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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
September 12, 2010

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,318 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

************************************************************************

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1.  Rallies across Quebec call for more federal funding for homeless (Montreal Gazette) - September 10
2. Ottawa ends enhanced Employment Insurance program
(Toronto Star) - September 9
3. Government panel pushes for maximum increase in EI premiums (Globe and Mail) - September 9
4. Help Wanted: How Well did the EI Program Respond During Recent Recessions? (Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation - University of Toronto) - September 8
5. World Economic Forum Ranks Canadian Banks Soundest in the World for the Third Consecutive Year (Finance Canada) - September 9
6. Evaluation of the Guaranteed Income Supplement Take-up Measures and Outreach (Human Resources and Skills Development Canada) - February 2010
7. THE CENSUS LONG FORM QUESTIONNAIRE : Cappe, Himelfarb, Dodge and Fellegi weigh in.
8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour Force Survey, August 2010 - September 10
--- E-STAT: An interactive tool about society and the economy in Canada -
September 10
--- Study: Marital trends and education, 2006 - September 9
--- Study: Knowledge of Aboriginal languages among young First Nations children living off reserve, 2006 - September 9
--- Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds), first quarter 2010 - September 9
--- Canada Year Book 2010 - September 9
--- Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective, 2010 - September 7
9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - September 12

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
11. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content
12. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

1. Rallies across Quebec call for more federal funding for homeless - September 10
(Montreal Gazette)

Rallies across Quebec call for more federal funding for homeless
By Jan Ravensbergen
September 10, 2010
Advocacy groups rallied in five locations across Quebec yesterday to punctuate a push to more than double annual federal funding to combat homelessness in the province. Ottawa should boost the allocation of federal cash for such housing and other assistance to more than $50 million a year, Benoit Poirier, coordinator of the Reseau Solidarite Itinerance du Quebec, said after 300 boisterous demonstrators issued the Montreal component of the message outside federal offices in the downtown Guy Favreau Complex. (...) The most recent Quebec census of the homeless -conducted 13 years ago, in 1997 -pegged the figure for Montreal and Quebec City at 28,000 in total.

Source:
Montreal Gazette

Related link:

Homelessness resources in Quebec - from Homeless Nation [ "... the only website in the world created by and for the street community." ]

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm

2. Ottawa ends enhanced Employment Insurance program - September 9
(Toronto Star)

Ottawa ends enhanced EI program
September 9, 2010
By Tanya Talaga
Ontario workers who lose their jobs next week will receive less employment insurance. As of Saturday (September 11), Ottawa will cancel an extra five weeks of regular EI benefits and end a program that provided up to an additional 20 weeks of benefits for longer-serving employees. (...) Last year, Prime Minister Stephen Harper enhanced regular EI benefits for laid off workers by five weeks in response to the crippling of Canada’s job market during the economic downturn. Ottawa also enhanced benefits for longer-serving employees by up to 20 weeks. Five weeks of benefits roughly equals $1,768 on average — EI claims are based on 55 per cent of a person’s income. Twenty weeks is a lost $7,072.
Source:
Toronto Star

Related links:

Government of Canada news release announcing
the extended EI benefits in September 2009:

Government of Canada intends to table legislation to
extend Employment Insurance benefits for long tenured workers

September 14, 2009
...the Government of Canada has given notice that it intends to introduce legislation that would temporarily provide additional Employment Insurance (EI) regular benefits to unemployed long tenured workers. These are individuals who have worked and paid EI premiums for a significant period of time and have previously made limited use of EI regular benefits.
Source:
Canada News Centre

----------

From Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC),
the federal department responsible for EI:

Extended Employment Insurance
regular benefits for long tenured workers

Fact Sheet
Web page dated 2009-11-25

Source:
Employment Insurance (HRSDC)

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm
- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm

3. Government panel pushes for maximum increase in EI premiums - September 9
(Globe and Mail)

Government panel pushes for maximum increase in EI premiums
Ottawa to decide whether to overrule board it created as critics argue increase will slash jobs during fragile economic recovery

September 9, 2010
By Bill Curry
A new panel created by the Harper government will move to raise employment insurance premiums by the maximum allowed, despite calls to leave payroll taxes frozen in light of Canada’s fragile jobs picture. Canadians will start feeling the hit on their paycheques when the two-year freeze on EI premiums announced in the 2009 budget comes to an end on Jan. 1. Employers will also have to cough up more in premiums for their workers, which economists and business groups warn could hurt employment.The Globe and Mail has learned that an internal report on EI rates by a new independent body will recommend they be raised by 15 cents on every $100 earned, an 8.7-per-cent increase from the current $1.73 and the maximum allowed under federal law. Employers will have to pay an extra 21 cents per $100.
Source:
Globe and Mail

Related link:

EI Premiums Come Full Circle
By Andrew Jackson
September 9, 2010
For reasons that escape me, the Globe ran a headline front page story today [see above] on what all fiscal policy and Employment Insurance wonks have known to be true for some time. Under current legislation, and as announced in the 2009 Budget, the EI premium rate set by a supposedly autonomous but tightly constrained new body will rise by 15 cents per $100 of insured earnings for workers, and by 21 cents per $100 of earnings for employers in January. This is the maximum increase allowed, and the maximum increase is required since premiums must rise to balance revenues and expenditures if the fund has no surplus. Premiums must rise, that is, unless the government decides to exercise its right to unilaterally set the premium rate, which it does not intend to do. This is a new chapter in an old story which brings us full circle. Once again, the federal government will be deliberately running annual EI account surpluses to reduce the public debt. Minister Flaherty is taking a rather big play out of Paul Martin’s book.
Source:
Progressive Economics Forum Blog

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm
- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm

4. Help Wanted: How Well did the EI Program Respond During Recent Recessions? - September 8
(Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation - University of Toronto)

Help Wanted: How Well did the EI
Program Respond During Recent Recessions?
September 8, 2010
This Mowat Note assesses how well Canada’s Employment Insurance system performed during the most recent recession compared to previous recessions, focusing on regional inequities. (...) The analysis reveals that regional differences in coverage between provinces were significant. In Ontario and British Columbia in 2009, only 38 per cent and 39 per cent (respectively) of the unemployed were receiving benefits, while in some other provinces, over 90 per cent of the unemployed were receiving benefits.

Full text (PDF - 335K, 16 pages)
By Matthew Mendelsohn & Jon Medow
September 2010

Source:
Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation (University of Toronto)
The Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation has been set up to help inform and revitalize Canada’s public policy agenda, given new Canadian and global realities. This includes questioning many of the assumptions that underlie our current approaches, while ensuring that all of us continue to share a sense of common citizenship, benefit from equality of opportunity, and have access to all the benefits of being Canadian

Related link:

A disguised welfare scheme
By Lorne Gunter
September 10, 2010
(...) Released Wednesday by the University of Toronto's Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation, the study [on Employment Insurance disparity] shows that during the 2008-09 recession, Ontario and Western workers received half the benefits per capita that unemployed workers in Atlantic Canada and Quebec received.

According to researchers, only 38% of unemployed workers in Ontario and 39% in B.C. received benefits, despite those provinces being among the hardest hit with job losses. And while 42% of Canada's unemployed lived in Ontario, laid-off workers in that province received only 25% of training funds available through EI.

Source:
National Post

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm
- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm

5. World Economic Forum Ranks Canadian Banks Soundest in the World for the Third Consecutive Year - September 9
(Finance Canada)

World Economic Forum Ranks Canadian Banks
Soundest in the World for the Third Consecutive Year

September 9, 2010
Federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty : "I am very pleased to see the World Economic Forum has ranked Canada’s banking system as the soundest in the world for the third consecutive year. Canada’s banks and other financial institutions are sound and well-capitalized, and were less highly leveraged than their international peers heading into the financial crisis. In contrast to many other countries, none of Canada’s banks required bailouts."
Source:
Department of Finance Canada

Related links:

From the
World Economic Forum:

The Global Competitiveness Report 2010-2011
Main page of the report --- includes links to all related materials: top ten rankings, the Global Competitiveness Index Analyzer, media coverage, video interviews with the study co-authors, country studies (incl. Canada) (PDF - 283K, 2 pages), and more...

The complete report:

The Global Competitiveness Report 2010–2011 (PDF - 5.1MB, 515 pages)

The news release:

United States Falls in Competitiveness Rankings
Beijing
9 September 2010
Switzerland tops the overall rankings in The Global Competitiveness Report 2010-2011, released today by the World Economic Forum ahead of its Annual Meeting of the New Champions 2010 in Tianjin. The United States falls two places to fourth position, overtaken by Sweden (2nd) and Singapore (3rd), after already ceding the top place to Switzerland last year.
[FYI - Canada slipped from 9th place to 10th place from 2009-2010 to 2010-2011, according to table 4 of the report.]
Source:
The Global Competitiveness Report 2010-2011

To put these numbers in perspective, Table 4 of the 2006-2007 Global Competitiveness Index rankings (PDF - 227K, 1 page) shows that the U.S. was #1 during that year and Canada was #12.
[ earlier competitiveness reports ]

Source:
World Economic Forum
The World Economic Forum is an independent international organization committed to improving the state of the world by engaging leaders in partnerships to shape global, regional and industry agendas. Incorporated as a foundation in 1971, and headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Economic Forum is impartial and not-for-profit; it is tied to no political, partisan or national interests. The World Economic Forum is under the supervision of the Swiss Federal Government.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

6. Evaluation of the Guaranteed Income Supplement Take-up Measures and Outreach - February 2010
(Human Resources and Skills Development Canada)

The Guaranteed Income Supplement Saga

During the summer of 2001, Richard Shillington and the Toronto Star stirred up a hornet's nest when they criticized the federal government for not trying to reach several hundred thousand seniors who were eligible for, but had not applied for, the income-tested Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) under the Old Age Security program. Here's an update on that situation.

THE GOOD NEWS:
In 2001, the number of Canadians over 65 who were eligible for GIS but never applied for it was over 380,000. In 2006, that number was just over 200,000. That's a drop of almost 50% in five years.

THE BAD NEWS:
In 2006, the number of Canadians over 65 who were eligible for GIS but never applied for it was just over 200,000.
That's 200,000 Canadian seniors too many.
Moreover, the data is four years old, so it doesn't take into account the effect of the 2008-2009 recession on GIS take-up. The recession may in fact have increased the GIS take-up rate, if low-income seniors were motivated/driven by their difficult circumstances to avail themselves of all sources of support.

From Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC)
Federal department responsible for Old Age Security and
the Guaranteed Income Supplement (among other mandates):

Evaluation of the Guaranteed Income Supplement
Take-up Measures and Outreach
February 2010
HTML version - Table of contents + links to each section of the report
PDF version (1MB, 76 pages)
Table of contents:
* Title Page
* List of abbreviations
* Executive Summary
* Management Response:
- 1. Introduction
- 2. Evaluation Methodology
- 3. Evaluation Findings
- 4. Overall Conclusions

This report presents the findings of the evaluation of the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) Take-up Measures and Outreach, which assesses the measures undertaken by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) and Service Canada (SC) since 2002 to increase take-up of the GIS. The objective of the study* is to examine the profile of eligible non-recipients, the barriers to GIS take-up, the appropriateness of the design of HRSDC/SC activities, given these barriers, and the results of activities to increase GIS take-up.
Source:
Excerpt from the
Executive Summary

*The evaluation team collected and reviewed information mainly
from January to August 2008 but data examined concerns the years 2001 to 2006.

< Begin One-semi-sorta-bouquet-and-one-brickbat
for-the-Human-Resources-and-Skills-Development-Canada-website rant
. >

1. The Bouquet:
The HRSDC website search engine has improved significantly in the past few years in terms of relevance of results, so that now, when I search for "Canada Pension Plan Annual Report" (without the quote marks), the first result is the CPP Annual Report --- for 2005-06. This is followed by links to CPP annual reports for 2006-07 and then 1998-99, and then almost 300 links to reports that have very little to do with my search. The #1 result of a search for Canada Pension Plan Annual Report should be the page where all CPP annual reports are located on the HRSDC website. But at least now the search engine can return correct titles. Also, the results would be so much easier to follow if they were in chronological order, with the most recent entry at the top, rather than the pell-mell presentation of the HRSDC search engine results page.
So much for the bouquet --- Until the HRSDC site search engine starts offering better results, I'll continue to recommend Google.ca to anyone looking for HRSDC reports.

2. The Brickbat:
One richly-deserved Bronx Cheer for the web team at HRSDC.
Although the cover of the report on GIS take-up is dated February 2010,
it was posted to the HRSDC website sometime this summer (because the PDF file is dated August 2010).
It doesn't appear anywhere on the HRSDC What's New - 2010 page.

Why?

The home page of the Department's website does have a link to Publications and Resources --- where the visitor quickly realizes that (s)he must click EIGHT separate links to view all of HRSDC's publications. That's because the reports are organized under eight headings : * Departmental Reports * Public Opinion Research Reports * Research Studies * Audit Reports * Evaluation Reports (where I stumbled upon the GIS take-up report by accident)* Social Policy * Labour Market Policy * Learning Policy. Most of those selections will take you to a collection of links to reports dating back to the early 1990s, in some cases, but precious little from recent years, likely due to departmental reorganizations and a narrowing down of the role of HRSDC.

That sucks.

HRSDC, please use the What's New page of your
departmental website to announce what's new on your website.
And please make your publications page less frustrating...

< / End One-semi-sorta-bouquet-and-one-brickbat
for-the-Human-Resources-and-Skills-Development-Canada-website rant. >

-------------------------------

Link to departmental
program information:

Old Age Security and Guaranteed
Income Supplement program information
- including the Guaranteed Income Supplement, the Allowance (formerly Spouse's Allowance) and International Agreements
Source:
Human Resources
and Social Development Canada
(HRSDC)

-------------------------------

How it all came about...

The Guaranteed Income Supplement Saga
How 300,000 lost out on GIS and then some/most got their benefits

By Richard Shillington
June 2002
Source:
Tristat Resources - Richard Shillington's website
Detailed account with over a dozen links to related information.

---

From Statistics Canada:

Study: Guaranteed Income Supplement update, 2006
July 2009
More seniors who are eligible for Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) benefits are actually receiving them, as both take-up rates and application rates have improved. The GIS was established in 1967 as an additional benefit for low-income seniors receiving the Old Age Security pension. (...) Increases in both the GIS take-up rate and application rate between 2000 and 2006 coincided with a number of reforms by the federal government to simplify the application process. Since 2007, seniors have needed to apply only once to receive GIS payments for all years of eligibility, provided they file tax returns. This marks a significant change from the study period, when eligible seniors were required to re-apply if they lost eligibility during one or more years because of an increase in income. [ More... ]

Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) update
July 2009
By May Juong
* Highlights
* Full article:
--- HTML version
--- PDF version
(141K, 9 pages)

Related StatCan subjects:
o Income, pensions, spending and wealth
o Household, family and personal income
o Low income and inequality
o Seniors
o Income, pensions and wealth

Source:
Statistics Canada

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm
- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm

7. THE CENSUS LONG FORM QUESTIONNAIRE : Cappe, Himelfarb, Dodge and Fellegi weigh in.

Former top bureaucrats ask PM to enshrine independence of StatsCan boss
By Kathryn May
September 10, 2010
OTTAWA — Four former top bureaucrats are appealing to Prime Minister Stephen Harper to enshrine in law the independence of Canada’s chief statistician to decide on how the agency collects data, including the census. In a letter sent to Harper, the four say the government’s decision to make the long-form census voluntary has damaged Statistics Canada’s credibility and international standing. The letter was signed by two former clerks of the Privy Council Office, Mel Cappe and Alex Himelfarb, former Bank of Canada governor David Dodge and former chief statistician Ivan Fellegi, who headed the agency for more than 20 years.
Source:
Ottawa Citizen

------------------------------------

The most comprehensive
resource on the Census issue:

datalibre.ca
datalibre.ca is a blog that's maintained mostly by Tracey Lauriault.
It's inspired by civicaccess.ca, which believes all levels of Canadian governments should make civic information and data accessible at no cost in open formats to their citizens.

Tracey is also responsible for the Census Watch page:
Organizations and individuals AGAINST and FOR the
Harper position on the cancellation of the Long Form of the 2011 Census.
As at September 11:
* 354 AGAINST
* 11 FOR

Latest Census-related
blog posts from datalibre.ca:

* Big Census Media Round-up - September 11 (34 links)
* Working with Census Data – Ontario’s Social Landscape: Socio-demographic trends and conditions in communities - September 8
* Weekend Census Media Roundup - September 7 (18 links)
* Data is the new soil – The beauty of data visualization - September 4

===> Go to datalibre.ca for earlier postings

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour Force Survey, August 2010 - September 10
--- E-STAT: An interactive tool about society and the economy in Canada -
September 10
--- Study: Marital trends and education, 2006
- September 9
--- Study: Knowledge of Aboriginal languages among young First Nations children living off reserve, 2006
- September 9
--- Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds), first quarter 2010
- September 9
--- Canada Year Book 2010
- September 9
--- Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective, 2010 - September 7

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

September 10, 2010
Labour Force Survey, August 2010
Employment increased by 36,000 in August. At the same time, the unemployment rate edged up 0.1 percentage points to 8.1%, as more people entered the labour force. Monthly gains in employment averaged 13,000 in July and August, compared with an average monthly increase of 51,000 during the first six months of the year.
- incl. links to three tables:
* Labour force characteristics by age and sex
* Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS)
* Labour force characteristics by province

Related report:
Labour Force Information, August 15 to 21
1. Highlights
2. Analysis — August 2010
3. Tables
4. Charts
5. Data quality, concepts and methodology
6. User information
7. Related products
8. PDF version (458K, 62 pages)

[ earlier reports in this series ]

Related subjects:
* Labour
* Employment and unemployment

---

September 10, 2010
E-STAT: An interactive tool about society and the economy in Canada
The 2010 edition of E-STAT, Statistics Canada's interactive learning tool for the education community, lets you dynamically generate tables, customize graphs and maps from Statistics Canada's census of population and socioeconomic data. CANSIM in E-STAT, an online database of socioeconomic statistics, now contains more than 3,000 tables, accounting for over 42 million time series.
E-STAT is offered free online and is available only to teachers, students and educational institutions.

E-STAT for Education - home page

---

September 9, 2010
Study: Marital trends and education, 2006
In 2006, the majority of women with a university education were married to men who also had a university education. However, this tendency has decreased slightly over the last quarter-century. The pattern is similar for women in common-law unions.
[ Related link: Sharing their lives: women, marital trends and education [ HTML ] [ PDF - 107K, 7 pages]
By Laetitia Martin and Feng Hou

September 9, 2010
Study: Knowledge of Aboriginal languages among young First Nations children living off reserve, 2006
In 2006, one in five (20%) off-reserve First Nations children aged two to five were able to understand an Aboriginal language, regardless of whether it was learned as a mother tongue or second language. Cree and Ojibway were the languages understood by the largest number of these children.
[ Related link : Family, community, and Aboriginal language among young First Nations children living off reserve in Canada [ HTML ] [ PDF - 131K, 12 pages ]
By Evelyne Bougie

NOTE: The two links immediately above came from the
Winter 2010 issue (Number 90) of Canadian Social Trends
.
In the same issue, you'll find links to recent articles on the following topics:
* Participation in sports and cultural activities among Aboriginal children and youth
* Emigration from Canada to the United States from 2000 to 2006
* Migration from central to surrounding municipalities in Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver
* Making fathers “count”
* Foreign nationals working temporarily in Canada

[Click the September issue link above to access all of these articles from the latest issue of Canadian Social Trends.]
NOTE: StatCan is getting as bad as those retailers who start advertising Christmas merchandise in September.
This issue, dated September 9, 2010, is indeed the Winter issue. Sheesh.

---

September 9, 2010
Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds), first quarter 2010
The market value of employer-sponsored pension funds amounted to $943.4 billion at the end of the first quarter of 2010, up $23.0 billion (+2.5%) from the fourth quarter of 2009. This was the fourth consecutive quarter of growth in pension fund assets, as they rebounded from significant losses in 2008 and the first quarter of 2009.
- incl. two tables:
* Trusteed pension funds, market value of assets by type
* Trusteed pension funds: Revenue and expenditures

---

September 9, 2010
Canada Year Book 2010 ($)
The 2010 edition of the Canada Year Book, available today, is a valuable reference tool that provides extensive information on trends in the nation's social, economic and environmental fabric. The 31 chapters in this year's edition contain 456 pages of analysis, charts, maps and tables in an easy-to-use format, with data from many of Statistics Canada's latest surveys and the census.
The 2010 Canada Year Book is not available online - only in paper format.
Order the 2010 edition of the Canada Year Book now for $24.95.

Canada Year Book 2010 Overview (PDF - 3.3MB, 27 pages)
Free overview of this year's edition of the Canada Year Book.
- includes sections on:
* Population * Health * Education * Crime * Housing * Income, Spending * Government * International Comparisons * Labour * Economy * International Trade * Energy * Manufacturing * Agriculture * Environment * Travel, Transport

Canada Year Book Overviews
for 2009 - 2008 - 2007 - 2006

Clicking this link takes you to the "Discover Canada Year Book" page, where you'll find links (in the left-hand margin) to the overview for each of the four years noted; these overviews cover the same areas as the 2010 overview above, but they're easier to read because they're in easy-to-read HTML format.

Canada Year Book - product main page
Click View for the latest edition of the publication;
click Chronological index for earlier editions of this publication.

Canada Year Book Historical Collection
Explore Canada’s history in text, tables, charts, maps and
multimedia features drawn from Canada Year Books, 1867 to 1967.

Related StatCan document:

* Canada at a Glance
Canada at a Glance presents the current Canadian demographic, education, health and aging, justice, housing, income, labour market, household, economic, travel, financial, agricultural, international trade and environmental statistics
[ Canada at a Glance 2010 ]

---

September 7, 2010
Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective

In 2008, 20% of Canadian teenagers aged 15 to 19 were no longer pursuing a formal education. This was higher than the average of 15% across the 31 member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). While this OECD proportion was down from 20% in 1998, in Canada, it remained stable at 20%.

September 7, 2010
Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective, 2010
This report, the second in an annual series, places certain aspects of the educational systems of Canada’s provinces and territories into an international context. Ten international indicators are presented in this edition, capturing information on educational attainment and graduation, labour market outcomes by educational attainment, spending on education, international students, and participation in adult learning.
[ Highlights ]

Source:
Education Matters: Insights on Education,
Learning and Training in Canada- September 2010 issue

Teachers and students of primary and secondary level can access free learning resources through Statistics Canada’s Education Outreach Program. Its goal is to ensure timely information for learning whether for history, geography, mathematics, family studies or other subjects. From grades 4 to 12, Census at school gives students hands-on experience with surveys and data analysis. The E-STAT database allows educational users to choose, graph, map and download a wealth of data.

Education Matters - main product page
Click View for the latest issue of the publication;
click Chronological index for earlier issues of this publication.

Related products:

* Learning Resources at Statistics Canada - For Teachers - For Students - For Kids - Postsecondary
* Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program
* Education Indicators in Canada: Fact Sheets
* Statistics by Subject : Education, Training and Learning

Related international link:

Education at a glance 2010: OECD indicators
9 September 2010
Main page - includes links to news releases, the complete report, dozens of Excel tables on various indicators and other related material

Complete report (PDF - 4.5MB, 472 pages)
- includes Canada

Report highlights

Source:
OECD Directorate for Education
[ Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) ]

------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---------------------------------

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

- Go to the Education Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - September 12

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

September 12, 2010

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

Back to school with full-day early learning
10 Sep 10
- This week three additional provinces will be offering public full-day early learning/kindergarten programs for the first time.

Combating poverty and inequality: Structural change, social policy and politics
8 Sep 10
- Major report from the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development explores why poverty persists. It warns that "current approaches that target the poor or separate poverty from broader processes of economic growth and development are misconceived."

Setting our agenda on early learning, violence and physical environment
8 Sep 10
- Latest edition of the Bernard van Leer Foundation's Early Childhood Matters series lays out the organization's new goals and areas of focus for 2010-2015.

Pre-budget submission to the Federal Standing Committee on Finance 2011 Federal Budget
8 Sep 10
- Submission from the Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC lays out its vision for federal action on ECEC.

Early learning and care impact analysis
1 Sep 10
- Study by economist Robert Fairholm finds that "early learning with extended day child care options provides a greater economic benefit than any other sector of the economy."

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· Full-day K: Are we ready?
[CA-BC] 8 Sep 10

· Sprits run high as 20,000 begin all-day kindergarten
[CA-BC] 8 Sep 10

· Full-day kindergarten in Ontario gets failing grade
[CA-ON] 7 Sep 10

· The Kindergarten Diaries
[CA] 7 Sep 10

· Time to learn, and play, at full-day kindergarten
[CA-ON] 7 Sep 10

· Battle lines drawn on full-day kindergarten
[CA-ON] 7 Sep 10

· Prince Edward Island goes back to school this week
[CA-PE] 6 Sep 10

· P.E.I schools ready for kindergarten classes
[CA-PE] 1 Sep 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

September 10:
Grandparents Raising Grandchildren
Maine Poverty Report
Medicaid and Education Funding - Kentucky
Cuts to Public Defenders Offices

September 9:
TANF Emergency Funds and Jobs Program - Illinois
Report: Poverty Rate - Ireland
Food Stamp Program Enrollment - Maine, New Hampshire
Millennium Development Goals and Child Poverty

September 8:
Home Weatherization Program - West Virginia
Childrens’ Health Insurance Coverage
Food Stamp Application Process - Texas
Telecommunications in Developing Nations

September 7:
Jobs Bill and Education Funding
Joblessness and Unemployment
Assistance Programs and Children of Illegal Immigrants - Los Angeles, CA

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content - September 12

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week (see below)
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

Week ending September 12, 2010
Most viewed this week on APO:

1. Leaving Care and Homelessness: A Council to Homeless Persons Sector Forum
2. Why public hospitals are overcrowded: ten points for policymakers
3. Education at a glance 2010: OECD indicators
4. Australia's hidden homeless: community-based approaches to asylum seeker homelessness
5. The price of fear: Dialogue 2010 volume 29 number 2

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Week ending September 12, 2010
Most viewed this week in the Social Policy area:

1. Leaving Care and Homelessness: A CHP Sector Forum
2. Education at a glance 2010: OECD indicators
3. Australia's hidden homeless: community-based approaches to asylum seeker homelessness
4. The price of fear: Dialogue 2010 volume 29 number 2
5. World giving index 2010

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

8 September 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1191
In this issue:
-
Top story : Children's rights under Brazilian law
-
Latest news and reports:
*** Breaking new ground (Bangladesh, South Korea, Americas)
*** Discrimination against Roma people (France, Italy, Sweden)
*** Calling time on abuse (India, Senegal)
*** Haiti: Report on inter-country adoptions
*** Employment

- Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL
- links to hundreds of weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.
NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 

Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



*****************************

The Innocence of Childhood

*****************************

Proactive disclosure:
I know that this is the stuff you find in the Reader's Digest at the dentist's office, but I must admit some of these are so gosh-darned cute, y'know....
Gilles


******
     
    
While I sat in the reception area of my doctor's office, a woman rolled  an elderly man in a wheelchair into the room.  As she went to the receptionist's desk, the man sat there, alone and silent. Just as I was thinking I should make small talk with him, a little boy slipped off his mother's lap and  walked over to the  wheelchair.  Placing his hand on the man's, he said, I know how you feel.  My mom makes me ride in the stroller too..'


*****


Out bicycling one day with my eight-year-old granddaughter, Carolyn, I got a  little wistful. 'In ten years,' I said, 'you'll want to  be with your friends and you won't go walking, biking, and  swimming with me like you do now. Carolyn shrugged.  'In ten years you'll be too old to do all those things  anyway.'


******


Working as a pediatric nurse, I had the difficult assignment of giving immunization shots to  children. 
One day, I entered the examining room to give four-year-old Lizzie her needle. 'No, no, no!' she  screamed.  'Lizzie,' scolded her mother, 'that's not polite behavior.'  With that, the girl yelled even  louder, 'No, thank you!  No, thank you!


******


On the way back from a Cub Scout meeting, my grandson innocently said to my son, 'Dad, I know babies come from mommies' tummies, but how do they get there in the first place?'  After my son hemmed and hawed awhile,  my grandson finally spoke up in disgust, 'You don't have to make up something, Dad.  It's okay if you don't know the answer.'

 
*****

 
Just before I was deployed to Iraq , I sat my eight-year-old son down and broke the news to him.  'I'm going to be away for a long time,' I told him.  'I'm going to Iraq .'   'Why?' he asked. 'Don't you know there's a war going on  over there?'


*****

Source:
Terrie and the internets


-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------

Jigsaw puzzle Generator
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/your-shot/jigsaw-puzzles


------------------------


Trip to the Creationism Museum in Kentucky (video)
http://videosift.com/video/SAIU-trip-to-the-Creation-Museum
Un-friggin-believable!
This is all for real.
I think I even saw Stockwell Day in a cameo appearance
on a Triceratops...


------------------


Pinky and the Brain, tongue twister (cartoon video).
http://www.wimp.com/tonguetwister/
Articulate Alliterators: Arise!
She sells sheasells by the she-sore!


------------------

I Feel Pretty
The funniest scene in Anger Management: (You Tube video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9sE55QzXlo&feature=related


------------------


Day-o (The Banana Boat Song)
The funniest scene in Beetlejuice: (You Tube video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQXVHITd1N4