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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 12,  2008

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1941 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. 2008 Federal Election Resources (Canadian Social Research Links)
2. Canada Pension Plan Loss at $25 Billion (Strategic Thoughts, David Schreck) - October 8

3. The Economic Well-being of Children in Canada, the United States and Mexico (Canadian Council on Social Development) - September 2008
4. Brigit's Notes - September/October 2008 (Canadian Women's Health Network)
5.
What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
--- Labour Force Survey, September 2008 - October 10
--- University tuition fees, 2008/2009 - October 9
--- Comparing low income of Canada's regions: A stochastic dominance approach - October 9
--- Family violence: Spousal violence in Canada, 2006 - October 9
6. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - October 8

International  content

7. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
8. Gloria Steinem on Sarah Palin (Los Angeles Times) - September 4
9. U.S. - Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Paper Abstracts - September 2008
--- What Does It Mean to Be Poor in a Rich Society? (Robert Haveman)
--- Poverty Politics and Policy (Mary Jo Bane)
--- Trends in Income Support (John Karl Scholz et al.)
--- Welfare Reform: The U.S. Experience (Robert Moffitt)
--- Poverty Levels and Trends in Comparative Perspective (Daniel R. Meyer and Geoffrey L. Wallace)
10. What Do the Recently-Released U.S. Poverty Numbers Tell Us? (Brookings Institution)
- September 25

11. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content
12. CRINMAIL (October 2008) - (Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Have a great week!

Gilles Séguin
Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. 2008 Federal Election Resources
(Canadian Social Research Links)

New links added in the past week to the
Canadian Social Research Links
2008 Federal Election Links page:

---

Why vote on October 14?
Voting connects us to one another as citizens. By taking part in an election and by expressing our point of view, we help our democracy work. By agreeing or disagreeing with our leaders we show that the political system can accept differing points of view and can resolve them.

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Daily Digest for October 11, 2008
- 150+ links to articles concerning the 2008 federal election in the Canadian media from coast to coast.

Source:
The Daily Digest - Information and Opinion from St. John's to Victoria
- includes links to daily digests back to January 2006

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Bringing Women's Voices and Concerns to the National Table
Federal Election 2008

CWHN is highlighting resources created by other non-governmental organizations for this federal election. These cover important issues, specifically on questions dealing with healthcare and women's equality. In this section, you will find answers from politicians, calls to action, questions to ask the candidates and analysis of the parties' platforms

Source:
Canadian Women's Health Network

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CUPE's election report card:
CUPE rates the platforms of the parties
October 10
Comparison of party platforms in the following areas :
* Privatization * Health care * Child Care * Economy * Environment *
Source:
Canadian Union of Public Employees

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Women's List - Federal Election 2008
September 2008

Issues of importance to Canadian women’s equality in the 2008 federal election:
* Deliver on the constitutional promise of equality
* Ensure equal rights for Aboriginal women
* Fund quality early childhood care & education
* Ensure a livable income
* Commit to affordable housing
* Eliminate violence against women
* Ensure access to justice
* Improve maternity & parental benefits
* Act for women’s health
* Increase female political representation

Click the Women's List link for a collection of over 120 individual resources related to the above list of issues.
[Some of this info is specific to NB]
NOTE: Never mind the federal election --- I highly recommend this resource as a primer on women's issues in Canada!
Source:
New Brunswick Advisory Council on the Status of Women

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A guide to the federal parties' election promises for families
October 9, 2008
*List of campaign promises pertaining to families by all major parties
Source:
The Ottawa Citizen

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thestar.com party game
October 8, 2008
Which party best represents your views in the 2008 federal election? Answer these questions to compare your opinion against the parties'' policies on eight important issues. After you've completed the short questionnaire (one question per issue, multiple choice answer), you'll see which party is your best overall match
- questions include * Afghanistan * Cities * Poverty * Health Care * Child Care * Fiscal Imbalance * The Economy * The Environment
Source:
2008 Federal Election Page (Toronto Star)

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The Conservative Party of Canada Party Platform (October 7)

Protecting Canadian families amid global economic uncertainty
Conservatives implementing a proven plan; Liberals still trying to find one
News Release
October 07, 2008
Toronto – Prime Minister Stephen Harper today laid out the time-tested and true path his Conservative Government has charted consistently over the past two and a half years to prepare and protect Canadian families and the economy amid increasing global economic uncertainty.
- includes a backgrounder with Tory platform highlights

The True North Strong and Free:
Stephen Harper's Plan for Canadians
(PDF - 2.6MB, 44 pages)
NOTE: there's no direct link to the Tory platform on their website because the link itself is a javascript popup window.
There are many compelling security-related reasons NOT to use javascript or popup windows when you want to spread your message on the Internet. And I think the Tories know very well that both javascript and popup windows will reduce the number of visitors who will actually read their platform. Forcing visitors to flail around the site to even find the link to the PDF file is also funny but not funny-ha-ha.

To view the Tory party platform
PDF file on the Conservative Party's website:

1. Click the link below.
2. On the next page that opens, click the secret link (the cover page of the party platform) to view the 44-page PDF file.
NOTE: you must have both javascript and popups enabled to view the PDF file on the Tory website.

A plan for the economy vs proposals for financial disaster
October 07, 2008
- incl. a link to the Tory platform in PDF format

Source:
Conservative Party of Canada

Related links:

Assessing Harper's platform
October 7, 2008
Analysis of the Conservative platform by Greg Lyle (former chief of staff for premiers Gary Filmon and Gordon Campbell), Scott Reid (former communications director for Paul Martin) and Gerald Caplan (former NDP campaign manager).
Source:
Federal Election 2008
[ The Globe and Mail ]

---

Two editorials from the
2008 Federal Election Page
(Toronto Star):

Harper proposes little on economy
October 8
Prime Minister Stephen Harper tried hard in his speech in Toronto yesterday to regain momentum in this election campaign by focusing on the economy. Tried, but ultimately failed. He failed because in his speech he did not display any empathy for Canadians who have lost their jobs as the economy has slowed or who have seen their retirement savings severely reduced as the markets have crashed. Instead, in TV interviews yesterday he talked of "some great buying opportunities emerging in the market."

... and a vapid platform
October 8
More than a month after calling the election – and only a week before Canadians cast their ballots – Prime Minister Stephen Harper released his party's election platform yesterday.That he would wait until the 11th hour to unveil his master plan says a great deal. That the 41-page plan would say so little speaks volumes about Harper's calculations. And that it would feature 22 colour photos of the Prime Minister in its 41 large-font pages says it all.

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Bloc Québécois
NOTE : the party's site is in French only, but the party platform is available in English.

English party platform:

Présent pour le Québec [Present for Québec]:
Policy Statement, 2008 federal election
(PDF - 2.3MB, 16 pages)
September 8

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Housing, homelessness, health, and the 2008 federal election
October 6
* Housing insecurity at record levels
* Federal investments lowest in two decades
* Key federal investments renewed, but funding frozen despite growing need
* Analysis of housing in 2008 political party platforms
Source:
The Wellesley Institute

---

- Go to the 2008 Federal Election and General Political Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2008_fed_election.htm

2. Canada Pension Plan Loss at $25 Billion - October 8
(Strategic Thoughts, David Schreck)

CPP Loss at $25 Billion
October 8, 2008
It will be February before we know how much the Canada Pension Plan recently lost on the stock market, but a fair guess is $25 billion disappeared between the end of the first quarter on June 30th and October 8th. On June 30th the CPP had $127.7 billion in assets, $79.2 billion of which was in equities. On June 30th the TSX composite index was 14,467; on October 8th it was 10,056, a drop of 30.5%.
Source:
Strategic Thoughts
[Website of BC political pundit David Schreck]

More strategic thoughts - from September and October 2008
[HINT : click the links for earlier months.]

- Go to the Human Resources and Social Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm

3. The Economic Well-being of Children in Canada, the United States and Mexico - September 2008
(Canadian Council on Social Development)

What's new from the Canadian Council on Social Development:

New report says NAFTA ignores economic well-being of our kids ( PDF - 74K, 2 pages)
Media Release
September 17, 2008

The Economic Well-being of Children
in Canada, the United States and Mexico
(PDF - 1.2MB, 59 pages)
- examines a range of different measures to determine the economic security of children living in Canada, the United States and Mexico.

Source:
Growing Up in North America series

Related links:

Children in North America Project website
The Children in North America Project aims to highlight the conditions and well-being of children and youth in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Through a series of indicator reports, the project hopes to build a better understanding of how our children are faring and the opportunities and challenges they face looking to the future.

Partners in the project:

Canadian Council on Social Development
The Annie E. Casey Foundation (U.S.)
Population Reference Bureau (U.S.)
Red por los Derechos de la Infancia (Mexico)

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

4. Brigit's Notes - September/October 2008
(Canadian Women's Health Network
)

Brigit's Notes - September/October 2008

In this issue:

1. Bringing Women’s Voices and Concerns to the National Table Federal Election 2008
2. Helping an Abused Woman: 101 Things to Know, Say and Do
3. Invitation to provide feedback on gender, sex and health research in Canada
4. Women's Health: Intersections of Policy, Research, and Practice
5. Caregiver Connect
6. Steady work and mental health – is there a connection?
7. What about Women? Gender Analysis of Discussion Paper on New Brunswick's Tax System
8. AWHONN Canada
9. Midwifery Bridging Project
10. Human resources for health: a gender analysis

Source:
Canadian Women's Health Network
The Canadian Women’s Health Network (CWHN) was created in 1993 as a voluntary national organization to improve the health and lives of girls and women in Canada and the world by collecting, producing, distributing and sharing knowledge, ideas, education, information, resources, strategies and inspirations. We are a far-reaching web of researchers and activists, mothers, daughters, caregivers, and family members, people working in community clinics and on hospital floors, at the university, in provincial and federal health ministries, and in women’s organizations, all dedicated to bettering women’s health and equality.

Also from CWHN:

Bringing Women's Voices and Concerns to the National Table
Federal Election 2008

CWHN is highlighting resources created by other non-governmental organizations for this federal election. These cover important issues, specifically on questions dealing with healthcare and women's equality. In this section, you will find answers from politicians, calls to action, questions to ask the candidates and analysis of the parties' platforms

- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

5. What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
--- Labour Force Survey, September 2008
- October 10
--- University tuition fees, 2008/2009 - October 9
--- Comparing low income of Canada's regions: A stochastic dominance approach - October 9
--- Family violence: Spousal violence in Canada, 2006 - October 9

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

October 10, 2008
Labour Force Survey, September 2008
Following a decline in July and a small gain in August, employment increased by 107,000 in September. Almost all of this increase was in part-time work (+97,000). Despite the gain, the unemployment rate was unchanged at 6.1%, as the increase in employment was matched by a similar rise in labour force participation.
[ Labour Force Information, September 14 to 20, 2008 ]

October 9, 2008
University tuition fees, 2008/2009
Canadian full-time students in undergraduate programs saw tuition fees increase 3.6% on average to $4,724 in the 2008/2009 academic year.

October 9, 2008
Comparing low income of Canada's regions: A stochastic dominance approach (PDF - 385K, 44 pages)
October 2008
Comparisons of low income between regions may have impacts on policy choices. However, it is often argued that rankings of distributions are not robust and that they are also quite sensitive to methods of defining low income. This paper avoids these problems by using a stochastic dominance approach to compare regional low income profiles in Canada without arbitrarily specifying a low-income line.This analysis is carried out for the 10 provinces using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics for 2000.

NOTE : if you're like me, your eyes glaze over when you see something like "stochastic dominance approach" or "LICO-based price deflators and equivalence scales". On the other hand, the economists reading this are probably chomping at the bit to dive in there. For the rest of us, the study says that (a) poverty levels in any given jurisdiction may be over- or under-reported, depending on the definition of low income that is used, and (b) "...regardless of the choices of poverty lines, cost-of-living factors, equivalence scales and an absolute or a relative low-income concept", the incidence of low income in 2000 was greatest in British Columbia. [Gordon Campbell and the BC Liberals took office in June of 2001.]
Related link:
Poverty rates by province in 2004 (PDF - 616K, 1 page)
Source:
Poverty Profile 2004
[National Council of Welfare ]

October 9, 2008
Family violence: Spousal violence in Canada, 2006
Over 38,000 incidents of spousal violence were reported to 149 police services across Canada in 2006, accounting for about 15% of all reported violent incidents. Spousal violence was most prevalent in Nunavut and Quebec in 2006, and least prevalent in British Columbia, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, according to police data. In every province and territory, about 8 in 10 victims of spousal violence were women in 2006. Spousal abuse was twice as common between current partners as between former partners regardless of gender.

Complete report:

Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile (PDF - 238K, 53 pages)
This is the eleventh annual Family Violence in Canada report produced by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics under the Federal Family Violence Initiative. (...) Each year the report has a different focus. This year, for the first time, the focus chapter examines variations in spousal violence across the provinces and territories.

Highlights
* Spousal violence in Canada’s provinces and territories
* Family violence against children and youth
* Family violence against older adults
* Family homicides

[ earlier editions of Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile ]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

6. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - October 8

From the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):

October 8, 2008

Early childhood education and care in the 2008 federal election: Updates
9 Oct 08
- In preparation for the federal election on October 14th, CRRU is providing and regularly updating information useful to those who wish to follow ECEC in the campaign.

Child care - Forgotten election issue
9 Oct 08
- Video segment from TVO's The Agenda with Steve Paikin features a panel (including CRRU's Martha Friendly) discussing child care issues in Canada today.

Attitudes toward child care
8 Oct 08
- Poll by Environics for Code Blue for Child Care finds three-quarters of Canadians think that the lack of affordable child care is a serious problem in Canada today.

New evidence about child care in Canada: Use patterns, affordability and quality
8 Oct 08
- Study from the Institute for Research on Public Policy finds that while a majority of employed Canadian mothers use child care, many existing child care services fail to provide adequate quality.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Canadians want national child care (1) [CA]
10 Oct 08

· Canadians want national child care (2) [CA]
10 Oct 08

· National child care program must be established now [CA]
9 Oct 08

· Parents concerned about child care [CA]
8 Oct 08

· 1 in 5 Canadian children still live in poverty: Report [CA]
7 Oct 08

· Harper promises modest enhancement to child benefit [CA]
6 Oct 08

· No licensed child care for majority of Canadian kids [CA]
5 Oct 08

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

7. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(
Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S). ===> the content of this link changes twice a week
IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches twice a week. Each issue of the dispatch provides links to U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media.

October 9, 2008
* Privatization of Social Services - Indiana, Texas
* Increasing Need for Social Services - New Jersey, California
* State Budget Cuts and Social Services - California
* Study: Income and Children's Health
* Infant Mortality and Mothers' Health - Maryland
* Children's Health Insurance Plan - South Carolina
* State Medicaid Programs and Long-term Care
* Head Start Program
* Child Welfare and Foster Care - Nebraska, Oregon, Michigan
* Food Stamp Program - California
* States and Unemployment Benefits
* Section 8 Housing Subsidies and Waiting Lists - New Jersey

October 6, 2008
* Homelessness and Housing
* Food Stamp Program Participation
* State Medicaid Programs
* Poverty in U.S. Cities - Survey of Mayors
* Academic Achievement Gap - Washington, D.C.
* Enrollment at Two-year Colleges - Michigan
* The Economy and State Budgets
* Underemployment and Unemployment
* States and Drug-testing Policies for Aid Recipients
* Free Drug Samples and Low-income Children
* Emergency Room Use by the Insured - Massachusetts
* Felons and Restoration of Voting Rights - Tennessee

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

If you wish to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail,
please send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

8. Gloria Steinem on Sarah Palin - September 4
(
Los Angeles Times)

Gloria Steinem on Sarah Palin
Palin: wrong woman, wrong message
By Gloria Steinem
September 4, 2008
Here's the good news: Women have become so politically powerful that even the anti-feminist right wing -- the folks with a headlock on the Republican Party -- are trying to appease the gender gap with a first-ever female vice president. (...) But here is even better news: It won't work. This isn't the first time a boss has picked an unqualified woman just because she agrees with him and opposes everything most other women want and need. Feminism has never been about getting a job for one woman. It's about making life more fair for women everywhere. (...) Sarah Palin shares nothing but a chromosome with Hillary Clinton.
She is Phyllis Schlafly, only younger.

Source:
Los Angeles Times

Comment:
You won't find many online resources relating to the 2008 U.S. presidential election on the Canadian Social Research Links website.
[ Not that I consider it irrelevant, but I have to budget my time, and I get to make the decisions here. Here are some resources for U.S. election junkies (it's a Google search results page).]
But I just had to share this article with you --- Gloria Steinem nails it. Now I know why the theme song from Leave it to Beaver pops into my head every time I think of "Schlafly" Palin in the White House...

- Go to the 2008 Federal Election and General Political Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2008_fed_election.htm

9. U.S. - Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Paper Abstracts - September 2008
---
What Does It Mean to Be Poor in a Rich Society? (Robert Haveman)
--- Poverty Politics and Policy
(Mary Jo Bane)
--- Trends in Income Support (John Karl Scholz et al.)
--- Welfare Reform: The U.S. Experience (Robert Moffitt)
--- Poverty Levels and Trends in Comparative Perspective (Daniel R. Meyer and Geoffrey L. Wallace)

Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP Discussion Paper Abstracts - 2008
Links to 13 papers presented at the Changing Poverty Conference (May 29–30, 2008, University of Wisconsin–Madison).
"(...) a small working conference to discuss a new set of commissioned papers that consider trends and determinants of poverty and inequality, the evolution of poverty-related policy, and the consequences of poverty for families and children."
[ NOTE : All papers have since been updated to September 2008.]

Selected papers:
(click the link above to see the whole list)

What Does It Mean to Be Poor in a Rich Society? (PDF - 192K, 37 pages)
September 2008
By Robert Haveman
Department of Economics and Public Affairs
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Excerpt from the abstract:
In this paper, the author attempts to broaden the discussion of poverty and poverty measurement. He first discusses the broad question of “what is poverty?” and describes various poverty concepts that have been proposed. He then describes the official U.S. poverty measure, highlights its main characteristics, and notes some of the criticisms directed toward it. Finally, he examines broader conceptions of poverty and deprivation. The paper ends with a modest proposal for the development of a broader measure of poverty and social exclusion for the United States.

Poverty Politics and Policy (PDF - 99K, 28 pages)
September 2008
By Mary Jo Bane
Harvard University
John F. Kennedy School of Government
Excerpt from the abstract:
Much has happened in politics and policy around poverty and welfare after and to some extent because of Bill Clinton’s 1992 campaign agenda. [Remember that catchy slogan"Ending welfare as we know it!"?- Gilles] In this paper, the author addresses three questions: What changed in policy, practice and the lives of the poor? What changed, if anything, in public opinion and the political context around poverty and welfare? What are the prospects and the best political strategies for improvement in the lives of the poor going forward from 2008?

Trends in Income Support (PDF - 201K, 53 pages)
September 2008
By John Karl Scholz, Robert Moffitt, and Benjamin Cowan
Excerpt from the abstract:
Antipoverty programs are designed to mitigate the most pernicious aspects of market-based economic outcomes—unemployment, disability, low earnings, and other material hardship. These programs compose society’s “safety net” and each has different eligibility standards and benefit formulas. (...) The authors have three primary goals in this paper. First, they provide updated information on expenditures and recipients for a range of antipoverty programs, describing the evolution of the safety net over the past thirty-five years. Second, they use data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to calculate the antipoverty effectiveness of federal programs for families and individuals in different circumstances. Third, they explore changes in the characteristics of recipients of means-tested transfers, tax credits and social insurance.
[TIP: I highly recommend this paper as a primer on American social programs - it covers
a wide range of initiatives, and it underscores the significant differences with the Canadian income security and universal health care systems.]

Welfare Reform: The U.S. Experience (PDF - 294K, 50 pages)
February 2008
By Robert Moffitt
Department of Economics
Johns Hopkins University
Excerpt from the abstract:
The reform of the cash-based welfare program for single mothers in the U.S. which occurred in the 1990s was the most important since its inception in 1935. The reforms imposed credible and enforceable work requirements into the program for the first time, as well as establishing time limits on lifetime receipt. Research on the effects of the reform have shown it to have reduced the program caseload and governmental expenditures on the program. In addition, the reform has had generally positive average effects on employment, earnings, and income, and generally negative effects on poverty rates, although the gains are not evenly distributed across groups. A fraction of the affected group appears to have been made worse off by the reform.

Poverty Levels and Trends in Comparative Perspective (PDF - 140K, 27 pages)
September 2008
By Daniel R. Meyer and Geoffrey L. Wallace
Excerpt from the abstract:
In 2006, 42 years after President Johnson proclaimed war on poverty, the rate of poverty according to the official measure was 12.3 percent, about the same as it was in the late-1960s. A poverty measure that incorporates additional income sources shows somewhat lower poverty, 11.4 percent, but if a relative measure (that incorporates changes in the standard of living over time) is used, poverty in 2006 would be 16.0 percent. Regardless of the exact rate, it is clear that the struggle against poverty has been protracted and difficult, and, despite a variety of social policy changes, very little progress has been made. This paper reviews the way in which poverty is officially measured in the U.S., examines which groups are most affected and how poverty has changed over time, and concludes with a comparison of U.S. poverty rates with those of other countries. The authors end with the suggestion that “perhaps it is time for a renewed war on poverty, this time fought with new commitments and different policy weapons.

Source:
[ Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) ]
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

10. What Do the Recently-Released U.S. Poverty Numbers Tell Us? - September 25
(Brookings Institution)

What Do the Recently-Released U.S. Poverty Numbers Tell Us? (PDF - 48K, 9 pages)
September 25, 2008
Testimony to the Joint Economic Committee
Hearing entitled “Leave No Family Behind: How Can We Reduce the Rising Number of
American Families Living in Poverty?”
By Rebecca M. Blank
"(...)

Highlights:
- poverty did not fall to any appreciable extent during the economic expansion of the 2000s. This is quite unusual.
- In past decades,the poverty rate and the unemployment rate have moved together. When unemployment fell in the 1980s expansion, so did poverty. Unemployment and poverty both fell rapidly in the strong expansion of the 1990s. But when unemployment fell after 2003, poverty remained essentially flat.
- the rise in poverty reflects the generally sluggish growth in income by all families in the bottom half of the income distribution

Anti-Poverty Strategies for the Next Decade:
* Continue to Incentivize and Support Low-Wage Work
--- Work and earnings must be at the center of any anti-poverty strategy.
--- Expanding the EITC for workers without children in their immediate households would help incentivize work among less-skilled men.
--- Increase assistance to help pay child care expenses for single mothers who are caring for children.
*Assuring the Presence of an Effective Safety Net
--- Help disconnected women and their families stabilize their incomes.
--- Revisions in Unemployment Insurance. (...)
We have had real successes in our anti-poverty efforts over the past 30 years, but there is more that we can do to reduce economic need among our citizens."

Source:
Brookings Institution

Related link:

Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance
Coverage in the United States: 2007
(PDF - 2.9MB, 84 pages)
August 2008
Source:
U.S. Census

11. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content

APO Weekly Briefing
The content of this page changes each week, and it includes links to a few book/report reviews, about two dozen new reports, a few job ads and 60 events (mostly conferences) of interest to social researchers...
Source:
Australian Policy Online (APO) - home page
With nearly 120 member centres and institutes, Australian Policy Online offers easy access to much of the best Australian social, economic, cultural and political research available online.
NOTE: the APO home page includes links to the five most popular reports on the APO website, and this list is updated each week.

APO Archive
The APO archive is grouped into 23 subject areas, with entries appearing in reverse chronological order.
* Ageing *Asia and the pacific * Citizenship and the law * Disability * Economics and trade * Education * Employment and workplace relations * The environment * Foreign policy and defence * Gender and sexuality * Health * Housing * Families and households * Immigration and refugees * Income, poverty and wealth * Indigenous * Media, communications and cultural policy * Politics and government * Population, multiculturalism and ethnicity * Religion and faith * Rural and regional * Science and technology * Social policy * Urban and regional planning * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. CRINMAIL - September/October 2008
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

9 October 2008 - CRINMAIL 1023
* DEATH PENALTY: Sign the Petition
* EDUCATION: Learn without Fear [publication]
* AUSTRALIA: Move to ban corporal punishment in schools in South Australia [news]
* DISCRIMINATION: Hate Crimes in the OSCE Region - Incidents and responses [publication]
* JAPAN: 'Dating cafes' fostering child prostitution [news]
* EUROPE: Eurochild 5th Annual Conference [event]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

7 October 2008 - CRINMAIL 1022
* CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS: Committee on the Rights of the Child issues recommendations to States Parties [news]
* EDUCATION: Viewpoint - Human rights education must be a priority [publication]
* PERU: Children demand right to work, but an end to exploitation [news]
* ECUADOR: New constitution strengthens children’s rights [news]
* FRANCE: Children and Young People in Care: What do YOUth think? [event]
* CALL FOR INFORMATION: Child Victims and Witnesses of Crime - online training tool
* EMPLOYMENT: SOS Kinderdorf International - DCI Palestine
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 300+ earlier weekly issues
, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm



Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


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Investment tips for 2009

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 For all of you with any money left, be aware of the next expected mergers so that you can get in on the ground floor and make some BIG bucks.

Watch for these consolidations in 2009:

1.) Hale Business Systems, Mary Kay Cosmetics, Fuller Brush, and W. R. Grace Co. will merge and become:  Hale, Mary, Fuller, Grace

2.) PolygramRecords, Warner Bros., and ZestaCrackers join forces and become: Poly, Warner Cracker

3.) 3M will merge with Goodyear and become: MMMGood

4.) ZippoManufacturing, AudiMotors, Dofasco, and Dakota Mining will merge and become: ZipAudiDoDa

5.) FedEx is expected to join its competitor, UPS, and become: FedUP

6.) Fairchild Electronics and Honeywell Computers will become: Fairwell Honeychild

7.) Grey Poupon and Docker Pants are expected to become: PouponPants

8) . Knotts Berry Farm and the National Organization of Women will become: Knott NOW!

And finally….

9.) Victoria’s Secret and Smith & Wesson will merge under the new name: TittyTittyBangBang

Source:
http://bitsandpieces.us/2008/10/03/investment-tips-for-2009/

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And, in closing...

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Watching the Growth of Walmart Across America
http://projects.flowingdata.com/walmart/
Watch a visual representation of Wal Mart's growth over the past 40 years.

The Cadaver Calculator - how much are YOU worth?
http://www.oneplusyou.com/bb/cadaver
My cadaver is worth $3840.

Morbid Facts About Your Birthday
http://www.oneplusyou.com/bb/death

Why I don't sleep well at night
http://www.todaysbigthing.com/2008/10/09 (Video)
We have three of those adorable creatures at home; we call them the Board of Directors.
If you haven't met them yet, click the link below
(WARNING TO CAT-O-PHOBES : don't click the link below if you don't want to see cute kitty photos.)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal/