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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
June 12, 2005

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter, a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1369 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.


PLEASE NOTE THAT THERE WILL BE NO CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER NEXT WEEK.

I'll be attending the 12th Social Welfare Policy Conference in Fredericton:
http://www.ccsd.ca/cswp/2005/program.htm
- hope to see you there!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. G-8 pledges $40 billion US in debt relief - June 11
2. Lifting the Boats: Policies to Make Work Pay - report (Canadian Policy Research Networks) - June 10
3. Kids Canada Policy Inventories (Canadian Policy Research Networks)
4. Telling Tales: Living the Effects of Public Policy - Ontario report (The Toronto Star) - June 10
5. Early Learning and Care in the City Update (Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development) - June 8
6. Who's Hungry: 2005 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area (The Daily Bread Food Bank) - June 7
7. Welfare Incomes 2004 (National Council of Welfare) - June 7
8. Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Initiative
(Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services) - February 2005
9. From Statistics Canada:
--- 2004 Low Income Cut-Offs - April 2005
--- Low Income Measurement in Canada - December 2004

10.
What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit ( University of Toronto) - June 10

International Content

11. Poverty Dispatch Digest : U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- June 9
12. GEsource (U.K.)
13. Recent Working Papers (#394-409) from the Luxembourg Income Study:
--- Benefit Generosity and Absolute Poverty in 16 OECD Countries - April 2005
--- Welfare States, Social Structure and the Dynamics of Poverty Rates : A comparative study of 16 countries, 1980-2000 - February 2005


Have a great  week!

Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. G-8 pledges $40 billion US in debt relief - June 11

G-8 pledges $40 billion US in debt relief
June 11, 2005
"Finance ministers from the Group of Eight industrialized nations, including Canadian Finance Minister Ralph Goodale, agreed Saturday to a historic deal cancelling at least $40 billion US worth of debt owed by the world's poorest countries."
Source:
Canada.com

Google News search Results : "G-8, debt relief"
Google Web Search Results : "G-8, debt relief"
Source:
Google.ca

- Go to the Globalization Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/global.htm
- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

2. Lifting the Boats: Policies to Make Work Pay (report) - June 10
(Canadian Policy Research Networks)

Lifting the Boats: Policies to Make Work Pay (PDF file - 1.6MB, 53 pages)
Research Report
by Ron Saunders
June 2005
"In Lifting the Boats: Policies to Make Work Pay, Ron Saunders, Director of CPRN's Work Network, explores measures to help the one in six Canadians who work for less than $10/hour improve their lot in the labour market and their community."

Associated Documents:
(all dated June 10)
- E-network : A Policy Mix For Canada's Working Poor (PDF file - 92K, 5 pages)
- News Release : A Policy Mix For Canada's Working Poor (PDF file - 98K, 2 pages)
- Executive Summary - Lifting the Boats: Policies to Make Work Pay (PDF file - 71K, 5 pages)

Source:
Work Network ===> see more Work Network publications
[ Canadian Policy Research Networks - CPRN ]

Related Link:

Task Force on Modernizing Income Security for Working Age Adults ("MISWAA")
- incl. links to : In the News · Press Releases · Task Force and Working Group Members · Contact Us · Reports · Frequently Asked Questions
NOTE: CPRN's President Judith Maxwell is a member of the Task Force and Ron Saunders is a member of the MISWAA Working Group.
See the complete List of MISWAA Task Force and Working Group Members.
Read some of MISWAA's working documents.
Excellent multisectoral initiative!
...and I'm not just saying that because I'm a member of the Working Group. I should add that I'm a *quiet* member of the working group - uncharacteristic for me, but Lord, it's easy to be humble when I'm sitting at the same table as many of Canada's top social policy outfits and thinkers...

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

3. Kids Canada Policy Inventories
(Canadian Policy Research Networks)

Kids Canada Policy Inventories
"The Kids Canada policy inventories are organized by policy field, as well as by jurisdiction [arranged from west to east to north].
The inventories are easy to use and navigate. Just click on the jurisdiction or program that interests you. To find out what other governments are doing, scroll up or down, or follow the links to a related table.
Our goal is to make the information as accessible and accurate as possible. Please let us know how we're doing.
Fields
1. Administration of Child and Family Policies and Programs in Canada
2. Initiatives for Children and Families, Government of Canada
3. Income Supports, Provincial and Territorial
4. Leaves from Work, Provincial and Territorial
5. Early Childhood Education and Care, Provincial and Territorial
6. Policies and Programs for Children with Disabilities
7. Programs for Aboriginal Children [coming soon]
8. Programs for School-aged Children [coming soon]
9. Children, Families and the Justice System [coming soon]
10. Education Governance [coming soon]

Source:
Canadian Policy Research Networks - CPRN

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

4. Telling Tales: Living the Effects of Public Policy (Ontario report) - June 10
(The Toronto Star)

Poverty study full of surprises
June 10, 2005
By CAROL GOAR
"In an ideal world, the poor would be blameless, resilient and sympathetic to others who have fallen on hard times. In real life, they're just like any other segment of society. Some are victims of circumstance; others are snared in troubles of their own making. Some are good neighbours; others denigrate immigrants, racial minorities and unconventional families. Some can see past their own misfortune; others have a permanent chip on their shoulder. Tempting as it may be for social activists to portray the poor in romanticized terms, it is not the basis for sound public policy. That is one of the lessons that emerges from a three-year study of 40 lower-income families struggling to survive in Ontario in the late '90s. The final report, entitled Telling Tales: Living the Effects of Public Policy [$], was released yesterday."
Source:
The Toronto Star

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

5. Early Learning and Care in the City Update - June 8
(Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development)

From the Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development:

June 8, 2005
Study urges caution on Best Start strategy (Word file - 30K, 2 pages)
"TORONTO - Three education leaders who released a study last year advising the province to rethink its strategy for preschoolers are urging caution as Ontario finalizes it child care plans with the federal government. Early Learning and Care in the City: Update 2005 warns that new federal funding for Ontario must be accompanied by a stronger policy framework than is now outlined in the province's Best Start Plan."
Study update:
Early Learning and Care in the City Update (Word file - 61K, 6 pages)
June 2005

Original study:
Early Learning and Care in the City:
A New Blueprint for Ontario
(PDF file - 326K, 30 pages)
September 2004
Michael Cooke, Daniel Keating & Marjorie McColm
The Centre of Early Childhood Development, George Brown College and
Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development, Ontario Institute of Studies in Education/ University of Toronto

Highlights of the original study (PDF file - 147K, 4 pages)

__________

Related Links
__________

From the Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services:

May 6, 2005
Moving Forward: Governments of Canada and Ontario
sign an agreement on Early Learning and Child Care

"HAMILTON — Prime Minister Paul Martin, along with Social Development Minister Ken Dryden and Dr. Marie Bountrogianni, Ontario's Minister of Children and Youth Services, announced today an historic Agreement in Principle that further supports the development of quality early learning and child care (ELCC) for young children and their families in Ontario."

May 6, 2005
Backgrounder- The McGuinty Government's Best Start Plan

November 25, 2004
Results For Ontario Families

November 25, 2004
Helping Young Children Get The Best Start In Life

--------------------

From the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) at the University of Toronto:

Towards a national system of early learning and child care
- includes a broad (and growing) collection of government and non-governmental reports, press releases, news articles and other documents dealing with the new federal-provincial-territorial arrangements for early learning and child care in Canada.

--------------------

From the Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care:

Build it Right!
Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care Response to the Best Start Plan
(PDF file - 82K, 18 pages)
April 2005

--------------------

Google News search Results : "Child care, Canada"
Google Web Search Results : "Child care, Canada"
- each of the above links takes you to a Google.ca search results page - always up to date!
Source:
Google.ca

--------------------

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

6. Who's Hungry: 2005 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area - June 7
(The Daily Bread Food Bank)

Who's Hungry: 2005 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area (PDF file - 393K, 28 pages)
June 07, 2005
"Daily Bread Food Bank insists that charitable food relief programs are only a temporary solution to hunger. Food banks have consistently advocated that government programs ensure a decent standard of living for everyone. Despite this work, food banks are still entrenched as a necessary social service for low-income people, compensating for the government cutbacks of the 1990s and the increasingly tenuous labour market."

Survey results indicate drastic overhaul of social assistance required (PDF file - 60K, 2 pages)
Report looks at who’s hungry in Toronto in 2005 and how to help them
News Release
June 7, 2005
"TORONTO, ON – Thirty-four per cent of people on Ontario Works are discouraged from working because of the deduction of employment income from their social assistance, according to the results of Daily Bread’s 2005 survey of people relying upon food banks. As a result, just thirteen per cent of this group reports work income (virtually identical to the 14% who do so across the province). The loss of dental and drug benefits is another major barrier to getting back to work as shown by the experience of people relying upon food banks who are working full-time—46 per cent of them have no dental coverage and only 43 per cent have an employer drug plan."

Source:

Daily Bread Food Bank (Toronto)
"The Daily Bread Food Bank is a non-profit, non-denominational charitable organization working to eliminate hunger in the Greater Toronto Area. It is Canada's largest food bank, serving 170 food programs. In addition, we work together to try to end the root causes of hunger through public education and research."

Publications - links to over two dozen reports from 2002 to 2005

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

7. Welfare Incomes 2004 - June 7
(National Council of Welfare)

Fix Welfare Financing and End the "Clawback" of Child Benefits! (PDF file - 112K, 2 pages)
June 7, 2005
Press release
"Governments need to provide adequate financing for welfare programs and end the “clawback” of child benefits from families on welfare, the National Council of Welfare said in a report published today.
Welfare Incomes 2004 shows many welfare recipients eking out a living on incomes well below the poverty line. After adjusting for inflation, many of the incomes were significantly lower in 2004 than they were ten or 15 years ago. (...) The report urges governments to come up with new fiscal arrangements for welfare, calling current arrangements 'complex, unintelligible, unaccountable and totally divorced from the real needs of welfare recipients.' An acceptable new deal would include more realistic federal support earmarked specifically for welfare and minimal standards for provincial and territorial welfare and related programs. Among other things, welfare incomes should be based on the actual cost of a basket of goods and services rather than being set arbitrarily by government decree."

Complete report:

Welfare Incomes 2004 (PDF file - 2.04MB, 125 pages)
June 2005
Revised August 2005

Excerpt :
"The federal government has increased its spending on child benefits significantly since 1998, but the increases have been offset by freezes and cuts in provincial and territorial benefits, including the clawback of the National Child Tax Benefit Supplement (NCBS). Two-parent families with children on welfare in Nova Scotia, Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, and the three territories wound up with lower total incomes in 2004 than they had in 1999, the first full year of the National Child Benefit. Single parents wound up with lower total welfare incomes with only two exceptions. (...)Despite all the glowing government rhetoric about the National Child Benefit and a very real increase in federal funding, the fact remains that many families on welfare were worse off in 2004 than they were five years earlier. This is a big step backwards in the fight against child poverty. Both the clawback and the current funding arrangements for welfare are blatant and longstanding examples of bad social policy, and bad social policy almost inevitably produces bad results."
NOTE: According to a (separate) Errata Sheet:
Page 93, Appendix A: Estimated number of people on welfare by province and territory. Estimates for Northwest Territories, as of March 31, 2004 should read “1,965”.

Highly recommended reading!
Welfare Incomes 2004 presents estimates of the incomes of welfare recipients in each province and territory for four family types: a single employable person, a single person with a disability, a single parent with one child, and a two-parent family with two children. Also included are comparisons with the poverty lines and average incomes, and data on welfare incomes as far back as 1986. The report also includes interjurisdictional comparisons of welfare policies concerning the treatment of assets and income from work and other sources.

Source:
National Council of Welfare
"The mandate of the National Council of Welfare is to advise the Minister of Social Development in respect of any matters relating to social welfare that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate."

Google.ca Web Search : "welfare incomes report, canada"
Google.ca News Search : "welfare incomes report, canada"
Source:
Google.ca

On a personal note...
I hold the National Council of Welfare in the highest regard, because of the dedication of Council members and staff and because of the Council's mandate (in federal legislation) to inform and advise the federal Minister of Social Development (Ken Dryden) on all matters relating to the welfare of Canadians. In my 'former life' as a federal government social program information provider, I worked cooperatively with Council staff starting in the early 1980s to help ensure the factual accuracy of their reports. While on a one-year secondment with the Council starting in the summer of 1996, I was responsible for the 1995 "edition" of the Welfare Incomes report, which is produced annually since 1986, and I also did the research and wrote the provincial-territorial chunk of a report entitled "Another Look at Welfare Reform in Canada (1997)". You'll find links to these and other reports on the Publications page of the Council's website: http://cnb-ncw.gc.ca/

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm
- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm
- Go to the Welfare and Welfare Reforms in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welref.htm

8. Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Initiative - February 2005
(Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services)

Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Initiative
Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services
Synthesis Report
February 2005
HTML version
- incl. links to : Title Page - Introduction - Background - Description of the NCB Initiative - Evaluation of the NCB Initiative — The Program Evaluation Approach - Evaluation Findings - Conclusion - Annex One: Report Summaries - Annex Two: NCB Initiative Logic Model
PDF version (1.07MB, 64 pages)
Excerpt (p.31):
"In most jurisdictions, the design of the NCB Initiative has made work financially more attractive than social assistance for families with children by improving the difference between minimum wage employment and social assistance. This improvement was associated with a reduced dependency on social assistance among families with children. These findings were further supported by the provincial case studies which indicate that the NCB Initiative reduced social assistance caseload for families with children. However, there is also evidence that introduction of the Initiative did not lead to shorter spells on social assistance. Thus, the effect of the NCB was likely that of reducing the number of families entering assistance."
Source:
National Child Benefit website

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Unofficial Social Union Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/socu.htm

9. From Statistics Canada:
--- 2004 Low Income Cut-Offs - April 2005
--- Low Income Measurement in Canada - December 2004

From Statistics Canada:

Low income cut-offs for 2004
and low income measures for 2002
(PDF file - 217K, 34 pages)
April 2005

Low income cutoffs from 1994 - 2003 and
low income measures from 1992 - 2001
(PDF file - 288K, 38 pages)
March 2004
Source:
Income research paper series - links to 150+ studies going back to 1993

Low Income Measurement in Canada (PDF file - 220K, 20 pages)
December 2004
by Philip Giles
Description and comparison of measures of low income:
- Low-income cutoffs (LICO)
- Low income measures (LIM)
- Market Basket Measure (MBM)
- Future developments

"On poverty and low income" - by Ivan Fellegi (1997)
The Chief Statistician of Canada explains why his agency's low income cut-offs should not be used as the "official" poverty line.

Related Link:

2004 Poverty Lines
May 5, 2005
"The LICOs are published by Statistics Canada. Persons and families living below these income levels are considered to be living in "straitened circumstances." There are 35 different LICOs, varying according to family size and size of community. The LICOs are more popularly known as Canada's poverty lines."
Source:
Canadian Council on Social Development

- Go to the Poverty Measures Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

10. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - June 10
( University of Toronto)


What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is content from the most recent issue of the notifier.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NEW POSTINGS AVAILABLE ON THE
CHILDCARE RESOURCE AND RESEARCH UNIT’S WEBSITE
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

--------------------
WHATS NEW
--------------------

>> Shedding new light on staff recruitment and retention challenges in child care
Report for the Child Care Human Resources Sector Council uses further, more in depth analysis of You Bet I Care! data sets to explore recruitment and retention issues in child care.

>> Early learning and care in the city: Update June 2005
Report from the Atkinson Centre & George Brown College responds to Ontario’s Best Start Plan; warns that federal funding must be accompanied by a stronger policy framework.

>> Welfare incomes 2004
Report from the National Council of Welfare presents welfare rates for each province and territory in Canada; discusses the clawback of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

>> Address by Prime Minister Paul Martin to the Empire Club and Toronto Board of Trade
Speech by Prime Minister Paul Martin outlines his position on the importance of early learning and child care to Canada.

---------------------------------------------------
CHILD CARE IN THE NEWS
---------------------------------------------------

>> Review could debase city's after-school care: New provincial presence means lower standards, needless duplication [CA-AB]
Edmonton Journal, 10 Jun 05
A proposed review of the Edmonton's role in after-school care could lead to a big drop in standards that would affect thousands of children, parents and operators say. Last year the province introduced its first regulations in this area, which a city report describes as less comprehensive than Edmonton's.

>> Big pay-off from child care centres [CA]
Leader-Post (Regina), 10 Jun 05
I am writing regarding the article, "Minister wants irreversible program" in the June 6 edition of the Leader-Post to express my support for the very important initiative mentioned in the article.

>> Making cents of child care [CA]
Times Colonist (Victoria), 5 Jun 05
UVic law professor Rebecca Johnson says that despite all the talk about how kids are the future of the country, the onus for providing, paying and stressing out over quality child care is piled too much on parents.

>> Caring for our children [CA-NB]
Telegraph-Journal (Saint John), 4 Jun 05
Guest commentaries by Tony Hutjens, NB provincial minister of Family and Community Services and Linda Gould, parent of two children, the administrator of a not-for-profit 60-space child care centre located in Miramichi, and the past president of Early Childhood Care and Education New Brunswick.

>> Psst! - the world has changed. Mr. Lord [CA-NB]
Telegraph-Journal (Saint John), 31 May 05
Rather than play the family values card in a thinly-veiled attempt to pander to the conservative vote, New Brunswick premier Bernard Lord should sign a child care deal as soon as possible with Ottawa that sees the money go where it is intended and needed – New Brunswick’s child care system.

>> Maybe preschool is the problem [US]
New York Times, 22 May 05
If six out of every 1,000 preschool children are expelled at the tender age of 4 whose fault is that? "Two-career families" - code words for working mothers - would be the easiest target, followed by violent cartoons or some electronic toy. But maybe, some education experts say, the problems stem from preschool itself.

>> Move to outlaw schools-for-profit [AU]
The Queensland Government will legislate to thwart plans by Australia's largest child care provider to set up for-profit "primary colleges". ABC Learning Centres wants to channel children from its child care centres into the schools in a move it expects to generate returns of more than 20 per cent.
The Australian, 12 May 05

>> Minister wants irreversible program [CA]
Leader-Post (Regina), 6 May 05
A national early learning and child- care system must become rooted in Canadian society in order to make it irreversible in the future, says the federal minister of social development.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This message was forwarded through the Childcare Resource and Research Unit e-mail news notifier.
For information on the CRRU e-mail notifier, including subscription instructions , see http://www.childcarecanada.org
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (University of Toronto, Canada)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Related Links:

What's New? - Canadian, U.S. and international resources from Jan 2000 to the present.
Child Care in the News - media articles from January 2000 to the present
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

Also from CRRU:

Current developments in Early Childhood Education and Care: Provinces and territories
Regularly updated
"This resource is a collection of useful online readings about current early childhood education and care policy and program delivery issues in each province and territory. Within each jurisdiction, information is organized into three sections: news articles, online documents and useful websites."

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

11. Poverty Dispatch Digest :
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- June 9, 2005

POVERTY DISPATCH Digest
Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin
This digest offers dozens of new links each week to full-text articles in the U.S. media (mostly daily newspapers) on poverty, poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, and much more...
The Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison offers a free e-mail service that consists of an e-mail message sent to subscribers each Monday and Thursday, containing a dozen or so links to articles dealing with the areas mentioned above. The weekly Canadian Social Research Links Poverty Dispatch Digest is a compilation, available online, of the two dispatch e-mails for that week --- with the kind permission of IRP.

Here's a one-day sample of the subjects covered in the Poverty Dispatch Digest:

June 9, 2005
Compiled by the Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and distributed Mondays and Thursdays


Today's subjects include: Health Care Costs for Uninsured // School Choice // Welfare and Work - Indiana // Welfare and Education - New York // Wal-Mart and State Social Services - Wisconsin // Social Services Cuts - Michigan // Predicted Impact of Programs for Uninsured - Wisconsin // Medicaid - Wisconsin, Ohio // Health Care Program - Minnesota, Tennessee // Health Care Costs for Uninsured - Washington // Social Service Computer Problems - Colorado // No Child Left Behind Act - Indiana, Florida // Racial Achievement Gap - Florida // Charter Schools - Los Angeles // Educational Achievement - St. Paul, Providence, Pittsburgh // Higher Education for Low-Income Students - Missouri // Food Insecurity - California, Kansas // Homelessness - Rhode Island

Each of the weekly digests below offers dozens of links or more to media articles that are time-sensitive.
The older the link, the more likely it is to either be dead or have moved to an archive - and some archives [but not all] are pay-as-you-go.
[For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH link above]

The Poverty Dispatch weekly digest is a good tool for monitoring what's happening in the U.S.; it's a guide to best practices and lessons learned in America.

Subscribe to the Poverty Dispatch!
Send an e-mail message to John Wolf < jwolf@ssc.wisc.edu > to receive a plain text message twice a week with one to two dozen links to media articles with a focus on poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, health, Medicaid from across the U.S.
And it's free...

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH link at the top of this section.
Recently-archived POVERTY DISPATCH weekly digests:

- June 2, 2005
- May 26
- May 19
- May 12
- May 5

POVERTY DISPATCH description/archive - weekly issues back to October 2004 , 50+ links per issue
NOTE: this archive is part of the Canadian Social Research Links American Non-Governmental Social Research page.

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

12. GEsource (U.K.)

GEsource
"GEsource is a free information resource for Geography and the Environment, and is aimed at staff, students and researchers in the HE and FE communities. Alongside a growing range of additional services, GEsource includes a core database of high-quality Internet resources catalogued by subject specialists across a number of disciplines - the environment, general geography, human geography, physical geography and techniques and approaches."

GEsource World Guide: Canada
- incl. Country Profile * Demographics * Geography/Maps * Economic Data * Articles * Satellite Images * Internet Links * Landscape Photos
World Guides
===> same info as above for 270 countries!

Country Comparison Tool - compare up to four countries : Population - Population Growth - Migration - Life expectancy - Gender ratio - Age structure - Birth rate - Death rate - GDP - GDP per Capita - GDP Growth - Unemployment - Labour force - Area- Coastline - Boundaries

GEsource is one of the partners in the Resource Discovery Network - RDN (U.K.)
"The Resource Discovery Network is the UK's free national gateway to Internet resources for the learning, teaching and research community. The service currently links to more than 100,000 resources via a series of subject-based information gateways (or hubs). The RDN is primarily aimed at Internet users in UK further and higher education but is freely available to all."

SOSIG - The Social Science Information Gateway
- another partner of the RDN, well worth an exploratory visit if you've never seen this huge European/international site...

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

13. Recent Working Papers from the Luxembourg Income Study:
- Benefit Generosity and Absolute Poverty in 16 OECD countries - April 2005
-
Welfare States, Social Structure and the Dynamics of Poverty Rates : A comparative study of 16 countries, 1980-2000 - February 2005

New from the Luxembourg Income Study:

The Material Consequences of Welfare States:
Benefit Generosity and Absolute Poverty in 16 OECD countries
(PDF file - 327K, 39 pages)
Working Paper No. 409
Lyle Scruggs and James P. Allen
Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
Syracuse University
April 2005
"In this paper we examine more directly the relationship between welfare state generosity in three social insurance programs—unemployment, sickness and pensions—and poverty levels in advanced industrial democracies in the last quarter of the twentieth century. Our results strongly suggest that more generous entitlements to key social insurance programs are associated not only with lower relative poverty, but also lower absolute poverty. This supports the contention that promoting relative economic equality can improve the absolute material well-being of the poor. However, we find no evidence to suggest that relatively more generous unemployment benefits systematically reduce poverty. (...) [In this paper] we construct a sample of absolute poverty rates using disposable income surveys from the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) with detailed social program data from our Comparative Welfare State Entitlements data set to examine the effects of the generosity of public unemployment, sickness and pension insurance benefits on absolute poverty rates in sixteen advanced industrial economies."
- [Canada is mentioned six times in this report]

Related Link:

Welfare States, Social Structure and the Dynamics of Poverty Rates
A comparative study of 16 countries, 1980-2000
(PDF file - 264K, 30 pages)
Working Paper No. 408
Olof Bäckman
Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
Syracuse University
February 2005
"The purpose of this paper is twofold. The primary purpose is to try and explain both the temporal and the spatial variation of poverty rates in terms of unemployment insurance indicators and structural/sociodemographic factors. Secondly, the paper aims to test the ‘convergence hypothesis’ of the poverty rate, i.e. whether or not poverty rates in modern welfare states have converged in recent decades."

Other recent LIS Working Papers:
No. 407. Structural Theory and Relative Poverty in Rich Western Democracies, 1969-2000, by David Brady, March 2005.
No. 406. Principles and Practicalities for Measuring Child Poverty in Rich Countries, by Miles Corak, March 2005.
No. 405. Child Poverty and Changes in Child Poverty in Rich Countries since 1990, by Wen-Hao Chen and Miles Corak, January 2005.
[This paper was prepared as a contribution to the Innocenti Report Card No. 6 “Child Poverty in Rich Countries 2005,” UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre. It has also been published as an Innocenti Working Paper 2005-02, February 2005 --- http://www.unicef-icdc.org/publications/pdf/iwp_2005_02_final.pdf
No. 404. Market Economic Systems, by Frederic L. Pryor, October 2004.
No. 403. Families at the Margins of the Welfare State: A Comparative Study on the Prevalence of Poverty among Families Receiving Social Assistance, by Susan Kuivalainen, February 2005.
No. 402. Electoral Systems, Poverty and Income Inequality, by Darwin Ugarte Ontivaros and Vincenzo Verardi, February 2005.
No. 401. The Impact of Taxes and Transfer Payments on the Distribution of Income: A Parametric Comparison, by Samuel R. Dastrup, Rachel Hartshorn, and James B. McDonald, January 2005.
No. 400. Rising Inequality and the Politics of Redistribution in Affluent Countries, by Lane Kenworthy and Jonas Pontusson, January 2005.
No. 399. Familialism and Welfare Regimes: Poverty, Employment and Family Policies, by Joya Misra and Stephanie Moller, January 2005.
No. 398. Poverty and Income Maintenance in Old Age: A Cross-National View of Low Income Older Women, by Timothy M. Smeeding and Susanna Sandström, January 2005
No. 397. Production of Last Resort Support: A Comparison on Social Assistance Schemes in Europe with the Notion of Welfare Production and the Concept of Social Right, by Susan Kuivalainen, December 2004.
No. 396. L’immigration au Luxembourg, et après?, by Craig Parsons and Timothy M. Smeeding, November 2004.
No. 395. Ireland's Income Distribution in Comparative Perspective, by Brian Nolan and Timothy Smeeding, December 2004.
No. 394. The Age Profile of Income and the Burden of Unfunded Transfers in Four Countries: Evidence from the Luxembourg Income Study
===>>To access any of the above papers, click the link below and scroll down the next page to select a specific study.

Links to all 409 Luxembourg Income Study / Luxembourg Employment Study Working Papers
- all on one page
Economese Alert:
Many of the LIS working papers are written in economese.
If you start feeling light-headed when you read any of these working papers, back away from your machine and make your way smartly to the nearest exit for some fresh air...

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm



Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

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Thanks, CUPE!

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You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to include a link back to the home page of Canadian Social Research Links.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

----------------------------------------

My Weekly Exercise Program
----------------------------------------

Monday:

Beat around the bush.
Jump to conclusions.
Climb the walls.
Wade through paperwork.

Tuesday:

Drag my heels.
Push my luck.
Make mountains out of molehills.
Hit the nail on the head.

Wednesday:

Bend over backwards.
Jump on the bandwagon.
Balance the books.
Run around in circles.

Thursday:

Toot my own horn.
Climb the ladder of success.
Pull out the stops.
Add fuel to the fire.

Friday:

Open a can of worms.
Put my foot in my mouth.
Start the ball rolling.
Go over the edge.

Saturday:

Pick up the pieces.

Source:
http://www.cybersalt.org/