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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
July 12, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2056 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. Decisions of the Women’s Court Of Canada - Gosselin v. Quebec, 2006 (Women's Court) - July 8
2. Best Interests of the Child: Meaning and Application in Canada (Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children) - June 2009
3. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, June 2009 - July 10
---Study: Education and labour market transitions in young adulthood, 2000 to 2008 - July 9
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours April 2009 - July 9
4. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - July 12

International content

5. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
6. America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2009 (Childstats.gov) - July 11
7. Civil Legal Aid in the United States: An Update for 2009 (Center for Law and Social Policy) - July 7
8. U.S. Safety Net Effective at Fighting Poverty, But Has Weakened for the Very Poorest (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) - July 6
9. California's Budget Deficit and Welfare Cuts - July 9
10. Bretton Woods Update No.66, June/July 2009 (Bretton Woods Project)
11. Australian Policy Online
12. CRINMAIL - (Child Rights Information Network newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. Decisions of the Women’s Court Of Canada - Gosselin v. Quebec (Attorney General), [2006] - July 8
(Women's Court)


Decisions of the Women’s Court Of Canada
In 2004, a group of feminist / equality Charter activists, lawyers, and academics, decided to do something about what they saw as the sorry state of equality jurisprudence under s. 15. The solution, rewrite the key decisions of the Supreme Court of Canada in this important area. The first six judgments of the Women’s Court of Canada have now been published in Volume 18 of the Canadian Journal of Women and the Law. Over the coming months TheCourt.ca will have the honour of reproducing these judgments and providing them with a permanent online home.
Source:
THE COURT - the online resource for debate & data about the Supreme Court of Canada

The Women’s Court of Canada: Gosselin v. Quebec (Attorney General), [2006] (39 pages)
July 8, 2009
by Gwen Brodsky, Rachel Cox, Shelagh Day and Kate Stephenson
The Women’s Court of Canada reconsiders the 2002 decision [see link below, under Related links] in Gosselin v. Québec (Attorney General), in which the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that section 29(a) of Québec’s Regulation Respecting Social Aid, which reduced the welfare rate of recipients under the age of thirty to below subsistence level (in the 1980s), did not violate sections 7 or 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms or section 45 of the Québec Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
"(...) We decided to participate in the Women’s Court’s reconsideration of Gosselin because we believe that sections 15 and 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and section 45 of the Québec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms are fully capable of addressing poverty issues and that the reluctance of courts in Canada to interpret them in this way reflects what Louise Arbour has called 'judicial timidity.'’’

* Recommended reading for welfare historians and anyone interested in sections 7 and 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

NOTE: the Gosselin case is one of five cases that you'll find on the Decisions of the Women's Court of Canada page (as at July 2009); the complete final list appears below.

Related links:

Gosselin v. Quebec (Attorney General), [2002] (106 pages)
- the official decision of the Supreme Court of Canada
Source:
Supreme Court of Canada Decisions

---

Women’s Court of Canada
by Simon Fodden
March 5, 2008
The Women’s Court of Canada launches this week. The WCC is a group of women academics and practitioners who combined to rewrite six Supreme Court of Canada decisions to take a full and proper account of women’s equality. The affected decisions are:
* Symes v. Canada, [1993] : deduction — child care expenses — women — taxpayer — income
* Native Women’s Association of Canada v. Canada, [1994] : funding — freedom of expression — women — equal — constitutional
* Eaton v. Brant County Board of Education, [1997] : placement — disabled — special — child — pupil
* Law v. Canada (Minister of Employment and Immigration), [1999] : discrimination — differential treatment — claimant — survivor’s pension — dignity
* Gosselin v. Quebec (Attorney-General), [2002] : programs — welfare recipients — security of the person — dignity — legislation
* Newfoundland (Treasury Board) v. Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Public and Private Employees, [2004] : pay equity — government — crisis — hospital workers — women
SourceL
SLAW - a cooperative Canadian weblog on things legal

---

Startling acts of well-thought uppitiness
Gutsy, legal-minded Canadian women refuse to take 'because' for an answer

By Janice Kennedy
March 2, 2008
Law professors Natasha Bakht, Diana Majury and Rosemary Cairns Way say it's time to get serious about women's equality. Majury, a law professor, is a founding member of the Women's Court of Canada, to be unveiled this week. They were probably a bit defiant as young girls. Uppity, even. These women must have been the kind of kids who kept asking, "But why?" even after the ultimate parental law had been laid down. "Because I said so" just didn't cut it for them. Still doesn't. Their stage is large and public now, and the issues more far-reaching, but these stubborn women are still challenging conventional wisdom. And in Toronto later this week, International Women's Week, they will engage in a startling act of uppitiness. They will unveil the Women's Court of Canada. Bravo. The Women's Court is a group of Canadian lawyers, law professors and activists who have decided it's time to get serious about women's equality.
Source:
The Ottawa Citizen

---

Introducing the Women’s Court of Canada (PDF - 204K, 12 pages)
2008
By Diana Majury
Source:
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law
[ University of Toronto Press Journals ]

Links to more resources about the Gosselin case - from the Canadian Social Research Links Caselaw Resources page

- Go to the Case Law / Court Decisions / Inquests page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/caselaw.htm
- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

2. Best Interests of the Child: Meaning and Application in Canada - June 2009
( Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children)


Best Interests of the Child: Meaning and Application in Canada

The Best Interests of the Child is a central principle in the Convention on the Rights of the Child. A new report, released by the Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children, explores how this principle has been used, misused, and under-used in the context of Canadian policy and practice. The report, entitled Best Interests of the Child: Meaning and Application in Canada, proposes a rights-based approach for application in a wide variety of areas. Based on research and a national, multi-disciplinary conference, the report hopes to foster reflection in Canada on how well we are living up to our commitment to act in the best interests of children.

Complete report:

Best Interests of the Child:
Meaning and Application in Canada
(PDF - 3.8MB, 90 pages)
June 2009

Further information:

* Council of Europe: The best interests of the child - what it means and what it demands from adults (June 2008)
* UN High Commissioner for Refugees Guidelines on Determining the Best Interests of the Child (June 2008)

Source:
Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children
The Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children is a non-profit, voluntary organization
dedicated to the full implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child in Canada and around the world.

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

3. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour Force Survey, June 2009 - July 10
---Study: Education and labour market transitions in young adulthood, 2000 to 2008 - July 9
--- Employment, Earnings and Hours April 2009 - July 9


What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

July 10, 2009
Labour Force Survey, June 2009
Employment was little changed in June, leaving total net losses during the last three months at 13,000, much smaller than the 273,000 decline in the first three months of the year. The unemployment rate edged up 0.2 percentage points to 8.6% in June, as more people looked for work.
- includes four tables:
* Labour force characteristics by age and sex
* Employment by class of worker and industry
* Labour force characteristics by province May 2009 (monthly/annual)
* Labour force characteristics by province
[ Related link: Labour Force Information, June 14 to 20, 2009 ]

July 9, 2009
Study: Education and labour market transitions in young adulthood, 2000 to 2008
In general, men and women have followed the same pathways from school to adult life during the past eight years. However, their timing for various transitions has been quite different. A long-term study of several thousand young people between 2000 and 2008 showed the most common sequence of events to adulthood was to leave school, find a full-time job, leave the parental home, form a relationship and have children.
[ Education and Labour Market Transitions in Young Adulthood (PDF - 360K, 38 pages)

Related subjects:
o Children and youth
o Child development and behaviour
o Labour market activities
o Education, training and learning
o Outcomes of education

July 9, 2009
Employment, Earnings and Hours April 2009
Total non-farm payroll employment fell by 51,400 in April, down 0.4% from March. Since the peak in October 2008, the number of employees has fallen every month, bringing total losses over this period to 376,500. Job losses occurred in 64% of industries, unchanged from a month before.
[ chart : Total payroll employment, 2006 to 2009 ("I think I see the problem here, Sherlock.") ]

---

The Daily Archives - select a year and month from the drop-down menu to view releases in chronological order
[ Statistics Canada ]

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm
- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

4. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - July 12


Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

July 12, 2009

Research on ratios, group size, and staff qualifications and training in early years and childcare settings
8 Jul 09
- Report on two projects from the Department of Children, Schools and Families, UK Government, on child:adult ratios in early years settings.

Sacrificing their careers for their families? An analysis of the penalty to motherhood in Europe
8 Jul 09
- Report from the University of Manchester on the labour market’s penalty to motherhood in six European countries.

Assessment practices and aspects of curriculum in early childhood education
8 Jul 09
- Report from the New Zealand Council for Educational Research presenting survey findings on assessment practices in early childhood education settings.

Family stress: Safeguarding young children’s care environment
8 Jul 09
- Report from the Bernard van Leer Foundation examining the relationship between familial stress and child development.

About Canada: Childcare
24 Jun 09
- Just published – a new book co-authored by CRRU director Martha Friendly and University of Manitoba Sociologist Susan Prentice.

With our best future in mind: Implementing early learning in Ontario
17 Jun 09
- Report to the Premier of Ontario from Charles Pascal, the Premier's Special Advisor on Early Learning.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news


· Mobile community pre-school centre rolling in Brampton
[CA-ON] 7 Jul 09

· Oshawa school tries full-time kindergarten
[CA-ON] 6 Jul 09

· District hopeful of kindergarten plan; Officials look to the government to start the all-day sessions
[CA-BC] 2 Jul 09

· Global education giant targets ABC Learning Centres
[AU] 30 Jun 09

· Eddy Groves beats freeze with asset fire sale
[AU] 26 Jun 09

· Struggle for daycare continues
[CA-NU] 15 Jun 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

5. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)


Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

July 10:
Report: Child Well-Being in the U.S.
Job Training Program - Omaha, NE
Public Assistance Offices and Voter Registration
Increasing Need for Food Assistance
G-8 Food Security Initiative

July 9:
Food Assistance for Children in the Summer
Rural Children in Cohabiting Households
Report: Homelessness in the U.S.
Report: Homelessness in Australia
State Budget Cuts to Welfare Programs - California

July 8:
State Budgets and Cuts to Assistance Programs
Privatization of Social Services - Indiana
States' Use of Stimulus Funds
Welfare Reform Bill - United Kingdom
Hate Crime Legislation and the Homeless - Florida

July 7:
States and Budget Deficits
Homeless Children and Families
Children and Families of Prisoners
Federal Minimum Wage
Food Stamp Program as Economic Stimulus
Food Stamp Program and Farmers Markets

July 6:
Homelessness among Female Veterans
States and Job Training Initiatives
Drought and Unemployment - San Joaquin Valley, CA
Increase in Cash Assistance Amounts - New York
Safety Net Programs and Poverty Alleviation
Climate Change and Hunger

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

6. America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2009 - July 11
(Childstats.gov
)


America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2009
America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2009 continues a series of annual reports to the Nation on conditions affecting children in the United States. Three demographic background measures and 40 selected indicators describe the population of children and depict child well-being in the areas of family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. This year's report has a special feature on children with special health care needs.
[ Highlights ]
Source:
America's Children Reports
[ Childstats.gov - the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (working group of Federal agencies that collect, analyze, and report data on issues related to children and families. The Forum has partners from 22 Federal agencies as well as partners in private research organizations) ]

Related link:

Child Poverty Rising, Report Says
July 11, 2009
A growing number of American children are living in poverty and with unemployed parents, and are facing the threat of hunger, according to a federal report released yesterday.
According to the report, America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 18 percent of all children 17 and younger were living in poverty in 2007, up from 17 percent in 2006. The percentage of children with at least one parent working full time was 77 percent in 2007, down from 78 percent in 2006. Those living in households where parents described children as being hungry, having skipped a meal or having gone without eating for an entire day increased from 0.6 percent in 2006 to 0.9 percent in 2007, the report said.
Source:
Washington Post

- Go to the International Children, Families and Youth Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chn2.htm

7. Civil Legal Aid in the United States: An Update for 2009 - July 7
(Center for Law and Social Policy
)


Civil Legal Aid in the United States:
An Update for 2009
(PDF - 212K, 29 pages)
By Alan W. Houseman
July 2009
"(...) An integrated and comprehensive civil legal assistance system should have the capacity to: (1) educate and inform low-income persons of their legal rights and responsibilities and the options and services available to solve their legal problems; and (2) ensure that all low-income persons, including individuals and groups who are politically or socially disfavored, have meaningful access to high-quality legal assistance providers when they require legal advice and representation. The United States has made considerable progress in meeting the first of these two objectives, but progress has been slow in meeting the second."
Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy

---

Related link from
Statistics Canada
:

Legal Aid in Canada:
Resource and Caseload Statistics, 2007/2008
(PDF - 616K, 127 pages)
February 2009
* In 2007/2008, $670 million was spent on providing legal aid services in 10 provinces and territories. This represents over $20 for every person living in these jurisdictions.
* In the last five years, legal aid spending after inflation has decreased just as many times as it has increased, but on average, it has risen about 1% per year. Compared to the previous year, spending in 2007/2008 was virtually unchanged, up by less than one-half of one percent.
[ Highlights ]
[ Earlier editions of this report ]

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

8. U.S. Safety Net Effective at Fighting Poverty, But Has Weakened for the Very Poorest - July 6
(Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)


United States:

Safety Net Effective at Fighting Poverty, But Has Weakened for the Very Poorest
By Arloc Sherman
July 6, 2009
As mounting job losses threaten to push more Americans into poverty and make poor families still poorer, a new examination of the public benefits system finds that it is more effective in reducing poverty than previously known but has become less effective over the past decade in protecting Americans from deep poverty. In 2005 (the last year for which we have data), the nation’s safety net protected 31 million people from poverty and kept 34 million from slipping below half of the poverty line. Nonetheless, this protection became weaker for children in the poorest families from 1995 to 2005.

View the full report:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2859
http://www.cbpp.org/files/7-6-09pov.pdf
(15pp.)

Source:
Poverty and Income - incl. links to related resources
[ Center on Budget and Policy Priorities ]
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

Related link:

Safety Net Is Fraying for the Very Poor
By Erik Eckholm
July 4, 2009
Government “safety net” programs like Social Security and food stamps have pulled growing numbers of Americans out of poverty since the mid-1990s. But even before the current recession, these programs were providing less help to the most desperately poor, mainly nonworking families with children, according to a new study by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a private group in Washington. The recession is expected to raise poverty rates, economists agree, although the impact is being softened by the federal stimulus package adopted this year, which temporarily expanded measures like food stamps, child tax credits, unemployment benefits and housing and tuition aid.
Source:
New York Times

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

9. California's Budget Deficit and Welfare Cuts - July 9


Schwarzenegger's welfare cuts angers Dems
July 9, 2009
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's insistence on cost-cutting measures to weed out what he has described as "waste, fraud and abuse" in California's social service programs has struck a nerve with Democrats, welfare advocates and the frail. They say the Republican governor is using the poor as a scapegoat for the state's $26.3 billion budget shortfall. They also fear his proposals, if approved by the Legislature, would trigger increased unemployment and homelessness, and force thousands of people from their homes into expensive nursing facilities.
Source:
Associated Press

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

10. Bretton Woods Update No.66 June/July 2009
(Bretton Woods Project)


Bretton Woods Update No.66 June/July 2009

Selected content:
* World Bank health work flawed still pushing privatisation of services
*
International Monetary Fund (IMF) austerity chills crisis countries
* Hungary and the IMF: indebted future
*
Record World Bank lending
*
U-turn on Doing Business: time to withdraw from the knowledge bank?
*
Reviews fail to erase doubts over World Bank conditionality
*
Controversy continues: The World Bank's hydropower
*
Will rights and gender be at heart of World Bank's climate response?
*
International monetary reform: IMF not in the game
*
Economic crisis: rich countries block reform at UN summit
*
Evaluation: IMF trade policy advice biased
* IMF encourages debate on governance reform
* World Bank loses legal battle in Bangladesh
* Racial discrimination at World Bank
* more...
[ earlier editions of Bretton Woods Update - back to 1998 ]

Source:
Bretton Woods Project
The Bretton Woods Project works as a networker, information-provider, media informant and watchdog to scrutinise and influence the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF). Through briefings, reports and the bimonthly digest Bretton Woods Update, it monitors projects, policy reforms and the overall management of the Bretton Woods institutions with special emphasis on environmental and social concerns.

Related link:

Rethinking Finance - "Alternative voices for a new financial architecture"
Special coverage of the financial crisis, G20 summits, and moves towards a Bretton Woods II conference.

"(...) Before the financial crisis, people across the world were already suffering from the effects of rising food prices, inadequate essential services and the threat of climate chaos. There can be no return to business as usual. Fundamental change is needed. The question is whether the policy makers in charge are able and willing to reform the current global financial architecture in the right direction and to a sufficiently fundamental degree. So far, official reform proposals are moderate at best and the decision process lacks transparency and excludes many countries and large parts of society.

Rethinking finance addresses these shortcomings. It puts forward alternative ideas and analyses, provides information about and comments on latest events, and gives an overview of civil society and other peoples' activities. Rethinking finance is a website of several international civil society organisations and individuals that contribute to its content, keeping it a place of lively debate and up to date information.

Tags (themes):
* activism * aid * effectiveness * Alternatives Blog * capital account * liberalisation * capital flight * citibank * Conditionality * debt * Debt sustainability * developing countries * development * economic crisis * Finance and debt Financial/Economic Crisis * Financial Architecture * financial crisis * G8 * G20 summit * Gender * global crisis * global financial regulation * Human Rights * Labour * London * NGO Organisational structures * poverty * Put People First * reform * Reports * stiglitz * tax havens * United Nations * unregulated finance * WB/IMF governance * WB/IMF roles * World Bank * World Social Forum * more...

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

11. Australian Policy Online


Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. CRINMAIL - July 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)


Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
CRIN is a global network coordinating and promoting information and action on child rights. More than 2,000 member organisations and tens of thousands more activists from across the world rely on CRIN for research and information. CRIN presses for rights, not charity, for children and is guided by a passion for putting children’s rights at the top of the global agenda by addressing root causes and promoting systematic change. Its guiding framework is the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).

Recent CRINMAIL (newsletter) content:

9 July 2009 - CRINMAIL 1095
* COMPLAINTS MECHANISM: Next Steps [news]
* GLOBAL: General Comment on article 12 [news]
* EUROPE: Key child rights network folds [news]
* ASIA: Mind the Gaps: A Comparative Analysis of ASEAN Legal Responses to Child-Sex Tourism [publication]
* ASEAN: Inter-American Commission encourages creation of human rights mechanism [news]
* CANADA: Best Interests of the Child: Meaning and Application in Canada [publication]
* RWANDA: Revise Reproductive Health Bill [news]
* LITHUANIA: Keeping the door open - Support to young people leaving care [event]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

CRINMAIL
(email newsletter on child rights)
- links to 300+ weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.
[There was no issue of CRINMAIL since the last Canadian Social Research Newsletter.]

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com




**************************

Top 10 Worst Jobs 

***************************

Think your job is bad?
Tired of arbitrary deadlines, endless meetings, and pointless performance reviews?
Well, before you consider quitting your job, you may want to consider other undesirable occupations.
You might discover that your job isn’t so bad after all.

***

10. De-construction Worker.
While this may seem like a variation of a regular construction job, the difference is that you’re not building something — you’re tearing it down. By the end of the day, deconstruction workers are literally covered dust, chipped paint, and dangerous debris such as glass. Still, while dirty and somewhat dangerous, deconstruction might also be strangely satisfying …

9. Pest Control Worker.
Pest control workers use their knowledge of pests’ biology and habits along with an arsenal of pest management techniques — applying chemicals, setting traps, operating equipment, and even modifying structures — to alleviate pest problems. In short, pest control workers have to think like pests and go where pests go — usually to places that are dark, damp, and dirty. Plus, they get deal with chemicals.

8. Dentist.
Probably not the job most people would expect, but it definitely fits the bill. Dentists spend their days wading around one of the dirtiest cavities in the world — the human mouth — which combines some of the more repugnant features of all of the aforementioned jobs — blood, dirt, bugs, and disease. What’s more, unlike other bad jobs, which require little, if any, formal training, dentists are forced to endure years of schooling and pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to even practice their dirty job. Is it any wonder that dentistry boasts the highest rate of suicide of any profession?

7. Hot-Zone Superintendent.
Hot-zone superintendents perform maintenance work for bio-safety labs that study lethal airborne pathogens for which there is no known cure. These pathogens include disease-causing organisms such as anthrax. Given that it is a sterilized lab, the work is not dirty per se. But what it lacks in dirt, it makes up for in worry.

6. Zoo Cleaner.
You’d think working at a zoo would be fun, and it probably is, if you’re the zookeeper. Zoo cleaners, on the other hand, are in charge of the behind-the-scenes work, which means cleaning the zoo as well as the animals, including the lost and forgotten places on their bodies. And remember — not all animals are as fastidious as house cats.

5. Crime-Scene Cleaner.
If not the dirtiest, this is definitely the most mentally disturbing job. crime-scene cleaners wear hazmat suits, respirators, and chemical-spill boots; still, they must have strong stomachs as they brave blood, decomposition, and the loose remains of human bodies once the police have left the scene.

4. Ape Urine Collector.
This job sounds unreal but, sadly, it is not. Ape urine collectors are employed by scientists who need ape urine to study factors that affect their reproduction. The work involves tracking down apes and laying down large plastic sheets or attaching plastic bags to poles in hopes of catching adequate samples to analyze.

3. Roadkill Collector.
Pretty self-explanatory. Roadkill collectors not only have the job of peeling the remains of dead creatures in various states of decay off the road, they also get to do it while braving oncoming traffic.

2. Manure Inspector.
Animal manure is an important natural fertilizer, but first it has to be checked for contaminants like E.coli and salmonella. That’s where manure inspectors come in: not only do they get to search for bacteria that causes bloody diarrhea if ingested, they also get to wade through animal waste. Quite a 1-2 punch.

1. Portable Toilet Cleaner.
You had to know this one was coming. First of all, I have serious reservations about using portable toilets, much less cleaning one. Portable toilet cleaners pick up leftover toilet paper, spray on a de-greasing solution, hose the entire unit down with scalding water, scrub, squeegee, dry, and then finish it off with a deodorizing spray. And yet, even after all of this, I would rather take my chances in the woods

Source:
http://www.top10-lists.com/2008/10/top-10-worst-jobs.html


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And, in closing...

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Evian Skating Babies (video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQcVllWpwGs

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Romantic 1st lines.... Deadly 2nd lines
http://www.laughitout.com/2007/06/romantic-1st-lines-deadly-2nd-lines.html

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11 Awesome Phobias, In Photos and Videos
http://www.11points.com/Web-Tech/11_Awesome_Phobias,_In_Photos_and_Videos