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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
February 15, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1985 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.  [Ontario] The Silence of the Lines: Poverty reduction strategies and the crash of 2008 (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - February 12
2. [Ontario] A Blueprint for Economic Stimulus and Poverty Reduction in Ontario (25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction) - February 12
3. [Ontario] 2009 Emergency Social Services Conference, Toronto (Ontario Municipal Social Services Association) - February 26-27
4. Housing bill of rights introduced in Canadian Parliament (Wellesley Institute) - February 11
5. [Manitoba] “We got evicted...did I leave that out?” : Stories of Housing and Mental Health (Manitoba Office - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - February 10
6. Learning What Works (Newsletter of the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation) - February 2009
7. Employment links updated (Canadian Social Research Links) - February 10
8. Time for a Poverty Reduction Plan for BC (BC Poverty Reduction Committee) - February 5
9. Increase welfare payments, Ontario urged (Toronto Community Social Planning Council and others) - February 9
10. What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
--- Study: Persistence in postsecondary education in Atlantic Canada, 2001/2002 to 2004/2005 - February 12
--- Canadian Economic Observer - February 2009 - February 12
--- Households and the Environment Survey, 2007 -
February 10
--- Legal Aid in Canada: Resource and Caseload Statistics, 2007/2008 - February 10
--- Provincial and territorial government assets and liabilities, fiscal year ending March 31, 2007 - February 9

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - February 11

International  content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
13.
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - President Obama's economic stimulus plan
14. [U.S.] Target Practice: Lessons for Poverty Reduction (Center for Law and Social Policy) - January 2009
15. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content
16. CRINMAIL (February 2009) - (Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Have a great week!

Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. [Ontario] The Silence of the Lines: Poverty reduction strategies and the crash of 2008 - February 12
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Depression-era hardship could await Ontarians
Press Release
February 12, 2009
TORONTO – Without government action, the lack of adequate income security programs could plunge Ontarians suffering the worst of the current recession into dire straits, says a report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).Silence of the Lines: Poverty Reduction Strategies and the Crash of 2008 shows how the economic downturn is already worse than the Great Depression but predicts different results for Ontarians who end up down on their luck.
Source:
Ontario Alternative Budget
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives ]

Complete report:

The Silence of the Lines:
Poverty reduction strategies and the crash of 2008
(PDF - 135K, 5 pages)
February 2009
By John Stapleton
"(...) people who once could successfully apply for welfare during a rough patch (along with all the people turned away from EI) are going to be turned away at the welfare office. The reason for this is that since the last major recession, governments have brought in four significant sets of changes:
• Lower social assistance rates;
• Much lower assets limits;
• Earning exemptions policies that do not apply to new applicants; and
• ‘Workfare’ — now called ‘community participation’.
The confluence of these four sets of changes has not been tested in a recession but when the ‘new poor’ make a welfare application, they will be turned down to live off lower paid jobs or their dwindling savings. When they re-apply later on, they will be told that ‘any job is a good job’ and will be pointed in the direction of the relatively plentiful low paid jobs that will be available."

Related link:

Open Policy- John Stapleton's personal website
John is a Policy Fellow with the Metcalf Foundation and St. Christopher House in Toronto.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

2. A Blueprint for Economic Stimulus and Poverty Reduction in Ontario - February 12
(25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction)

A Blueprint for Economic Stimulus and Poverty Reduction in Ontario:
Blueprint could help cut child poverty by 19%

News Release
February 12, 2009
TORONTO – A report by the 25 in 5 Poverty Reduction Network shows how the Ontario government could get three-quarters of the way towards its goal to reduce child poverty by 25 per cent. A Blueprint for Economic Stimulus and Poverty Reduction in Ontario – the result of consultations in 30 Ontario communities – lays out a plan that could reduce the number of poor Ontarians by 197,420 (15 per cent) and reduce the number of poor children in Ontario by 62,000 (19 per cent) within the next three years.

Complete report:

A Blueprint for Economic Stimulus
and Poverty Reduction in Ontario
(PDF - 157K, 28 pages)
February 2009
Source:
* 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction
* Ontario Federation of Labour
(Sheila Block of the OFL wrote the report)

Related link:

Welfare 'stimulus' touted
February 12, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten
If Premier Dalton McGuinty wants to protect Ontario's faltering economy, he should give more money to people like René Adams so she can buy her daughters healthy food and pay for swimming lessons, poverty activists say. The Toronto single mother, who volunteers at a local food bank while she looks for full-time work, says every extra penny she receives goes back into the local economy. (...) In addition to cutting poverty, putting money into the hands of those who need it most is the best way to stimulate the economy at a time of global economic uncertainty, says a report by the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction. (...) The proposed economic stimulus and poverty reduction package calls on Ontario to spend $5 billion over the next two years to beef up welfare and other social supports and build new child-care spaces and social housing units.
Source:
The Toronto Star

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

3. [Ontario] 2009 Emergency Social Services Conference - February 26-27
(Ontario Municipal Social Services Association)

Upcoming annual conference of the
Ontario Municipal Social Services Association (OMSSA):

2009 Emergency Social Services Conference
Renaissance Toronto Airport Hotel
February 26-27, 2009
Each year, OMSSA holds an Emergency Social Services Conference, a learning event to explore the many aspects of emergency social services that CMSMs and DSSABs provide in the event of an emergency in their communities. The conference is intended to provide emergency social services staff with practical tools and resources that they can adapt and implement in emergency plans for their communities.

Preliminary Program (PDF - 401K, 14 pages)
- updated to February 9

Source:
Ontario Municipal Social Services Association (OMSSA)
OMSSA is a non-profit organization whose members plan, manage, fund and deliver social and community services at the municipal level throughout Ontario. OMSSA works on behalf of Ontario's municipal service system managers, known as Consolidated Municipal Service Managers (CMSMs). The consolidation of municipal service management by the provincial government has resulted in the creation of 47 CMSMs across Ontario, made up principally of upper tier municipalities in southern Ontario and District Social Service Administration Boards (DSSABs) in northern Ontario.

- Go to the Conferences and Events Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/confer.htm
- Go to the Municipalities Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/municipal.htm

4. Housing bill of rights introduced in Canadian Parliament - February 11
(Wellesley Institute)

Housing bill of rights introduced in Canadian Parliament
February 11, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
Just days after Canada was criticized at the United Nations' Human Rights Council in Geneva for failing to meet its international housing obligations, a new National Housing Bill of Rights has been introduced in Canada's House of Commons by MP Libby Davies (NDP - Vancouver East). Bill C-304 , a Private Member's Bill, seeks to re-engage the federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, along with the community and private sectors in a comprehensive national housing strategy. It's a powerful and comprehensive piece of legislation that would re-establish a national housing plan that Canada has lost after two decades of funding cuts, downloading and an increasingly fraying patchwork of funding and programs.

Source:
Wellesley Institute

Related link:

Bill C-304 (Libby Davies' Private Member's Bill)

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

5. [Manitoba] “We got evicted...did I leave that out?” : Stories of Housing and Mental Health - February 10
(
Manitoba Office - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

“We got evicted...did I leave that out?”
Stories of Housing and Mental Health
(PDF - 1.4MB, 52 pages)
By Ian Skelton and Richard Mahé
February 2009
This study begins to explore ways of supporting processes of community transformation through enhancing the provision of housing and supports for people living with mental illness. In particular, the study is concerned with factors that mediate between individuals living with mental illness and the broader social environment. (...) In-depth, face-to-face interviews were held over the summer of 2008 in Winnipeg
with people living with mental illness, family members with responsibility for giving care and key informants. This report attempts to portray experiences of housing and mental health as recounted by the interview participants.
Source:
Manitoba Office - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
[ More publications from CCPA-Manitoba ]

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm
- Go to the Manitoba Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm

6. Learning What Works - February 2009
(Newsletter of the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation)

What's new from Social Research and Demonstration Corporation (SRDC):

Final evaluation report of the
Case Coordination Project in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

February 2009
SRDC released its final evaluation report of the Case Coordination Project (CCP) in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, an area with high rates of poverty, substance abuse, poor housing, and unemployment. The project was designed to determine whether a comprehensive model delivering one-to-one support to long-term unemployed residents of the Downtown Eastside could help them return to employment and self-sufficiency. Components of the project and methods of delivery had to be flexible to meet the changing needs of participants. The final report presents the findings of the CPP, with details on participants’ employment, their outcomes from receiving Income Assistance, and their experiences with the project. The report also draws conclusions relating to project implementation and administration, as well as policy implications for similar projects.
Source:
Learning What Works (February 2009)
- the latest issue of SRDC's newsletter

Complete report:

The Downtown Eastside Case Coordination Project:
Moving Hard-to-Employ Individuals from Welfare to Opportunity
(PDF - 840K, 65 pages)
By Barbara Dobson Susanna Gurr
July 2008

NOTE: the February 2009 issue of Learning What Works
also includes articles (and links to related reports) about:

* The B.C. AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) Early Implementation Report: Addressing academic barriers to PSE (AVID that aims to increase post-secondary enrolment among Grade 8 students with a B to C average).
* Community Employment Innovation Project (CEIP): A viable alternative for vulnerable communities and the unemployed
* Data from the Community Employment Innovation Project is available to interested researchers
* The Child Care Pilot Project is extended (testing a preschool daycare service designed to help children master the French language)
* SRDC to evaluate initiatives of the BC Healthy Living Alliance

All SRDC Publications - by theme
All SRDC Publications - alphabetical

Source:
Social Research and Demonstration Corporation (SRDC)
SRDC is a not-for-profit organization, a registered charity, and a pioneer in the use of social experiments in Canada. SRDC’s two-part mission is to help policy-makers and practitioners identify social policies and programs that improve the well-being of all Canadians, with a special concern for the effects on the disadvantaged, and to raise the standards of evidence that are used in assessing social policies and programs.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Social Research Organizations (II) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research2.htm

7. Employment links updated - February 10
(Canadian Social Research Links)

Employment links updated:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm#labour
(this is part of the Canadian Social Research Links
Human Resources and Skills Development Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm

Even though the main focus of Canadian Social Research Links is social program information, I occasionally receive email requests for employment resources.
Below, you'll find links to selected federal government resources and to selected non-government (commercial) job websites.

----------

Federal government links:

Labour Market Information
"Answer your questions about jobs, skills and worker availability in local areas across Canada."
- incl. links to : NewsFlash - Build Your Occupational Profile - Job Descriptions - Employment Prospects - Wages / Salaries - Who Hires - Where to Get Training - More LMI - Provincial / Territorial HRDC LMI - Having trouble finding work? - Don't know what work you want to do? - Looking for facts and figures on the labour market? - Where can I find the workers that I need? How much should I pay them? - What can this site do for me?

Training, Career and Worker Information

Job Bank
-
Government Jobs
Categories : * Careers in the Public Service * Contract Work * Department and Agency Direct Hiring * Municipal Government * Provincial and Territorial Government * Public Service Commission

Job Futures

Services for Unemployed Youth
- from the Government of Canada
(Youth.gc.ca)

----------

Miscellaneous non-governmental links:

Workopolis - "Canada's Biggest jobsite"

Indeed.ca
Indeed is a search engine for jobs - with a radically different approach to job search. In one simple search, Indeed gives job seekers free access to millions of employment opportunities from thousands of websites. Indeed.ca includes all the job listings from major job boards, newspapers, associations and company career pages - and we continue to add new sites every day.

Monster.ca

jobboom (bilingual)
Jobboom is a leader in online recruiting that specializes in the Canadian job market. We feature thousands of job postings every day and provide employment news and career management advice.

AllStarJobs Canada
Your Online Source For Finding A Job In Canada

Bilingual Link CareerSite
The Bilingual Link has partnered with Brainhunter Inc. to provide a comprehensive job-networking tool. You can search and apply for hundreds of targeted jobs with employers from around the world, as well as manage your resume and job applications online.

canjobs.com - Your Canadian Employment Search network

8. Time for a Poverty Reduction Plan for BC - February 5
(BC Poverty Reduction Committee)

The time is now for a legislated poverty reduction plan:
200 organizations and community leaders to BC political parties

News Release
February 5, 2009
(Vancouver) Two hundred organizations from across the province joined together today in a call for all-party support for a legislated BC poverty reduction plan.
The 200 groups are signatories to an open letter released today calling on all political parties to commit that, if elected in May, they will implement a comprehensive poverty reduction plan that includes:

* Legislated targets and timelines to reduce BC’s poverty rate by one third within four years, and end street homelessness within two years; and,
* Policy actions in seven key areas that would end deep poverty, improve conditions for the working poor, and focus on groups that are most vulnerable to poverty.

BC Poverty Reduction (home page)
On February 5, 2009, more than 200 organizations and community leaders joined together to call on all BC political parties to commit to a comprehensive, legislated poverty reduction plan. This groundswell of concern about BC’s unacceptably high levels of poverty and homelessness comes from many different communities in BC. It comes from all regions of the province, and from faith leaders, health organizations, doctors, businesses, First Nations and Aboriginal groups, labour unions, immigrant and refugee organizations, community service agencies, municipal councils, women’s groups, and many more.
- scroll to the bottom section of the home page to see the list of organizations (and some individuals who are partners in and supporters of this initiative.

Recommended targets and timelines:
* Using Statistics Canada’s low-income cut off after tax (LICO-AT), reduce BC’s poverty rate from 13 per cent to 9 per cent in four years, and to 3 per cent in ten years (meaning, effectively, a one third reduction within the mandate of the next government, and a 75 per cent reduction within a decade).
* Ensure the poverty rate (using the LICO-AT) for children, lone-mother households, single senior women, Aboriginal people, people with disabilities, and recent immigrants likewise declines by 30 per cent in four years, and by 75 per cent in ten years, in recognition that poverty is concentrated in these populations.
* Within two years, ensure that every British Columbian has an income that reaches at least 75 per cent of the poverty line (using the LICO-AT).
* Within two years, ensure no one has to sleep outside, and end all homelessness within eight years (ensuring all homeless people have good quality, appropriate housing).

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk2.htm

9. Increase welfare payments, Ontario urged - February 9
(Toronto
Community Social Planning Council and others)

Ontario

Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired:
Taking Action on Poverty, Poor Health and Bad Jobs
February 9, 2009
Falling on the heels of the release of Ontario’s landmark poverty reduction strategy, Sick and Tired paints a grim picture of the health of the province’s poorest residents. This new report from the Community Social Planning Council of Toronto, University of Toronto’s Social Assistance in the New Economy Project and the Wellesley Institute documents the compromised health of social assistance recipients and the working poor in Ontario. It includes practical and pragmatic recommendations to strengthen the province’s poverty reduction plan, address the increased burden of ill health among poor people in Ontario, and promote equitable access to health services in Ontario. In addition, many of our recommended actions will promote much-needed economic stimulus as an antidote to Ontario’s struggling economy and promote cost savings in the health care system. This is a companion to our research, released in December, which looks at the health status of poor people across Canada and is called Poverty Is Making Us Sick (link below).
Partners:
* Wellesley Institute
* Social Assistance in the New Economy
* Community Social Planning Council of Toronto

Complete report:

Sick and Tired: The Compromised Health
of Social Assistance Recipients and the Working Poor in Ontario
(PDF - 5.3MB, 35 pages)
February 2009

Related links:

Poverty is making us sick : A comprehensive survey
of income and health in Canada
(PDF - 522K, 39 pages)
By Ernie Lightman Ph.D, Andrew Mitchell and Beth Wilson
December 2008
Source:
Social Assistance in the New Economy

From The Toronto Star:

Higher welfare payments urged:
Report considers ways province can help solve chronic health problems affecting poor Ontarians
February 9, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Queen's Park should boost welfare payments and improve access to disability assistance for Ontarians who can't work for health reasons as a remedy for chronic health problems among the poor, according to a report produced by the Community Social Planning Council, with the University of Toronto and the Wellesley Institute. People on welfare are 10 times more likely to have attempted suicide than those living on middle- or upper-incomes, notes the report, which is to be released today.

The poverty-health link
Editorial
February 10, 2009
Money may not buy happiness, but it does do wonders for your health. A new study – by the Community Social Planning Council, University of Toronto and the Wellesley Institute – has drawn a direct link between poverty and ill health. Ontarians on welfare suffer from diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, mood disorders and other chronic ailments at up to four times the rate of middle- or upper-income earners. Such findings are always disturbing, but given the current economic downturn, there's even greater cause for concern over this study.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

10. What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
---
Study: Persistence in postsecondary education in Atlantic Canada, 2001/2002 to 2004/2005 - February 12
-- Canadian Economic Observer - February 2009 - February 12
--- Households and the Environment Survey, 2007 -
February 10
--- Legal Aid in Canada: Resource and Caseload Statistics, 2007/2008 - February 10
--- Provincial and territorial government assets and liabilities, fiscal year ending March 31, 2007 - February 9

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

February 12, 2009
Study: Persistence in postsecondary education in Atlantic Canada, 2001/2002 to 2004/2005
Not all postsecondary students in Atlantic Canada remained at the same university or college until they graduated. Many of these students moved between institutions, and many others appeared to have temporarily suspended their postsecondary education for short periods.

Related links:

Moving Through, Moving On: Persistence
in Postsecondary Education in Atlantic
Canada, Evidence from the PSIS

Executive summary (HTML)
Complete report (PDF - 604K, 91 pages)
February 2009
This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on Postsecondary Education (PSE) pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the Postsecondary Student Information System (“PSIS”)
by Ross Finnie and Theresa Qiu

February 12, 2009
Canadian Economic Observer - February 2009
1. Sections 2. Tables 3. Charts 4. Appendices 5. User information 6. Related products
[ earlier issues of the Canadian Economic Observer ]

February 10, 2009
Households and the Environment Survey, 2007
Increasing numbers of Canadian households are taking advantage of energy and water-saving devices in their home, and environmental issues are influencing household purchasing decisions and consumer habits.
[ Households and the Environment 2007 (PDF - 518K, 102 pages) ]

---

February 10, 2009
(under New Products)
Legal Aid in Canada:
Resource and Caseload Statistics, 2007/2008
(PDF - 616K, 127 pages)
February 2009
* In 2007/2008, $670 million was spent on providing legal aid services in 10 provinces and territories. 1 This represents over $20 for every person living in these jurisdictions.
* In the last five years, legal aid spending after inflation has decreased just as many times as it has increased, but on average, it has risen about 1% per year. Compared to the previous year, spending in 2007/2008 was virtually unchanged, up by less than one-half of one percent.
[ Highlights ]
[ Legal Aid in Canada, Description of Operations (March 2001, PDF - 1MB, 204 pages) ]

---

February 9, 2009
Provincial and territorial government finance:
Assets and liabilities, fiscal year ending March 31, 2007

As of March 31, 2007, the net financial debt (defined as the excess of liabilities over financial assets) of provincial and territorial general governments totalled $242.4 billion, down $10.1 billion or 4.0% from March 31, 2006. Financial assets increased by $39.7 billion, larger than the growth of $29.5 billion in liabilities. The increase in assets was mainly the result of a $27.4 billion increase in securities held by provincial and territorial general governments. All provinces, except Quebec, saw an improvement in their financial position for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2007.
- incl. links to two tables:
* Net financial debt of provincial and territorial general governments at March 31, 2007
* Provincial and territorial general governments net financial debt at March 31

---

The Daily Archives - select a year and month from the drop-down menu to view releases in chronological order

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - February 11

From the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):

February 11, 2009

Child care by design
11 Feb 09
- 1995 video produced by CRRU about child care architecture and design principles is now available online.

Early childcare and child development
11 Feb 09
- Research from UK’s Millennium Cohort Study published in the Journal of Social Policy “tests how different forms of child care play a role in the production of cognitive skills and the behavioural development”.

Cost-benefit review of work-life balance practices - 2009
11 Feb 09
- Report for the Canadian Association of Administrators of Labour Legislation reviews research and literature on supporting employees’ caregiving responsibilities.

CUPE: Harper fails child care again
11 Feb 09
- Report card from the Canadian Union of Public Employees on the Conservative government’s record on child care.

Federal early childhood policy guide for the first 100 days
11 Feb 09
- Policy brief from the National Institute for Early Education Research [US] created at the request of President Barack Obama.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Female workers can jolt economy; look at Japan [US]
9 Feb 09

· The daycare dollar gap [CA-ON]
8 Feb 09

· Providers fear big cuts to local daycare spaces [CA-ON]
7 Feb 09

· Why child care, Head Start funding DO belong in the stimulus package [US]
Feb 09

· Federal budget leaves women behind, professor says [CA]
5 Feb 09

· Threat to daycare spaces prompts calls for Ottawa, Queen's Park to step in [CA-ON]
5 Feb 09

· CBC's The National: Affordable daycare
4 Feb 09

· European Parliament criticizes Czech presidency's proposals on childcare [EU]
3 Feb 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(
Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S). ===> the content of this link changes twice a week
IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches twice a week. Each issue of the dispatch provides links to U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media.

February 12, 2009
* Joblessness and Unemployment
* Privatization of Social Services
* Medicaid Eligibility - Utah
* Kids Count Reports - Illinois, West Virginia
* Homeless Students and Families
* Education Reform - Colorado, Texas
* Economic Stimulus Spending
* Racial Disparity in Mortgage Lending - Minnesota
* Disaster Housing Assistance Program - Gulf Coast
* Earned Income Tax Credit
* Prison Overcrowding - California

February 9, 2009
* Joblessness and Unemployment
* Economic Stimulus Package
* State Budgets and Medicaid Spending
* Children's Health Insurance Coverage
* Framing of "Welfare" and "Safety Net"
* Enrollment in TANF Program
* Poverty Measurement in the U.S.
* High School Graduation Rates - Massachusetts, North Carolina
* Low-income Districts and School Funding - Ohio, North Carolina
* Low-income Students and the Achievement Gap - New Jersey
* Rural Areas and Need for Assistance - Alaska
* Services and Housing for the Homeless
* Disaster Housing Assistance Program - Louisiana
* Earned Income Tax Credit - Louisiana

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

If you wish to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail,
please send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - President Obama's economic stimulus plan

In stimulus, social programs get largest boost in decades
By Michael Fletcher (The Washington Post)
WASHINGTON – The massive economic stimulus package approved by Congress dramatically ramps up spending for a broad array of social programs for needy Americans in a way not seen since the launch of the Great Society programs. (...) The bill includes billions in new money for food stamps, expanded child care and services for the homeless. It funds long-sought increases in education funding for low-income and special education students, new refundable tax credits for low-income workers, stepped-up job training, expanded health-care coverage, and an increase of $100 a month in unemployment insurance.
Source:
Northwest Herald (Illinois)

Highlights of House-Senate economic stimulus plan
By The Associated Press
February 14
Highlights of a $787 billion compromise version of President Barack Obama's economic recovery plan. Additional debt costs would add about $330 billion over 10 years.
Many provisions expire in two years.
---
* $40 billion to provide extended unemployment benefits through Dec. 31, and increase them by $25 a week; $20 billion to increase food stamp benefits by 14 percent; $4 billion for job training; $3 billion in temporary welfare payments.
* $14.2 billion to give one-time $250 payments to Social Security recipients, poor people on Supplemental Security Income, and veterans receiving disability and pensions.
*
$86.6 billion to help states with Medicaid; $24.7 billion to provide a 65 percent subsidy of health care insurance premiums for the unemployed under the COBRA program; $19 billion to modernize health information technology systems; $10 billion for health research and construction of National Institutes of Health facilities; $1 billion for prevention and wellness programs.
*
$44.5 billion in aid to local school districts to prevent layoffs and cutbacks, with flexibility to use the funds for school modernization and repair; $25.2 billion to school districts to fund special education and the No Child Left Behind law for students in K-12; $15.6 billion to boost the maximum Pell Grant by $500 to $5,350; $2 billion for Head Start.
*
$4 billion to repair and make more energy efficient public housing projects; $2 billion for the redevelop foreclosed and abandoned homes; $1.5 billion for homeless shelters; $2 billion to pay off a looming shortfall in public housing accounts.
*
About $116 billion for a $400 per-worker, $800 per-couple tax credits in 2009 and 2010. For the last half of 2009, workers could expect to see about $13 a week less withheld from their paychecks starting around June. Millions of Americans who don't make enough money to pay federal income taxes could file returns next year and receive checks. Individuals making more than $75,000 and couples making more than $150,000 would receive reduced amounts.
*
About $70 billion to spare about 24 million taxpayers from being hit with the alternative minimum tax in 2009. The change would save a family of four an average of $2,300. The tax was designed to make sure wealthy taxpayers can't use credits and deductions to avoid paying any taxes. But it was never indexed to inflation, so families making as little as $45,000 could get significant increases without the change. Congress addresses it each year, usually in the fall.
*
About $15 billion to provide the $1,000 child tax credit to more families that don't make enough money to pay income taxes.
*
$4.7 billion to expand the Earned Income Tax Credit for low-income families with three or more children.
* much more...

---

Preliminary Summary of Key Provisions of the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Aimed
at Improving the Lives of Low-Income Americans
(PDF - 184K, 5 pages)
February 13, 2009
Preliminary summary of the key provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act aimed at improving the lives of low-income Americans.
Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)
The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) is a national nonprofit that works to improve the lives of low-income people. CLASP’s mission is to improve the economic security, educational and workforce prospects, and family stability of low-income parents, children, and youth and to secure equal justice for all.

---

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009:
State-by-State Estimates of Key Provisions Affecting
Low- and Moderate-Income Individuals

February 13, 2009
- short descriptions and tables with estimated state-by-state impacts of the following key provisions:
* Temporary Increase in State FMAP (federal matching funds for Medicaid assistance)
* State Fiscal Stabilization Fund
* Education
* Unemployment Insurance
* Child Care
* Child Support
* Training and Employment Services
* Food Stamp (or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance) Program
* Emergency Shelter Grant Program
* Child Tax Credit
* Making Work Pay Tax Credit
Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)

---
NOTE : Click the CLASP and CBPP home page links above
to see other analyses of the economic stimulus package.
---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

14. Target Practice: Lessons for Poverty Reduction (U.S.) - January 2009
(Center for Law and Social Policy)

[United States]

Target Practice: Lessons for Poverty Reduction (PDF - 355K, 20 pages)
January 2009
By Jodie Levin-Epstein and Webb Lyons
Target Practice outlines how governments (local, state and the federal) can use targets (goals and timelines to achieve those goals) as a policy tool for reducing poverty by drawing on lessons learned from targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and homelessness.
Source:
Poverty and Opportunity
[Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) - U.S.]
CLASP is a national nonprofit that works to improve the lives of low-income people. CLASP’s mission is to improve the economic security, educational and workforce prospects, and family stability of low-income parents, children, and youth and to secure equal justice for all. ]

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

15. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content

APO Weekly Briefing
The content of this page changes each week, and it includes links to a few book/report reviews, about two dozen new reports, a few job ads and 60 events (mostly conferences) of interest to social researchers...
Source:
Australian Policy Online (APO) - home page
With nearly 120 member centres and institutes, Australian Policy Online offers easy access to much of the best Australian social, economic, cultural and political research available online.
NOTE: the APO home page includes links to the five most popular reports on the APO website, and this list is updated each week.

APO Archive
The APO archive is grouped into 23 subject areas, with entries appearing in reverse chronological order.
* Ageing *Asia and the pacific * Citizenship and the law * Disability * Economics and trade * Education * Employment and workplace relations * The environment * Foreign policy and defence * Gender and sexuality * Health * Housing * Families and households * Immigration and refugees * Income, poverty and wealth * Indigenous * Media, communications and cultural policy * Politics and government * Population, multiculturalism and ethnicity * Religion and faith * Rural and regional * Science and technology * Social policy * Urban and regional planning * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

16. CRINMAIL - February 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

12 February 2009 - CRINMAIL 1058
* CAMPAIGN: Complaints Mechanism - Lobbying Documents
* INDIA: Still Out of Focus - The State of India's Children 2008 [publication]
* HIV and AIDS: Home Truths: Facing the Facts on Children, AIDS, and Poverty [publication]
* ISRAEL-OPT: Children in Gaza left without textbooks as paper ban continues [news]
* INDONESIA: Workers in the Shadows: Abuse and Exploitation of Child Domestic Workers [publication]
* EMPLOYMENT: UNICEF
**NEWS IN BRIEF**
**QUIZ**

10 February 2009 - CRINMAIL 1057
* CRC: General Comment no 11: Indigenous Children and their Rights under the Convention [news]
* UN: Full of Promise: How the UN's Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism can better protect children [publication]
* SIERRA LEONE: FGM group 'kidnaps journalists' [news]
* MALI: Students left behind in race for education MDG [news]
* KENYA: Address Children’s Rights in AIDS Strategy [news]
* INDONESIA: Southeast Asia conference on child sex tourism [event]
* EMPLOYMENT: UNICEF
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 300+ earlier weekly issues
, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


***********************************

Life's Unanswered Questions

***********************************

If drinking and driving is illegal, why do bars have parking lots?

Are those cookies made with real Girl Scouts?

After eating, do amphibians have to wait one hour before getting out of the water?

After they make styrofoam, what do they ship it in?

Are part-time band leaders semi-conductors?

Before they invented drawing boards, what did they go back to?

Can a storm be officially designated as a tornado without touching down at a trailer park?

Can atheists get insurance for acts of God?

Can I yell MOVIE in a crowded firehouse?

Can you be a closet claustrophobic?

Crime doesn't pay... does that mean my job is a crime?

Did Noah keep his bees in archives?

Did Washington flash a quarter when asked for ID?

Do cemetery workers prefer the graveyard shift?

Do files get embarrassed when they get unzipped?

Do infants enjoy infancy as much as adults enjoy adultery?

Do Lipton employees take coffee breaks?

What happens if you get scared half to death twice?

What happens to an 18 hour bra after 18 hours?

What if you're in hell, and you're mad at someone, where do you tell them to go?

Source:
Life's Unanswered Questions
http://coolsig.com/lifes_questions1.html
(click for seven pages of questions)


***************************

And, in closing...

***************************


Green Ottawa
http://www.GreenOttawa.ca
Green Ottawa is a network and gateway to everything green and environmental in the area -- people, places, organizations, events, jobs, volunteering and participation. It's for everybody who wants to help grow a greener, more sustainable region.

Fat cats
http://tinyurl.com/m423r

2009 U.S. Presidential Inauguration Photo - SUPER HI-DEF
http://tinyurl.com/c8jabs
Zoom in ('double-click' an area) ....and watch it focus.
Then zoom some more... and wait for focus.
Click and drag to move the photo around.
This picture was taken with a robotic camera and weighs in at 1,474 megapixel. (295 times a 5 megapixel camera)
It was a Canon that pulled together over 200 individual shots.

Some guitars have 12 strings --- not this one. (video)
http://dilidoo.com/2009/02/11/to_play_the_one_string_guitar_is_actually_fun_2_2_mb.html