Canadian Social Research Newsletter
July 15, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,563 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. How Canada Performs 2011: A Report Card on Canada (Conference Board of Canada)
2. Ontario Trillium Benefit combines benefits under three programs - effective July 2012
3. Speak. Share. Thrive. – The Alberta Social Policy Framework Online (Government of Alberta) - June/July 2012
4. Tackling the income gap in Canadian cities (Toronto Star) - July 8
5. Stretched Beyond Human Limits: Death By Poverty in First Nations (Canadian Review of Social Policy, issue No. 65-66 - 2011) - June 2012
6. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Study : Profile and Labour Market Outcomes of Doctoral Graduates from Ontario Universities - July 9
7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

8. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
9. [United States] Poverty in America : A Series by NPR (National Public Radio)
10. [United States] America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012 (ChildStats.gov - U.S. Government) - July 13
11. [United States] The Green Book (U.S. Government) - March 30, 2012

12. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. How Canada Performs 2011: A Report Card on Canada
(
Conference Board of Canada)

How Canada Performs 2011 : A Report Card on Canada
http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/default.aspx
How Canada Performs is a multi-year research program to help leaders identify relative strengths and weaknesses in Canada’s socio-economic performance. This website is the flagship product. It helps policy makers, organization leaders, and all Canadians answer the following questions: How does Canada’s quality-of-life report card compare to that of other countries? Is Canada’s quality of life sustainable? Has it improved? What must Canada do to provide a high and sustainable quality of life for all Canadians?

The site has over 80 pages covering a wide number of indicators, including:
· Employment · GDP Growth · Income Inequality (Canada and the world) · Child Poverty· Elderly Poverty · Disabled Poverty · Life Expectancy · University Completions and many more.

Each indicator contains data from 17 countries:
* Australia * Austria * Belgium* Canada * Denmark * Finland * France * Germany * Ireland * Italy * Japan * Netherlands * Norway * Sweden * Switzerland *
United Kingdom * United States

Details and Analysis:
Categories and indicators

http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details.aspx
- incl. links to ALL indicators under the following categories:
* Economy * Environment * Society * Health * Innovation * Education and Skills

Selected content from the
"Society" category:

Jobless Youth --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/jobless-youth.aspx
Disabled income --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/disabled-income.aspx
Elderly poverty --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/elderly-poverty.aspx
Child poverty --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/child-poverty.aspx
Working-age poverty --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/working-age-poverty.aspx
Income inequality --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society/income-inequality.aspx
Intergenerational income mobility --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society/intergenerational-income-mobility.aspx
Social isolation --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society/social-isolation.aspx
Gender income gap --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society/gender-income-gap.aspx
---
To access the links for the following categories, click "Details and analysis" above.
---
Voter turnout
Confidence in parliament
Homicides
Burglaries
Assaults
Life satisfaction
Acceptance of diversity
Suicides

---

Society : Key Messages and links
http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society.aspx
* Canada earns a “B” and ranks 9th out of 17 peer countries in the Society report card. Canada’s middle-of-the-pack ranking means it is not living up to its reputation or its potential.
* Canada’s social performance has remained a “B” over the last two decades.
* Canada’s “D” grade on the poverty rate for working-age people, and its “C” grades on child poverty, income inequality, gender equity, and assaults are troubling for a wealthy country.
---
NOTE : When the U.N. Rapporteur on Food Security said pretty much the same thing recently about poverty and inequality in pretty much the same words [ http://goo.gl/15eP9 ], senior federal ministers called him "a bit patronizing" and "ill-informed."
So is the Conference Board of Canada also "a bit patronizing" and "ill-informed"??
---

Health : Key Messages and links
http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/Health.aspx
* Canada maintains its “B” grade and 10th-place ranking among the 17 peer countries.
* As the population ages, chronic diseases will place an increasing burden on Canadian society.
* Obesity is one of the most significant contributing factors to many chronic conditions, including heart disease, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes.

Source:
How Canada Performs 2011 : A Report Card on Canada

http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/default.aspx
Conference Board of Canada

http://www.conferenceboard.ca/
The Conference Board builds leadership capacity for a better Canada by creating and sharing insights on economic trends, public policy and organizational performance.

---

- Go to the Banks and Business Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bookmrk3.htm

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

2. Ontario Trillium Benefit combines benefits under three programs - effective July 2012

From the
Ontario Ministry of Finance:

Ontario Trillium Benefit
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/credit/otb/index.html
Starting July 2012, the Ontario Trillium Benefit (OTB) combines the following into one monthly payment:
* Ontario Sales Tax Credit
* Ontario Energy and Property Tax Credit
* Northern Ontario Energy Credit
If you are receiving any of the three tax credits that have been rolled into the new Ontario Trillium Benefit your money will be coming to you by direct deposit or by mail. Starting July 2012, you will be paid monthly rather than having to wait until after you file your tax return next year.

Source:
Ontario Ministry of Finance
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/credit/otb/index.html

---

From the
Toronto Star:

Ontario’s Trillium Benefit: A new way to help the poor
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/1225861
July 12, 2012
Laurie Monsebraaten
Social Justice Reporter
22 Comments
About 3.5 million low- and moderate-income Ontarians this week are receiving their first Trillium Benefit, a provincial initiative that combines three quarterly tax credits into a new monthly payment.
The benefit, which includes the provincial sales, property and energy tax credits, was first announced in the 2011 budget and provides monthly payments of up to $113 for a single person, $142 for a single parent and $124 for a senior.
(...)
Designed to help households better manage their monthly expenses by providing the money earlier and more frequently than before, the benefit, worth about $2.4 billion annually, is the first outside Quebec to be paid monthly through the tax system to all low- and moderate-income people. Quebec’s monthly “Solidarity Tax Credit” was also introduced this month. Until now, only seniors, the disabled and parents with children received monthly benefits through the tax system. And it is why some social policy experts say the benefit sets the stage for the introduction of a guaranteed annual income.

“It puts the delivery platform in place,” said John Stapleton, a retired social services ministry official who now advises government and community agencies on policies to ease poverty. “The next step would be to increase the amount of money available,” he said. Stapleton encouraged the government to move to monthly tax credits and also appears in a finance ministry video explaining the new benefit.

The benefit is part of the province’s poverty reduction strategy, said Children and Youth Minister Eric Hoskins who oversees the province’s anti-poverty file.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

Related links:

The Trillium Benefit
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/credit/otb/index.html
Starting July 2012, the Ontario Trillium Benefit (OTB) combines the following into one monthly payment:
*
Ontario Sales Tax Credit * Ontario Energy and Property Tax Credit * Northern Ontario Energy Credit
If you are receiving any of the three tax credits that have been rolled into the new Ontario Trillium Benefit your money will be coming to you - by direct deposit or by mail - every month.
Source:
Ontario Ministry of Finance
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/
)

---

Québec Solidarity Tax Credit
http://www.revenuquebec.ca/en/citoyen/credits/credits/credit_remb/solidarite/default.aspx
On July 1, 2011, the solidarity tax credit took effect, thereby replacing the QST credit, the property tax refund and the credit for individuals living in northern villages.
Source:
Revenu Québec

http://www.revenuquebec.ca/

Version française:
Crédit d'impôt pour solidarité – Programmes et crédits
http://www.revenuquebec.ca/fr/citoyen/credits/credits/credit_remb/solidarite/default.aspx
Depuis le 1er juillet 2011, le crédit d'impôt pour solidarité remplace le crédit pour TVQ, le remboursement d'impôts fonciers et le crédit pour particulier habitant un village nordique.

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- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm

- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

3. Speak. Share. Thrive. – The Alberta Social Policy Framework Online - June/July 2012
(Government of Alberta)

Speak. Share. Thrive. – the Alberta Social Policy Framework online
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/
June/July 2012
The Government of Alberta is leading the development of a social policy framework that will guide the future of Alberta's social policy and programs. The Framework will describe how we create hope and opportunity for all Albertans by working together to improve social outcomes.
- includes links to the following:
*
Social Policy Framework 101 (frequelntly-asked questions) * Library * Blog * Survey * Discussion Kit * Guide to Participation * Help Guide * All Recent Changes

On the website you can register and create a use account. You can participate by completing the online survey [see below], by contributing to the blog [ http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/Blog ] and online discussions and adding to the information contained on the Wiki.

The survey and blog will be online until July 31, 2012. The wiki will remain open through the remainder of 2012. Submissions from community-led discussions are also requested by July 31, 2012. The initial public engagement will take place from June to July 31, 2012. Information collected about the vision, principles and strategies will be collected over the summer of 2012. This will inform further discussions with Albertans in the fall about roles, responsibilities and next steps for the framework.

Social Policy Framework Survey:
https://extranet.gov.ab.ca/opinio6/s
This survey was developed to better understand the opinions of Albertans on issues that matter to them and to determine priorities for the development of Alberta's Social Policy Framework. It consists of 16 questions and should only take about 15 minutes to complete.

Social Policy Framework 101 (frequently-asked questions)
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/Frequently_Asked_Questions_0

Guide to Participation
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/Guide_Participation
(...)
How to Get Involved:
* Read relevant documents.
* Participate in discussions in your community.
* Contribute by editing the wiki or writing a blog.
* Complete the survey.
* Send us your thoughts directly to hs.socialpolicy@gov.ab.ca

Discussion Kit
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/Discussion_Kit
These resources have been put together to help you and your community learn more about the Framework. You can download the resources and use them to start a conversation with your family, friends, colleagues, clients or board members.

---

From the
Social Policy Framework website:

Four Things We Know About Poverty
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/Blog/Four_Things_We_Know_About_Poverty
Posted by Alexa on 20 June 2012
1. We can’t address poverty without addressing income. (...)
2. Poverty is a complex problem with interlocking causes and effects and solutions must also be interlocking, comprehensive, and preventive. (...)
3. Poverty is an individual experience and society’s problem. (...)
4. Poverty comes with a price tag. (...)

Source:
Speak. Share. Thrive. – the Alberta Social Policy Framework online
http://socialpolicy.alberta.ca/
Government of Alberta

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Gilles' Gratuitous Suggestion To All Albertans : You have only until the end of July to present your views in this survey about the kind of Alberta you want. Complete the Social Policy Framework Survey "leading the development of a social policy framework that will guide the future of Alberta's social policy and programs." Click the survey link above and complete it now!

NOTE to the Alberta Government
: This is the most progressive shift in Alberta social policy since, well, since forever.
But I find it mildly perplexing that the timing and duration of the consultation are not very conducive to a high participation rate - the end of the school year and the start of summer mean the start of the vacation season, a time when many individuals and families are disconnected from the issues, either because they're at the cottage or otherwise away from their computer, or because they choose to take a mental health break from burning issues during the summer period.
Why not recognize that many individuals and families are away during July and allow a bit longer for input via the survey?
Better to take a bit longer to obtain the views of all those who would want to participate in the process...

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- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

4. Tackling the income gap in Canadian cities- July 8
(Toronto Star)

Tackling the income gap in Canadian cities
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/1223391
July 8, 2012
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Toronto’s middle-class suburbs of the 1970s have turned into “urban deserts” of growing poverty while the city centre has become an enclave for the ultra rich.
But in the Montreal region, the suburbs are growing increasingly wealthy while poverty is spreading in the band of communities just outside the city’s historic downtown. Meantime, the wealthy suburbs of North and West Vancouver have grown richer while poverty has spread east and south of downtown since 1970.

What’s common for all three cities, however, is that the middle class is shrinking, notes University of Toronto researcher David Hulchanski, whose ground-breaking The Three Cities Within Toronto report in 2007 was the first to map Statistics Canada Census income data over time by neighbourhood. The new Montreal and Vancouver research, presented at U of T last week and not yet published, is part of a seven-year study of neighbourhood inequality in six Canadian cities that Hulchanski hopes will help explain why this is happening and what measures can halt or at least ease the 35-year-trend.

Calgary, Winnipeg, Halifax and the Greater Toronto Area are the other Canadian cities that will be examined in the study.

134 Comments about this article:
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/1223391#comments

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

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- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

5. Stretched Beyond Human Limits: Death By Poverty in First Nations - June 2012
(Canadian Review of Social Policy, issue No. 65-66 - 2011)

Stretched Beyond Human Limits: Death By Poverty in First Nations (PDF - 240K, 16 pages)
http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/crsp/article/viewFile/35220/32057
June 2012
By Pamela D. Palmater
“Indian” policy in Canada has been historically based on the objective of assimilating the Indigenous population. There has been recent movement to create policies that support First Nations’ self-governance, yet, the Indian Act and its related policies have not been amended to reflect this change. Thus federal policy now hovers between the two conflicting objectives. The result is chronic poverty in First Nations, a worsening problem that has stymied federal policy-makers.

Source:
Issue No. 65-66 (2011) of the
Canadian Review of Social Policy (CRSP)
http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/crsp/issue/view/2005/showToc
NOTE: The above article is a free sample of the type of content that you'll find in CRSP.
To access other articles in this issue and in the archives, click the "Subscription information" link below.

Archives - back to 1993
http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/crsp/issue/archive

Subscription information
http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/crsp/about/subscriptions

Canadian Review of Social Policy - Home Page
http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/crsp/index
The Canadian Review of Social Policy/Revue canadienne de politique sociale is a scholarly and bilingual journal of progressive social policy. It aims to promote the exchange of ideas amongst a network of people involved in education, the public sector and social movements in the field of Canadian social policy and administration. CRSP/RCSP publishes analyses of historical and current developments, issues, debates, and reviews of recent publications.

---

- Go to the First Nations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm

---

- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

6. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Study :
Profile and Labour Market Outcomes of Doctoral Graduates from Ontario Universities - July 9

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

July 14, 2012

StatCan has shifted into low gear as the dry, sweltering summer is upon us --- or perhaps it's because they're still reeling at the depth of the Harper Government™ cuts to Canada's premier statistical agency.

There's nothing particularly noteworthy in the social policy field that was released in the past week except for a July 9 study entitled Profile and Labour Market Outcomes of Doctoral Graduates from Ontario Universities:
[ http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-595-m/81-595-m2012098-eng.htm ]

Related research papers:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=81-595-M&chropg=1&lang=eng

Check recent issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?m=07&y=2012&s=monthly

---

Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

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- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

July 7, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Why universal childcare is essential for a more equal Canada
http://goo.gl/5t0s8
4 Jul 2012 | Canada
New blog from CRRU argues that a solid policy framework and sustained public funding to ensure a system of high quality early childhood education and care are integral to reducing inequality and creating a fairer, more inclusive Canada for all.

Starting well: Benchmarking early education across the world
http://goo.gl/Y7TJL
4 Jul 2012 | International
The Starting Well Index considers the relative availability, affordability and quality of preschool environments for children from 3 to 6 years old across 45 countries, encompassing the OECD and major emerging markets. Canada ranks 26th overall.

Childcare markets: Can they deliver an equitable service?
http://goo.gl/otKv1
4 Jul 2012 | International
Book edited by Eva Lloyd and Helen Penn "presents recent, significant research from eight nations where childcare markets are the norm" and "compares these childcare marketisation and regulatory processes across the political and economic systems in which they are embedded".

Quality matters in early childhood education and care: Czech Republic
http://goo.gl/56FUF
3 Jul 2012 | International
10 of 34 OECD countries are participating in the Quality Matters in ECEC: Country Policy Profiles. Canada is not included. This week the CRRU is featuring the Czech Republic where policy lever 2 - Designing and implementing curriculum and standards, is examined.

Universal Entitlements: How investments in the early years should be informed by research evidence about universal approaches
http://goo.gl/sDzO4
3 Jul 2012 | Europe
Briefing paper from Children in Scotland provides arguments to support a universal approach to early learning and care and states that, "even when targeted approaches work for individual families, their success can come at the expense of increased social solidarity and integration."

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Toronto Mayor’s Task Force on Child Care: Report offers little relief
http://goo.gl/Dz8ri
6 Jul 2012 | Ontario

Parental leave and childcare: Why can't we make it fair for women and men?
http://goo.gl/4GKTQ
4 Jul 2012 | Europe

Denmark invests to improve staff:child ratios
http://goo.gl/bekiC
4 Jul 2012 | Europe

Early years experts launch campaign to 'save childhood'
http://goo.gl/oDhfJ
3 Jul 2012 | Europe

Today's modern parent: Daycare poor, with little to save
http://goo.gl/yNimi
3 Jul 2012 | Canada

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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NOTE: For links to earlier (weekly) issues of this weekly alert going back to June 2009,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

8. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

July 13, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/07/13/
Affordable Care Act and Medicaid
Poverty in America : A Series by NPR (National Public Radio)
[See the first link below the next red horizontal bar.]
Kids Count Report - Nevada

July 12, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/07/12/
Health Coverage for the Poor - Pennsylvania
Public Transit and Employment
Medicaid Patients and Emergency Care

July 11, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/07/11/
Minimum Wage
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

July 10, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/07/10/
Welfare Purchase Restrictions
Economic Mobility
College Graduation Gap - Kentucky

July 9, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/07/09/
Jobless Benefit Overpayments
Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Coverage

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

9. [United States] Poverty in America : A Series by NPR (National Public Radio)

Poverty in America : A Series by NPR (National Public Radio)
[ http://www.npr.org/series/155932539/poverty-in-america ]

10. [United States] America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012 - July 13
(ChildStats.gov - U.S. Government)

America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012

Federal report shows drops in infant mortality, preterm birth rates
Annual statistics compilation notes increases in poverty, drop in secure parental employment
http://childstats.gov/americaschildren/press_release.asp
Press Release
July 13, 2012
The infant mortality rate, the preterm birth rate, and the adolescent birth rate all continued to decline, average mathematics scores increased for 4th and 8th grade students, the violent crime victimization rate among youth fell, as did the percentage of young children living in a home where someone smoked, according to the federal government's annual statistical report on the well-being of the nation's children and youth. However, the percentage of children living in poverty increased, and the percentage of children with at least one parent employed full time, year-round decreased, the report said.

These and other findings are described in America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012. The report was compiled by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, a working group of 22 federal agencies that produce and use data on issues related to children and families.

NOTE : The above press release includes a dozen of the most significant findings
from the report and links to previous reports in this series back to 1997.

Complete report:

America's Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012

HTML version:
http://childstats.gov/americaschildren/index.asp

PDF version (2.5MB, 24 pages) :
http://childstats.gov/pdf/ac2012/ac_12.pdf

Table of contents:

Introduction
Demographic Background
Family and Social Environment
Economic Circumstances
Health Care
Physical Environment and Safety
Behavior
Education
Health
America's Children at a Glance
Forum Agencies
List of Tables
List of Figures
Data Source Descriptions

Source:
Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics
ChildStats.gov
http://childstats.gov/
The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics is a group of 22 Federal government agencies involved in research and activities related to children and families. The mission of the Forum is to foster coordination and collaboration and to enhance and improve consistency in the collection and reporting of Federal data on children and families. The Forum also aims to improve the reporting and dissemination of information on the status of children and families.

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

11. [United States] The Green Book - March 30, 2012
(U.S. Government)

[U.S. Government]

Recent release from the
Committee on Ways and Means of the
United States House of Representatives:

The “Green Book” :
Background Material and Data on Programs
within the Jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means
http://greenbook.waysandmeans.house.gov/
March 2012
The Green Book published by the Committee on Ways and Means of the United States House of Representatives provides background material and data on the programs within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means.

This is the definitive authority on U.S. social security programs, in the opinion of many.

The Green Book is divided into two parts, Program Descriptions and Appendixes. In the Program Descriptions part, separate chapters are devoted to the major spending programs under the Committee’s jurisdiction: Social Security; Medicare; Supplemental Security Income; Unemployment Compensation; Earned Entitlements for Railroad Employees; Trade Adjustment Assistance; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families; Child Support Enforcement; Child Care; Social Services Block Grants; Child Welfare; and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation. Tax provisions are not included in the 2011 Green Book; however, readers are referred to the series of volumes entitled Tax Expenditures: Compendium of Background Material on Individual Provisions, prepared by the Congressional Research Service for the Senate Budget Committee and available on the Budget Committee’s website.

This edition of the Green Book also includes three appendices that provide cross-program information. The appendices provide information on Federal benefits and services for people with low income; social welfare programs in the U.S. territories; and Federal benefits for non-citizens.

Go to the 2011 Green Book home page
[
http://greenbook.waysandmeans.house.gov/ ]
to access the chapters below (only selected chapters are highlighted below):

Chapter 1 Social Security --- http://greenbook.waysandmeans.house.gov/2011
Chapter 2 Medicare - http://greenbook.waysandmeans.house.gov/2011-13
Chapter 3 Supplementary Security Income --- http://greenbook.waysandmeans.house.gov/2011-19
Chapter 4 Unemployment Insurance - http://greenbook.waysandmeans.house.gov/2011-25
Chapter 5 Earned Entitlements for Railroad Employees
Chapter 6 Trade Adjustment Assistance
Chapter 7 Temporary Assistance for Needy Families --- http://greenbook.waysandmeans.house.gov/2011-42
Chapter 8 Child Support Enforcement
Chapter 9 Child Care
Chapter 10 Social Services Block Grants
Chapter 11 Child Welfare
Chapter 12 Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation
Appendixes
Appendix A: Federal Benefits and Services for People With Low Income --- http://greenbook.waysandmeans.house.gov/2011-82
Appendix B: Social Welfare Programs in the Territories
Appendix C: Federal Benefits for Noncitizens

Sample content from Chapter 7 - TANF, the American welfare program for needy families with children:

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
- includes * Introduction and Overview * Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports * Tables and Figures * Legislative History * Links to Additional Resources

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ways and Means Committee Chair Dave Camp
Announces Release of the “Green Book”
http://waysandmeans.house.gov/News/DocumentSingle.aspx?DocumentID=288306
March 30, 2012
News Release
Washington, DC – Today, Committee on Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp (R-MI) announced release of the latest version of the Ways and Means “Green Book,” which is officially titled "Background Material and Data on the Programs within the Jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means." This document, prepared by the Congressional Research Service (CRS) under the direction of the staff of the Committee on Ways and Means, has served as an important reference for legislators, program administrators, researchers, and the public since it was first published in 1981.
(...)
The Green Book combines a description of key health, welfare, retirement, and related programs under the jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means along with current data on these programs, the populations they serve, and historical information relating to each program. It also contains data and discussion on cross-cutting matters of interest to the Committee, including federal policy affecting low-income households, noncitizen eligibility for federal benefit programs, and social welfare programs in the U.S. territories.

Source:
Committee on Ways and Means
of the United States Congress

http://waysandmeans.house.gov/

---

Earlier editions of the Green Book:
http://aspe.hhs.gov/greenbook/
- includes links to editions of the Green Book released in 2004 - 2000 - 1998 - 1996 - 1994

---

- Go to the Welfare in Canada vs the U.S. Links page :
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/canada_us_welfare.htm

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

12. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)
Latest issue:

11 July 2012 - CRINMAIL issue 1284
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4330
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Militants recruiting & abusing children
- Justice strikes back
- Human rights in the digital realm
- Setting the right (and wrong) standards
- Legal inconsistencies
- CRC call for input
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Greece
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1: (WITH table of contents)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010:

Option 2: (WITHOUT table of contents)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- On the CRINMAIL website --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

--------------------------------------------------

NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Dumber Than a Bag of Hammers

Interesting phrases that probably came from south of the Mason Dixon Line and east of the Mississippi River:

Dumber than a bag of hammers
This comment is made when you are indicating the level of someone's intelligence being very low. Example: "There goes Scott. I swear but I think he is dumber than a bag of hammers." You can also use "box of rocks".

Barking up the wrong tree
This has to do with using dogs to hunt - especially raccoons. You send the dogs out to flush out any potential targets which eventually end up trapped in a tree. The dogs settle in at the base of the tree and howl, allowing you to find them and the prey. However, raccoons are smart little critters and they can sometimes cross over to another tree using upper branches which means at that point, the dogs are "barking up the wrong tree". When used for something besides hunting, it means you think the wrong option was chosen when posed with a multiple choice decision. Example: "Mary thinks that Paul dipped her pigtail in the ink well. She's barking up the wrong tree because it was actually Peter."

Beat the tar out of
Another way of saying you are going to beat someone. Example: "Billy broke one of my new dishes. I am going home and beat the tar out of that boy!" I have always thought this related to beating the "devil" or evil out of someone so they would behave.

Beat like a rented mule - Used to describe any situation where the results were one sided or someone gettin' a whoopin'. Take for example in football: "Did you see last night's scores? Doyle beat South-Young like a rented mule! It was 44-7." You may have heard the punch line "it's a rental" which refers to how people treat rental cars (or anything else that is rented). I have also heard of someone being beaten "like a red headed step child."

Biting off more than you can chew
You have taken on too much. Example: "Look! Willy has started a fight with Melvin! I think Willy has bitten off more than he can chew!"

Can't see the forest for the trees
You are too close to the details to see the big picture. Example: "Juanita! If you wouldn't spend so much time trying to make that cake look so pretty you might have had the entire dinner ready on time. I swear but you can't see the forest for the trees sometimes!"

Caught with your pants down
Basically this means that you were faced with a situation that you were unprepared for. We can make the assumption here that this started in the days of people having outhouses. Example: "Ole Mr. Smith really surprised me with that pop quiz. He definitely caught me with my pants down."

Chew the fat
To have a conversation. Example: "Why don't you invite the Griffith family over so we can chew the fat and see how they are doing?"

Coon's age
This is a very general measure of time referring to the lifespan of a raccoon (on average about 2-3 years). It can be any length of time you choose but basically expresses that the length of time is too long. Example: "How have you been, Jimmy! I haven't seen you in a coon's age!"

Couldn't carry a tune in a bucket
You would use this expression to describe someone that does not sing well. Example: "Listen to that caterwaulin' from Ed! He's so tone deaf that he couldn't carry a tune in a bucket!"

Cow peeing on a flat rock
I have heard this expression used when it is pouring down rain. I cannot say that I have ever heard a cow peeing on a flat rock nor to do I aspire to hear this anytime in the future. Example: "That rain is coming down! It sounds like a cow peeing on a flat rock!"

Crotchety
The way I have heard this used typically refers to someone that is temperamental due to old age. Example: "My granddad is getting downright crotchety. He beat the tar out of his dog because it peed on the rug!"

Cut off your nose to spite your face
In doing something spiteful to someone else, you are willing to go do injury or damage to yourself to accomplish it. Example: "I wouldn't mess with Dave. He is so mean he would cut off his nose to spite his face."

Dagnabit
Another of the wonderful Southern expletives here in the middle of the "Bible Belt". I remember being in grade school using expletives of this nature that would allow you to "cuss" like our parents without using a true expletive. Teachers at my grade school kept an ear open for the real thing. You can imagine what "gosh darn it" and "geez" are replacing. Example: "Dagnabit! I just dropped my teeth into the soup kettle!"

Drawers
Another word for underwear. Example: "Look! I ripped my pants so badly that you can see my drawers."

Fart in church
Typically an indication that something is not a good idea. Example: "I suggested that we change the meeting time from one hour to two hours. That went over like a fart in church!" You can also use "like a lead balloon".

Fell out of the ugly tree
This is a useful phrase when commenting that someone is ugly. Example: "That Russell is so ugly he looks like he fell out of the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down!" You can also use "so ugly his mama had to tie a pork chop around his neck to get the dog to play with him". I have also heard, "so ugly they could make a train take a dirt road" and many, many more.

Going to hell in a handbasket
This phrase is a perfect way to remark about something going downhill fast. Example: "Look at all those ugly condos they built in the middle of that beautiful piece of land. That area is going to hell in a handbasket."

Source:
The internets


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And, in closing...
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A rare photo of the CSRL Guy *not* in front of the computer:

The Canadian Social Research Links Guy
fishing on the Mighty Gatineau River
(July 9-10, 2012)
http://goo.gl/l1kPO

(Catch-and-Release all the way.)

More photos:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/photo.htm

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Top Documentary Films Online
http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/

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Drifting through San Francisco (video, duration 9:51)
http://www.wimp.com/driftingthrough/
View full-screen if you can.
Incredible video, incredible driving skills!
[I would've needed at least two stops on the course to change my underwear.]

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Unusual Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses
http://www.theworldgeography.com/2012/06/unusual-bridges-for-animals-wildlife.html

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