS changes:
Flaherty mentions 2020, but speculation is premature, spokesman says
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/business/Staff+denies+imeline+changes/6136649/story.html
By Mark Kennedy
February 11, 2012
Finance Minister Jim Flaherty appeared to suggest Friday that planned changes to the pension system won't occur before 2020, but government officials later moved to clarify his comments and urged people not to assume this reflects a final decision on timing for a plan.

Source:
Ottawa Citizen
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

4. Alberta Budget 2012: Investing in People - February 9

Alberta Budget 2012: Investing in People
http://budget2012.alberta.ca/
February 9, 2012
The Government of Alberta is following through on its commitments to Albertans by responsibly investing in programs that support Albertans’ quality of life without raising taxes and positioning the province to balance the budget by 2013-14. Albertans have been clear about their priorities: health, education, jobs, services for seniors and our most vulnerable, infrastructure, communities and their children’s future. Budget 2012 delivers on those priorities.

Budget 2012 Quick Links:

Budget Speech Video: (45 minutes)
http://goo.gl/1EqLY

Budget Highlights
http://budget2012.alberta.ca/highlights/index.html

Budget 2012 News releases:
http://budget2012.alberta.ca/newsroom/index.html

* Budget 2012 invests in families, communities and supports for the vulnerable
http://alberta.ca/ACN/201202/31913640B0C90-D139-5FB2-9F8908B806C2D3BD.html

* Budget highlights (backgrounder)
http://alberta.ca/ACN/201202/31913640B0C90-D139-5FB2-9F8908B806C2D3BD.html#backgrounder

* Health investments deliver on Albertans’ priorities
http://alberta.ca/ACN/201202/319146439D6A3-F552-8E90-8723E5BC09AA5406.html

* From kindergarten to post-secondary, Alberta’s education systems receive predictable funding
http://alberta.ca/ACN/201202/31915643EAD08-C2A1-E98A-065B34E9A5521661.html

* Budget 2012 provides close to $5 billion in supports for vulnerable Albertans and seniors
http://alberta.ca/ACN/201202/31916644672F3-F3A1-2051-D18381AF304D7615.html

Government and Ministry business plans 2012-2015
http://budget2012.alberta.ca/details/index.html#busplans

[ Previous business plans by fiscal year:
http://www.finance.alberta.ca/publications/measuring/ministry-business-plans.html#previous ]

2012-13 Government and Legislative Assembly Estimates
http://budget2012.alberta.ca/details/index.html#estimates

Budget Documents & Quarterlies
For Fiscal Years 2001-02 to 2012-13
http://www.finance.alberta.ca/publications/budget/index.html

Source:
Alberta Budget 2012: Investing in People
http://budget2012.alberta.ca/ Related links:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Related links:

TD Bank Financial Group
Analysis of the 2012 Alberta Budget

Spending Days Are Here Again (PDF - 620K, 3 pages)
http://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/budgets/ab12.pdf

Highlights

• Alberta will return to surplus in fiscal 2013-14 after five years of deficit. A positive balance of $952 million (0.3% of GDP) in fiscal 2013-14 is expected to jump to $5.2 billion (1.5% of GDP) in fiscal 2014-15.

• Expenditures are ratcheted up in both fiscal 2012-13 and 2013-14, with the bulk of the spending increase resulting from new commitments in health care. Increased funding is made available to nearly all ministries. On the revenue side, there are no major tax initiatives. The brisk increase in revenue results from anticipated economic growth and from a surge in resource royalties.

• Budget projections show real GDP growth of almost 4% in 2012 and 2013, which is significantly above the private sector average and the TD Economics forecast. Other assumptions adopted by the budget about crude oil and natural gas prices are not much different from us.

Source:
2012 Federal, Provincial and Territorial Budgets
http://www.td.com/economics/analysis/canada/public-policy-government-finances/gov-finances.jsp
[ TD Bank Financial Group:
http://www.td.com/index.jsp ]

---

Alberta Budget 2012: Big Spending, Ongoing Deficit
http://edmonton.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120209/EDM_budget_120209/20120209/
February 9, 2012
The province is delivering another deficit budget for 2012/2013, eating through the majority of record-breaking revenue projections by significantly increasing overall spending. (...) Major beneficiaries of Budget 2012 – dubbed Investing in People – include low-income families and those who rely on Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped (AISH) [ http://www.seniors.gov.ab.ca/AISH/ ].

A new $21 million initiative will see households qualify for full child care subsidies if total annual income is under $50,000. The previous threshold was $35,000.

Government officials believe this will affect approximately 26,000 children, with 4,000 families who already receive funding seeking increases, and between 3,000-5,000 new families applying for assistance.

Maximum allowances for daycare are $628 for infants between one-18 months, $546 for toddlers from 19 months-kindergarten and $310 for children in grades one to six. Funding for day homes will be $520, $437 and $310, respectively.

AISH funding is also increasing by $271 million, marking a 34 per cent funding spike. The 46,000 affected Albertans will see their monthly assistance rise from $1,188 to $1,588 starting April 1st. Monthly income exemptions will also jump from $400 to $800 for single clients and from $975 to $1,950 for families.

Both the Liberals and the New Democrats believe the funding increases are about nothing more than gaining votes, and could be reversed after polls close this spring*.

Source:
CTV Edmonton

http://edmonton.ctv.ca/

---
* The next Alberta election will take place
during Spring 2012 (exact date to be determined):
Section 3(1) of the Legislative Assembly Act directs that "No Legislative Assembly shall continue for longer than 5 years from the date fixed for the return of the writs at a general election of its Members." The Provincial General Election was held on March 3, 2008. Official results were announced and writs were returned on March 13, 2008. Therefore, the twenty-seventh Legislative Assembly shall not continue past March 13, 2013. A Provincial General Election would have to be called on or before Thursday, March 14, 2013. Polling Day would be twenty-eight days after the date the election is called.
Source:
Elections Alberta Common Questions

http://www.electionsalberta.ab.ca/Public%20Website/faq.htm

---

- Go to the Alberta Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

5. Old Age Security: Can We Afford It? - February 8
(Monica Townson, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Old Age Security: Can We Afford It? (PDF - 169K, 4 pages)
http://goo.gl/Q49iF
February 2012
By Monica Townson
Old Age Security is the basic building block of Canada’s retirement income system. It is a flat rate monthly benefit that goes to everyone at age 65, provided they meet certain residency requirements. Canadians build on that foundation, saving for their retirement with benefits from the Canada or Quebec Pension Plan, a workplace pension if they’re lucky enough to have one, and private savings.

But now Prime Minster Harper says OAS is unsustainable. According to the Prime Minister, the program will not be able to accommodate the retirement of the baby boom generation over the next 20 years, so something must be done. Although details were sketchy at first, Harper now admits he is planning to raise the age of eligibility for OAS from 65 to 67.

Pension experts don’t agree with him.

Source:
Alternative Federal Budget Updates
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/projects/alternative-federal-budget

Author Monica Townson is an independent economic consultant working in the field of social policy. She has written six books and many reports and studies on pensions and retirement, income security programs and the economic situation of women.

More about Monica Townson
http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/2008/townson/

More reports and studies by Monica Townson
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/authors/monica-townson

Also from the Alternative Federal Budget project:

* Alternative Federal Budget Roundtable: Can Canada Escape a Lost Decade?
http://goo.gl/89aCz
February 8, 2012
As part of the consultations undertaken in preparation of our forthcoming Alternative Federal Budget, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives hosted an economic roundtable.

* What economic recovery?
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/what-economic-recovery
January 26, 2012
We've all heard political leaders boast that the Canadian economy has fully recovered from the recession and that the recession was not as severe in Canada as in other countries. It turns out that both of those claims are false because they don't take population growth into consideration.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The CCPA is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice.

---

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

6. Ontario social assistance rules in Plain Language:
Do you live with someone who might be seen as your spouse? - November 2011
(CLEO - Community Legal Education Ontario)

Ontario social assistance rules in Plain Language:
An update on the Ontario welfare "Spouse-in-the-House" rule (The "Falkiner Case")

Are you an Ontario welfare recipient?
Do you live with someone who might be seen as your spouse? (PDF - 528K, 19 pages)
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/PDF/socialAsst/cohab-en.pdf
November 2011

[ Version française de la brochure (PDF - 215Ko.) ] :
http://www.cleo.on.ca/francais/pubf/onpubf/PDFf/sociale/cohab-fr.pdf

This booklet will give you some information in plain language (KUDOS!) about the rules that Ontario Works (OW) and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) use to decide if two people who live together must apply as a couple for social assistance. Those rules were changed in 2002 as a result of a court decision in favour of Sandra Falkiner.

For 50+ links to contextual information about the Falkiner Case,
go to the Ontario Spouse-in-the-House Links page:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/spouse.htm

Related links:

Other CLEO documents online:
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/online.htm

Autres documents offerts en ligne en français:
http://www.cleo.on.ca/francais/pubf/onpubf/onlinef.htm

Source:
CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario)
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/index.htm

[ Version française du site:
Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario

http://www.cleo.on.ca/francais/pubf/onpubf/onlinef.htm

---

- Go to the Ontario Spouse-in-the-House Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/spouse.htm

7. 2011 Census: Population and dwelling counts - February 8
(Statistics Canada)

New from
Statistics Canada
:

February 8, 2012
2011 Census: Population and dwelling counts
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/dq120208a-eng.htm
The population of Canada increased 5.9% between the 2006 and 2011 censuses, compared with a 5.4% increase during the previous five-year period. The increase in the growth rate was attributable to slightly higher fertility and to an increase in the number of non-permanent residents and immigrants. A full analysis is available in the report, The Canadian Population in 2011: Population Counts and Growth.

The report:

The Canadian Population in 2011: Population Counts and Growth
HTML version
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011001-eng.cfm
PDF version
(992K, 26 pages)
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011001-eng.pdf
Contents:
Highlights
Part 1: National portrait
Part 2: Provinces and territories
Part 3: Portrait of metropolitan and non-metropolitan Canada
Part 4: Portrait of municipalities (census subdivisions)
Additional information

Related products:

* Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011003_1-eng.cfm

* Canada's rural population since 1851
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011003_2-eng.cfm

* The census: A tool for planning at the local level
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011003_3-eng.cfm

* Focus on Geography Series
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/fogs-spg/Index-eng.cfm

Source:
Analytical products
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/index-eng.cfm

Census of Canada - main page:
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/index-eng.cfm
- includes links to
the following Census 2011 information:
* By topic * Data products * Analytical products * Reference materials * Geography * Consultation* Custom services * Census of Agriculture
- also includes links to previous censuses (2006 - 2001 - 1996)

----------------------------

Selected new products and studies related to the 2011 Census:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/pn120208-eng.htm
February 8, 2012
NOTE : Click the link above to access all products below and more.

* GeoSearch
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=92-142-X&lang=eng

* GeoSuite, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=92-150-X

* Thematic Maps, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=92-173-X

* Illustrated Glossary, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=92-195-X

* Census Dictionary, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-301-X

* Overview of the Census, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-302-X

* more...
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/pn120208-eng.htm

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

Related links:

Canada Census links: Toronto Star coverage
http://www.thestar.com/topic/census
- links to just under 100 Star articles pertaining to the Census going back to March 2007. Topics include Census 2006 and Census 2011, the elimination of the compulsory long census form and subsequent resignation of the Chief Statistician, etc.

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

8. There’s no old age security ‘crisis’ : Parliamentary Budget Officer - February 8
(Globe and Mail)

There’s no old age security ‘crisis’ : Parliamentary Budget Officer
http://goo.gl/OPKl9
By Bill Currie
February 8, 2012
Kevin Page says the boomers will not break the bank.
In fact, Ottawa’s finances are in such good shape that it could afford to cut taxes and boost spending all while cutting cheques to a growing number of Canadian seniors. Mr. Page, the Parliamentary Budget Officer, released a new report Wednesday that takes a close look at the suddenly explosive issue of Old Age Security and pours cold water on Conservative warnings that the program faces a sustainability crisis.

[ 1142 comments : http://goo.gl/oSwze ]

Source:
Globe and Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com

The report of the
Parliamentary Budget Officer:

Federal Fiscal Sustainability and Elderly Benefits
http://www.parl.gc.ca/PBO-DPB/documents/Sustainability_OAS.pdf
February 8, 2012
This note reviews the framework PBO uses to assess fiscal sustainability and provides a comparison of projections of federal elderly benefits over the long term. Long-term federal debt-to-GDP projections and estimates of the federal fiscal gap are also provided under alternative assumptions regarding the indexation of elderly benefit payments.

Source:
Parliamentary Budget Officer
http://www.parl.gc.ca/PBO-DPB/index.aspx?Language=E
The mandate of the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) is to provide independent analysis to Parliament on the state of the nation’s finances, the government’s estimates and trends in the Canadian economy; and upon request from a committee or parliamentarian, to estimate the financial cost of any proposal for matters over which Parliament has jurisdiction.

Related link:

Maybe Canada should raise OAS limit to 67
Change would ease demographic crunch
http://goo.gl/1PQvy
By Stephen Maher
February 9, 2012
(...) For electoral reasons, we spend a lot of time in Canada debating retirement security, and little debating education, which is how we can boost our productivity, the key to making the economy grow, so we can afford to pay benefits to retired people. It's not Harper's style to release position papers and have a civilized debate about OAS. His style is to declare a crisis, attack the parliamentary budget officer, denounce his opponents as dangerous idiots who want to wreck Canada and declare that his plan is all that stand between us and ruin. That's not true, but it doesn't mean we shouldn't raise the age of eligibility for OAS.

Source:
Ottawa Citizen
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/

---

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

9. 2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Ontario - February 6
(Ontario Campaign 2000)

2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Ontario

Ontario does not have a choice on Poverty Reduction (PDF - 216K, 2 pages)
http://goo.gl/auobG
February 6, 2012
Media Release
Toronto – Ontario cannot afford to have the poverty reduction strategy sit on the margins, warns Ontario Campaign 2000. The economic and social potential of the province is at risk of being further eroded if the austerity agenda is given precedence over the wellbeing of Ontario’s children and their families. The government no longer has a choice in whether or not to concentrate on poverty reduction over other policy areas – poverty reduction must be a necessary part of overall public decision-making. The 2011 report card, Poverty Reduction in an Age of Uncertainty and Change, focuses on
child, family and youth poverty and finds that 393,000 children are still living in poverty in Ontario.

Poverty Reduction in an Age of Uncertainty and Change:
2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Ontario
(PDF - 960K, 13 pages)
http://goo.gl/ZhU4E
Table of contents:
* Key Recommendations
* Measuring Child Poverty
* Ontario Deprivation Index
* Employment Insecurity
* Economic insecurity amongst youth
* An Unequal Society
* Ontario Child Benefit
* Ontario’s Social Assistance
* Mental Health and Child Poverty
* Child Care in Ontario
* Affordable Housing
* Conclusion

Source:
Ontario Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/Ontario/
Part of
Campaign 2000

http://www.campaign2000.ca/
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada.

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

10. Calgary Homeless Foundation : The Homeless Hub Newsletter - February 6
--- Homelessness in Calgary Down for the First Time in 20 Years
--- Housing Subsidies and Homelessness: A Simple Idea
--- Working Rough, Living Poor
--- The Housing Market and Canada's Economic Recovery
--- Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention
--- Inuit Housing and Homelessness
--- Youth on the Street and Youth Involved with Child Welfare: Maltreatment, Mental Health and Substance Use

From
The Homeless Hub Newsletter - February 6, 2012:
http://goo.gl/R5OEm

Homelessness in Calgary Down for the First Time in 20 Years
http://goo.gl/TcXOf
February 6, 2012
News Release
The Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF) is pleased to report the 2012 homeless count shows an 11.4 per cent decrease in the number of people experiencing homelessness since 2008.

The report:

The State of Homelessness in Calgary in 2012 (PDF - 460K, 18 pages)
http://calgaryhomeless.com/assets/research/The-State-of-Homelessnessonlineversion.pdf

February 3, 2012
Key Findings:
1. Results to date show that the 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness in Calgary is working.
2. We are on track with 10 Year Plan projections. We are meeting the promise of Housing First for people housed under the 10 Year Plan.
3. Calgary is the epicentre of homelessness in Alberta, driven by migration, and the labour and rental market.
4. Emerging trends suggest family homelessness is increasingly becoming a regional rather than local phenomenon. Prevention and Housing First programs are working, but Calgary is seeing a high number of Aboriginal and immigrant families in family shelters.
5. The size of the at-risk for homelessness pool may be smaller than originally thought.

(Excerpt, p.2):
The 10 Year Plan, initially launched in 2008, was revised and updated in 2011 with a renewed focus on system planning. Its priorities continue to be the reduction of chronic homelessness and emergency shelter use, while demonstrating client benefits from Housing First interventions and decreases in health, correction and shelter services use.
10 Year Plan Milestones
• House 1,500 chronic and episodically homeless people by 2014
• By 2014, ensure that no more than 10% of those served by “Housing First” programs return to homelessness
• By December 2014, all individuals who engage in rough sleeping will have access to housing and support options appropriate to their needs
• Eliminate 85% of 2010 emergency shelter beds by 2018
• Reduce the average length of stay in family emergency shelters to 14 days by Dec. 2014 and to seven days by December 2018
• Reduce the average length of stay in emergency shelters to seven days by January 2018

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness in Calgary
http://calgaryhomeless.com/10-year-plan/progress/
- incl. links to:
* Progress * Fundamentals * Milestones * Strategies * Guiding Principles * History

Source:
Calgary Homeless Foundation
[ http://calgaryhomeless.com/ ]
Our mission :
To end homelessness in Calgary.
Our v
ision : By January 29, 2018, an individual or family will stay in an emergency shelter or sleep outside for no longer than one week before moving into a safe, decent, affordable home with the support needed to sustain it.

Related link:

Alberta announces $3.2b plan to end homelessness
http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/blog/alberta_announces__3_2b_plan_to_end_homelessness/
March 16, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
The Alberta government has today released a dramatic plan to end homelessness in 10 years by committing $1.2 billion in capital investments and $2 billion in operating funding. The plan – based on the “housing first” approach (which provides immediate housing and then offers supports as required) – will lead to the creation of 11,000 new homes by 2012, according to the provincial government. Full details, including funding and implementation lines, will be released in next month’s provincial budget.

The Alberta Plan:

A Plan For Alberta : Ending Homelessness in 10 years (PDF - 1.8MB, 48 pages)
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/documents/PlanForAB_Secretariat_final.pdf
October 2008
Prepared By:
The Alberta Secretariat
For Action On Homelessness
http://www.housing.alberta.ca/Alberta_Secretariat.cfm

[ Alberta Municipal Affairs
http://municipalaffairs.alberta.ca/ ]

---

Also in the February 6 issue of the
Calgary Homeless FoundationThe Homeless Hub Newsletter:
http://goo.gl/R5OEm
[ Click the link above to access any of the items below. ]

* Homelessness in Calgary Down for the First Time in 20 Years
* Housing Subsidies and Homelessness: A Simple Idea
* Working Rough, Living Poor
* The Housing Market and Canada's Economic Recovery
* Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention
* Inuit Housing and Homelessness
* Youth on the Street and Youth Involved with Child Welfare: Maltreatment, Mental Health and Substance Use

---

- Go to the Alberta Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

11. Poverty Costs : An Economic Case for a Preventative Poverty Reduction Strategy in Alberta - February 6
(Action to End Poverty in Alberta and Vibrant Communities Calgary)

Preventing poverty would save billions: study
Alberta's current charity model costs $9 billion and is less humane, coalition says
http://goo.gl/MaJd0
By Karen Kleiss
February 6, 2012
EDMONTON - Failure to address root causes of poverty costs Alberta as much as $9.5 billion each year, a new study says.
The report, published Monday by a coalition of anti-poverty groups, urges provincial leaders to fundamentally rethink their approach to poverty: Instead of spending to alleviate the symptoms of poverty, invest in preventing people from falling into poverty in the first place.
Source:
Edmonton Journal

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/index.html

February 6, 2012
Just released by Action to End Poverty in Alberta and
Vibrant Communities Calgary:

Poverty Costs : An Economic Case for
a Preventative Poverty Reduction Strategy in Alberta
(PDF - 3MB, 44 pages)
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/images/stories/documents/Poverty-Costs_Feb06-2012.pdf
By Alexa Briggs and Celia R. Lee
February 6, 2012
Table of contents:
* Introduction
* Poverty in Alberta and Canada
--- Measuring poverty
--- Poverty by the numbers
--- Poverty in context
* Tackling poverty
--- Poverty as a systemic issue
--- Poverty reduction
--- Who is responsible for Poverty reduction in Alberta
* External costs of poverty
--- Costs of poverty to health care
--- Costs of poverty attributable to crime
--- Intergenerational costs of poverty
--- Opportunity costs of poverty
--- Total external costs of Poverty
* Investing in a poverty reduction strategy??
* References

Source:
Co-published by
Vibrant Communities Calgary
http://www.vibrantcalgary.com/
and
Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/

Related links:

Poverty Costs in Alberta: Infographic (PDF - 360K, 1 page)
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/images/stories/documents/Poverty-Costs_Infographic.pdf

Video : Poverty Costs in Alberta (Duration 3:08)
http://youtu.be/SpmxCmh9c64

June 15, 2011
Video : A Better Calgary for All: (Duration 1hr 13 min.)
A Poverty Reduction Discussion with Mark Chamberlain
Co-hosted by Calgary Economic Development and Vibrant Communities Calgary.
http://youtu.be/KPTm9ZNHXzw

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

12. Open Letter to the Prime Minister from Campaign 2000 & Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada
re. Reprofiling the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) Fund -
February 6

Open Letter to the Prime Minister from Campaign 2000 & Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada
re. Reprofiling the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) Fund

February 6, 2012 – Today - six years since the announcement of the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB)—the CCAAC and Campaign 2000 call on the Harper government to redirect the $2.5 billion annual UCCB to fund ECEC programs and the National Child Benefit for low and modest income families. An open letter sent today to the Prime Minister, Finance Minister and President of Treasury Board says that Canadians simply cannot afford to let a substantial public expenditure like the UCCB continue with no documented efficacy. (...).

Read the full Open Letter:

English (PDF - 224K, 22 pages):
http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/Open%20letter-CCAAC&C2000EnglishFeb2012.pdf

Français (268K, 2 pages)
http://www.campaign2000.ca/whatsnew/Open%20letter-CCAAC&C2000FrenchFeb3pm,2012.pdf

Related links:

* Universal Child Care Benefit (Canada Revenue Agency)
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/bnfts/uccb-puge/menu-eng.html

* Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/

* Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada
http://www.ccaac.ca/home.php

* National Child Benefit
http://www.nationalchildbenefit.ca/eng/home.shtml

---

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

13. Ontario Social Assistance Review Webinar Series - Jan/Feb 2012
(
Income Security Advocacy Centre)

Ontario Social Assistance Review Webinar Series

The Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario recently released the following paper with options for reforming Ontario Works (OW) and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP):

Approaches for Reform: Discussion Paper 2 (PDF - 1.2MB, 77 pages)
http://goo.gl/RyvnX
February 2012
The discussion paper was released in the first week of February,
and the Commission is seeking feedback and comments by
Friday, March 16, 2012.

---

From
Your Legal Rights:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/

According to the organizers of the webinar series:
"The options could have far-reaching implications for people on low incomes."

In this webinar series, Jennefer Laidley and Dana Milne of the Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC) [ http://www.incomesecurity.org/ ] presented on three different options expected in the paper and offered a variety of tools to help groups across Ontario organize consultations in their communities and make submissions.

Links to each of the three webinars:

NOTE : Clicking a link to one of the three webinars below takes you to a content page that includes:
- the embedded video (and a link to a mirror of the video on Vimeo),
- a link to an audio-only version of the webinar in MP3 format
- a link to a Powerpoint presentation to download in different formats (PPT - PDF - DOC)

Part 1 : Tax Delivered Income - January 26
(video duration : 1 hour 46 minutes)
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/webinar/83721

Part 2 : Moving Benefits outside OW and ODSP - February 1
(video duration : 1 hour 52 minutes)
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/webinar/83725

Part 3 : Merging OW and ODSP - February 6
(video duration : 1 hour 57 minutes)
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/webinar/83726
The Options Paper was released before the third webinar – as a result, the third webinar addresses the content of the Options Paper directly.

Tools You Can Use
In the Social Assistance Review
(Word file - 168K, 25 pages)
http://sareview.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Toolkit-Final.doc
* Frameworks for Reforming Social Assistance
* Options Backgrounders
* Using an Equity Lens
* ODSP Action Coalition Position Statements
* Government's Poverty Reduction Commitments
* Political and Economic Overview
* MPP Lobby Kit
* Detailed info on each of three options
* Government's Poverty Reduction Principles and the Social Assistance Review
* The Social Assistance Review So Far : The Political and Economic Context
* Next Steps

This toolkit was created by:

* The Income Security Advocacy Centre
http://www.incomesecurity.org/

...in partnership with:

* Campaign 2000
http://www.campaign2000.ca/

* Colour of Poverty - Colour of Change
http://www.colourofpoverty.ca/

* Metro Toronto Chinese & Southeast Asian Legal Clinic
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/organization/74087

* The Ontario Council for Agencies Serving Immigrants
http://www.ocasi.org/index.php

* The ODSP Action Coalition
http://www.odspaction.ca/

* YWCA Toronto
http://www.ywcatoronto.org/

* The community legal clinic system's
Steering Committee on Social Assistance

Source:
Your Legal Rights : Training
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/training

[ Your Legal Rights Home Page:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/ ]

----------------------
NOTE : These webinars and presentation materials are also available on the Income Security Advocacy Centre’s website on the Social Assistance Review at http://sareview.ca/isac-resources/webinars-preparing-for-the-options-paper/

Related link:

Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario
http://www.socialassistancereview.ca/

---

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

14. The Canada Social Transfer: Retrospect and Prospect - July 2011
(Library of Parliament Research Publications)

There's gonna be some changes 'round here.

The 2007 federal Budget restructured the Canada Social Transfer to provide equal per capita cash support to provinces and territories, effective 2007-08; similar changes to be made to the Canada Health Transfer effective 2014-15, when its current legislation is renewed.
Source:
History of the Health and Social Transfers
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fedprov/his-eng.asp

---

The Canada Social Transfer: Retrospect and Prospect (Word 2007 file - 242K, 15 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net//CST_2011.docx
By James Gauthier
14 July 2011
The structure of major federal transfers for provincial/territorial social programs has undergone significant changes over the years, primarily in response to the desire among provincial/territorial governments for greater flexibility and federal concerns over rising costs. This paper provides an overview of how federal support for social programs is provided to provinces and territories today through the CST, and how this fiscal arrangement has evolved over time, including its associated accountability mechanisms. The paper concludes with a presentation of some likely key issues for renewal of the CST, along with a description of the process of FPT negotiations for major federal transfers, as well as an example of a more targeted federal transfer to provinces and territories in support of housing and homelessness.

-----
NOTE : The above file hasn't been posted to the Parliamentary Research website as at February 6, 2012.
It was sent to me by a newsletter subscriber to share with other social researchers.
Gilles
-----

Source:
Library of Parliament Research Publications
http://www.parl.gc.ca/About/Library/VirtualLibrary/ResearchPublications-E.asp

Related links:

The Canada Social Transfer : In Brief
By James Gauthier and Shahrzad Mobasher Fard
Revised 23 July 2009
[ NOTE : This is an earlier, shorter version of the July 2011 CST paper. ]

HTML version
http://www2.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/prb0857-e.htm

PDF version (56K, 3 pages)
http://www2.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/prb0857-e.pdf

The Canada Social Transfer (CST) is the primary federal contribution in support of provincial programs related to post-secondary education, social assistance and social services, and programs for children in Canada. This short paper offers an overview of the Canada Social Transfer (CST) that includes the amounts payable to provinces and territories in cash transfers from 2004–2005 to 2013–2014, along with information on related tax point transfers and associated equalization. It also includes information on the change in the CST Formula since 2007-2008 and the impact of that change.

Source:
Library of Parliament Research Publications
http://www.parl.gc.ca/About/Library/VirtualLibrary/ResearchPublications-E.asp
HINT: Click the source link above to access several hundred reports by this research group, all organized by category.

- For other welfare-related links, see the History of Welfare in Canada : selected readings page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare_history.htm

Related links:

Canada Social Transfer
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fedprov/cst-eng.asp
(...) The CST is calculated on an equal per capita cash basis to reflect the Government’s commitment to ensure that general-purpose transfers provide equal support for all Canadians. Prior to that, the CST was calculated on an equal per capita basis combining the value of both tax and cash transfers.

Source:
Federal Transfers to Provinces and Territories
http://www.fin.gc.ca/access/fedprov-eng.asp

Department of Finance Canada:
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp

---

- Go to the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

15. The Federal Role in Health and Health Care - September 2011
(Library of Parliament Research Publications)

The Federal Role in Health and Health Care
By Marlisa TiedemannParliamentary Information and Research Service
Library of Parliament
22 September 2011

HTML version:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2011-91-e.htm

PDF version (172K, 11 pages)
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2011-91-e.pdf

Contents

1 Health and the Constitution Act, 1867
2 The Criminal Law Power
3 The Federal Spending Power
4 Peace, Order and Good Government
5 Other Federal Responsibilities that Bear on Health
Selected Bibliography

Source:
Library of Parliament Research Publications
http://www.parl.gc.ca/About/Library/VirtualLibrary/ResearchPublications-E.asp

---

- Go to the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

- Go to the Medicare Debate Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/medicare.htm

16. Opening the Door : Reducing Barriers to Post-Secondary Education in Canada - December 6, 2011
(
Senate Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology)

Opening the Door : Reducing Barriers to
Post-Secondary Education in Canada
(PDF - 1.2MB, 130 pages)
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/SEN/Committee/411/soci/rep/rep06dec11-e.pdf
December 2011
(...)
In Canada, education falls under provincial jurisdiction. Section 93 of the Constitution Act, 1867, states that “[i]n and for each Province the Legislature may exclusively make Laws in relation to Education”. As a result, each province and territory is responsible for organizing, delivering and evaluating education within its borders, from primary to post-secondary levels. However, pursuant to section 91 of the Constitution, the federal government is responsible for the education of First Nations people on reserve, members of the armed forces and their families, and inmates of federal correctional institutions, among others.

The federal government’s role for primary and secondary education is limited to these specific groups (e.g., education of First Nations on reserve), but is more flexible with regard to PSE. For example, the federal government is involved in PSE by indirectly funding the provincial PSE systems through transfer payments, financing research through granting councils, and supporting students through the Canada Student Loans Program. Federal involvement in PSE is based on the government’s significant responsibility for national economic policy, human resource development and citizens’ mobility between provinces.

Partial table of
contents for the report:

Order of Reference
Members
List of Recommendations
Introduction
Barriers to Post-Secondary Education in Canada
--- Non-financial barriers
--- Financial barriers
Specific under-represented groups
Gender differences
Aboriginal People and Post-secondary Education
Post-secondary Funding Mechanisms
---Student financial assistance
--- Tax measures
--- Savings incentives
--- Canada Summer Jobs
--- Financial support for apprentice training
Research at Post-secondary Institutions
The Role of the Federal Government
--- The Canada Social Transfer (CST)
National strategy on the accessibility of post-secondary education
Conclusion

Source:
Senate Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology
http://goo.gl/22amn

Senate Committees:
http://goo.gl/g9Bv2

Parliament of Canada
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Default.aspx?Language=E

---

- Go to the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

17. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
CANSIM is now FREE - February 2012
--- Canadian Economic Observer, February 2012 -
February 12
---
2011 Census: Population and dwelling counts - February 8

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

February 2012
CANSIM is now FREE.
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a01?lang=eng
CANSIM is Statistics Canadas key socioeconomic database. In CANSIM, the user can choose a specific table, geography(ies), characteristics (variables) and date range, then download the data. Users can create customized tables by adding or removing data; and manipulate data by asking for percent changes or year-to-date sums or averages.

Updated daily, CANSIM provides fast and easy access to a large range of the latest statistics available in Canada. CANSIM data are now available free of charge under the Statistics Canada Open Licence Agreement:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/reference/licence-eng.html

In addition, the interface has been modified to make it more user friendly.

See the Tutorial: Introduction to the New CANSIM Interface:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/about-apercu/video/cansim-eng.html

Browse CANSIM by subject:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a01?lang=eng

Related link:

Statistics Canada to make all online data free
National Statistics Council, which opposed scrapping the long-form census, applauds the move

November, 25, 2011
By Carl Meyer
All of Statistics Canada’s standard online products, including the census, socioeconomic and geographic data, will be offered to the public for free starting February 2012, Embassy has learned. In 2010, the agency was rocked when the government dropped the mandatory long-form census, and its chief statistician resigned in protest. Immigration experts slammed the decision for jeopardizing the targeted delivery of services like languages training and job-search workshops. Now, the agency will not charge for the information it gathered during the 2011 census. Instead, as it releases the first set of census data this February, it will also announce that it will be free—as well as the rest of its online, readily-available data.

Source:
Embassy - Canada's Foreign Policy Newsweekly
http://embassymag.ca/

 

February 12, 2012
Canadian Economic Observer, February 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-010-x/11-010-x2012002-eng.htm
Sections:
1. Current economic conditions
2. Economic events
3. Recent feature articles
4. National accounts
5. Labour markets
6. Prices
7. International trade
8. Goods-producing industries (manufacturing, construction and resources)
9. Services (trade, transportation, travel and communications)
10. Financial markets
11. Provincial (latest Unemployment rates and Consumer Price Index)
Tables
Charts
Appendices
User information
Related products

Source:
Canadian Economic Observer - Product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=11-010-XWE&lang=eng
This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations.
[ * Click "View" for the latest issue of this periodical; click "Chronological" index for earlier editions. ]

Related subjects:

* Business performance and ownership
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=2239&lang=eng&more=0

* Current conditions
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2239&id=712&lang=eng&more=0

* Economic accounts
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3764&lang=eng&more=0

* Leading indicators
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=3764&id=1880&lang=eng&more=0

 

February 8, 2012
2011 Census: Population and dwelling counts
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/dq120208a-eng.htm
The population of Canada increased 5.9% between the 2006 and 2011 censuses, compared with a 5.4% increase during the previous five-year period. The increase in the growth rate was attributable to slightly higher fertility and to an increase in the number of non-permanent residents and immigrants.

Links to dozens of Census 2011 products
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/pn120208-eng.htm

---

NOTE: For more links to 2011 Census products, go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

 

The Daily Archives
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

18. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

February 12, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Solutions: How the Ontario government can rescue and ensure the viability and quality of the province’s child care system
http://goo.gl/tuhJS
8 Feb 2012 | Ontario
Paper from the Quality Early Learning Network explains the current crisis in child care in Ontario. It argues that "for the Ontario ECEC system to survive and thrive, a multi-pronged approach is needed". A comprehensive plan is outlined and includes the call for "immediate, emergency financial assistance, a long-term policy framework, increased stable public funding, and a modernized funding model."

Canada’s history of the never-was national child care program
http://goo.gl/BnzLw
8 Feb 2012 | Canada
In this edition of Know thy History: Looking back on child care, we look back at the three major attempts by federal governments to develop a national child care strategy for Canada.

Poverty reduction in an age of uncertainty and change: 2011 report card on child and family poverty in Ontario
http://goo.gl/LgrQ0
8 Feb 2012 | Ontario
Campaign 2000's annual report card on poverty in Ontario argues that "if the Ontario government wants to stay on track and reduce child poverty, it has to see poverty reduction as a priority, a key consideration in public sector decision making."

Who says what: Election coverage and sourcing of child care in four Canadian dailies
http://goo.gl/RY6Hx
8 Feb 2012 | Canada
Article co-written and researched by CRRU staff Carolyn Ferns and Lyndsay Macdonald analyzes news coverage from the 2006 federal election. It concludes that "the voices of parents and child care activists were marginal".

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

New poll shows Canadians want to make family a priority
http://goo.gl/ZsUZA
8 Feb 2012 | Canada

French-language day care to reopen
http://goo.gl/w9elJ
8 Feb 2012 | Ontario

Campaigners to draw up 'alternative' EYFS
http://goo.gl/Iuqo6
8 Feb 2012 | Europe

Poverty fight must go on despite deficit, activists say
http://goo.gl/Be4IC
8 Feb 2012 | Ontario

The rollout of full-day kindergarten
http://goo.gl/rNmFM
8 Feb 2012 | Ontario

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MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

19. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

February 10:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/10/
Kids Count Report - Illinois
Jobless Benefit Claims
Achievement Gap
State Medicaid Programs

February 9:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/09/
Medicaid and Emergency Room Visits - Washington
US Teen Pregnancy Rate

February 8:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/08/
Recession and Demographic Groups
Child Poverty - Maine
Prisoner Re-Entry Program - Michigan

February 7:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/07/
State Medicaid Programs - Maine, California
High School Graduation Rate - Indiana
Prisoner Re-Entry Program - Michigan

February 6:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/06/
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - Pennsylvania, Connecticut
Homeless Rate - New Orleans, LA
Aging Out of Foster Care - Nebraska

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

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NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

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Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

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- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

20. Welfare in Canada vs the U.S : Apples and Oranges - New Canadian Social Research Links page - February 8

Welfare in Canada vs the U.S : Apples and Oranges
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/canada_us_welfare.htm
- A new Canadian Social Research Links page - February 8

21. [U.S.] Even Critics of Safety Net Increasingly Depend on It - February 11
(New York Times)

Even Critics of Safety Net Increasingly Depend on It
http://goo.gl/jihSX
By Binyamin Appelbaum and Robert Gebeloff
February 11, 2012
NOTE: This article includes links to six short but compelling videos --- first-hand candid views about government entitlements.
Read the article first, then watch the videos.
Recommended viewing!

(...) As more middle-class families ... land in the safety net in Chisago and similar communities, anger at the government has increased alongside. Many people say they are angry because the government is wasting money and giving money to people who do not deserve it. But more than that, they say they want to reduce the role of government in their own lives. They are frustrated that they need help, feel guilty for taking it and resent the government for providing it. They say they want less help for themselves; less help in caring for relatives; less assistance when they reach old age.
(...)
Americans are divided about the way forward. Seventy percent of respondents to a recent New York Times poll said the government should raise taxes. Fifty-six percent supported cuts in Medicare and Social Security. Forty-four percent favored both.
(...)
Almost half of all Americans lived in households that received government benefits in 2010, according to the Census Bureau. The share climbed from 37.7 percent in 1998 to 44.5 percent in 2006, before the recession, to 48.5 percent in 2010.
The trend reflects the expansion of the safety net. When the earned-income credit was introduced in 1975, eligibility was limited to households making the current equivalent of up to $26,997. In 2010, it was available to families making up to $49,317. The maximum payout, meanwhile, quadrupled on an inflation-adjusted basis.

Source:
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/

Also from the New York Times:

Interactive map
Where Americans Most Depend on Government Benefits:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/02/12/us/entitlement-map.html

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- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

22. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter
Latest issue:

8 February 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1262
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4086
Latest news and reports
- Restrictive budgeting on human rights
- 'Freedom of expression has its limits'
- End of one problem, others continue
- Racial profiling to meet quotas
- UN news
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Republic of Korea
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL"page (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Children's rights Wiki - from CRIN
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php
The Children's Rights Wiki assembles all information about children's rights in every country in one place.

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)
http://www.crin.org/email/

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://www.crin.org/

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Two Absolutely Fascinating Factoids about
The Canadian Social Research Links Guy

[By Gilles]

1. I once had a legitimate cheque for $92 Million in my possession for half a day.

- I was ("Interim") Director, Quebec Region in the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) for six months back in 1988 as part of a secondment. There was a long weekend ("stat holiday") coming up, and the Quebec government had been promised their CAP advance before the weekend. [That's so the sum could be deposited by Quebec officials in a banking institution and accrue some interest during the weekend.] Small wonder that Quebec was anxious to receive the cheque --- it was for $92 million. As the CAP Quebec officer, it was my duty to accept the cheque from a Finance Canada official and to pass it along to a Quebec government representative several hours later.

2. I played Carnegie Hall when I was 15 years of age.

Ronald O. Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall [ http://www.carnegiehall.org/ ] has been the premier classical music performance space in the United States since its opening in 1891, showcasing the world's greatest soloists, conductors, and ensembles. Throughout its century-plus history, the space has been the forum for important jazz events, historic lectures, noted educational forums, and much more. Some of Canada's best-know singers and musicians would give their right arm to be invited to Carnegie Hall. In 1965, I was a member of the LaSalle Cadets, Ottawa drum corps, and we were invited to perform in a soirée of drum corps music. I didn't appreciate until several years later the grandeur of the place and its significance in the careers of many artists who would later become musical legends.
Many, but not me.

---------------------------------------

And, in closing...

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The man who lived on his bike. (video, duration 3:00)
http://www.wimp.com/livedbike/
(Très Cool! - filmed in Montreal)

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Hell's Angels never retire. (video, duration 1:30)
http://www.wimp.com/mobilityscooter/

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Who else likes banjo music out there?
Sleepy Man Banjo Boys:
(video, duration 1:20)
http://www.wimp.com/amazingkids/

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Scale of the Universe
http://onemorelevel.com/game/scale_of_the_universe_2012

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Ellen Degeneres Responds To Her 'Degenerate' Right-Wing Haters -- 'One Million Moms' (video, duration 2:32)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cippPJaeLi4
Right on, Ellen.
Right on.

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Top five regrets of the dying
A nurse has recorded the most common regrets of the dying, and among the top ones is 'I wish I hadn't worked so hard'.
What would your biggest regret be if this was your last day of life?
http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/feb/01/top-five-regrets-of-the-dying

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