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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
September 13, 2009

 

September 20, 2009
OOPS --- I MADE A BOO-BOO.

I accidentally overwrote the content of the newsletter for September 13 when I was working on the September 20 issue.

Below is a copy of the complete newsletter that I've just copied from the email version. There are no links that you can click on this page. You can either copy individual URLs from this page and paste them into a new browser window, or copy the entire page (click anywhere on the page and then click Ctrl + A). Then paste the URL into a new (Ctrl+V) email message to yourself. The message you receive will have all active (clickable) links.
(Sorry for being lazy, but it would take me half an hour to reinsert all the links below one by one, and, well, it's sunny and warm outside so pity, eh...)


*************************************************
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
September 13, 2009
*************************************************


Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter, a listing of
the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the
past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out
to 2,087 subscribers.

Here's where you can find the online version of this week's newsletter:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal/news130909.htm


Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. Recession Relief Coalition - new website
2. Ontario welfare caseload statistics and incomes, July 2009 (Open
Policy [John Stapleton] + Ontario Ministry of Community and Social
Services)
3. Low Income in Canada: 2000-2007 Using the Market Basket Measure
(Human Resources and Skills Development Canada) - August 2009
4. What's new from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy - September 9
--- Student Aid Meets Social Assistance - September 2009
--- All Aboard Manitoba’s Poverty Train - September 2009
--- New Ingredients for the Health Care Mix - September 2009
--- Supporting Working Canadian Families: The Role of Employment
Insurance Special Benefits - September 2009
5. Treatment of Registered Disability Savings Plans (RDSPs) under
provincial/territorial welfare programs - Updated to 09/09 (Human
Resources and Skills Development Canada)
6. Tories to introduce own EI reform (Globe and Mail) - September 7
7. Drug/Alcohol Testing & Welfare Recipients - an Ontario Oldie Goldie
(2000) - from the Alcohol Policy Network
8. From Homeless to Home (video) - Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa
9. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canadian Economic Observer - September 2009 issue - September 11
--- Study: Trends in gross domestic product and self-employment of
unincorporated enterprises, 1987 to 2005 - September 10
--- Back to school – September 2009 - September 8
--- Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective -
September 8
10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) -
September 13

International content

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
12. [U.S.] Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United
States: 2008 (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) - September 10
13. A new poverty measure for the U.S.? (Center for American Progress) -
August 25
14. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) : Eighth
Annual Report to Congress (Department of Health and Human Services) -
June 2009
15. President Obama's Speech to the Joint Session of Congress on Health
Care Reform - September 9
16. Australian Policy Online
17. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - September 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin
Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


************************************************************************
1. Recession Relief Coalition
************************************************************************


Recession Relief Coalition - NEW WEBSITE!
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org
(Formerly the Recession Relief Fund Coalition )
The Recession Relief Coalition is a broad-based group of organizations
and individuals concerned about the impact of the recession on Canada’s
most vulnerable and marginalized residents. Over 260 organizations and
over 1,100 individuals across Canada have endorsed the coalition’s call
on the federal government to create a recession relief fund to prevent
cuts to public and private not-for-profit agencies serving vulnerable
communities, and to increase funding to support vital social services
including homelessness programs and settlement services.

- incl. links to:
* home
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org

* actions (no content yet)
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/actions.php

* indicators
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/indicators.php

* contact
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/contact.php

* participate
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/participate.php

* video
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/video.php

* gallery
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/gallery.php

* news
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/news.php

* archives
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/archives.php

* blog
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/blog.php

* submit your story
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/submit.php

Endorse the
Recession Relief Coalition Declaration
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/endorse.php
- read the declaration, then scroll down the page and add your name to
the growing list of supporters.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm


************************************************************************
2. Ontario welfare caseload statistics and incomes, July 2009
(Open Policy - John Stapleton + Ontario Ministry of Community and Social
Services)
************************************************************************


Welfare historians and number-crunchers, Rejoice!

Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Caseload Change
- April 2007 to July 2009 (PDF - 159K, 1 page)
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/resources/odsp%20graph%20of%20casesloads%20to%20july2009.pdf

This graph shows the steady increase in ODSP cases since the recession
began

Source:
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services
http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/mcss/english/

---

Ontario Works (OW) Caseload Change
- April 2007 to July 2009 (PDF - 159K, 1 page)
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/resources/ow%20graph%20of%20casesloads%20to%20july2009.pdf

This graph shows the steady increase in OW cases since the recession began
Source:
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services
http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/mcss/english/

---

OW & ODSP Combined Caseload Change
- June 2007 to July 2009 (Excel file - 52K)
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/resources/OW%20&%20ODSP%20cases%20increase.xls
This excel worksheet shows the steady increase in ODSP and OW cases
since January 2008

Source:
Open Policy (John Stapleton)
http://www.openpolicyontario.com/

---

Selected Welfare Rates, 1935 to date (PDF - 64K, 1 page)
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/resources/Monthly%20social%20assistance%20graph.pdf
This graph shows the monthly change in income of a single person and a
single mother with one child on social assistance in Ontario from 1935
to 2009

Source:
Open Policy (John Stapleton)
http://www.openpolicyontario.com/

---

Ontario Social Assistance rates
and Minimum Wage for a Single Person, 1967 to 2010
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org/resources/ONTARIO%20-%20Social%20Assistance%20rates%20and%20Minimum%20Wage,%20Single%20Person,%201967%20to%202010.xlsx
(Excel file - 26K)
This excel worksheet shows a comparison of incomes between a single
person working at minimum wage and a single person on social assistance
since 1967
Source: Open Policy (John Stapleton)
http://www.openpolicyontario.com/


The source of these files is the Recession Relief Coalition website.
http://www.recession-relief-coalition.org

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm


************************************************************************
3. Low Income in Canada: 2000-2007 Using the Market Basket Measure
- August 2009 (Human Resources and Skills Development Canada)
************************************************************************


The latest from
the Market Basket Measure (MBM):

What's the MBM, you ask??
In 1997, Canada's ministers responsible for social services mandated the
Federal/Provincial/Territorial Working Group on Social Development
Research and Information to develop a new measure of low income in
Canada to complement existing measures. The Applied Research Branch of
Human Resources Development Canada developed the MBM in consultation
with provincial and territorial governments.

Recently posted to the
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) website:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/home.shtml

Low Income in Canada: 2000-2007 Using the Market Basket Measure
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/research/categories/inclusion/2009/sp-909-07-09/page00.shtml

August 2009
The Market Basket Measure (MBM) is a measure of low income based on the
cost of a specified basket of goods and services. It was designed to
complement two Statistics Canada measures of low income: the Low Income
Cut-offs (LICOs) based on average consumption patterns and the Low
Income Measure (LIM) based on median incomes. The MBM is far more
sensitive to geographical differences in living costs than these other
measures.

- includes links to the individual chapters and appendices; the table of
contents appears below.
- also includes links to a Highlights page and the full text in one PDF
file (both of these links appear below)

Table of Contents:
* 1. Introduction
* 2. Low Income Measures: Conceptual Differences
* 3. The Market Basket Measure
* 4. The Results
* 5. A Focus on the "Working Poor"
* 6. High Risk Groups
* 7. Conclusion
* 8. Introduction to Tables 7-10
* Appendix A - Methodological Annex
* Appendix B - Health Canada's National Nutritious Food Basket - 1998
* Appendix C - Revised Clothing and Footwear component (2005) based on
January 2001 Social Planning Council of Winnipeg and Winnipeg Harvest
Acceptable Level of Living (A.L.L)
* Appendix D - Percentage of Rental Units in which Various Appliances
are included in the Rent, Labour Force Survey (LFS) Rent Supplement,
Average of June to December 2000
* Appendix E - Cities in which transportation items are collected 1
* Appendix F - Survey of Household Spending (SHS) Items Included in
Other Expenses Calculation: Numerator
* Appendix G - MBM Thresholds for Reference Family by Component 2007($)

Complete report (PDF - 458K, 89 pages)
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/research/categories/inclusion/2009/sp-909-07-09/sp_909_07_09e.pdf

Highlights
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/research/categories/inclusion/2009/sp-909-07-09/page02.shtml

(Excerpts)
* The national incidence of low income fell from 14.6% in 2000 to 10.1%
in 2007.
* This decline in incidence was widespread across all age groups with
children under 18 experiencing the largest decline since 2000 (6.2
percentage points to 11.9% in 2007).
* Among age groups, the incidence among seniors was the lowest; falling
from 5.5% in 2000 to 2.6% in 2007.
* The national incidence of low income in 2007 was higher using the MBM
(10.1%) than Statistics Canada's post-income tax Low Income Cut-offs
(LICOs-IAT) (9.2%).1 This pattern was repeated for most sub-groups.

***

See also:

Low Income in Canada: 2000-2006 Using the Market Basket Measure
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/research/categories/inclusion/2008/sp-864-10-2008/page00.shtml

October 2008

Low Income in Canada: 2000-2004 Using the Market Basket Measure
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/research/categories/inclusion/2007/sp_682_10_07_e/page00.shtml

November 2007 (PDF file date)

Low Income in Canada: 2000-2002 Using the Market Basket Measure
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/pkrf/publications/research/2002-000662/page00.shtml

June 2006

Understanding the 2000 Low Income Statistics Based on the Market Basket
Measure
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/pkrf/publications/research/2003-000151/page00.shtml

May 2003

Constructing the Revised Market Basket Measure
April 2002
Technical Paper
Full text (HTML)
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/pkrf/publications/research/2002-002379/page00.shtml

Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/home.shtml


- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm


************************************************************************
4. What's new from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy - September 9
--- Student Aid Meets Social Assistance - September 2009
--- All Aboard Manitoba’s Poverty Train - September 2009
--- New Ingredients for the Health Care Mix - September 2009
--- Supporting Working Canadian Families: The Role of Employment
Insurance Special Benefits - September 2009
************************************************************************


What's new from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

Student Aid Meets Social Assistance (PDF - 278K, 77 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/815ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
September 2009
This study explores the interaction between student aid and social
assistance - the two main systems in Canada that provide financial
support to post-secondary students. Both systems are complex in
themselves because they are governed by a wide range of rules and
regulations. Their complexity is exacerbated by the constitutional
nature of Canada . This paper focuses on the interface issues because of
an overriding concern: Students from low-income households are
under-represented in the post-secondary educational system -
particularly at the university level. They face multiple barriers,
including information and motivational factors, to participation.
Another major problem, not surprisingly, is their limited income and
assets relative to the cost of post-secondary education.

All Aboard Manitoba’s Poverty Train (PDF - 47K, 10 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/816ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman, Ken Battle and Michael Mendelson
September 2009
This report summarizes the core elements of the newly-introduced poverty
reduction strategy in Manitoba.
Announced on May 21, 2009, All Aboard [
http://www.gov.mb.ca/fs/allaboard/index.html ] represents an annual
investment of $744 million, including $212 million in new funding. To
tackle the numerous factors that create and sustain poverty, the
province is investing in four clusters of intervention: safe affordable
housing; education, jobs and income support; strong and healthy
families; and coordinated programs and services. The strategy has
several elements of success: It is a whole-of-government approach rather
than the effort of a single department. It invests in recognized
pathways out of poverty and engages partners outside government in the
diverse interventions. The strategy provides direct (albeit modest)
payments to households with children to boost their incomes immediately.
All Aboard includes a process to coordinate its many components and
monitor its impact.

New Ingredients for the Health Care Mix (PDF - 35K, 3 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/817ENG.pdf
By Sherri Torjman
September 2009
As the aging population puts more pressure on scarce resources, the
debates as to who gets selected for essential health care services will
become increasingly contentious. The typical response is to look for
ways to reform health care in order to ration services more efficiently.
Another answer is to shore up the supply of nurses. This paper argues
for additional supports for the estimated three million informal
caregivers in Canada . Options include greater provision of home
supports and workplace policies that allow flexibility for elder care.
Another possibility involves the development of secondary suites, an
affordable housing option that enables the provision of care at home.
The paper argues that urban design makes an important policy
contribution to our social challenges.

Supporting Working Canadian Families:
The Role of Employment Insurance Special Benefits (PDF - 105K, 33 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/819ENG%2Epdf
By Michael J. Prince
September 2009
This paper explores the Employment Insurance (EI) policy objective of
encouraging long-term labour market attachment by providing temporary
income support during absences from work due to life events such as
illness, childbirth and caring for a terminally ill family member. The
study was undertaken as part of an ongoing assessment of the policies
and programs of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, which is
examining how EI may need to adjust to better align with current shifts
in the labour market and society. The report examines five EI special
benefits: the Family Supplement, Sickness, Parental, Maternity and
Compassionate Care. The paper also includes a chronology of major
developments in family-related benefits in EI policy from 1941 to 2006.
Because EI special benefits operate at the intersection of labour market
policy, income security policy and family policy, these benefits enable
a better balance between work and family life, and have important
implications for each of these policy domains.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/
The Caledon Institute of Social Policy does rigorous, high-quality
research and analysis; seeks to inform and influence public opinion and
to foster public discussion on poverty and social policy; and develops
and promotes concrete, practicable proposals for the reform of social
programs at all levels of government and of social benefits provided by
employers and the voluntary sector.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Education Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page :
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

- Go to the Manitoba Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm


************************************************************************
5. Treatment of Registered Disability Savings Plans (RDSPs) under
provincial/territorial welfare programs - Updated to September 2009
(Human Resources and Skills Development Canada)
************************************************************************


Treatment of Registered Disability Savings Plans (RDSPs) under
provincial/territorial welfare programs
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/disability_issues/disability_savings/rdsp_ptb.shtml

Updated to September 2009
In the determination of financial eligibility for needs-tested welfare
or disability benefits, each province and territory decides how it will
treat assets and income from various sources, both at the point of
application and on an ongoing basis. This page provides a current
overview of the treatment of the RDSP in all Canadian provinces and
territories, and it includes links to the relevant source material in
each jurisdiction.

Source:
Registered Disability Savings Plans
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/disability_issues/disability_savings/index.shtml

[ Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml ]

Related links from the
Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network:

Registered Disability Savings Plan
http://www.rdsp.com/
The Registered Disability Savings Plan is a savings plan designed
specifically for people with disabilities in Canada. The first of its
kind in the world, this new tax-deferred savings vehicle will assist
families in planning for the long - term financial security of their
relatives with disabilities.
- incl. links to * What is it? * How do I qualify * Where do I get it?

[ Registered Disability Savings Plan Blog
- "...everything you wanted to know about the RDSP" ]
http://rdsp.wordpress.com/

Source:
Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network
http://www.plan.ca/
Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network (PLAN) is a non-profit organization,
established in 1989 by and for families committed to future planning and
securing a good life for their relative with a disability.
PLAN is the non-profit organization that proposed, researched, and
campaigned for the RDSP.
PLAN created and maintains the RDSP website and the RDSP Blog.

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

- Go to the Disability Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm


************************************************************************
6. Tories to introduce own EI reform - September 7
(Globe and Mail)
************************************************************************


Tories to introduce own EI reform
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/tories-to-introduce-own-ei-reform/article1278718/

Human Resources Minister says changes to come in fall session;
Liberals question why proposals weren't made to the bipartisan working
group
By Rhéal Séguin (no relation)
Quebec City
September 7, 2009
Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Conservatives are planning to unveil an
unemployment insurance reform package in the coming session of
Parliament, in effect undermining one of the Liberal party's
justifications for a fall election. A bipartisan working group on EI
failed to agree to changes to the program over the summer, with the
Liberals accusing the Tories of not bringing any proposals to the table.
Last week, when the Liberals announced their intention of defeating the
government and said they would no longer attend the working group,
Conservative committee member Diane Finley chastised them for walking
away from the discussions. (...) The [proposed Conservative] move to
introduce their own EI plan suggests the Harper Conservatives, gearing
up for an election campaign, want to shift the blame onto the opposition
for failing to help the growing ranks of Canada's unemployed. (...)
Yesterday Marlene Jennings, one of the two Liberal MPs on the committee,
accused the government of acting in bad faith by now tabling proposals
that could easily have been debated by the EI reform panel.
Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page :
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm


************************************************************************
7. Drug/Alcohol Testing & Welfare Recipients - an Oldie Goldie from
Ontario (2000)
(Alcohol Policy Network)
************************************************************************


Oldie Goldie
- from the Alcohol Policy Network:

Drug/Alcohol Testing & Welfare Recipients
http://www.apolnet.ca/infopacks/groups/groupswelfarehome.html
On November 14, 2000, Ontario's Minister of Community and Social
Services, John Baird, launched province-wide consultations on mandatory
drug treatment for welfare recipients. Under the proposed plan, those
who refused treatment would be cut off social assistance. Click the
above link to access a collection of links to historical statistics,
research papers, and background information, as well as information on
prevention programs.

Source:
APOLNET
http://apolnet.org/index.html
The Alcohol Policy Network (APN) is a network of over 1000 individuals
and organizations across Ontario concerned about the impact of alcohol
on our friends, families and communities. APOLNET is the web-based tool
used to collect and disseminate a broad and comprehensive list of
resources to those working or interested in the field of alcohol policy.

APN is a project of the Ontario Public Health Association (OPHA)[
http://www.opha.on.ca/ ] which is an independent charitable organization
founded in 1949 to strengthen the impact of people active in public and
community health throughout Ontario.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm


************************************************************************
8. From Homeless to Home (video)
(Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa)
************************************************************************


>From Homeless to Home (video)
http://www.endhomelessnessottawa.ca/homeless-to-home/homeless-to-home.cfm
>From Homeless to Home is one of five ways developed in a project to
help the community learn from people who have been homeless in Ottawa
and to bring to life for a broad audience the findings from the Panel
Study on Homelessness in Ottawa.Through a partnership between the
University of Ottawa, Carleton University and the Alliance to End
Homelessness, the project was funded by the Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council of Canada through its Homelessness and
Diversity Issues initiative. The project shares with the broader
community answers to these questions – Who is homeless in Ottawa ? How
do people move into and out of homelessness? What challenges do they
face? How do people become homeless? How can community organizations,
governments and people in the community work together to end homelessness?

Source:
Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa
http://www.endhomelessnessottawa.ca/

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm


************************************************************************
9. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canadian Economic Observer - September 2009 issue - September 11
--- Study: Trends in gross domestic product and self-employment of
unincorporated enterprises, 1987 to 2005 - September 10
--- Back to school – September 2009 - September 8
--- Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective -
September 8
************************************************************************


Selected content from
The Daily
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html]

September 11, 2009
Canadian Economic Observer - September 2009
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-010-x/11-010-x2009009-eng.htmSections:
1. Current economic conditions
2. Economic events
3. Feature article
[ Trends in GDP and self-employment of unincorporated enterprises, 1987
– 2005 http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-010-x/2009009/part-partie3-eng.htm ]
4. Recent feature articles
5. National accounts
6. Labour markets
7. Prices
8. International trade
9. Goods-producing industries (manufacturing, construction and resources)
10. Services (trade, transportation, travel and communications)
11. Financial markets
12. Provincial
- also includes tables, charts, appendices, user information and related
products

Source:
Canadian Economic Observer
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/english/bsolc?catno=11-010-X
This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for
economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the
economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical
summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal
economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial
nations.
NOTE : click "Chronological index" on the main page of the Canadian
Economic Observer for links to (free) earlier issues of this publication
back to 2003.

September 10, 2009
Study: Trends in gross domestic product and self-employment of
unincorporated enterprises, 1987 to 2005
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/090910/dq090910b-eng.htm
Throughout most of the 1990s, the gross domestic product (GDP) of
unincorporated enterprises grew at a similar rate to that of
corporations. However, since the late 1990s, the growth rate of
unincorporated GDP was well below the growth rate of corporate GDP.

September 8, 2009
Back to school – September 2009
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-004-x/2009003/article/10922-eng.htmIt's
that time of year again – back to school for tens of thousands of
students from kindergarten to college and university, for their teachers
and principals and for their families who are busy preparing for another
school year. In honour of this annual ritual, we have put together a few
facts and figures relating to education.

Source:
Education Matters: Insights on
Education, Learning and Training in Canada (Sept. 2009)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-004-x/81-004-x2009003-eng.htm

September 8, 2009
Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/090908/dq090908b-eng.htm
Canada surpassed 23 of the 30 member nations of the Organisation for
Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in 2007 regarding the
proportion of its population aged 25 to 64 that had a university degree.
In Canada, as in other countries, employment rates were consistently
higher among people with postsecondary education than among those
without. Canada was also among the countries that allocated the highest
proportions of gross domestic product (GDP) to education, placing it
seventh highest among the OECD countries.

Related subjects:
o Education, training and learning
http://cansim2.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.pgm?Lang=E&SP_Action=Result&SP_ID=1821&SP_TYP=50&SP_Sort=-0&SP_Mode=2


o Fields of study
http://cansim2.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.pgm?Lang=E&SP_Action=Result&SP_ID=1586&SP_TYP=50&SP_Sort=-0&SP_Mode=2


o Outcomes of education
http://cansim2.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.pgm?Lang=E&SP_Action=Result&SP_ID=3073&SP_TYP=50&SP_Sort=-0&SP_Mode=2


o Students
http://cansim2.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.pgm?Lang=E&SP_Action=Result&SP_ID=1756&SP_TYP=50&SP_Sort=-0&SP_Mode=2


- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to
Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm


************************************************************************
10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto)
- September 13
************************************************************************


What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org

September 13, 2009

Women’s poverty and the recession
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127249
9 Sep 09
- Report from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives finds that
women raising children on their own are almost five times more likely to
be poor than two-parent families.

BC budget update 2009
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127248
9 Sep 09
- Budget update from the Government of BC highlights their promise to
phase in full-day kindergarten beginning in 2010.

BC budget update response
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127247
9 Sep 09
- Press release from the Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC in
response to the BC government’s budget update.

ECE Affinity Group: Something to share
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127246
9 Sep 09
- This document from the Child Care Human Resources Sector Council
includes a series of ideas and resources for those delivering
post-secondary training in ECE.

About Canada: Childcare
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=126600
24 Jun 09
- Just published – a new book co-authored by CRRU director Martha
Friendly and University of Manitoba Sociologist Susan Prentice.

With our best future in mind: Implementing early learning in Ontario
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=126513
17 Jun 09
- Report to the Premier of Ontario from Charles Pascal, the Premier's
Special Advisor on Early Learning.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_whatsnew.shtml

child care in the news

· Hardwiring our children for success
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127243
[CA-ON] 9 Sep 09

· Children, families forgotten in this budget
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127241
[CA-BC] 9 Sep 09

· No such thing as a free market
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127252
[AU] 9 Sep 09

· Day care operator pleads guilty to fraud
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127245
[CA-ON] 9 Sep 09

· Accidents up at child care
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127251
[AU] 6 Sep 09

· In a shrinking workforce women outnumber men
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127242
[CA] 5 Sep 09

· Province supports integrated child care and learning: Minister
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=127222
[CA-ON] 2 Sep 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_inthenews.shtml

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU
website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood
care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly
released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child
care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/issues/
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to
further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research
oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child
care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm


************************************************************************
11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
************************************************************************


Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty,
welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and
Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

September 11:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2009/09/11/
Free and Reduced-price Lunch Program - Mississippi
Unemployment Benefits and Job Programs - Georgia, New Jersey
Report: Cost of High School Dropouts
Census Report: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the US:
2008

September 10:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2009/09/10/
Census Report: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the US:
2008
Measuring Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage

September 9:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2009/09/09/
International Aid and Poverty Reduction - East Timor
Teenage Pregnancy and Access to Birth Control - Texas
Unemployment and Disabled Workers
Flu Planning and Sick Leave
Tax Credits for the Working Poor

September 8:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2009/09/08/
States and the Stimulus Emergency Fund for Needy Families
Schools and Homeless Children
State Children’s Health Insurance Program
Medicaid Enrollment and Funding - Louisiana, Alabama
Health Care Reform and Subsidies
Retailers Accepting Food Stamps
State Unemployment Insurance Systems - California, Wisconsin
Jobless Benefits for Workers Over 65 - Utah

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/initiatives/outreach/pastdispatch.htm
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/initiatives/outreach/dispatch/search.htm

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/ ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm


************************************************************************
12. [U.S.] Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage
in the United States: 2008 - September 10
(Census Bureau)
************************************************************************


Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2008
http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/income_wealth/014227.html

Press Release
September 10, 2009
The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that real median household income
in the United States fell 3.6 percent between 2007 and 2008, from
$52,163 to $50,303. This breaks a string of three years of annual income
increases and coincides with the recession that started in December
2007. The nation’s official poverty rate in 2008 was 13.2 percent, up
from 12.5 percent in 2007. There were 39.8 million people in poverty in
2008, up from 37.3 million in 2007. Meanwhile, the number of people
without health insurance coverage rose from 45.7 million in 2007 to 46.3
million in 2008, while the percentage remained unchanged at 15.4
percent. These findings are contained in the report Income, Poverty, and
Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2008.
NOTE: this press release includes extensive highlights from the report.

Complete report:

Income, Poverty and Health
Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2008 (PDF - 1.4MB, 74 pages)
http://www.census.gov/prod/2009pubs/p60-236.pdf
This report contains the official national findings from the Current
Population Survey (CPS).

* Income and Poverty Fact Sheet (PDF - 55K, 2 pages)
http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/pdf/incomeandpovertyfactsheet.pdf


* Health Insurance Fact Sheet (PDF - 61K, 3 pages)
http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/pdf/healthinsurancefactsheet.pdf

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau
http://www.census.gov/

---
Related links from the Census Bureau:
---

Income Statistics, 2008
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/income/income08.html
- includes tables showing income by state

[ main Income page - more links
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/income/income.html]

Poverty Statistics, 2008
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/poverty08.html
- incl. highlights, graphs and tables
[ main Poverty page http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/poverty.html
- more links]

Health insurance coverage data, 2008
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/hlthins/hlthin08.html - incl. highlights,
graphs and tables
[ main Health Insurance page
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/hlthins/hlthins.html - more links]

---
Related links - Web/News/Blogs:
---

Search Results Links
- always current results!
Using the following search terms (without the quote marks):
"Census Bureau, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage"

Web search results page
http://tinyurl.com/2s6h2n

News search results page
http://tinyurl.com/2q6sjt

Blog Search Results page
http://tinyurl.com/32ur97
Source:

Google.ca
http://www.google.ca/

---
Related links - Analysis:
---

Last Year’s Poverty Rate Was Highest in 12 Years
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/11/us/11poverty.html?_r=1
By Erik Eckholm
September 10, 2009
In the recession, the nation’s poverty rate climbed to 13.2 percent last
year, up from 12.5 percent in 2007, according to an annual report
released Thursday by the Census Bureau. The report also documented a
decline in employer-provided health insurance and in coverage for
adults. The rise in the poverty rate, to the highest level since 1997,
portends even larger increases this year, which has registered far
higher unemployment than in 2008, economists said.

Source:
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/

Children's Defense Fund Statement on
New Data Showing 8.1 Million Uninsured Children, 14.1 Million Children
in Poverty in 2008
http://www.childrensdefense.org/news-media/cdf-press-releases/2009/20090910-census-bureau-statistics-uninsured-poverty.html
Number of Children Living in Poverty Increased by Nearly 750,000
September 10, 2009
WASHINGTON, DC—Today, Children's Defense Fund (CDF) President Marian
Wright Edelman issued the following statement in response to the Census
Bureau's release of data showing that, in 2008, 8.1 million children
were uninsured and 14.1 million children lived in poverty.
"Today’s Census data show that there are 8.1 million uninsured children
in America. This new information only underscores why health reform must
guarantee that every child in America can easily access comprehensive,
affordable health coverage. We know that investing in preventive
services for children and addressing their health needs now is far more
cost-effective than ignoring them. Communities incur increased costs
when their children are not insured, often because of increased use of
emergency rooms and longer hospital stays. For example, an uninsured
child can cost the community as much as $2,100 more than a child covered
by Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)."

Source:
Children's Defense Fund
http://www.childrensdefense.org/
The Children's Defense Fund (CDF) is a non-profit child advocacy
organization that has worked relentlessly for 35 years to ensure a level
playing field for all children. We champion policies and programs that
lift children out of poverty; protect them from abuse and neglect; and
ensure their access to health care, quality education and a moral and
spiritual foundation.

---

Statement: Greenstein on Census’ 2008 Health Insurance and Poverty Data
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2911
September 10, 2009
By Robert Greenstein
Today’s grim Census Bureau report shows the nation lost substantial
ground in 2008 on poverty, median income, and the number of people who
are uninsured. Several aspects of the Census report stand out. The
number of people living in poverty jumped by 2.6 million to 39.8 million
— the highest since 1960. The poverty rate — the percentage of people
living in poverty — also rose, to 13.2 percent, which is its highest
level since 1997. Similarly, real median household income fell by $1,860
to $50,303, its lowest level since 1997. These figures are particularly
grim because they come after the disappointing record of the 2001-2007
expansion.

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s
premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on
fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income
families and individuals. The Center conducts research and analysis to
help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to
help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families
and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to
alleviate poverty.

---

New 2008 poverty, income data reveal only tip of the recession iceberg
http://www.epi.org/publications/entry/income_picture_20090910/
By Heidi Shierholz
September 10, 2009
(...) While the 3.6% decline in median income in 2008 was the largest
one-year decline on record (since 1967) and the increase in poverty was
the largest one-year increase in poverty since 1991, an important thing
to keep in mind about today's data release is that it captures only a
small portion of the deterioration in the economy up to this point in
the recession.

Source:
Economic Policy Institute
http://www.epi.org/
The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit Washington D.C. think tank,
was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to
include the interests of low- and middle-income workers. Today, with
global competition expanding, wage inequality rising, and the methods
and nature of work changing in fundamental ways, it is as crucial as
ever that people who work for a living have a voice in the economic
discourse.

---

Declining health care coverage: the worst is yet to come
http://www.epi.org/analysis_and_opinion/entry/declining_health_care_coverage_the_worst_is_yet_to_come/

By Elise Gould
September 8, 2009
On Thursday, September 10, the U.S. Census Bureau will release its
annual report on health insurance coverage in 2008. The report includes
the latest numbers on the uninsured and various forms of health
coverage. EPI’s same-day analysis of this report will highlight trends
in employer-sponsored health insurance, including valuable
state-by-state coverage rates

Source:
Economic Policy Institute
http://www.epi.org/
The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit Washington D.C. think tank,
was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to
include the interests of low- and middle-income workers. Today, with
global competition expanding, wage inequality rising, and the methods
and nature of work changing in fundamental ways, it is as crucial as
ever that people who work for a living have a voice in the economic
discourse.

---

Stimulus Keeping 6 Million Americans Out Of Poverty In 2009, Estimates Show
by Arloc Sherman
September 9, 2009
“This analysis, which comes one day before the Census Bureau will
release updated poverty figures (for 2008), examines seven of the
recovery act’s provisions — two improvements in unemployment insurance,
three tax credits for working families, an increase in food stamps, and
a one-time payment for retirees, veterans, and people with disabilities
— and finds that they alone are preventing more than 6 million Americans
from falling below the poverty line and are reducing the severity of
poverty for 33 million more. The analysis includes state-specific
estimates for California, Texas, Florida, New York, and Illinois.”

View the full statement:
HTML
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2910
PDF
http://www.cbpp.org/files/9-9-09pov2.pdf

Source:
- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J)
Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm


************************************************************************
13. A new poverty measure for the U.S.? - August 25
(Center for American Progress)
************************************************************************


>From the Center for American Progress
http://www.americanprogress.org/

It’s Time for a Better Poverty Measure
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/08/new_poverty_measure.html
By Mark Greenberg
August 25, 2009
The federal poverty measure shapes our understanding of how many people
are in poverty, who is in poverty, and how much poverty goes up or down
when economic conditions and policies change. But the official measure
is deeply flawed. The dollar figures used to determine if families are
in poverty are low and in many ways arbitrary. The rules don’t consider
some resources, such as tax credits and food stamps, and some key family
expenses that determine a family’s available income. As a result, the
poverty measure often doesn’t show the impacts of important policies
that are intended to improve the economic well-being of families. It
needs to be updated and improved.
[Mark Greenberg is Executive Director of the Georgetown Center on
Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy:
http://change.gov/open_government/entry/georgetown_center_on_poverty_inequality_and_public_policy/]

- recommended reading!

>From an anonymous contributor:
In addition to summarizing the 1995 poverty measurement recommendations
of the Panel appointed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the
Greenberg paper includes a section on “Strengths, weaknesses, and issues
in the NAS approach.” In addition to summarizing the Measuring American
Poverty Act of 2009 (recently proposed legislation), the paper includes
a brief section on “Evaluating the MAP [Measuring American Poverty] Act
approach.”

The last two sentences of the paper read: “In many respects the best
result would be [Obama A]dministration action [rather than Congressional
action], so that the [new poverty] measure could be developed and
continually refined without locking in the detailed rules contained in
parts of the MAP Act. Still, the introduction of the MAP Act is an
important step forward in showing how the administration or Congress can
build on the recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences and the
subsequent learning and experience to develop a significantly better
poverty measure and lay the groundwork for a Decent Living Standard.”
[The MAP Act would direct the National Academy of Sciences--presumably
through an appointed panel--to develop and publish a method of
calculating a Decent Living Standard threshold generally similar to
basic needs budgets and the Self-Sufficiency Standard, and higher than
the proposed new NAS-based poverty measure.]

---
Also by Mark Greenberg:

Implications of a New Poverty Measure for Program Funding Formulas and
Benefits Eligibility
Prepared for the Brookings/Census Bureau Conference on Improved Poverty
Measurement
August 25, 2009
Dozens of federal and state programs use the poverty measurement as part
of the formula to determine who should receive services.
(...) In any effort to develop an improved poverty measure for the
United States, questions arise to how a new measure might affect
allocation of federal funds to states and localities, and eligibility
for and benefit amounts under federal means-tested programs. The
recently filed Measuring American Poverty (MAP) Act, H. R. 2909 directs
the adoption of a “modern” poverty measure drawing from recommendations
of the National Academy of Sciences.

Summary of the report (HTML)
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/08/poverty_measurement.html

Complete report (PDF - 206K, 13 pages)
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/08/pdf/poverty_measurement.pdf
July 29, 2009

Source:
Center for American Progress
http://www.americanprogress.org/
The Center for American Progress is a think tank dedicated to improving
the lives of Americans through ideas and action. We combine bold policy
ideas with a modern communications platform to help shape the national
debate, expose the hollowness of conservative governing philosophy, and
challenge the media to cover the issues that truly matter.

---

Also from the Center:

>From Poverty to Prosperity: A National Strategy to Cut Poverty in Half
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2007/04/poverty_report.html
By The Center for American Progress Task Force on Poverty
April 25, 2007

---

NOTE: for 500+ links to resources on the subject of poverty measurement
in the U.S.,
go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm


************************************************************************
14. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF):
Eighth Annual Report to Congress - June 2009
(Department of Health and Human Services)
************************************************************************


In Canada, the federal government contributes towards the cost of
provincial/territorial welfare programs under the Canada Social Transfer
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fedprov/cst-eng.asp.
In the U.S., the federal government contributes towards the cost of
state programs providing time-limited financial assistance to families
with children* under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/tanf/about.html.
Each year, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (responsible
for the administering of the federal contributions) submits two
extensive reports to Congress.
The latest HHS report on TANF was presented to Congress in June 2009
(see the links below). A bit further down, you'll find a link to Welfare
Dependence in the U.S., the second report that's required annually, by law.
[Now, THAT's accountability.]
Keep scrolling down this page for the latest Canadian government report
tabled in Parliament about federal contributions to provincial welfare
costs in Canada.
---
*NOTE: I used the expression "time-limited financial assistance to
families with children"
in the above blurb because state programs under TANF are NOT comparable
to Canadian social assistance programs on a number of levels, explained
below.

---

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) :
Eighth Annual Report to Congress
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/data-reports/annualreport8/ar8index.htm
June 2009
[incl. links to all chapters and appendices in the report in HTML and
PDF formats]
This report describes the characteristics and financial circumstances of
TANF recipients and presents information regarding TANF caseloads and
expenditures, work participation and earnings, High Performance Bonus
awards, child support collections, two-parent family formation and
maintenance activities, out-of-wedlock births, child poverty,
characteristics and financial circumstances of TANF recipients, Tribal
TANF, specific Provisions of State Programs, TANF Research and
Evaluation and state profiles.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) :
Eighth Annual Report to Congress
June 2009
Complete report (incl. Appendix) (PDF file - 6.2MB, 728 pages)
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/data-reports/annualreport7/TANF_7th_Report_Final_101006.pdf


Executive Summary (HTML)
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/data-reports/annualreport8/chapter00/chap00.htm

Table of contents (HTML)
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/data-reports/annualreport8/ar8index.htm
- links to each chapter

Current and Earlier
Annual Reports to Congress (back to 1998)
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/data-reports/index.htm

NOTE:
This report provides detailed information and tables on the following
aspects of welfare for able-bodied families with children* in America :
Caseload - Expenditures and Balances - Work Participation Rates - Work
and Earnings - High Performance Bonus - Child Support Collections -
Formation and Maintenance of Married Two-Parent Families -
Out-of-Wedlock Births - Child Poverty and TANF - Characteristics and
Financial Circumstances of TANF Recipients - Tribal Temporary Assistance
for Needy Families and Native Employment Works - Specific Provisions of
State Programs - TANF Research and Evaluation - State Profiles

Source:
Administration for Children and Families
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/

[ Department of Health and Human Services
http://www.dhhs.gov/ ]

-----------------------------------------------

* NOTE: CANADIAN AND AMERICAN
WELFARE SYSTEMS SHOULD NOT BE COMPARED:
The expression "welfare for able-bodied families with children" in the
above description is a caveat for social researchers who might be
tempted to compare U.S. state welfare programs under TANF and the
Canadian welfare system as if they were equal.

They are not.

In the U.S., people with disabilities needing financial assistance must
apply for assistance from the federal Social Security Disability
program. In Canada, we have the contribution-based Canada Pension Plan
Disability Benefit:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/isp/pub/cpp/disability/guide/sectiona.shtml
...but provincial-territorial welfare programs also provide needs-tested
assistance to people with disabilities - who currently make up about
35-40% of the national welfare caseload. The "with children" part of the
expression above refers to the fact that in the U.S., there is not one
able-bodied single childless adult in receipt of state assistance under
TANF. In Canada, childless single people account for around 50% of the
total welfare caseload across the country --- but many of those singles
are people with disabilities.

In 2006, child-only cases represented 47.2% percent of the total TANF
caseload
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/data-reports/annualreport8/chapter01/chap01.htm#1

Of these child-only cases, over half were children living with a
caretaker relative with sufficient income not to receive assistance,
one-fifth were families with a disabled parent receiving Supplemental
Security Income, and a similar number were families in which the parent
was ineligible for TANF because of his or her citizenship status. In the
Canadian welfare system, "child-only" cases make up a very small
proportion of the total welfare caseload --- a child-only case exists
where a child at risk is taken into custody by the government and placed
with an informal caregiver, usually a relative and usually on a
temporary basis.

There are other aspects of the two countries' programs of last resort
that differ from one another. If you want more information on the two
systems, this TANF report and the links below to related info will give
you more detailed info on the American welfare system; for Canadian
welfare info, try the Canadian Social Research Links Welfare and Welfare
Reforms in Canada page as a starting point:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welref.htm

...or Social Assistance in Canada, 1994
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/publications/reports/1996-000047/page00.shtml

(an oldie moldie look at welfare in Canada in 1994 that offers some
insights into how welfare works today in Canada).

U.S. and Canadian welfare systems should NOT be compared without
situating each within its social policy context.

************************************************************************

Complementary report from Human Services Policy
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/index.shtml
(also part of the Dept. of Health and Human Services):

Welfare Dependence in the U.S.
(Posted March 9, 2009)

Indicators of Welfare Dependence: Annual Report to Congress, 2008
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/indicators08/index.shtml
December 2008
The Welfare Indicators Act of 1994 requires the Department of Health and
Human Services to prepare annual reports to Congress on indicators and
predictors of welfare dependence. The 2008 Indicators of Welfare
Dependence, the eleventh annual report, provides welfare dependence
indicators through 2005, reflecting changes that have taken place since
enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity
Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in August 1996. As directed by the Welfare
Indicators Act, the report focuses on benefits under the Temporary
Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, formerly the Aid to
Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program; the Food Stamp Program;
and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. (...) Finally, the
report has four appendices that provide additional data on major welfare
programs, alternative measures of dependence and nonmarital births, as
well as background information on several data and technical issues.

[Source: Executive Summary
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/indicators08/execsum.shtml]

Complete report:
* HTML Version
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/indicators08/index.shtml

* PDF Version (674K, 157 pages)
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/indicators08/report.pdf

- Indicators of Dependence include : Degree of Dependence - Receipt of
Means-Tested Assistance and Labor Force Attachment - Rates of Receipt of
Means-Tested Assistance - Rates of Participation in Means-Tested
Assistance Programs - Multiple Program Receipt - Dependence Transitions
- Program Spell Duration - Welfare Spell Duration with No Labor Force
Attachment - Long-Term Receipt - Events Associated with the Beginning
and Ending of Program Spells

- includes longitudinal and current caseload and expenditure data for
Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and Temporary Assistance
for Needy Families (TANF), the Food Stamp Program and Supplemental
Security Income (SSI). In addition, you'll find dozens of tables and
charts showing predictors and risk factors associated with welfare
receipt, such as : Poverty Rates - Deep Poverty Rates - Experimental
Poverty Measures - Poverty Spells - Child Support - Food Insecurity -
Lack of Health Insurance - Labor Force Attachment - Employment among the
Low-Skilled - Earnings of Low-Skilled Workers - Educational Attainment -
High School Dropout Rates - Adult Alcohol and Substance Abuse - Adult
and Child Disability - Births to Unmarried Women/Teens - much more...

Program Data
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/indicators08/apa.shtml
**Excellent resource for qualitative AND quantitative information!
Detailed program description and information (historical and current),
recent changes, and statistics for:
* Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Aid to Families
with Dependent Children (AFDC)
* Food Stamp Program
* Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

Earlier annual reports - back to 1997
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/indicators-rtc/index.shtml

Source:
Human Services Policy (HSP)
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/index.shtml

Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE)
http://aspe.hhs.gov/

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
http://www.hhs.gov

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

************************************************************************


Canadian federal government reports tabled in Parliament
about federal contributions to provincial/territorial welfare programs:

NONE.

ZILCH.

NADA.

NYET.

In the old days (under the Canada Assistance Plan or "CAP" from 1966 to
1996), the federal government actually gave a shit about helping people
in need AND about government accountability for program dollars. The
federal Department of Health and Welfare was required by law to table,
in the House of Commons, an annual report on the operation of provincial
and territorial welfare programs and social services in Canada, in the
same manner as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services presents
annual reports on TANF and welfare dependence to Congress.

In April 1996, a block fund called the Canada Health and Social Transfer
(CHST) replaced CAP's 50-50 cost-sharing as the statutory mechanism for
determining federal contributions to provincial/territorial welfare
programs.
[ See A History of the Health and Social Transfers:
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fedprov/his-eng.asp]

Neither the CHST nor its successor, the Canada Social Transfer (since
April 2004), contain rules regarding the production of reports about
welfare for tabling and discussion in the Parliament of Canada. In fact,
the last national public report about welfare in Canada that was tabled
and discussed in the House of Commons was the final CAP Annual Report
for 1995-96. In my view, that's not much accountability for a program of
this magnitude. The CST will cost the Canadian taxpayer almost $11
billion in 2009-10 [ http://www.fin.gc.ca/fedprov/cst-eng.asp ] in cash
transfers alone, all without any debate or even discussion in the House
of Commons.

Because the CST is a block fund, and because it covers post-secondary
education, early learning and childcare as well as welfare and social
services, it's no longer possible to calculate how much each province
and territory receives annually from Ottawa specifically earmarked for
welfare. That's why you won't see any Canadian equivalent to Indicators
of Welfare Dependence: Annual Report to Congress in the near future.
That, and the fact that there doesn't appear to be any political will by
the ruling federal party to support provincial-territorial programs of
last resort at this time.

NOTE: For links to more info about the Canada Assistance Plan, the CHST
and the CST, see:
Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada
Social Transfer Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

Related reading from Finance Canada:

Federal Transfers to Provinces and Territories
http://www.fin.gc.ca/access/fedprov-eng.asp
- updated to January 2009
...everything you ever wanted to know about federal transfers.
(or what the Department of Finance wants you to know about federal
transfers)


************************************************************************
15. President Obama's Speech to the Joint Session of Congress
on Health Care Reform - September 9
************************************************************************


Transcript of President Obama's
Speech to the Joint Session of Congress
http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/09/09/obama.health.care.transcript/index.html
September 9, 2009
"(...) I will not accept the status quo as a solution. Not this time;
not now. Everyone in this room knows what will happen if we do nothing.
Our deficit will grow. More families will go bankrupt. More businesses
will close. More Americans will lose their coverage when they are sick
and need it the most. And more will die as a result. We know these
things to be true."

Source:
CNN News
http://www.cnn.com/

Related link:

“Now is the Season for Action”:
Some Thoughts on President Obama’s
Speech to the Joint Session of Congress
http://wellesleyinstitute.com/now-season-action-some-thoughts-president-obama-s-speech-joint-session-congress

September 10, 2009
By Matt Kanter
"(...) All in all, it was a very effective speech and, predictably, poll
numbers today have indicated that the President and his plan are more
popular. It remains to be seen whether the speech "bump" can be
sustained in the long-term to get meaningful reform passed. There are
also several critical issues that still do need to be "ironed out" as
the President said. Judging by the raucous town hall meetings over the
August recess, while there may be agreement on 80 percent of the issues,
finding acceptable bi-partisan solutions to the remaining 20 percent may
still prove to be impossible."

Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
http://wellesleyinstitute.com/blog/

[ The Wellesley Institute
http://wellesleyinstitute.com/ ]


************************************************************************
16. Australian Policy Online
************************************************************************


Australian Policy Online (APO)
http://www.apo.org.au/
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public
policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks,
government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion
and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the
policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO
http://apo.org.au/about/about-apo ]

NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular
downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the
downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
http://apo.org.au/social-policy/147
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender &
sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion &
faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm


************************************************************************
17. CRINMAIL - September 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)
************************************************************************


>From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://www.crin.org/

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

10 September 2009 - CRINMAIL 1107
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail.asp?crinmailID=3179
* IRAN: EU urges Iran to halt executions of minors [news]
* REPORT: Children Need Dads Too - Children with fathers in prison
[publication]
* GREAT LAKES REGION: New human rights observatory [news]
* EL SALVADOR: Probe for missing children [news]
* MALAYSIA: Loggers raped Borneo girls [news]
* INDIA: Children and Governance - Holding the State Accountable
[publication]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

8 September 2009 - CRINMAIL 1106
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail.asp?crinmailID=3178
* CANADA: Top court to review detainee repatriation order [news]
* CHINESE: A-Z of Child Rights [publication]
* UNITED KINGDOM: Young offenders are being held in 'dungeons', says
child jail report [publication]
* ARGENTINA: Pan-American Civil Society Forum [event report]
* CAMPAIGN: The future of children's rights - in whose hands? [campaign
update]
* EMPLOYMENT: Executive Director of Defence for Children - International
[job posting]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

---

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_archive.asp?productID=2&PageTitle=Crinmail%2BArchive%2B-%2BCRINMAIL%20English

- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special
editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the
Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of
the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
(incl. subscription info)

[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://www.crin.org/ ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


************************************************************************
************************************************************************
************************************************************************


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social
Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and
for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer,
my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting
service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using
software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees
(CUPE) http://www.cupe.ca/.
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the
Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail
message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text
(no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid
security problems with government departments, universities and other
networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for
people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any
purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any
junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to
different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research
Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish,
but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


***********************************************

SECURITY / MEDICAL EMERGENCY TIP:
SLEEP WITH YOUR CAR KEYS!

***********************************************


(This tip obviously applies to cars that come equipped
with remote-type keys that unlock the vehicle or start it.)

Put your car keys beside your bed at night.

If you hear a noise outside your home or someone trying to get in your
house, just press the panic button for your car.
The alarm will be set off, and the horn will continue to sound until
either you turn it off or the car battery dies.

Your car key fob is a free security alarm system that requires no
installation. Test it in different rooms in the house - it should
activate the horn from anywhere inside your house if you park in your
driveway or garage. If your car alarm goes off when someone is trying to
break into your house, odds are the burglar/rapist won't stick around.
And remember to carry your keys while walking to your car in a parking
lot. The alarm can work the same way there, provided you're close enough
to your car.

The remote is small enough that it can easily be carried around during
the day by seniors fearful of a medical crisis (heart attack, fall,
etc.) or people with reduced mobility in any emergency, as long as
they're within range of their vehicle...

Source:
Forwarded by
my 87-year-old uncle from Cornwall (ON)


---

And, in closing...

---


Bing vs Google
http://www.bing-vs-google.com/
Can't choose default search engine? Want to compare Bing & Google results?
This is the right place to be. Just put your query in the search box and
press Enter. You'll see results from both engines side by side.
Search provider for Internet Explorer 7/8 and Firefox is also available
- search both engines from your browser!

***

CometDocs
Free Online File Converter
http://www.cometdocs.com/

***

50 things that are being killed by the internet
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/6133903/50-things-that-are-being-killed-by-the-internet.html


***

Internet Detective
http://www.vts.intute.ac.uk/detective/index.html


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