Canadian Social Research Newsletter Logo
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 13, 2005

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter, a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1530 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. What's New from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:
--- Taking the Spin Out of the Economic and Fiscal Update
- November 11
---- The Vanishing Efficiency Gains of Debt Repayment - November 9

2. Remembrance Day - November 11
3. Employment Insurance Premium Reduction for 2006 (Finance Canada) - November 10
4. Recommitting to the Miracle of Canada (Speech by Roy Romanow to the Council of Canadians - November 4
5. Lit review and bibliography on Aboriginal child welfare in Canada (First Nations Research Site) - summer 2005

6.
Alternatives North (Northwest Territories )
7.
What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit ( University of Toronto) - November 11

International Content

8. Poverty Dispatch Digest : U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- November 10
9. New from the Center for Law and Social Policy - CLASP (Washington):
---
House Cuts to Foster Care Funding Would Jeopardize Children Living With Grandparents and Other Relatives - November 9
--- Families Will Lose Child Care Assistance under Ways and Means Committee Welfare Reauthorization Bill - November 1
--- CLASP Federal Budget and Tax Policy Page


Have a great  week!
gs

Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. What's New from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:
--- Taking the Spin Out of the Economic and Fiscal Update
- November 11
----
The Vanishing Efficiency Gains of Debt Repayment - November 9

Recent releases from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:
[ Alternative Federal Budgets ]

Alternative Federal Budget decodes the spin, provides a guide to the Economic and Fiscal Update
Press Release
November 11, 2005
OTTAWA—Monday’s Economic and Fiscal Update is animated more by politics than economics. In the present political circumstances the temptation for the Liberals to massage their financial disclosures in a manner consistent with their pre-election strategy is great. A new report, released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, provides Canadians with tools to decode the spin. Authored by CCPA Senior Economist Ellen Russell, the report helps journalists and others examine the plausibility of the government’s numbers by providing:
* an assessment of how big the current year’s surplus should be;
* an indication of budget surpluses for future years;
* pointers on how to tell whether the government is spending as much as it seems to be;
* a reality check for the plausibility of revenue and expenditure estimates.

Complete report:

Taking the Spin Out of the Economic and Fiscal Update: A Guide to the Numbers - PDF File (118K - 8 pages)
November 2005

---------------

Debt repayment arguments don’t add up—report
Press Release
November 9, 2005
"OTTAWA—A new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives finds that, contrary to popular belief, it does not make economic sense for the Canadian government to pay down the national debt. The study, by Tony Myatt and Joe Ruggeri of the University of New Brunswick, examines the assertion by many economists that lowering the debt-to-GDP ratio will have a substantial positive effect on the standard of living. The consensus estimate is that permanently reducing the debt-to-GDP ratio from 80% to zero would raise the long-run level of consumption by around 8%. However, Myatt and Ruggeri argue that these estimates cannot be used to justify using budget surpluses to pay down the debt because balanced budgets alone are sufficient to shrink the debt-to-GDP ratio—even without debt repayment. Debt repayment simply speeds up the automatic rate of decline in this ratio by a few years."

Complete report:

The Vanishing Efficiency Gains of Debt Repayment - PDF File (209K, 22 pages)
November 2005

- Go to the Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm

2. Remembrance Day - November 11

The Poppy Campaign
(including "In Flanders Field")
Source:
Royal Canadian Legion

-----

From Veterans Affairs Canada:

Veterans' Week
November 5-11, 2005


Year of the Veteran - 2005

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the General Federal Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fed2.htm

3. Employment Insurance Premium Reduction for 2006 - November 10
(Finance Canada)

Government Welcomes Employment Insurance Premium Reduction for 2006
News Release
November 10, 2005
"Minister of Finance Ralph Goodale and Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Belinda Stronach are pleased with the Employment Insurance (EI) Commission’s setting of the EI premium rate at $1.87 for 2006, a reduction from its current level of $1.95 per $100 of insurable earnings."

Source:
Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

4. Recommitting to the Miracle of Canada (Speech) - November 4
Roy Romanow - Council of Canadians

“Recommitting to the Miracle of Canada” (PDF file - 40K 14 pages)
Time to unleash Canada's "miracle potential", says Roy Romanow
Hon. Roy J. Romanow, P.C., O.C., Q.C.
On the Occasion of the 20th Anniversary of the
Council of Canadians
Ottawa, ON
November 4, 2005
"It's time to dream big about how we will shape the future of Canada, said Roy Romanow in a speech marking the 20th anniversary of the Council of Canadians. 'Canada is a nation with miracle potential. It is a nation that needs to be put back on track. We must get back to that Canadian balance between the individual and community, between nation and enterprise,' said Romanow. A sense of a shared destiny has nurtured Canada's legacy of fairness for its people, diversity, civility, respect, and the pursuit of peace. But today this legacy seems in jeopardy as the gap between rich and poor grows, Canada's medicare system calls out for reform, and major challenges face us in terms of a cleaner environment and the improvement of life prospects for Aboriginal peoples."

Related Links:

Council of Canadians
Atkinson Charitable Foundation

- Go to the Medicare Debate Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/medicare.htm

5. Lit review and bibliography on Aboriginal child welfare in Canada - summer 2005
(First Nations Research Site)

A Literature Review and Annotated Bibliography
on Aspects of Aboriginal Child Welfare in Canada
(PDF file - 2.8MB, 254 pages)
Second Edition - 2005 (File dated June 2005)
By Marlyn Bennett, Cindy Blackstock and Richard De La Ronde
"This comprehensive and user friendly literature review and annotated bibliography has been prepared at the request of the First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada as part of the research activities undertaken by the First Nations Research Site as noted in its 2002 Work Plan to the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare. It was designed to incorporate research and articles from all disciplines relevant to Aboriginal children, youth and the well being of the Aboriginal family. This literature review includes many unpublished papers, program descriptions and reports produced by, or for, Aboriginal Child Welfare agencies, as well as resources from many provincial, state, and federal governments in Canada and the United States. In addition, this review includes a consideration of some of the research conducted and produced by Masters and Doctoral students within Canada in relation to matters that touch on child welfare and/or social related issues benefiting or impacting on all aspects and well-being of Aboriginal children, families and communities."
Source:
The First Nations Research Site of the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare and
The First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada (FNCFCS)

Also from FNCFCS:

Fall 2005 Newsletter (PDF file - 1.9MB, 4 pages)
Second Edition of the First Peoples Child and Family Review - National Policy Review Phase Two Research Project Update - United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples: Promoting Indigenous Child Rights

Related Link:

Aboriginal Children’s Circle of Early Learning (ACCEL) "is a fully-functioning bilingual, web portal clearinghouse on Aboriginal early childhood development (ECD). You can consult the site to review, research and discuss best and promising practices; to exchange with a highly engaged network of Aboriginal ECD practitioners and researchers; and to keep in touch with the emerging needs of communities across Canada. (...) The ACCEL is being developed by and for Aboriginal communities in partnership by two national non-profit organizations –the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society (FNCFCS) and the Canadian Child Care Federation (CCCF)."

- Go to the First Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

6. Alternatives North (Northwest Territories )

Alternatives North
"Alternatives North is a social justice coalition operating in the Northwest Territories. Within our ranks are representatives of churches, labour unions, environmental organizations, women and family advocates and anti-poverty groups."
- incl. links to the following content:
Daycare - Northern Strategy - Energy Strategy for the NWT

- Go to the Northwest Territories Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ntbkmrk.htm

7. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - November 11
( University of Toronto)


What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is content from the most recent issue of the notifier.

11-Nov-05

---------------------------------------------------
WHAT’S NEW
---------------------------------------------------

>> Seeing the future: An answer to questions of integration
by Susan Colley
Paper from the Integration Network Project’s recent Unhurried Day symposium provides a vision of what a reformed system for early learning and care might look like.

>> The real issues in the Théberge reform
Fact sheet from the Association québécoise des centres de petites enfance discusses the significance of Quebec’s Bill 124; warns of “disastrous consequences” for accessibility, universality and quality.

>> For the next seven generations: Early learning and child care
programs for children in First Nations and Inuit communities
Report from the BC Aboriginal Child Care Society provides a summary of an Assembly of First Nations consultation with the BC First Nations community about ELCC.

>> $2.7 million to support expansion or building of new child care centres for the first time
Press release from the Government of Manitoba announces new capital funding.

---------------------------------------------------
CHILD CARE IN THE NEWS
---------------------------------------------------

>> The struggle to juggle [IE]
Irish Examiner, 10 Nov 05
Features an interview with Margaret Fine-Davis, Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies at Trinity College Dublin and Director of the Work-Life Balance Project, under the EU EQUAL Initiative.

>> Federal cash won’t go straight to daycare [CA-QC]
Montreal Gazette, 10 Nov 05
The $1.1 billion Quebec will get as its share of a federal daycare funding promise will not go into daycare. Helene Potvin, president of the Association quebecoise des centres de petites enfance, said yesterday the money will go into the provincial government's bank account, known as the consolidated revenue fund.

>> Dryden fears vote may harm child care plan [CA]
London Free Press, 9 Nov 05
The Liberals' nationwide child care plan is in jeopardy if the teetering minority government is toppled, Social Development Minister Ken Dryden has said.

>> Province kicks in cash to improve child care centres [CA-MB]
Brandon Sun, 8 Nov 05
The province of Manitoba has set up a $2.7-million capital fund program to renovate, expand or build new licensed child care centres.

>> Councils “must ensure child care” [GB]
BBC News, 8 Nov 05
Britain’s Childcare Bill will force councils to fund private provision where there is a gap in the market. The bill, published on Tuesday, also tells child care providers to give a mixture of "integrated care and education from birth".

>> N.S. child care workers among the lowest paid in the country [CA-NS]
Halifax Live, 31 Oct 05
Child care workers in Nova Scotia are not only among the lowest paid in the country, they have higher than average levels of training, CUPE National Researcher Margot Young told a forum in Halifax entitled, "Women, Work and Care: Policy at the Crossroads.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This message was forwarded through the Childcare Resource
and Research Unit e-mail news notifier. For information on the
CRRU e-mail notifier, including instructions for (un)subscribing,
see http://www.childcarecanada.org

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Related Links:

What's New? - Canadian, U.S. and international resources from Jan 2000 to the present.
Child Care in the News - media articles from January 2000 to the present
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

Also from CRRU:

Towards a national system of early learning and child care
Regularly updated
"(...) On April 29, 2005 the governments of Canada and Manitoba struck an historic Agreement-in-Principle on early learning and child care. This was followed by a similar agreement between the federal government and the province of Saskatchewan. These agreements are the beginning of what is hoped to be a series of strong bilateral agreements between the federal government and the provinces/territories. These historic agreements build on a meeting of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services in November 2004 and a subsequent meeting in February 2005. They (with the exception of Quebec) agreed to shared principles to guide the development of a new national system of early learning and child care."
NOTE: this is a large (and growing) collection that includes government and non-governmental reports, press releases, news articles and other documents dealing with the new federal-provincial-territorial arrangements for early learning and child care in Canada.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

8. Poverty Dispatch Digest :
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- November 10

POVERTY DISPATCH Digest
Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin
This digest offers dozens of new links each week to full-text articles in the U.S. media (mostly daily newspapers) on poverty, poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, and much more...
The Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison offers a free e-mail service that consists of an e-mail message sent to subscribers each Monday and Thursday, containing a dozen or so links to articles dealing with the areas mentioned above. The weekly Canadian Social Research Links Poverty Dispatch Digest is a compilation, available online, of the two dispatch e-mails for that week --- with the kind permission of IRP.

Here's the complete collection of U.S. media articles in this week's Poverty Dispatch Digest:
(click the link above to read all of these articles)

November 10, 2005

Today's subjects include: State Health Insurance Proposals // Social Services Privatization - Houston, TX // Medicaid - Missouri // Food Stamps for Hurricane Wilma Victims - Florida // Child Support Enforcement Cuts - Wisconsin // Series on Mortgage Fraud in Poor Neighborhoods - Chicago // Homeless and Voting Eligibility - Minnesota // Homelessness - Madison, WI, West Virginia

November 7, 2005

Today's subjects include: Preschool and the Working Poor - Opinion // Katrina and Efforts to Fight Poverty - Opinion // Abstinence Education // Welfare Reform - Michigan // Poverty Level - North Carolina // Puzzle of Low-Weight Births - Utah // Poverty and School Meal Programs - Kansas // All-Day Kindergarten - Utah // Help for Older Foster Children - Wisconsin // Effect of Federal Budget Cuts - South Carolina // Medicaid - Michigan // Hospital Discounts for the Uninsured - Iowa // Waiting Period of Low-Income Health Care - Milwaukee County // Inner-City Redevelopment - Milwaukee // Earned Income Tax Credit - Oregon // Heating Assistance - Colorado // Homeless Census - Newburgh, NY

Each of the weekly digests offers dozens of links or more to media articles that are time-sensitive.
The older the link, the more likely it is to either be dead or have moved to an archive - and some archives [but not all] are pay-as-you-go.
[For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH Digest link above]

The Poverty Dispatch weekly digest is a good tool for monitoring what's happening in the U.S.; it's a guide to best practices and lessons learned in America.

Subscribe to the Poverty Dispatch!
Send an e-mail message to John Wolf [ jwolf@ssc.wisc.edu ] to receive a plain text message twice a week with one to two dozen links to media articles with a focus on poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, health, Medicaid from across the U.S.
And it's free...

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH Digest link at the top of this section.
Recently-archived POVERTY DISPATCH weekly digests:

- November 3, 2005
- October 27
- October 20
- October 13
- October 6

POVERTY DISPATCH description/archive - weekly issues back to January 2005, 50+ links per issue
NOTE: this archive is part of the Canadian Social Research Links American Non-Governmental Social Research page.

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

9. New from the Center for Law and Social Policy (Washington):
---
House Cuts to Foster Care Funding Would Jeopardize Children Living With Grandparents and Other Relatives - November 9
---
Families Will Lose Child Care Assistance under Ways and Means Committee Welfare Reauthorization Bill - November 1
---
CLASP Federal Budget and Tax Policy Page

New from the Center for Law and Social Policy:

House Cuts to Foster Care Funding Would Jeopardize Children
Living With Grandparents and Other Relatives (PDF file - 43K, 5 pages)
November 9, 2005
"The House of Representatives is considering budget reconciliation legislation that would decrease federally funded foster care services by $577 million over five years and $1.3 billion over ten years. This brief examines the provisions, which, if implemented, would discourage the placement of abused and neglected children with grandparents and other relatives, impede efforts to reunify children with their parents, and make it more difficult to provide critical services to children and families."

Families Will Lose Child Care Assistance under Ways and Means Committee Welfare Reauthorization Bill (PDF file - 36K, 4 pages)
November 1, 2005
"The House Ways and Means Committee’s budget reconciliation bill includes provisions to reauthorize the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Even as the bill increases families’ work requirements—and thus, the need for child care—it provides only $500 million in new child care funding over five years, despite Congressional Budget Office estimates that keeping pace with inflation will cost $4.8 billion over five years. If enacted, this bill would force states to cut child care assistance for low-income working families over the coming years."

CLASP Federal Budget and Tax Policy Page
"For quick links to these and other CLASP analyses, as well as comprehensive background materials and resources from partner organizations and coalitions, visit the CLASP federal budget and tax policy page."

Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)
"The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) is a national non-profit that works to improve the lives of low-income people. CLASP’s mission is to improve the economic security, educational and workforce prospects, and family stability of low-income parents, children, and youth and to secure equal justice for all."

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm



Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page and submit your coordinates:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to include a link back to the home page of Canadian Social Research Links.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

----------------------------------------------------

YOU KNOW YOU ARE LIVING IN 2005 when...


1. You absent-mindedly enter your password on the microwave touchpad.

2. You haven't played solitaire with real cards in years.

3. You have a list of 15 ways to reach your family of 3 people.

4. You e-mail the person who works at the desk next to you.
At home, you e-mail your daughter in her bedroom to call her downstairs for dinner.

5. Your reason for not staying in touch with friends and family is that they don't have e-mail addresses.

6. You pull up in your own driveway and use your cell phone to see if anyone is home to help you carry in the groceries.

7. Every commercial on television has a web site at the bottom of the screen.

8. Leaving the house without your cell phone, which you didn't have the first 20 or 30 years of your life,
is now a cause for panic and you turn around to go and get it.

9. You check your e-mail before getting your morning coffee.

10. You start tilting your head sideways to smile (:-)

Source:
John, who probably found it here:
http://www.blifaloo.com/daily/2005/10/29/you-know-youre-living-in-2005-when/

----------------------------------------------------

Some personal closing thoughts:



1. For Cat-lovers only:
For those of you who know the person behind the links (moi), and for those who have visited every nook and cranny
 of the Canadian Social Research website including the kitties page - http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal/
it is with great sorrow that I must announce the passing last Monday of a great buddy of mine, Max the cat.
I haven't yet updated the kitties page yet to reflect his untimely departure; he was diagnosed as having the feline equivalent
to congestive heart failure, and he went quickly, in less than a week...
He was a good little buddy, and he'll be missed.
Please give your kitty an extra hug from me.



2. Today - November 13, 2005 - marks the eighth anniversary of the launch of Canadian Social Research Links website.
I started the site as a way to share my bookmarks with colleagues and friends in the "social research business":
other people in government, academics and non-governmental sector folks. I've since left the civil service,
taking an early pension to work from home on this labour of love of mine.

Cost of this service to the Canadian taxpayer?
Zero.
Nothing.
I pay for my equipment, my software, my web hosting and my Internet connection all by myself.

On the other hand, Human Resources Development Canada, t
he federal department where I worked [in social program information] until 2003 just before retiring,
was split into two "new" departments on December 12, 2003 --- Social Development Canada and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.
As of today, almost two years later, the two "new" departments still don't have their own distinct identity on the Web.

Check the content of the "Programs and Services" link for both the SDC and HRSDC websites:

SDC Programs and Services
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/ps.shtml

HRSDC Programs and Services
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/top_nav/ps.shtml

===> it's the exact same list for both departments --- can this be a good thing for ministerial responsibility and accountability???
(HINT: you have to click "About SDC" or "About HRSDC" in the box at the top of each page to see exactly what their respective mandates are.)

Cost of this service to the Canadian taxpayer?
Don't ask.

Suggestion:
Maybe SDC should consider outsourcing their websites.
For that matter, by extrapolation, if the rest of the federal government is as efficient as SDC in producing clear and current information,
perhaps the feds should get out of the website business altogether and turn it over to people who can make it work like it should.
[end of rant]