Canadian Social Research Links logo 
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
August 12, 2007

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1770 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. Canadian Housing Equality Resources (Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation)
2. What's New from Statistics Canada:
--- Labour Force Survey, July 2007 - August 10
3. What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU- University of Toronto)
- August 10

International Content

4. The Community Tool Box (University of Kansas)
5. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
6. 2007 Child Well-Being Index (Foundation for Child Development - U.S.) - July 17
7. Human Rights (National Archives, U.K. Government)
8. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - recent content (various sources)
--- Indigenous health: Saving children's lives is a matter of long-term will
--- A rising tide? Income inequality, the social safety net and the labour market in Australia
--- Life expectancy, ageing, disability and demand for disability services
--- At home in the world: the moral and political language of homelessness

9. CRINMAIL #905 - August 9 (Child Rights Information Network)
---
SOUTH AFRICA: 'No biblical justification' for hitting child [news]
--- UNITED STATES: Bringing A Human Rights Vision to Public Schools [publication]
--- MAURITANIA: Slavery law passed [news]
--- JORDAN: Schools opened to Iraqis [news]
--- INDIA: Youth Leadership Training Camp [event]
--- EMPLOYMENT - ECPAT - Child Rights and You [job postings]
10. SiCKO - Michael Moore and National Health Care: Lies of the Left and the Right

Have a great week!

Gilles Séguin
Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. Canadian Housing Equality Resources
( Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation)

Canadian Housing Equality Resources
This website is produced by the Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA), an Ontario-based non profit human rights organization that has spent the past 20 years challenging the systemic barriers and discrimination that contribute to homelessness and housing insecurity.

- incl. links to : Advocate's Guide - Human Rights - Tools - Legislation - Case Law - Other Resources

Source:
Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA)

Related link:

Housing rights: A Canadian web site
August 7, 2007
The Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA) has launched a new web site devoted to housing rights in Canada called Canadian Housing Equality Resources. It's full of interesting and important information, and is designed for everyone from the person (or household) that is experiencing housing discrimination to the housing advocate. Lawyers and legal advocates will find information on legislation and case law. And there are lots of practical tools, like dealing with the media. CERA has been active for two decades on housing issues and is recognized locally, nationally and internationally as an important partner.
Source of this brief review:
Michael Shapcott
The Wellesley Institute Blog
[ The Wellesley Institute ]

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm
- Go to the Human Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm

2. What's New from Statistics Canada:
---
Labour Force Survey, July 2007 - August 10

What's New from The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

August 10, 2007
Labour Force Survey, July 2007
Employment was little changed in July, leaving growth so far in 2007 at 1.3%, similar to the growth rate in the first seven months of 2006. The unemployment rate edged down 0.1 percentage points to 6.0%, the lowest since 1974.

Related link:

Labour Force Information, July 15 to 21, 2007
[ Earlier issues of this report ]

The Daily archives for August 2007 - see for yourself what's been released by StatCan since August 1 by clicking on the archive link and then on the "HTML" link beside each date; use your browser's Back button to return to the archive page.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

3. What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - August 10
(CRRU- University of Toronto
)

What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

The Childcare Resource and Research Unit offers a free weekly "e-mail news notifier" service.
Here's the content of the latest issue of this bulletin.

For more information about this service, including subscription information,
see http://www.childcarecanada.org

10-Aug-07

---------------------------------------------------
What's New
---------------------------------------------------

GENDER INEQUALITY, GROWTH AND GLOBAL AGEING
Report from Goldman Sachs finds that making it easier for women to work and have children “could play a key role in addressing the twin problems of population ageing and pension sustainability.”
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=107385

CHUTES OR LADDERS? CREATING SUPPORT SERVICES TO HELP EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDENTS SUCCEED IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Report from Berkeley’s Center for the Study of Child Care Employment recommends ways for “institutions of higher education and local planners to work together to assess the needs of nontraditional ECE students.”
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=107372

TEACHERS, PARENTS, AND WHÄNAU WORKING TOGETHER IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
Final report of a project from the New Zealand Council for Education Research discusses case studies “in which teachers and parents worked together to enhance children’s learning and wellbeing.”
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=107371

CHILDCARE: WHAT PARENTS WANT
21-point plan from Daycare Trust (UK) aims to build affordable, universal, high quality child care for Britain.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=107370

IT TAKES A CHILD TO RAISE A COMMUNITY: 'POPULATION-BASED' MEASUREMENT OF EARLY CHILD DEVELOPMENT
Research brief from UBC’s Human Early Learning Partnership.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=107369

--------------------------------------------------
Child care in the news
--------------------------------------------------

Subsidized child care is a proven way to increase birth rate [CA]
Montreal Gazette, 10 Aug 07
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=107365

Put poverty on premiers' agenda [CA]
Toronto Star, 9 Aug 07
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=107367

Baby Einsteins: Not so smart after all [US]
Time Magazine, 6 Aug 07
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=107368

--------------------------------------------------
New book
--------------------------------------------------

A QUESTION OF COMMITMENT: CHILDREN’S RIGHTS IN CANADA
Covell, K. & Howe, R.B. (Eds.)
Wilfred Laurier University Press

Description:
In 1991, the Government of Canada ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, requiring governments at all levels to ensure that Canadian laws and practices safeguard the rights of children. A Question of Commitment: Children’s Rights in Canada is the first book to assess the extent to which Canada has fulfilled this commitment. The editors, R. Brian Howe and Katherine Covell, contend that Canada has wavered in its commitment to the rights of children and is ambivalent in the political culture about the principle of children’s rights. A Question of Commitment expands the scope of the editors’ earlier book, The Challenge of Children’s Rights for Canada, by including the voices of specialists in particular fields of children’s rights and by incorporating recent developments.

To order: http://www.wlu.ca/press/Catalog/howe.shtml

--------------------------------------------------
Useful resource for understanding research
--------------------------------------------------

This section of the American website Child Care & Early Education Research Connections explains how to evaluate the quality of social science and policy research. Also included are useful glossaries of terms used in social science and policy research generally, and in early childhood research specifically.
http://childcareresearch.org/Discover?displayPage=understanding.jsp

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This message was forwarded through the Childcare Resource
and Research Unit e-mail news notifier. For information on the
CRRU e-mail notifier, including instructions for (un)subscribing,
see http://www.childcarecanada.org

The Childcare Resource and Research Unit
University of Toronto, Canada
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Related Links:

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Link to the CRRU home page:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

4. The Community Tool Box
(University of Kansas)

The Community Tool Box
"Our goal is to support your work in promoting community health and development.
The Tool Box provides over 7,000 pages of practical skill-building information on over 250 different topics. Topic sections include step-by-step instruction, examples, check-lists, and related resources. "
Source:
Work Group on Health Promotion and Community Development, University of Kansas
Recommended by:
Tim Aubry, Centre for Research on Educational and Community Services (University of Ottawa)

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

5. Poverty Dispatch:
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs

Poverty Dispatch (U.S). ===> the content of this link changes each week
- links to news items from the American press about poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

This week's issues of Poverty Dispatch:

August 9, 2007
* Privatization of Social Services - Indiana
* Welfare-to-Work and Federal Requirements - Indiana
* State Children's Health Insurance Program
* Characteristics of the Underinsured in the U.S.
* Editorial: Working Poor Families - Michigan
* School Free Breakfast Programs
* Affordable Housing - New York
* Data on People Displaced by Hurricanes - Louisiana
* Adoption Tax Credit and Foster Adoptions
* Early Childhood Education
* States and the Healthy Marriage Initiative

August 6, 2007
* State Children's Health Insurance Program
* Opinions: State Children's Health Insurance Program
* Medicaid Recipients and Access to Care - Kansas, Texas
* Medicaid Birth Coverage - Wisconsin
* Social Security Disability Payments - Wisconsin
* Grandparents Raising Grandchildren - Wisconsin
* Food Insecurity and Assistance
* Homeless Veterans - Florida
* Affordable Housing - Portland, OR
* School Integration by Income - Florida
* Early Childhood Education - Alaska, Washington

Search Poverty Dispatches

IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches, links to Web-based news items dealing with poverty, welfare reform, and related topics twice a week. Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media. Persons wishing to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail should send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu.

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 2006

Poverty Dispatch Digest Archive - archive of weekly digests* of dispatches from August 2005 to May 2006
(*For a few years prior to the creation of this new web page for the Dispatch, I was compiling a weekly digest of the e-mails and redistributing the digest to my mailing list with IRP's permission.
This is my own archive of weekly issues of the digest back to August 2005, and most of them have 50+ links per issue. I'll be deleting this archive from my site gradually, as the links to older articles expire.)

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

6. 2007 Child Well-Being Index - July 17
(Foundation for Child Development - U.S.)

2007 Child Well-Being Index (CWI) Special Focus Report on International Comparisons
April 2007 (Published July 19, 2007)
This analysis compares the United States to the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. These Anglophone countries share a common language, similar cultural heritage, as well as comparable political and economic cultures. The report assembles 19 key international indicators of child well-being within seven domains of social life.

Child Well-Being Index 2007 Report (PDF file - 204K, 21 pages)

Key Indicator Figures by Race/Ethnicity (Powerpoint presentation - 1MB)

Indicator Figure List Presentation (Powerpoint presentation - 4.9MB)

Child Well-Being Index 2007 Presentation (Powerpoint presentation - 803K)

Earlier editions of this report - back to 2004

Source:
Child Well-Being Index
[ Foundation for Child Development ]

Related Web/News/Blog links:

Google Search Results Links - always current results!
Using the following search terms (without the quote marks):
"Child Well-Being Index, Foundation for Child Development"
Web search results page
News search results page
(no results)
Blog Search Results page
Source:
Google.ca

- Go to the International Children, Families and Youth Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chn2.htm

7. Human Rights
(National Archives, U.K. Government)

Human Rights (U.K.)
"800 years of human rights in the United Kingdom explored using original documents from The National Archives"
The idea of "human rights" is a relatively new development in history, but as this website from Britain’s National Archives notes in its discussion of the long trajectory of struggles for equality and so forth, "We could do worse than characterizing this history as the struggle for human rights." This visually compelling online exhibit uses original documents from The National Archives to take a long view of these struggles and movements. Visitors can start their journey through the site by picking a time period, and then reading an introductory essay on the period. Each time period includes a timeline and links to digitized version of relevant documents, such as The Poor Act of 1601 and a poster for a Staffordshire coal miners’ union public meeting from 1831. The site is rounded out by a thorough glossary and a document index.
Source:
National Archives
(Government of the United Kingdom)
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2007.

- Go to the Human Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm
- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

8. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - recent content (various sources)
---
Indigenous health: Saving children's lives is a matter of long-term will
--- A rising tide? Income inequality, the social safety net and the labour market in Australia
--- Life expectancy, ageing, disability and demand for disability services
---
At home in the world: the moral and political language of homelessness

APO Weekly Briefing
The content of this page changes each week, and it includes links to a few book/report reviews, about two dozen new reports, a few job ads and 60+ events (mostly conferences) of interest to social researchers...
Source:
Australian Policy Online (APO)
With nearly 120 member centres and institutes, Australian Policy Online offers easy access to much of the best Australian social, economic, cultural and political research available online.
NOTE: the APO home page includes links to the five most popular reports on the APO website, and this list is updated each week.

Selected recent content from the APO Weekly Briefing:

Indigenous health:
Saving children's lives is a matter of long-term will

Posted:07-08-2007
You can't protect children without supporting and involving their community, argues Fiona Stanley, director of the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research.

A rising tide? Income inequality, the social safety net and the labour market in Australia
Ann Harding, Quoc Ngu Vu and Alicia Payne / National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM - Canberra)
Posted 09-08-2007
In 1996 Australia elected a new Liberal government, ending 13 years of rule by the Australian Labor Party. The decade since has been marked by strong economic growth and prosperity, along with substantial changes in social and labour market policy. This paper highlights some of the key shifts in the social policy landscape over the period and assesses the outcomes for income inequality, poverty, income redistribution and earnings.

Life expectancy, ageing, disability and demand for disability services
Xingyan Wen / Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Posted 07-08-2007
This paper from the 2007 Australian Social Policy Conference re-examines the trends in expected years of life lived with disability over a period of 15 years (from 1988 to 2003) using the latest available data. It then gives estimates of current levels of unmet demand for specialist disability services, and presents data and commentary relating to projected future demand.

At home in the world: the moral and political language of homelessness
Andrew Hollows / RMIT University and Hanover Welfare Services
Posted 07-08-2007
Inspired by the political theorist Hannah Arendt, this paper from the 2007 Australian Social Policy Conference poses the question: what does it mean to think morally and politically about homelessness? Recent research by Hanover Welfare Services confirms how moral judgements about homelessness continue to be informed by a stereotypical focus on individual attribution and responsibility.

APO Archive
The APO archive is grouped into 23 subject areas, with entries appearing in reverse chronological order.
* Ageing *Asia and the pacific * Citizenship and the law * Disability * Economics and trade * Education * Employment and workplace relations * The environment * Foreign policy and defence * Gender and sexuality * Health * Housing * Families and households * Immigration and refugees * Income, poverty and wealth * Indigenous * Media, communications and cultural policy * Politics and government * Population, multiculturalism and ethnicity * Religion and faith * Rural and regional * Science and technology * Social policy * Urban and regional planning * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

9. CRINMAIL #905 - August 9
(Child Rights Information Network)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

9 August 2007 - CRINMAIL 905

- SOUTH AFRICA: 'No biblical justification' for hitting child [news]
- UNITED STATES: Bringing A Human Rights Vision to Public Schools [publication]
- MAURITANIA: Slavery law passed [news]
- JORDAN: Schools opened to Iraqis [news]
- INDIA: Youth Leadership Training Camp [event]
- EMPLOYMENT - ECPAT - Child Rights and You [job postings]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**
**QUIZ**

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to over 200 issues, many of which are special editions focusing on a particular theme, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET (European Children's Network) Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

10. SiCKO - Michael Moore and National Health Care: Lies of the Left and the Right

Michael Moore and National Health Care: Lies of the Left and the Right
Posted August 7, 2007
In Moore's film the first president Bush is seen dismissing the idea of socialized medicine, remarking that if you think it could work, "Ask a Canadian." The fact is that while many Canadians have criticisms of their health care system, almost none would choose a U.S.-style, for-profit system. They would laugh at the idea that it would work better for them.
Source:
Huffington Post (U.S.)

Related links:

SiCKO - the official movie website

MichaelMoore.com - includes "SiCKO Factual Backup"

SiCKO - from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm
- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research
Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com


**************************************


Instructions from the I.T. Department

Subtitle:
Top Ten Tips to make Friends with Techies - NOT!


1. When you call us to have your computer moved, be sure to leave it
buried under half a ton of postcards, baby pictures, stuffed animals,
dried flowers, bowling trophies and children's art.

2. Don't ever write anything down, especially the error message that was on your screen.

3. If we ask what the last thing you did was, always respond with, "I didn't do anything."

4. When we say we'll be right over, immediately find a reason to leave so you won't have to
answer silly questions from us, like "what's your screen saver password?"

5. When describing your problem, just tell us what you were ultimately trying to do.
For example, just say, "I can't get my email". We don't need to know that the computer won't even turn on.

6. Feel free to ignore any email sent from us, especially those marked with high importance.
You don't really need to know about the latest virus that wiped out your neighbors hard drive.

7. Always send important and urgent emails in all uppercase.

8. When the copier, or anything else remotely electronic, doesn't work, call us.
Heck, if we can fix computers, we must know all about copiers too.

9. If the document you sent to the printer didn't print, send it at least 20 more times.
One of them is bound to work.

10. Don't ever learn the proper name for anything technical.
We know exactly what you mean by "my thingy blew up".

Source:
http://www.barnharts.net/bn/itinstructions.asp

Click on the link above to read 12 more tips; my favourite is #15:
"Feel perfectly free to say things like 'I don't know anything about this computer crap'.
We love hearing our area of professional expertise referred to as crap."

--------------------------------------------

And in closing...

101 Tips to Improve Your Web Presence
http://searchengineoptimisation.yourspaced.com/2007/03/26/101-tips-to-improve-your-web-presence/
Recommended reading for all individuals and organizations - government AND non-government - with websites!!

U.S. 2004 federal election results by I.Q.
http://asdfhj.com/wp-content/2004election_by_iq.png

1989 Tandy 5000 computer newspaper ad
http://www.therion.freewind25.com/120dr3.jpg

Online Stopwatch/Countdown timer
http://www.online-stopwatch.com/


Spinning Sihouette Optical Illusion

http://www.moillusions.com/2007/06/spinning-sihouette-optical-illusion.html
Wow.  My brain hurts.