Canadian Social Research Links logo 
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
June 14, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2043 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. Recession Relief Fund Coalition - June 10
2. Statement of G8 Finance Ministers (Finance Canada) - June 13
3. It’s time to raise your voice for affordable housing! (Housing Network of Ontario) - June 12
4. Canada’s non-profit maze: A scan of legislation and regulation impacting revenue generation in the non-profit sector (Wellesley Institute) - May 2009
5. Summer Reading List 2009:
--- Parliamentary Committee study: The Federal Contribution to Reducing Poverty in Canada (Feb.- Jun. 2009)
--- Making Sense Out Of Dollars, 2007-2008 - Federal Government Revenues, Expenditures, Deficits and Surpluses from 1994-1995 to 2007-2008
6. [Ottawa] From Homeless to Home Project (Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa) - June 2009
7. Canadian Index of Wellbeing : First Report of the Institute of Wellbeing - June 10
8. The Economic Well-Being of Canadians: Is there a Growing Gap? (Chris Sarlo, Fraser Institute) - May 2009
9. Nova Scotia voters elect NDP Majority (Election 2009) - June 9
10. [ Ontario ] ISAC UPDATE - April 2009 (Income Security Advocacy Centre)
11. Canada to UN: We'll decide what rights we will choose to observe... (Wellesley Institute Blog) - June 8
12. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
--- Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds) - June 11
--- Study: A National Accounts perspective on recent financial events, 2008 - June 11
--- Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating, 2007 - June 8
--- Pension plans in Canada as of January 2008 - June 8
13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - June 14

International content

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
15. Australian Policy Online
16. CRINMAIL - (Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)


Have a great week!

Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Recession Relief Fund Coalition - June 10

Recession Relief Fund Coalition - website launched June 10, 2009
The Recession Relief Fund Coalition was formed by a group of social service agencies, philanthropic organizations, Bay Street Investment Firms and concerned citizens who came together to discuss options for addressing the effects of the recession.

The Recession Relief Fund Coalition is a national organization representing more than 230 organizations across the country that are concerned about the recession’s impact on Canada's most vulnerable people.
We call on the Federal Government to immediately create a Recession Relief Fund which will include:
* preventing spending cuts to public and private not for profit agencies serving vulnerable people including children, youth, families, immigrants, those who are homeless, un/under-employed, senior citizens, people who are disabled and those suffering from mental illness.
* increase funding to all HRSDC (Human Resources and Social Development Canada) and settlement programs, including doubling the existing level of funding being provided through the HPI (Homeless Partnerships Initiatives) program to supplement funding that is projected to be lost from private sector sources and increase funding levels as required.
In addition, we call upon the Federal Government to invest a portion of proposed infrastructure spending on social infrastructure by implementing a fully funded National Housing Program.

Endorse the
Recession Relief Fund Declaration

- read the declaration, then scroll down the page and add your name to the growing list of supporters, including me!

A Call for Recession Relief (PDF - 18K, 2 pages)
Notes by John Stapleton at the launch of the Recession Relief Fund Coalition
June 10 (Revised June 13)
"(...) The federal government owns, controls, administers or funds almost 85% of the income security programs in Canada. To cede social policy and governance respecting poverty to sub-national governments with no reasonable prospect of capacity or success - is either an act of cruelty or fantasy - and most likely both. And with so many unable to access Employment Insurance and with welfare doors often shut, the new stories resemble those we read from the 1930's when neither of these programs were firmly in place.

---

From the website's
Resource Materials page:

This Is What the Recession Looks Like: June 2009 (PDF - 361K, 8 pages)
Research Bulletin #1
- calling for immediate government action on: * Social Assistance Reform * Unemployment Income (EI Reform * Funding for Non-Profit Sector, including Housing and Homelessness Programs
- incl. Key Facts & Trends in this Recession

"The Federal Contribution to Reducing Poverty in Canada"- Presentations
to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development
and the Status of Persons Disabilities (HUMA)

Several Recession Relief Coalition members were invited to make deputations to about “the Federal Contribution to Reducing Poverty in Canada” on June 1st and 2nd in Toronto.
The four next links below are to presentations from that session.

* Combating Poverty, Homelessness and Hunger: Create a Peace Dividend (PDF - 65K, 7 pages)
By Cathy Crowe, Street Nurse and Atkinson Economic Justice Fellow
June 1, 2009
"(...) Canadians need and want a peace dividend that is an investment in people not destr
uction. In the meantime however, this recession further necessitates program spending that will provide emergency recession relief – monies to expand Employment Insurance benefits, bolster provincial social assistance rates, prevent evictions, and expand emergency life saving services such as food and shelter."

* Employment Insurance Reform and Poverty (PDF - 83K, 3 pages)
Submission to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills, Social Development
and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
By the Toronto City Summit Alliance
May 31, 2009 (in connection with appearance on June 2, 2009)

* Brief submitted to the House of Commons
Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and
Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
(PDF - 146K, 7 pages)
June 1, 2009
By John Stapleton
(on behalf of the Atkinson Charitable Foundation)
Topics:
* Federal Government Role in Canada's Social Safety net
* Disparity in responses to poverty and social policy at the Provincial and Territorial level
* Needlessly Prolonging the Recession

* Testimony to the
Standing Committee on Human Resources,
Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
(Word file - 24K, 3 pages)
by John Andras
Co Founder Recession Relief Coalition and Chair of SKETCH
"(...) The need for emergency funding to be made available to the agencies feeding, clothing, sheltering and counseling the victims of the recession is clear and pressing. Governments need to respond to the reality that demand is growing and non-government funding is falling. "

[ Keep scrolling down the page you're now reading
for more links to HUMA submissions and presentations
]

---

Related links:

Recession Relief Coalition:
This is what the recession looks like for Canadians

Jun 11, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
As Canada's federal government is set to release its first major report on its economic initiatives (including the multi-billion dollar economic stimulus package that was part of the January federal budget), the Recession Relief Coalition has released its own report on "what the recession looks like" this morning. The coalition is a broad-based group of more than 260 organizations and 1,100 individuals across Canada.
Some key findings from the coalition's research report:
* the number of single people on Ontario Works (provincial welfare) reached an all-time record of 130,180 in April, 2009
* Ontario's real unemployment rate (the official unemployment rate, plus people who are "discouraged" and have dropped out of the labour market, plus involuntary part-time workers) is now well into the double digits at 13.6% and is a staggering 28% for youth aged 15 to 24.
* Credit Canada (which helps people deal with debt) has had a 42% increase in new clients in the past year.
* Non-profit and community-based programs and services are being over-whelmed with growing demand; foodbanks in Toronto report that a record one million people were forced to line up for food last year.
The Recession Relief Coalition sets out a policy agenda that includes increases to federal and provincial income assistance programs (including welfare and employment insurance); plus increased funding for the non-profit sector, including housing and homelessness programs.
Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ Wellesley Institute ]

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

2. Statement of G8 Finance Ministers - June 13
(Finance Canada)

Statement of G8 Finance Ministers
Lecce, Italy
13 June 2009
"We, the G8 Finance Ministers, remain focused on addressing the ongoing global economic and financial crisis. We have taken forceful and coordinated action to stabilize the financial sector and provide stimulus to restore economic growth. There are signs of stabilization in our economies, including a recovery of stock markets, a decline in interest rate spreads, improved business and consumer confidence, but the situation remains uncertain and significant risks remain to economic and financial stability..."

Source:
Finance Canada

Related link from Finance Canada:

International Activities
- includes several dozen links to news releases, statements, working group reports, etc. from meetings with the following bodies:
*
Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)
* G-7
* G-8
* G-20
* International Monetary Fund (IMF)
* Western Hemisphere Finance Ministers

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Globalization Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/global.htm

3. It’s time to raise your voice for affordable housing!  - June 12
(Housing Network of Ontario)

It’s time to raise your voice for affordable housing!
June 12, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
The Housing Network of Ontario has an on-line hub that is regularly being updated with the latest news, reports from community meetings, tips for actions and plenty of other resources. Here’s some of the new material: Community report from Sault Ste. Marie: Notes from the preparatory meeting of housing leaders in the Soo on June 11; Building from the community up: Five practical tips for action; Homeless-making processes: A worksheet from Dr. David Hulchanski; Local housing audits: Quick tips on preparing housing audit for your community; Fixing Ontario’s affordable housing crisis: A presentation from Harvey Cooper, Co-operative Housing Federation of Canada – Ontario Region.
More than 225 people and groups have already endorsed the Housing Network of Ontario’s on-line declaration: “We believe everyone in Ontario has the right to live poverty-free and with dignity in housing that is stable, adequate, equitably accessible and affordable…" Read the full declaration and add your endorsement on the site. Also on the HNO web site: You can tell your housing story; find plenty of helpful resources; tell us what’s happening in your community and find out what is happening in other places; and learn more about the Housing Network of Ontario.
Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ Wellesley Institute ]

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

4. Canada’s non-profit maze: A scan of legislation and regulation impacting revenue generation in the non-profit sector - May 2009
(Wellesley Institute)

Canada’s non-profit maze:
A scan of legislation and regulation
impacting revenue generation in the non-profit sector
(PDF - 672K, 34 pages)
Lynn Eakin & Heather Graham
May 2009
Canada’s third sector – the vital web of non-profit, charitable and voluntary organizations that provide programs and services, and knit together communities – is also a significant economic force. In recent years, governments have increasingly relied on non-profit groups as the delivery agent of choice for government services. “Canada’s non-profit maze ” is powerful new research by Lynn Eakin and Associates, commissioned by the Wellesley Institute that provides a troubling picture of the financial and regulatory burdens facing the third sector.

Accompanying documents:

A policy perspective on Canada’s non-profit maze of regulatory and legislative barriers
Mapping the way forward for third sector organizations
(PDF - 160K, 5 pages)
Policy Brief
By Lynn Eakin, Heather Graham, Rick Blickstead, and Michael Shapcott
May 2009

Supporting Tables: Canada’s Non-Profit Maze (PDF - 419K, 4 pages)
Tables were generated from software used to survey respondents of the Wellesley
Institute’s research in Third-Sector regulation and legislation

Source:
Wellesley Institute
The Wellesley Institute is a Toronto-based non-profit and non-partisan research and policy institute.
Our focus is on developing research and community-based policy solutions to the problems of urban health and health disparities.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Voluntary Sector Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/voluntary.htm

5. Summer Reading List 2009:
--- Parliamentary Committee study: The Federal Contribution to Reducing Poverty in Canada (Feb.- Jun. 2009)
--- Making Sense Out Of Dollars, 2007-2008 - Federal Government Revenues, Expenditures, Deficits and Surpluses from 1994-1995 to 2007-2008

The two following resources are featured and recommended for your summer reading enjoyment.
The first is a veritable treasure chest of information on how Canada's social programs are holding up during the current economic crisis. HINT : the vultures are circling.
The second, I'm told, is THE motherlode of federal revenue and expenditure information - and from the Department of National Defence, no less.

---

Meetings of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills
and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities ("HUMA")

(40th PARLIAMENT, 2nd SESSION)

Thirty-eight of the 45 meetings listed on the page at the above link deal with the Committee study entitled "Federal Contribution to Reducing Poverty in Canada".
Sadly, there appears to be no index (that I can find) to assist researchers in navigating through the 38 poverty reduction sessions. Unless someone from the Parliamentary website reads this and can send me an index, you'll have to check each session where you see Federal Contribution to Reducing Poverty in Canada under "Studies/Activities". To the right of the text, you'll see two columns - Minutes (containing minimal info, incl. names and affiliations of witnesses) and Evidence. It's the Evidence files that contain all of the presentations by non-governmental organizations and individuals, and I highly recommend the entire collection. If you don't have time to read the hundreds of pages of valuable testimony , I'd suggest that you check at least the Minutes file for each session to see the impressive list of speakers and then select the Evidence file only those sessions that matter more to you or to your group. It would be *nice* if the Parliamentary Library folks could share an index or guide to these sessions...
[ my email address is gilseg@rogers.com ]

Source:
Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills
and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities

[ Parliament of Canada ]

------------------------------------

June 15 Update
- see the new Canadian Social Research Links HUMA Committee links page of this site.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm


Making Sense Out Of Dollars, 2007-2008
"This Financial Information Overview has been prepared by the Director Budget, Defence Economics Research and Analysis. The aim is to provide you with finance-related details that you may find informative and useful to incorporate in presentations, internal and external to your organization. The booklet includes financial and economic information on the Federal Government and National Defence, including comparisons with other countries."
- includes charts showing the following:
* Federal Government Revenues, Expenditures, Deficits and Surpluses from 1994-1995 to 2007-2008
* Trend in Share of Federal Government Revenues from 1994-1995 to 2007-2008
* Trend in Share of Federal Government Expenditures from 1994-1995 to 2007-2008
* Federal Government Spending as a Percentage of GDP from 1994-1995 to 2007-2008
* Federal Government Budgetary Expenditures as a Percentage of Total Expenditures for 1994-1995 and 2007-2008
* Comparison of Federal Government Revenues with Federal Program Expenditures Plus Debt Charges, 2007-2008
* Trend in Annual Federal Deficit and Federal debt (Accumulated Deficit) from 1994-1995 to 2007-2008
* Trend in Federal Government Debt (Accumulated Deficit) from 1994-1995 to 2007-2008
* Trend in Government Spending by Level of Government, 1977 to 2007

[ earlier editions of this resource - 2003-2004 to 2007-2008 ]

Source:
Financial Publications
[ Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance and Corporate Services) ]
[ National Defence and the Canadian Forces ]

Related link:

Estimates of the Government of Canada
- The Estimates and Supplementary Estimates contain information on the spending plans of the Government of Canada. Though primarily intended for members of Parliament, these documents are useful to anyone interested in federal government programs or concerned with financial management and accountability within the government.
Source:
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

- Go to the General Federal Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fed2.htm

6. [Ottawa] From Homeless to Home Project - June 2009
(Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa)

Ottawa:

From Homeless to Home Project
Click the link above for five ways to learn from people who have been homeless in Ottawa and became housed again.
The project brings to life the findings from the Panel Study on Homelessness in Ottawa (see links below)

1. Interviews:
Eleven people share their experience of homelessness in brief 4-5 minute audio-visual interviews.

2. Booklet with Research Highlights
Easy to read highlights help get the word out on how community organizations, governments and people in the community can work together to end homelessness.

3. A Documentary Film : From Homeless to Home
By filmmaker Jason Gondziola

4. Radio Show
A two-part radio documentary about homelessness in Ottawa on CHUO by Heather Gilberds, Communication Studies at Carleton University.

5. Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa, Jan-Dec 2007
Eight of the people interviewed below are also in the Housing WORKS section in the 2007 Report Card, talking about how they found a place to live after being homeless

Related links:

Panel Study on Persons Who Are Homeless in Ottawa:

Phase 2 Results Final Report (PDF - 473K, 67 pages)
By Tim Aubry, Ph.D., Fran Klodawsky, Ph.D., Rebecca Nemiroff, B.A., Sarah Birnie, B.A. & Cristina Bonetta, M.A.
March 2007

Phase 1 Results Final Report (PDF - 378K, 51 pages)
By Tim Aubry, Ph.D., Fran Klodawsky, Ph.D., Rebecca Nemiroff, B.A., Sarah Birnie, B.A. & Cristina Bonetta, M.A.
December 2003 - Revised to November 2006

[ more homelessness reports from the
Alliance to end Homelessness in Ottawa
]

Source:
Alliance to End Homelessness in Ottawa

7. Canadian Index of Wellbeing : First Report of the Institute of Wellbeing - June 10

First Report of the Institute of Wellbeing (PDF - 4.4MB, 41 pages)
June 2009
If you’ve ever wondered how Canadians are REALLY doing, you’re in the right place. This newly released report shows that: even in good economic times the lion’s share of benefits go to the wealthy while the poor stay poor and the shrinking middle class muddles through; Canadians are living longer but not healthier – health among teenagers is especially worrying; but crime is down and social relationships in our communities are stronger. The report also shows that cuts or lack of improvements to government programs like welfare, Employment Insurance and publicly funded medical services are hurting Canadians.

The Canadian Index of Wellbeing will track changes in eight quality of life categories or “domains”.
The following are available online as of June 10, 2009:
* Living Standards - measures the level and distribution of income and wealth, poverty rates, income volatility, and economic security, including the security of jobs, food, housing and the social safety net.
* Healthy Populations - measures the physical and mental wellbeing of the population, life expectancy, behaviours and life circumstances that influence health, health care quality and access, and public health services.
* Community Vitality - measures the strength, activity and inclusiveness of relationships among residents, private sector, public sector and voluntary organizations.
[ Click each of the links above to access an in-depth analytical report, an executive summary, highlights and tables and graphs.]
Reports on the findings from the other five domains will be released as the research is completed over the next year.

Source:
Institute of Wellbeing
The Institute is independent, non-partisan, with a newly forming affiliation with the University of Waterloo, and operates under the leadership of an advisory board of accomplished Canadians and international experts. Its mission is to report on the quality of life of Canadians, and promote a dialogue on how to improve it through evidence-based policies that are responsive to the needs and values of Canadians.

---

Two related links
from The Toronto Star:

There's more to life than GDP
Canadians need a new, holistic measure of societal progress that goes beyond economics
June 10, 2009
By Roy Romanow
[ Former Saskatchewan Premier and founding chair of the Institute of Wellbeing. ]
For many years – and particularly since the onset of the global recession – Canadians and people around the world have been bombarded with news about the gross domestic product. Numbers have been issued and then updated. Predictions have been made and then revised. So powerful and predominant has GDP become, that the New York Times referred to it as "a celebrity among statistics, a giant calculator strutting about adding up every bit of paid activity..." But what is GDP? What does it tell us about how well or poorly we are doing as a society? More important, what does it leave out? And what are the consequences of this omission?
(...)
Today is the launch of the Institute of Wellbeing and the introduction of its signature project, the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW). The institute is independent, non-partisan and guided by an advisory board of Canadian and international experts. (...) Today the institute released its first report, summarizing research findings in the three areas of Living Standards, Healthy Populations and Community Vitality. We noted that during so-called economic good times, Canadian workers failed to reap their share of the benefits of productivity growth, with hourly wages rising at only half of the rate of GDP. (...) The CIW will connect the dots between public policy decisions and Canadians' quality of life. It will promote a new understanding of wellbeing and a dialogue that reshapes the way we talk about wellbeing and public policy issues. It will encourage policy-makers to make evidence-based decisions that respond to the values and needs of Canadians. In that respect, it will be a true nation-building project.

Coming soon: Good-life index
Experts develop measure that looks beyond GDP to gauge quality of life and spur policy change
June 10, 2009
By Kenneth Kidd
"(...) 'GDP measures everything but the quality of life', notes Roy Romanow, chair of the Institute of Wellbeing, which is busy creating a more balanced and exhaustive method of measuring the quality of life Canadians enjoy. 'What we want to do is elevate, at a Canadian level, a measuring tool which is easily seen and understood by the public in order to put pressure, to be blunt about it, on governments,' says Romanow.
The push to create an alternative gauge that includes health and social measures as well as economic ones began about a decade ago, but has gathered steam in recent years under the auspices of the Institute of Wellbeing. Dozens of academics and policy-makers, partly funded by the Atkinson Charitable Foundation, are now working on various elements of a Canadian Index of Wellbeing, or CIW. The CIW will be a composite index aggregating results from eight areas, with reports to be released today on three of them: living standards, healthy populations and community vitality.

---

Sample report on Living Standards:

Living Standards report (PDF - 1.9MB, 134 pages)
By Andrew Sharpe and Jean François Arsenault
June 2009
The report is divided into four major parts. Part one examines trends in average and median income and wealth indicators in Canada. Part two looks at the distribution of the income and wealth of Canadians over time, including trends in poverty. Part three discusses trends in income fluctuations or volatility. Part four analyzes trends in the economic security of Canadians, including labour market security, food security, housing security, and the security provided by the social safety net.

Excerpt from
Highlights -
Living Standards (PDF - 773K, 8 pages):
An examination of data covering 1981-2008 revealed the following trends regarding the evolution of living standards in Canada:
* Canadians were on average better off in terms of income and wealth.
* But, income and wealth inequality increased.
* Labour productivity growth exceeded real wage growth.
* Little progress was made in reducing poverty.
* There was an overall improvement in labour market conditions.
* The social safety net continued to fray, providing less support for the disadvantaged.
* Overall, Canada became a much richer country, but it was the top 20% that received the lion’s share of rising income and wealth. (emphasis added by Gilles - see below)

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

8. The Economic Well-Being of Canadians: Is there a Growing Gap? - May 2009
(Chris Sarlo, Fraser Institute)

‘Growing gap’ between rich and poor overstated;
evidence points to improvements in living standards for poorest Canadians

News Release
May 28, 2009
VANCOUVER, BC—The “gap” between the economic well-being of rich and poor Canadians may not be growing, says a new, peer-reviewed report from independent research organization the Fraser Institute. Past attempts to measure economic inequality using only reported incomes have ignored other factors that contribute to the real standard of living, Professor Chris Sarlo writes in the report The Economic Well-Being of Canadians: Is there a Growing Gap? “There is a commonly held notion that the rich are always getting richer and the poor poorer,” said Sarlo, an associate professor of economics at Nipissing University and Fraser Institute senior fellow. “However, most reports of a ‘growing gap’ in economic well-being between the rich and poor are based exclusively on reported incomes, ignoring other factors that help define one’s standard of living.”

The Economic Well-Being of Canadians: Is there a Growing Gap?
May 2009
by Chris Sarlo
Complete report (PDF - 842K, 58 pages)
Executive summary (HTML)
"(...)This paper has two purposes. First and principally it is a critical examination of the evidence for a “growing gap” in Canada. The paper will attempt to look at inequality in a somewhat broader context than is customary. Evidence drawn largely from household-spending data files as well as from household facility-ownership data and household net-worth data can shed additional light on the trend in inequality for Canada. Second, the paper will examine the issue of data reliability in the context of the measurement of inequality."

Source:
Fraser Institute "A free and prosperous world through choice, markets and responsibility"

< Begin 1st Fraser Institute Rant of 2009 >

I disagree fundamentally with the ideologically-driven libertarian views of the Fraser Institute with respect to poverty and social programs in Canada, and I don't generally link to their reports --- let them get their own soapbox, I say.
[The exception to this rule is the Fraser Institute's poverty line reports, which are the bible of the Absolute Poverty Measure supporters; you'll find links to those reports on the Canadian Social Research Links Poverty Measures page.]

In this case, however, I decided to make an exception because of the last line in the Living Standards Highlights from the Institute of Wellbeing (above): "Canada became a much richer country, but it was the top 20% that received the lion’s share of rising income and wealth."
So who should I believe - former Saskatchewan NDP Premier Roy Romanow and his Institute of Wellbeing,
or Chris Sarlo, author of the aptly-nicknamed "calorie-from-starvation" poverty line and the "free-us-from-government-intervention" Fraser Institute
?
(Never mind. I just answered that myself...)

< /End 1st Fraser Institute Rant of 2009 >

Related links:

Defining and Re-Defining Poverty:
A CCSD Perspective
Position Paper
October 2001
"(...)All measures of poverty, whether they are based on income or a basket of goods and services, are also arbitrary, at least to some degree. It is really a matter of values how great a distance we are prepared to accept between the "poor" and the rest of society. The CCSD and most social welfare advocates support a relatively generous poverty line, because we recognize needs as social as well as physical. To be poor is to experience a significant degree of exclusion from the wider society, and not just to be deprived of very basic needs.
Source:
Canadian Council on Social Development

---

Learn more about the growing gap
between the rich and the poor

- incl. links to :
* Rags to Riches? * Why is the gap getting worse? * What about the rest of us? * What's happening to families in the middle? * One or two missed paycheques away... * Who is falling behind? * What can we do about the growing gap?

GrowingGap.ca -
GrowingGap.ca is a project of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Research & Publications
from the Inequality Project
The CCPA's Inequality Project is a national project with the aims of increasing public awareness about the alarming spread of income and wealth inequality in Canada.
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

9. Nova Scotia voters elect NDP Majority (Election 2009) - June 9

Nova Scotia voters elect 1st NDP government
June 9, 2009
"Nova Scotia has its first NDP government — and a majority government at that — ending a decade of rule by the Progressive Conservatives, who have been reduced to third-party status."
NOTE:
I guess this is what you call a seminal moment in Nova Scotia --- as of 6:30am on June 10, there are 510 comments on this article, predictably ranging from "Yayyyyyyyyyyy for the good side!" to "The sky is falling, the sky is falling!".

Nova Scotia Votes 2009
- from CBC

2009 Nova Scotia General Election
- from Mapleleafweb.com

- Go to the Nova Scotia Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nsbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

10. [ Ontario ] ISAC UPDATE - April 2009
(Income Security Advocacy Centre - ISAC)

Ontario:

ISAC UPDATE - April 2009 (PDF - 295K, 4 pages)
Income Security Advocacy Centre
(Volume 1, Issue 1)
This edition of ISAC UPDATE includes information on: the lead Special Diet Allowance case at the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario; our community-based Ending Poverty Project; Bill 152, the new Poverty Reduction legislation; the Poverty Reduction Results Committee; the upcoming Social Assistance Review; new case-selection criteria recently confirmed by ISAC’s Board of Directors; and, ISAC’s analysis of decision-making at the Ministry’s Disability Adjudication Unit.
Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC)

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

11. Canada to UN: We'll decide what rights we will choose to observe... - June 8
(Wellesley Institute Blog)

Canada to UN: We'll decide what rights we will choose to observe...
June 8, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
Canada has signed a significant number of international human rights treaties that are legally binding in international law, but the federal government believes that it can pick and choose among its obligations - according to the official document tabled at the United Nations' Rights Council in Geneva today. The good news is that the federal government has accepted its responsibility to take a stronger role in ensuring all Canadians are adequately housed, but the federal government says that companion initiatives to address deep and persistent poverty and income inequality are mostly the responsibility of provinces and territories (and not the national government)...
Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ Wellesley Institute ]

Related link:

A Call for Recession Relief (PDF - 18K, 2 pages)
Notes by John Stapleton at the launch of the Recession Relief Fund Coalition
June 10 (Revised June 13 to include a response to the )
"(...) The federal government owns, controls, administers or funds almost 85% of the income security programs in Canada. To cede social policy and governance respecting poverty to sub-national governments with no reasonable prospect of capacity or success - is either an act of cruelty or fantasy - and most likely both. And with so many unable to access Employment Insurance and with welfare doors often shut, the new stories resemble those we read from the 1930's when neither of these programs were firmly in place.

- Go to the Human Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm
- Go to the United Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/un.htm

12. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
---
Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds) - June 11
--- Study: A National Accounts perspective on recent financial events, 2008 - June 11
--- Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating, 2007 - June 8
--- Pension plans in Canada as of January 2008 - June 8

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

June 11, 2009
Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds)
- Fourth quarter 2008
The market value of retirement savings held in employer-sponsored pension funds declined by $58.1 billion, or 6.7%, during the fourth quarter of 2008 to $810.9 billion. This was attributable mainly to a fall in the market value of stocks and equity funds. The drop followed a decrease of $82.7 billion in the third quarter, which was the largest quarterly decline in a decade.

Related subjects
o Business, consumer and property services
o Professional, scientific and technical services
o Income, pensions, spending and wealth
o Pension plans and funds and other retirement income programs
o Seniors
o Income, pensions and wealth

---

June 11, 2009
Study: A National Accounts perspective on recent financial events, 2008
In recent months, Canada has been affected by the fallout from the severe decline in international trade and commodity prices. However, its avoidance of excessive reliance on debt has stood both its financial institutions and overall economy in good stead.
Source:
Canadian Economic Observer, June 2009
Content of this issue of the Economic Observer:
* Current economic conditions * Economic events * Feature article * Recent feature articles * National accounts * Labour markets * Prices * International trade * Goods-producing industries (manufacturing, construction and resources) * Services (trade, transportation, travel and communications) * Financial markets * Provincial

Related subjects
o Business performance and ownership
o Financial statements and performance
o Economic accounts
o Financial and wealth accounts
o Government
o Balance sheets

---

June 8, 2009
Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating, 2007
Most Canadians provided either time or money to charitable and non-profit organizations. The top 25% of donors provided 82% of total donations, and the top 25% of volunteers contributed 78% of the total unpaid work.

Related link:

Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians:
Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating

---

June 8, 2009
Pension plans in Canada, as of January 1, 2008
As of January 1, 2008, membership in registered pension plans (RPPs) in Canada amounted to 5.9 million, an increase of more than 140,000, or 2.4%, from the previous year. The number of RPPs reached 19,185, an increase of 590. Increases in the number of plans in recent years have come mainly from plans with fewer than 10 members.

Related subjects
o Business, consumer and property services
o Professional, scientific and technical services
o Seniors
o Income, pensions and wealth

The Daily Archives - select a year and month from the drop-down menu to view releases in chronological order
[ Statistics Canada ]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - June 14

Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

June 14, 2009

MEDIA ADVISORY - Special Advisor on Early Learning
12 Jun 09
- Dr. Charles Pascal, the Premier's Special Advisor on Early Learning, will release his report on implementing early learning in Ontario on June 15th, 2009.

Full-day early learning: Merging child care and kindergarten into a “seamless day”
12 Jun 09
- New ISSUE File from CRRU collects resources on the topic of blending child care and kindergarten education programs as background to the release of the Ontario Early Learning Advisor’s report.

Ratios for four and five year olds: What does the research say? What else is important?
12 Jun 09
- New BRIEFing NOTE from CRRU reviews research and expert opinion on staff:child ratios, child outcomes and program quality; offers lessons and conclusions.

Early childhood education and care: Key lessons from research for policy makers
11 Jun 09
- Report by Helen Penn for the European Commission provides a review of the international evidence about the social benefits of ECEC; recommends improvements to levels of provision and quality.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Receiver holding on for best ABC price
[CA-NZ] 10 Jun 09

· Rules relaxed for day cares
[CA-AB] 7 Jun 09

· Surprise new bidder joins chase for ABC
[NZ] 4 Jun 09

· Shakira’s children
2 Jun 09

· Oh, baby!
[CA-BC] 6 May 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.) ------------ (the content of this link changes twice a week)
IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches twice a week. Each issue of the dispatch provides links to U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media.

Latest issues of the Poverty Dispatch:

June 11, 2009
* Homelessness and Housing - Oregon, Kansas, Baltimore, MD
* HUD Affordable Housing Program and Foreclosure - Columbus, OH
* Schools and Free and Reduced-Price Lunch Programs
* Longer School Year and Academic Achievement
* Economic Stimulus Funding and Schools
* High School Graduation Rates
* Career Diplomas and GEDs
* Fuel Poverty - United Kingdom
* Joblessness and Unemployment Rates - Australia, South Africa
* 'Food Desert' Neighborhoods and Access to Nutritious Food
* Racial Health Disparities
* States and Health Insurance Coverage
* U.S. Health Care Reform

June 8, 2009
* Welfare Reform - Wisconsin, New York
* Medicaid Programs - Michigan, Indiana
* Report: Rural Homelessness
* Joblessness and Unemployment
* Charter School for Foster Youth - Philadelphia, PA
* Summer Food Assistance for Children - California
* State Budget Cuts and Social Services - California
* Hurricane Katrina Victims and Trailers
* Payday Lending Regulation - South Carolina, Ohio
* Prisoner Re-entry - New York
* States and Health Insurance Coverage - Washington, Iowa

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

If you wish to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail,
please send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

15. Australian Policy Online

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

16. CRINMAIL - May 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

11 June 2009 - CRINMAIL 1092
* VIOLENCE: Children's Rights Platform launched [publication]
* OPT: Palestinian Child Prisoners: The systematic and institutionalised ill-treatment and torture of Palestinian children by Israeli authorities [publication]
* UNITED STATES: One in five children sinking into poverty [publication]
* SOUTH AFRICA: HIV in South Africa 'levels off' [news]
* CHILD SOLDIERS: 2009 DDR bibliography [publication]
* EMPLOYMENT: Save the Children Sweden
* **FROM THE FRONTLINE** Kate McAlpine [interview]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

9 June 2009 - CRINMAIL 1091
* AFGHANISTAN: Confronting Child Labour in Afghanistan [publication]
* JAPAN: Software regulator bans rape "games" [news]
* CHINA: Parents try shock tactics to cure net ‘addicts’ [news]
* RUSSIA: Children may get lessons on TV propaganda [news]
* POLAND: UN expert on trafficking issues recommendations [news]
* FUNDING: UN-HABITAT Opportunities Fund for youth-led organisations
* EMPLOYMENT: Childhope
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

Links to all issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 300+ weekly issues
, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm



 

Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


*******************************

My Nine Favourite Mondegreens

*******************************


Monda-WHO??

The term mondegreen was originally coined by author Sylvia Wright, and has come to be quite widely used.
As a child, Wright heard the lyrics of The Bonny Earl of Murray (a Scottish ballad) as:

"Ye highlands and ye lowlands
Oh where hae you been?
Thou hae slay the Earl of Murray
And Lady Mondegreen"

It eventually transpired that Lady Mondegreen existed only in the mind of Sylvia Wright, for the actual lyrics said that they "slay the Earl of Murray and laid him on the green."
And to this day Lady Mondegreen's name has been used to describe all mishearings of this type.

My faves:

    * "Baking carrot biscuits."
         "Taking care of business."
         (Takin' Care Of Business, Bachman-Turner Overdrive)
      
    * "There's a bathroom on the right."
         "There's a bad moon on the rise."
         (Bad Moon Rising, Creedence Clearwater Revival)
      
    * "Excuse me while I kiss this guy."
         "Excuse me while I kiss the sky."
         (Purple Haze, Jimi Hendrix)
      
    * "Dead ants are my friends; they're blowin' in the wind."
         "The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind."
         (Blowin' In The Wind, Bob Dylan)
      
    * "Midnight after you're wasted."
         "Midnight at the oasis."
         (Midnight at the Oasis, Maria Muldaur)
      
    * "The girl with colitis goes by."
         "The girl with kaleidoscope eyes."
         (Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds, The Beatles)
      
    * "Donuts make my brown eyes blue."
         "Don't it make my brown eyes blue."
         (Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue, Crystal Gale)
         
    * "What a nice surprise when you're out of ice."
         "What a nice surprise bring your alibis."
         (Hotel California, Eagles)
         
    * "Just brush my teeth before you leave me, baby."
         "Just touch my cheek before you leave me, baby."
         Angel of the Morning, Juice Newton

Source:
http://www.fun-with-words.com/mala_mondegreens.html
(Click the link for more mondegreens)



*****************

And, in closing...

*****************


Your own wireless spy camera for $39!

http://tinyurl.com/lq8utw


Annie's Garden

My wife's early-season garden handiwork, and oasis of calm in our oh-so-busy retirement
:
(Now, if she could only stop pruning for five minutes and savour the fruit of her labour...)
http://picasaweb.google.com/gilseg99/AnnieSGardenJune62009


Kuku Klok
Online alarm clock
http://kukuklok.com/


Oronyms and Homophones
http://www.fun-with-words.com/nym_oronyms.html
(if only to see what the heck an oronym is...)