Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 14, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,584 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. What If Charities Go Silent? (Trish Hennessy, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - October 13
2. Towards A More Equal Canada (Broadbent Institute) - October 9
3. [British Columbia] A Public System of Integrated Early Care and Learning : $10 a Day Care a Key to Ending Family Poverty (Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC) - October 4
4. Latest Media and Policy News: 12 Oct 2012 (By Jennefer Laidley, Income Security Advocacy Centre)
5. Invest New Brunswick : Is it really investing in a new perspective? (New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice Inc.) - October 2012
6. A Living Wage As a Human Right (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - October 4
7. Youth Employment and Un(der) Employment in Canada : More Than a Temporary Problem? (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - October 4
8 .Equal Time : Margaret Somerville on abortion and the politics of female feticide
9. UPDATE on the National Council of Welfare website archive - October 14
10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Labour productivity in the business sector: Historical revision, 1981 to the second quarter 2012 - October 12
--- Adult correctional services, 2010/2011 - October 11
--- Adult correctional statistics in Canada, 2010/2011 - October 11
--- Youth correctional services, 2010/2011 - October 11
--- Youth correctional statistics in Canada, 2010/2011 - October 11
--- Criminal court statistics, 2010/2011 - October 9
11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
13. 2012 Global Hunger Index (International Food Policy Research Institute) - October 11
14. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. What If Charities Go Silent? - October 13
(Trish Hennessy, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

What If Charities Go Silent?
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/trish-hennessey/charity-canada_b_1963018.html
By Trish Hennessy (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)
October 13, 2012
How fares freedom of expression in Canada? As part of Non-Speak Week, PEN Canada blogs on the health of that most fundamental of freedoms.
While you're reading this, nearly two million employees are busy trying to make our world a little bit better through their work at Canada's more than eighty thousand registered charitable organizations. Some of these organizations are household names. When natural disaster strikes, for instance, many Canadians turn to charities like the Canadian Red Cross, CARE, Oxfam, or UNICEF. Other lesser known charities reflect the full spectrum of our public priorities: education, environmental protection, health care, children's well-being, youth engagement, seniors' supports, poverty reduction, help for the homeless, and more.
(...)
What does it say about our democracy when corporations can devote endless resources lobbying to change policy in their own interest while charities that work on behalf of the public interest risk losing their voice? Put it another way: What happens to our democracy when the voices of Canada's charitable organizations, the social conscience of this country, go silent?

Source:
Huffington Post Canada
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

---

- Go to the Voluntary Sector Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/voluntary.htm

2. Towards A More Equal Canada - October 9
(Broadbent Institute)

From the
Broadbent Institute:

Canadians can challenge income inequality: new Broadbent Institute paper
http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/en/blog/canadians-can-challenge-income-inequality-new-broadbent-institute-paper
October 8, 2012
News Release
By Mike Fancie
OTTAWA—Launching the next phase of its Equality Project, the Broadbent Institute has released a new discussion paper, “Towards a More Equal Canada”, which analyses the causes of, and proposes solutions to, income inequality. The paper follows the springtime publication of a Broadbent Institute-commissioned Environics poll on income inequality that shows Canadians overwhelmingly support taking action to alleviate our growing inequality problem.

The report:

Towards A More Equal Canada (PDF - 2.3MB, 26 pages)
http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/sites/default/files/documents/towards_a_more_equal_canada.pdf
October 2012
This report is part of the Broadbent Institute’s Equality Project. Launched in the spring of 2012, the project includes a Broadbent Institute-commissioned Environics poll which showed a majority of Canadians support taking action to reduce inequality, a social media campaign, and an animated video.

You'll find the Equality Project at
http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca

Source:
Broadbent Institute

http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/
The Broadbent Institute seeks to equip the next generation of progressive thinkers and activists with the ideas and tools they need to build a more progressive Canada.

NOTE: James Mulvale of Basic Income Canada Network Canada [ http://biencanada.ca/ ] points out in an email that guaranteed annual income is discussed on page 21 of the Broadbent Institute report, as follows:

"We should consider the idea of a guaranteed minimum income. Tom Kent, the late social policy giant who was the architect behind the Pearson-era reforms that shaped modern Canada, left behind a plea to look at such an approach. Kent argued that we should design a system to ensure a reasonable level of income for every Canadian, building on the basic income guarantee we already provide to seniors. Support would be given in the form of regular payments to those with very low incomes, phased out with rising income reported via tax returns. He believed that the federal economies of scale would provide considerable efficiencies and reduce federal/provincial overlap and friction as provinces would focus on services (Kent 2011). Kent’s blueprints find supporters and detractors among both conservatives and progressives. There are significant issues of cost to be considered, as well as how to provide income support without discouraging work. Perhaps we could begin by providing a guaranteed income to persons with disabilities, including persons who are able to work but cannot do so on a continuing full-time basis."

Related links:

What kind of Canada do we want?
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1267780
October 8, 2012
By Ed Broadbent

Canada is in the process of destroying decades of progress. We are developing limited, American-style access to social programs, our employment insurance system is being slowly starved to death, tuition fees are skyrocketing — all in the name of “austerity.”
Is this the kind of Canada we want to leave to future generations?

56 Comments about this article
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1267780#comments

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

---

Income Inequality In Canada: Ed Broadbent Wants To Give Tories 'A Good Shake'
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/10/09/income-inequality-canada-ed-broadbent_n_1949906.html
October 9, 2012
By Rachel Mendleson
Ed Broadbent has a novel idea for convincing Prime Minister Stephen Harper and other Conservative politicians to care about income inequality.
“I would like to take them all and give them a good shake, and take them back to talk to their parents or grandparents,” he said. As he envisions it, these heart-to-hearts would remind them of the fact that politicians of all stripes — including Conservatives — had a hand in helping to create Canada’s social welfare state. (...) Raising the profile of Canada’s growing rich-poor divide is top of mind for the former NDP leader and founder of the left-leaning Broadbent Institute, which is dedicated in large part to tackling rising income inequality. Speaking to The Huffington Post Canada in advance of the release of the think-tank’s latest report on the growing gap, Towards A More Equal Canada, Broadbent explained why income inequality “affects us all.”

Source:
Huffington Post Canada

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

---

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

3. [British Columbia] A Public System of Integrated Early Care and Learning : $10 a Day Care a Key to Ending Family Poverty - October 4
(Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC)

A Public System of Integrated Early Care and Learning:
$10 a Day Care a Key to Ending Family Poverty
(PDF - 1MB, 4 pages)
http://www.cccabc.bc.ca/plan/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/CCCABC_ECEBC_Factsheet4.pdf
Fact Sheet No. 4
PDF file date : October 4, 2012
In 2011, the Coalition of Child Care Advocates and the Early Childhood Educators of BC released a Community Plan for a Public System of Integrated Early Care and Learning [ http://www.cccabc.bc.ca/plan/ ] . The Plan offers a concrete, innovative ‘made in BC’ solution to the child care crisis facing families with young children. If and when government puts the Plan in place, child care will cost families $10 a day for a full-time program, $7 a day for part-time, and no user fee for families with annual incomes under $40,000.

Links to all four fact sheets:
http://www.cccabc.bc.ca/plan/toolkit/factsheets/

Source:
Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC (CCCABC)
http://www.cccabc.bc.ca/

Early Childhood Educators of BC
http://www.ecebc.ca

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk2.htm

4. Latest Media and Policy News: 12 Oct 2012
(Jennefer Laidley, Income Security Advocacy Centre)

Latest Media and Policy News: 12 Oct 2012
http://goo.gl/4GJTp
[ Toronto - Ontario - Canada - (some) international ]

Click the above link to access any of the articles below.

Top Story : Community Start-Up

* Carol Goar on the importance of Community Start-Up and efforts to save it
* NOW article says to watch for sleight-of-hand (Ed: see quote from yours truly)
* Sault Ste. Marie’s mayor says the pain of the cuts will dwarf any savings
* More outrage from Council in the Soo
*
The cuts will hit First Nations hard
* More people will be homeless in Hastings, Prince Edward, and Lennox & Addington
* Poverty will get worse with CSUMB cut, says CUPE - town hall in Sudbury
The cuts - and other austerity measures - are like boiling frog syndrome

Social Assistance Review

* Op-Ed: It’s time to build dignity into social assistance
* Here’s the full Five Tests for the Social Assistance Review - report expected late next week
* Martin Regg Cohn's take on the review
* No double-dipping! Even if you paid into EI! And you’re disabled! And have a new baby!

New Reports and other Cool Stuff

* The CCPA’s Living Wage conference is today in Toronto - and ISAC was pleased to co-sponsor. They’ve posted a toolkit and will be updating with new resources soon.
* An upcoming Community Forum – “Retiring on a Low Income: Presentation of New Tools that will result in better planning and advice”

Ontario Issues

* Ontario 211 workers say many Ontarians can’t afford groceries
* Looks like the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction might be coming back
* From the Workers’ Action Centre: Ontario needs a minimum wage people can live on!

Ontario Politics

* What Tim Hudak would do if he were preem
* Some PC MPPs raise the abortion issue; the Sun calls it a “crazed political death wish”

Around the Province

* Affordable homes saved in Toronto
* Government screwups dog senior in London with mental illness

Across the Country

* From Alberta – why we can do better than poverty reduction

National

* Broadbent Institute makes income inequality its first focus
* Are you outraged? You ought to be
* Five economic trends to watch – on food, gas, natural gas, housing, and interest rates
* Tips from advocates on finding a good rental apartment

Federal Issues

* The Current covers temporary foreign worker laws, and their impacts
* New federal program promises $30 million to spur 1600 jobs for people with disabilities
* But, disability advocate says there’s a better way
* Feds spend on ads while cutting programs
* Feds outline new access-to-information system
* Kevin Page wins major concessions in fight to get budget information

International

* People in Europe are increasingly abandoning their babies as economic prospects dim
* Creating living-wage jobs in the USA
* Protests at Walmart
* Inequality in American cities – how does it compare to other countries?
* Norway to double carbon tax on oil industry
* UK’s Work and Pension Secretary thinks welfare needs a “cultural shift” to “end reliance on benefits” – meaning a 10 billion BP cut to welfare budget

---

Source:
Jennefer Laidley
Policy & Research Analyst
Income Security Advocacy Centre

http://www.incomesecurity.org/

Jennefer Laidley is with the Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC) in Toronto.
Jennefer scans the electronic media for links to items of interest for social researchers and advocates in Toronto, and she also covers (to a lesser extent) the provincial, national and international scenes.

Each week, she sends out Latest Media and Policy News, the above a media scan of topical articles and news releases via email bulletin

Subscribe to ISAC's Latest Media and Policy News mailing list:
http://goo.gl/XEGZg

Subscribe to the main ISAC E-List (to receive info on ISAC's law reform work, the social assistance review, and other OW / ODSP -related information):
http://goo.gl/j3gzt

---

- Go to the Income Security Advocacy Centre Weekly Media Scan page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/isac_media_scan.htm

5. Invest New Brunswick : Is it really investing in a new perspective?- October 4
(New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice Inc.)

NOTA : La version française suit l'anglais ci-dessous.

From the
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice Inc. (CFSJ):

Invest New Brunswick : Is it really investing in a new perspective? (PDF - 512K, 12 pages)
http://www.frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Invest%20NB-%20Analysis-%20Final_Modified.pdf
October 2012
Backgrounder
NOTE : Appendix A of this PDF file is the Sept. 20 (2011) provincial government news release announcing the launch of Invest NB.
(...)
On September 20, 2011...David Alward opened a bottle of champagne to celebrate the new Crown Corporation called Invest NB. ‘’ New Brunswick needs a re-energized approach to economic development and investment attraction,’’ Alward said. ‘’To that end, Invest NB has a fresh focus on identifying and aggressively pursuing businesses that will succeed in our provinces and create jobs. The business plan framework sets out the path Invest NB is taking.’’

Therefore, Invest NB is another new-Brunswick Government tool to manage the economy of the province. Yet, the tool is different because fully managed by people
from the world of business. (...) We arrive at the conclusion that the promises made at the launch of the Crown Corporation Invest NB did not come true.

Source:
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice Inc.
http://www.frontnb.ca/

---

Du nouveau du
Front commun du Nouveau-Brunswick:

Investir Nouveau-Brunswick:
Est-ce vraiment investir selon une nouvelle perspective?
(fichier PDF - 388Ko., 13 pages)
http://www.frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Investir%20NB,%20Analyse%20finale_modifi%C3%A9e(1).pdf
Octobre 2012
Document d’information
NOTA : Dans l'annexe A, vous trouverez le texte du communiqué de presse du gouvernement provincial annonçant la nouvelle initiative
(...)
Le 20 septembre 2011 ... David Alward a ouvert la bouteille de champagne pour célébrer une toute nouvelle société de la Couronne nommée Investir NB. « Le Nouveau-Brunswick a besoin d’une approche plus dynamique en matière de développement économique et d’attraction des investissements » a déclaré M. Alward. « À cette fin, Investir NB propose une nouvelle approche pour identifier et rechercher activement des possibilités d’affaires qui auront du succès dans notre province et qui créeront des emplois. Le cadre du plan d’affaires définit la voie sur laquelle s’engage Investir NB. »

Investir NB devient donc un autre outil du gouvernement néo-brunswickois pour assurer la gestion économique de la province. Mais cet outil est différent puisqu’il est entièrement dirigé par des gens du monde des affaires. (...) En guise de conclusion, nous disons que les promesses faites lors du lancement de la société de la Couronne Investir NB ne se sont pas concrétisées.

Source:
Le Front commun pour la justice sociale du N.-B. inc. (FCJS)
http://www.frontnb.ca/

---

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

6. A Living Wage As a Human Right - October 5
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

From the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

A Living Wage As a Human Right (PDF - 432K, 18 pages)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/Ontario%20Office/2012/10/Living%20Wage%20as%20a%20Human%20Right.pdf
B
y Mary Cornish
October 5, 2012
In Canada, many workers do not earn a living wage because of discrimination. Women workers and those who are racialized, immigrant, Aboriginal, living with disabilities or similarly disadvantaged are all segregated into low wage job ghettoes—their work systemically devalued. Governments and employers need to deliver more equitable compensation incomes for vulnerable workers. This paper explores how we can close discriminatory pay gaps, so that this basic human right — the right to work and to earn pay free of discrimination — is realized for Canada’s low-paid workers.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Related link:

Living Wage for Families
http://livingwageforfamilies.ca/
The Living Wage for Families Campaign is hosted by First Call:BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition [ http://www.firstcallbc.org/ ] and is guided by an Advisory Committee of representatives from community organizations and other partners and supporters in Metro Vancouver.

---

- Go to the Minimum Wage / Living Wage Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

7. Youth Employment and Un(der) Employment in Canada : More Than a Temporary Problem? - October 4
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Youth Employment and Un(der) Employment in Canada:
More Than a Temporary Problem?
(PDF - 431K, 6 pages)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2012/10/Youth%20Unemployment.pdf
By Karen Foster
October 4, 2012
This report looks at trends in youth employment, and finds that one of the most troubling narratives to emerge from the economic downturn of 2007–08 revolved around the effect of recessed global and local economies on young workers. According to the report, young workers are more likely to be unemployed or precariously employed in non-permanent jobs—and regardless of whether they have post-secondary qualifications, these young workers will likely endure the negative effects of un- and underemployment for years to come.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

8. Equal Time : Margaret Somerville on abortion and the politics of female feticide

Abortion and sex-selective pregnancy termination

Last week's Canadian Social Research Newsletter [ http://goo.gl/T0WZT ] included a video dig by 22 Minutes' Dakey Dunn directed at federal Status of Women Minister Rona Ambrose for voting in favour of Motion 312 (to reopen the abortion debate) along with an overview of major dates in the abortion controversy in Canada by Trish Hennessy of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

Within hours of the newsletter's dissemination last Sunday, I received an email from a subscriber who is a senior researcher in a Canadian university. He said that he felt I had a "one-sided approach to abortion-related information."

"This procedure", he pointed out, "kills over 100,000 developing human beings a year in Canada (and this, ironically, in a country that desperately wants and needs immigration). You need to give equal time to those who believe (as the Supreme Court has argued) that the state has a legitimate right in the abortion question."

It is in the spirit of fairness and balance that I therefore present links suggested by my email critic to two pro-life articles by Margaret Somerville, founding director of the Centre for Medicine, Ethics and Law at McGill University.

Let’s have the abortion debate
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/have+abortion+debate/7135511/story.html
By Margaret Somerville, August 23, 2012
More than 100,000 abortions are performed in Canada each year. I suggest that we need to recover our sense of amazement, wonder and awe at the creation of new human life and that an in depth discussion about what our law on abortion should be might help us in this regard.

Source:
Ottawa Citizen

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/

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The preposterous politics of female feticide
http://goo.gl/xfPXm
By Margaret Somerville
September 28, 2012
Conservative MP Stephen Woodworth’s motion to set up an all-party parliamentary committee to discuss when an unborn child becomes a human being was voted down 203-91 this week. But the fact that 30 per cent of the MPs who voted supported the private member’s motion is a victory in defeat for Mr. Woodworth on two fronts. (...) First, most people had expected a far greater rate of rejection and never anticipated that, despite Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s opposition to it, 10 cabinet members, including Status of Women Minister Rona Ambrose, would back the motion. Second, the pro-choice mantra that “there is nothing to discuss” about abortion and that there’s a consensus in Canada with respect to the current status quo of no legal restrictions on abortion at any point in gestation were both shown to be false by the heated discussion, both inside and outside Parliament, that Mr. Woodworth’s motion generated.
So where do we go from here?
Another motion, this one from B.C. Conservative MP Mark Warawa : “That the House condemn discrimination against females occurring through sex-selective pregnancy termination.”
(...)
My prediction is, they (Members of Parliament) might find they’ve jumped out of the frying pan of Mr. Woodworth’s Motion 312 into the fire of Mr. Warawa’s Motion 408 [ http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/09/27/mark-warawa-motion-408-abortion_n_1920769.html ].

Source:
Globe and Mail
http://theglobeandmail.com/

---

A Personal Reflexion
(by Gilles
):

I don't remember exactly when I first started supporting women's right to choose what happens to their body - probably back in my university days in the late 1960s and early 70s in the middle of that whole debate about equality, rights and freedoms - but I continue to support that cause today, within acceptable medical protocols and in conjunction with a school program of sex education and family planning. I'm only human, however, and there are times when I pause to dwell upon the lost potential in human achievement. I recently read an opinion column in the St.Catharines Standard that sums up my dual view on the whole abortion debate.
Here's an excerpt:

 

"Look, I’m not going to pretend I have some easy, comfortable answer to the abortion question. There is nothing easy nor comfortable about it. I quite agree with Christopher Hitchens who once said it’s impossible not to regard a fetus as a candidate member of the species. I also agree with Sam Harris who correctly points out that a mass of cells with no nervous system and no sentience, isn’t a person."

As a rule, I try not to push my views on others in my web site and newsletter, except with respect to social justice and progressive social policy. I'm aware that there are *some* topics - "800-lb gorillas in the room", such as the war on drugs, abortion, euthanasia and the death penalty, to mention but a few - that can polarize a room full of otherwise like-minded people in a heartbeat. I decided long ago to utilize my discretionary time searching out and sharing online social research resources vs engaging in debates about those above-noted factious topics and others. I'll try to stick to that decision and that focus in the future.

If you have any opinions (pro or con) that you wish to share with the world on the subject of abortions or other controversial topics, please seek out a more appropriate online forum. This site and newsletter will stick to the long-term objcetive : to provide a comprehensive, current and balanced collection of links to Canadian social program information for use by those who formulate Canadian social policies and by those who study and critique them.

---

- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

9. UPDATE on the National Council of Welfare website archive - October 14

UPDATE on the
National Council of Welfare (NCW) website archive
October 14:

Argh.
It's probably just me being foolish thinking that the National Council of Welfare's website would be transferred seamlessly and quickly to its new permanent home in the Government of Canada Web Archive as soon as the Council's live site was shut down at the end of September. That transfer hasn't happened yet, although the link to the archived version of the Council's home page was sent to me by someone at Library & Archives (LAC) Canada late last week.
Here it is:
http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/205/301/ncw-cnb/2012-09-27/www.ncw.gc.ca/h.4m.2_40-eng.jsp@lang=eng.htm
[SPOILER : You can't access most of the Council's reports because the search feature doesn't work in the archive copy.]

The above link will take you to a mirror copy of the Council's home page, where you can click on the functional navigational aids in the left margin of the page to go to different sections of the site, including links to a limited number of publications (under "Communities"). What isn't yet working (as at October 14) is the search feature on the Research and Publications page. Because the site has no "Browse Reports" feature (i.e., a static page with a list of all online reports with their respective links), users must use the search feature to access any reports except for those in the Communities section, as noted above. And that search feature is kaput...

The Bottom line:

TAKE A DEEP BREATH, Gilles
and fellow historians and supporters of Open Government...

The contact person at Library &Archives Canada pointed out in her reply to my email on Friday that the Council's datasets would soon all be uploaded to the Govt of Canada Web Archive website, and that researchers would soon be able to access all of the Council's online reports more easily. Just before the weekend, I sent her an alert re. the search feature issue, and I'm hoping that things will get ironed out in the near future. I'll be updating this page and my NCW Links page as soon as that search feature on the NCW site archive is functional.

If you wish to browse a list of all NCW reports from 1971 to Fall 2007, see the NCW Publications List:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw_publications.htm

If you find an interesting report in the above publications list, select its title using your mouse, then go to the Publications Canada website [ http://www.publications.gc.ca/ ] to search whether that title is available for download.

---

- Go to the National Council of Welfare links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Labour productivity in the business sector: Historical revision, 1981 to the second quarter 2012
- October 12
---
Adult correctional services, 2010/2011 - October 11
--- Adult correctional statistics in Canada, 2010/2011
- October 11
--- Youth correctional services, 2010/2011 - October 11
--- Youth correctional statistics in Canada, 2010/2011
- October 11
--- Criminal court statistics, 2010/2011
- October 9

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

October 12, 2012
Labour productivity in the business sector: Historical revision, 1981 to the second quarter 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121012/dq121012a-eng.htm
The implementation of revised international System of National Accounts economic accounting standards resulted in a slight downward revision to Canada's average annual growth in business sector labour productivity over the period 1981 to the second quarter of 2012.

October 11, 2012
Adult correctional services, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121011/dq121011c-eng.htm
On any given day in 2010/2011, there were about 38,000 adults in Canada's prisons. This was nearly 900 more than the year before, resulting in a 0.9% increase in the rate of incarceration per 100,000 adults.

Related link:

Adult correctional statistics in Canada, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11715-eng.htm
By Mia Dauvergne
Table of contents:
* Rate of adults in the correctional system declines slightly in 2010/2011
* Quebec reports lowest rate of adults in correctional services
* Canada’s incarceration rate increases slightly in 2010/2011
* Manitoba reports highest incarceration rate among the provinces
* Remand rate decreases for the first time in more than a decade
* Most adults in sentenced provincial or territorial custody for non-violent offences
* Aboriginal people continue to be over-represented in custody
* Adults in custody in Saskatchewan have an average of four out of six rehabilitative needs
* Most adults under community supervision are on probation
* One in ten adults under community supervision on a conditional sentence
* Parole rate drops steadily since mid-1990s
* Summary

October 11, 2012
Youth correctional services, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121011/dq121011d-eng.htm
On any given day in 2010/2011, there were about 14,800 young people aged 12 to 17 under the supervision of Canada's correctional system. Of these, just over 13,300 (90%) were under supervision in the community, usually on probation. The remaining 1,500 (10%) were in custody.

Related link:

Youth correctional statistics in Canada, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11716-eng.htm

By Christopher Munch
Table of contents:
* Rate of youth under correctional supervision decreases in 2010/2011
* British Columbia reports lowest rate of youth in the correctional system
* Rates for youth admitted to correctional services increase with age
* Aboriginal youth over-represented in the correctional system
* Youth incarceration rate declines for the third year in a row
* Crimes committed by youth admitted to sentenced custody tend to be non-violent
* Youth in remand outnumber those in sentenced custody for the fourth year in a row
* Most youth under community supervision are on probation
* Summary

October 9, 2012
Criminal court statistics, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121009/dq121009a-eng.htm
Additional data for 2010/2011 on adult criminal courts and youth courts in Canada are now available for the provinces and territories reporting to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey.

Available without charge in CANSIM:
Table 252-0055 --- http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=252-0055&p2=31
Table 252-0066 --- http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=252-0066&p2=31

Related subjects:

Crime and justice
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2693&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Criminal courts
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2695&lang=eng&type=DAILYART



Check past issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last


Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

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- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

October 14, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Child care modernization feedback: Approaches for funding and quality
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/10/child-care-modernization-feedback-approaches-funding-and-qu
10 Oct 2012 | Ontario
Response to modernizing child care in Ontario discussion from Petr Varmuza & Laura Coulman focuses on funding and quality in child care services and "is centered on the core assumption that any substantial transformation (or modernization, if you will) in any one area of child care is not possible without a comprehensive Ontario child care policy framework".

Consideration of reports submitted by States parties under article 44 of the Convention. Concluding observations: Canada
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/10/consideration-reports-submitted-states-parties-under-articl
10 Oct 2012 | Canada
Concluding observations on Canada from the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child states that "early childhood care and education continues to be inadequate for children under four years of age. Furthermore, the Committee is concerned that the majority of early childhood care and education services in the State party are provided by private, profit-driven institutions, resulting in such services being unaffordable for most families".

Scientific thinking in young children: Theoretical advances, empirical research, and policy implications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/10/scientific-thinking-young-children-theoretical-advances-emp
10 Oct 2012 | United States
New research explores how "young children's learning and thinking are strikingly similar to much learning and thinking in science". Concludes that "early childhood experience is extremely important and that the trend toward more structured and academic early childhood programs is misguided".

Delivering quality early learning in low-resource settings: Progress and challenges in Ethiopia
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/10/delivering-quality-early-learning-low-resource-settings-pro
9 Oct 2012 | Africa
Working paper from Bernard van Leer Foundation compares the urban and rural challenges of implementing the Ethiopian government's 2010 ECCE framework.

Towards a more equal Canada: A report on Canada's economic & social inequality
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/10/towards-more-equal-canada-report-canadas-economic-social-in
9 Oct 2012 | Canada
Report from the Broadbent Institute explains the causes and implications of rising inequality in Canada, as well as a new vision and agenda to address economic and social inequality.

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Early childhood education squeezed too tightly
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/10/early-childhood-education-squeezed-too-tightly
10 Oct 2012 | British Columbia

What kind of Canada do we want?
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/10/what-kind-canada-do-we-want
10 Oct 2012 | Canada

Three-year study proves EYPS boosts quality
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/10/three-year-study-proves-eyps-boosts-quality
9 Oct 2012 | Europe

We’re hardly the nanny state when it comes to decent childcare
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/10/we%E2%80%99re-hardly-nanny-state-when-it-comes-decent-childcare
9 Oct 2012 | Australia and New Zealand

Central child-care database proposed
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/10/central-child-care-database-proposed
9 Oct 2012 | Ontario

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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NOTE:
For links to earlier (weekly) issues of this weekly alert going back to June 2009,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/

Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:
(older external links may be broken)

October 12, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/10/12/
US Health Care System
Low-Income Children and Prescription Medications
The Unemployed and Job Retraining

October 11, 2012 - no Poverty Dispatch today.

October 10, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/10/10/
State Unemployment Funds
UN World Hunger Figures
SNAP Enrollment – Staten Island, NY (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - formerly the Food Stamp program)

October 9, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/10/09/
Medicaid Program – Ohio
Prepaid Debit Cards and Low-Income Consumers

October 8, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/10/08/
Medicaid Program – Florida
Cities and the Homeless

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NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

13. 2012 Global Hunger Index - October 11
(International Food Policy Research Institute)

Hunger in Times of Land, Water, and Energy Pressures (PDF - 268K, 3 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/pressrel20121011.pdf
October 11, 2012
Press release
Washington, D.C.—Unsustainable use of land, water, and energy is threatening the food security of the poorest and most vulnerable around the world, according to the 2012 Global Hunger Index, released for the seventh year by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Welthungerhilfe, and Concern Worldwide. According to the 2012 Index, The Challenge of Hunger: Ensuring Sustainable Food Security under Land, Water, and Energy Stresses, hunger on a global scale remains serious with 20 countries having levels of hunger that are “alarming” or “extremely alarming.”

NOTE: this report doesn't cover North America or Europe.

Complete report:

2012 Global Hunger Index
The Challenge of Hunger:
Ensuring Sustainable Food Security U
nder Land, Water, and Energy Stresses (PDF - 4.3MB, 72 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ghi12.pdf

2012 Global Hunger Index - main page
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/2012-global-hunger-index
- includes links to country reports for all participating countries
- also includes links to an interactive version of the report, a related brief, media materials, maps, data, video and more

Background Facts and Key Findings
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/2012-global-hunger-index-background-facts-and-key-findings

Source:
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

http://www.ifpri.org/
The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI is one of 15 centers supported by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) [ http://www.cgiar.org/ ], an alliance of 64 governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

14. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)
Latest issue:

10 October 2012 - CRINMAIL 1297
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4431
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Shunning the rights of persons with mental disabilities
- Girl advocate shot for opposing Taliban
- From "protection" to prohibition
- Discrimination in the school head's office
- Poor children at risk of armed recruitment
- Starting equality from a young age
- Violence against children in detention
- Campaigning against the death penalty
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Jamaica
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy (Challenging breaches - Take action - Campaigns - Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1: (WITH table of contents)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010:

Option 2: (WITHOUT table of contents)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- On the CRINMAIL website --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

--------------------------------------------------

NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter online subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

You Know You're Having a Bad Day When...

- Your horn sticks on the freeway behind 32 Hell's Angels Motorcyclists.

- You've been at work 3 hours before you notice that your fly is open or your blouse unbuttoned.

- Your twin sister forgets your birthday.

- Your birthday cake collapses from the weight of the candles.

- You call the suicide prevention hotline and they put you on hold.

- You have to sit down to brush your teeth in the morning.

- Everyone avoids you the morning after the company office party.

- Your income tax refund check bounces.

- It costs more to fill up your car than it did to buy it.

- The bird singing outside your window is a vulture.

- You wake up and your braces are stuck together.

- Your blind date turns out to be your ex-wife/husband.

- You put both contacts into the same eye.

- Your mother approves of the person you're dating.

- Your doctor tells you that you're allergic to chocolate.

- You have to borrow from your Visa card to pay your Mastercard.

- Nothing you own is actually paid for.

- The health inspector condemns your office coffee maker.

- You invite the peeping Tom in... and he says no.

- The Gypsy fortune teller offers to refund your money when she sees your future.

- People think that you're 40 and you're only 25.

 

********************************************
And, in closing...
********************************************

 

Advanced Cat Yodeling (video, duration 2:44)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxLG2wtE7TM
From those same crazy guys who broght you "An Engineer's Guide to Cats"
and "An Engineer's Guide to Cat Flatulence"

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Shut the Puck Up! (video, duration 3:28)
http://www.youtube.com/embed/dcgpghm2tGw?rel=0

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TalkTyper:
Free speech to text dictation software in a browser
http://talktyper.com/

---

This Day in History - from history.com
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

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CHART: How Many Minutes Of Work Does It Take To Buy A Beer In Your Country?
http://www.upworthy.com/chart-how-many-minutes-of-work-does-it-take-to-buy-a-beer-in-your-country

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