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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 15, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,138 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.  Mind the Gap in Canadian unemployment stats (Globe and Mail) - November 9
2. Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan (New Brunswick Social Development) - November 13
3. [Ontario] More Support For Crown Ward Students [Seven new Crown Ward Education Championship Teams] (Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities)
- November 12
4. [Ontario] Ontario Court of Appeal decides immigration sponsors are not automatically responsible for family debts (Globe and Mail, Toronto Star) - November 12
5. Stop clawback of child benefits, P.E.I. urged (CBC) - November 12
6. What's New from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- A Poverty Reduction Strategy for Nova Scotia - November 2009
--- The Three Ghosts of Poverty - October 2009

7. Parliament should pass Bill C-304; Canada urgently needs national housing plan (The Wellesley Institute) - November 5
8.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
-Canadian Economic Observer November 2009 - November 12
----- What does the Pension Satellite Account tell about Canada’s pension system?
- Summary Table - Key Indicators (October 2007 -October 2009)
- General Social Survey: An Overview, 2009 - November 12
- Study: Canada's employment downturn, October 2008 to October 2009 - November 12

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - November 15

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
11. Million-Dollar Murray: Why problems like homelessness may be easier to solve than to manage (Gladwell.com) - February 13
12. Controversy and conversation continue about the transparency of microcredit lending organizations
13. Australian Policy Online - recent content
14. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - November 2009


Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. Mind the Gap in Canadian unemployment stats - November 9
(Globe and Mail)

From the Lies, Damn Lies and Statistics file:

Mind the gap
November 9, 2009
Canada's monthly unemployment statistics have a significant gap that must be filled. They do not reveal the number of people whose employment-insurance benefits have expired and who are still out of work. (...) People who have dropped off the unemployment rolls - and are thus no longer included in the numbers - may have found new jobs, but they may also have simply exhausted their benefits. That shifts them into a much more harrowing situation where they are likely facing dire financial straits and may be forced to consider welfare. But we have no way of knowing if that is the case. (...)
This is not just an issue of concern to economists interested in crunching the numbers to make their latest projections. It is about vital data that can direct governments and social agencies in their design of policies and their preparations to deliver resources to those most in need. Without these numbers, for example, no one knows how many people may be forced to seek welfare in the short term - a key issue for the provinces and municipalities that fund and administer the welfare system.
Source:
Globe and Mail

Related links:

Employment Insurance data don't count those who run out
Without statistics on the number of jobless Canadians whose employment insurance
benefits have been exhausted, it's difficult to gauge how many are headed for welfare.

By Tavia Grant - October 26, 2009
Source:
Globe and Mail

EI: Evidence of Exhaustion?
By Erin Weir - October 27, 2009
Source:
Progressive Economics Blog

StatCan tables by subject:
Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers

Source:
Statistics Canada

----------------------------

Back to the Future?
(Links to related TV clips that I found quite by accident
as I was looking for something else on the CBC Digital Archives page):

The exhaustees (TV clip, 6:10)
Broadcast Date: Nov. 4, 1982
With no work to be found amidst sky-high unemployment rates in 1982, Jim Lees reluctantly joins a club that is welcoming thousands of new members a month. "Exhaustees," as the government calls them, are people whose unemployment benefits have run out. From a former salary of $2,300 monthly, Lees is now applying for welfare benefits of just $800 to support his wife and two daughters. In this CBC-TV clip, his wife Wendy admits that while it bothers her to be forced onto welfare, she isn't in a position to refuse it.

Unemployment hits Windsor autoworkers (TV clip, 13:55)
Broadcast Date: Jan. 5, 1958
Frank Blair has been without a job for eight months. In his hometown of Windsor, Ont., the father of two (soon to be three) is not alone: some 21,000 members of the local labour force are out of work in late 1957, half of them workers in the city's idled auto plants.

Links to more historical resources about UNemployment Insurance from the CBC Digital Archives:
* What is social security? (In 1945, a panel of military men and women discuss unemployment insurance as part of Canada's social security system.)
* On the Dole: Employment Insurance in Canada
* So you need to collect UI?
* UI gets richer in 1971
* Gainfully unemployed
* The pogey police
* Unemployment reaches all-time high
* A Maritime way of life?
* Forget Commission seeks UI reform

Source:
CBC Digital Archives

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm
- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

2. Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan - November 13
(
New Brunswick Social Development)

New Brunswick's
Poverty Reduction Plan:

Social Development
Forum participants adopt first-ever poverty-reduction plan for province

News Release
November 13, 2009
SAINT JOHN (CNB) - The 50 participants attending the Final Forum on Poverty today adopted the first-ever poverty reduction plan for the province. Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan aims to reduce income poverty in the province by 25 per cent and deep income poverty by 50 per cent by 2015. "What has been agreed to here today is exceptional, and it will put us on the right path to achieving our poverty-reduction goals and helping thousands of New Brunswickers be more self-sufficient," said Premier Shawn Graham.

Overcoming Poverty Together:
The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan
(PDF - 100K, 5 pages)
November 13, 2009
By 2015, New Brunswick will have reduced income poverty by 25% and deep income poverty by 50%, and will have made significant progress in achieving sustained economic and social inclusion.
- includes a number of significant changes in social assistance (welfare) in New Brunswick both immediate and longer-term (over 5 yrs.)
- immediate changes to welfare in NB:
*** elimination of the interim social assistance rate program (and its punitive $294/mo. rate for single employable people);
*** extension of health card coverage for persons exiting social assistance for up to 3 years until a prescription drug program is introduced; and
*** the household income policy [PDF] will only be applied to social assistance recipients who are in spousal relationships (vs. single recipients sharing accommodation, e.g., students, siblings).
Over five years:
i. move from rules based to outcome based system;
ii. move from passive assistance to employment orientation;
iii. move from focus on income poverty to social and economic inclusion;
iv. restructure and increase social assistance rates including a new regime more appropriate for persons with disabilities;
v. significant overhaul of household income policy,
vi. introduction of vision and dental care for children in low-income families by April 1, 2011;
vii. provide more opportunities to keep earned income as individuals transition to work;
viii. reform wage exemptions to include a working income supplement;
ix. raise allowable asset exemption; and
x. link benefits such as child care, home heating and health to household income to the extent possible;
Other changes include an increase in the minimum wage, stable funding for homeless shelters, protection for roomers and boarders, and more....

Public engagement initiative:
Developing a poverty reduction plan
The official website of the New Brunswick government initiative to establish a poverty reduction plan
Source:
New Brunswick Social Development

Related link:

N.B. unveils sweeping changes to social assistance
November 13, 2009
The provincial government is promising sweeping changes to its social assistance system as part of a new poverty-reduction plan. Some of the changes will take effect immediately, while others will be implemented over the next five years, Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock said Friday after a two-day poverty forum in Saint John. Social assistance rates will immediately increase by 80 per cent for people on the "lowest rung" of the system, who currently live on less than $300 a month, he said. It's unclear how many people are included in that "single, employable adults" category. A 2008 report by the National Council of Welfare found New Brunswick paid the lowest amount by far to members of that group in 2007 — $3,258 a year. That rate would have to double to reach the Atlantic provinces average, the report said.
Source:
CBC New Brunswick

New Brunswick poverty strategy coming: premier
Premier Shawn Graham says poverty reduction must involve business and education initiatives.
November 12, 2009
Changes to combat poverty in New Brunswick could be implemented during the next year, says Premier Shawn Graham. About 50 people representing the non-profit sector, industry and government gathered in Saint John on Thursday to talk about ways to reduce poverty in the province. It is the final in a series of forums held across New Brunswick during the past year to help develop a strategy to reduce poverty and drive social change.
Source:
CBC New Brunswick

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

3. [Ontario] More Support For Crown Ward Students (Seven new Crown Ward Education Championship Teams) - November 12
(
Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities)

Ontario

More Support For Crown Ward Students
McGuinty Government Building Tomorrow's Highly Skilled Workforce

November 12, 2009
Ontario is helping more Crown wards succeed at college, university and apprenticeship training. Seven new Crown Ward Education Championship Teams will offer mentorship, peer support, motivation, and guidance to Crown wards across the province. This doubles the number of teams in Ontario to 14. The teams will help these students access and succeed in postsecondary education and training. Teams include volunteers from local school boards, Children's Aid Societies, postsecondary institutions, community agencies, Employment Ontario and provincial ministries. Support of Crown wards is part of Breaking the Cycle: Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy, which aims to reduce the number of children living in poverty by 25 per cent over five years -- lifting 90,000 kids out of poverty -- by boosting benefits for low-income families and enhancing publicly-funded education.

Learn more:
* Breaking the Cycle: Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy.
* Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities
* See how Ontario is helping to build a highly skilled workforce.
* ontario.ca/news
* Removing Education Barriers For Crown Wards.

Source:
Newsroom - Ontario Government

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

4. [Ontario] Ontario Court of Appeal decides immigration sponsors are not automatically responsible for family debts - November 12
(Globe and Mail, Toronto Star)

Court opens door to immigrant debt relief
By Nicholas Keung
November 12, 2009
People who found themselves with huge debts after sponsoring immigrants have won a landmark decision in Ontario's Court of Appeal. The court Thursday told the Ontario government to revisit its social assistance collection policies to recover debts owed by residents who sponsored immigrants to Canada. The court chided both the federal and provincial governments for disregarding the changing circumstances of the sponsors and the people they sponsored with their cut-and-dried collection policies.
Source:
Toronto Star

---

Sponsors not automatically responsible for family debts: court
Ontario Court of Appeal orders governments to stop automatically charging
individuals for social assistance debts of relatives they sponsored as immigrants;
ruling could cost governments millions

By Kirk Makin
November 12, 2009
The Ontario Court of Appeal has ordered governments to stop automatically charging individuals tens of millions of dollars for social assistance debts run up by family members who they had sponsored as immigrants. The Court said that it is unfair to force people to pay substantial sums of money on behalf of a relative they sponsored without first giving them an opportunity – on a case-by-case basis – to explain why they should not have to pay.
Source:
Globe and Mail

Read the court's ruling:

Mavi v. Canada (Attorney General), 2009
November 12, 2009
Ontario Court of Appeal

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

5. Stop clawback of child benefits, PEI urged - November 12
(CBC)

Prince Edward Island:

Stop clawback of child benefits, PEI urged
November 12, 2009
The P.E.I. government needs to stop clawing back the National Child Benefit from families on social assistance, the National Council of Welfare says. The council, an arms-length advisory group for the federal minister of human resources, notes P.E.I. is now in a minority among the provinces in clawing back the federal benefit. On the Island the money counts as income and is deducted from what a family receives from the province. (...) The National Council of Welfare was joined in its call by the P.E.I. Advisory Council on the Status of Women. In June, the Advisory Council produced a report card looking at the provincial government's progress on certain issues, including the clawback of the National Child Benefit.
Source:
CBC PEI

Related links:

National Council of Welfare
The National Council of Welfare (NCW) is an arm's length advisory body to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development on matters of concern to low-income Canadians.

From the
PEI Advisory Council
on the Status of Women:

PEI Equality Report Card (PDF - 403K, 20 pages)
June 2009
During the 2007 election, the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women introduced its plan for an Equality Report Card for PEI, and in June 2008, we published the first, pilot report. The Equality Report Card is a process to assess our Province’s progress towards women’s equality goals.
(...)
We urge the government to consult and collaborate with community-based organizations to develop a Poverty Reduction Strategy like those in other provinces. We see the three priority areas below as key elements of Poverty Reduction:
* Improvements to the Employment Standards Act * Investment in affordable, accessible, appropriate housing (incl. housing for seniors and persons with disabilities * Increase direct allowances to social services recipients to
cover all of their basic needs.
(...)
There has been no action towards the promised Poverty Reduction Strategy to consider how we are doing across the province and across departments to assist people who live in poverty. There is no political will to name the problem of poverty and to provide poverty reduction initiatives. The full-time position in government that is meant to be dedicated to Poverty Reduction has been vacant for over a year.

Source:
PEI Advisory Council
on the Status of Women

The PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women was established to advise the Minister Responsible with respect to matters relating to the status of women, the development of public awareness regarding issues affecting women, and the promotion of change in attitudes within the community in order that women may enjoy an equality of opportunity.
[ Related Press Release : Government Earns a C on 2009 Equality Report Card - June 16, 2009 ]

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Prince Edward Island Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pebkmrk.htm

6. What's New from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- A Poverty Reduction Strategy for Nova Scotia - November 2009
--- The Three Ghosts of Poverty - October 2009

New from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

A Poverty Reduction Strategy for Nova Scotia (PDF - 47K, 9 pages)
By Sherri Torjman
November 2009
In December 2007, the Government of Nova Scotia passed Bill 94, An Act to Establish a Poverty Reduction Working Group in Nova Scotia. The mandate of the Working Group was to prepare a report recommending strategies and priorities to reduce poverty. Based on the recommendations of the Working Group, the Government of Nova Scotia released on April 3, 2009 its Poverty Reduction Strategy entitled Preventing Poverty, Promoting Prosperity. The Strategy puts forward a framework for tackling the needs of persons living in and at risk of falling into poverty, while promoting prosperity for the province. Preventing Poverty, Promoting Prosperity is a multi-year plan with four main goals: enable and reward work, invest in households in need, focus on children, and coordinate and collaborate. The paper describes the various measures that have been undertaken or are being planned in order to achieve each of these goals.

The Three Ghosts of Poverty (PDF - 36K, 3 pages)
Sherri Torjman
October 2009
Three ghosts stalk far too many households involved in providing personal care and support to relatives with severe disabilities, or sick and aging parents. First, many persons with disabilities and seniors live on low incomes and caregivers spend much of their own money for basic food, heat and shelter. Second, caregivers’ own employment status and income can be jeopardized by the pressures of caregiving responsibilities. Third, caregivers often pay the additional costs of disability-related goods and services not covered by medicare or private insurance. The commentary considers various policy solutions: reforming the disability income system, expanding the Compassionate Care Leave under Employment Insurance, providing a modest caregiver allowance, turning caregiver tax measures into refundable tax credits and investing in the supply of disability supports.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Nova Scotia Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nsbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

7. Parliament should pass Bill C-304; Canada urgently needs national housing plan - November 5
(The Wellesley Institute)

Parliament should pass Bill C-304; Canada urgently needs national housing plan
November 5, 2009
The time is right for Parliament to pass Bill C-304, which directs the federal housing minister to consult widely and develop a national affordable housing plan within 180 days. The Wellesley Institute’s Michael Shapcott offered expert testimony at the Commons HUMA committee on Nov. 5 on the four key reasons for a comprehensive national housing framework.

Michael Shapcott's speaking notes (PDF - 237K, 4 pages)
November 5, 2009

Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ The Wellesley Institute ]
The Wellesley Institute is a Toronto-based non-profit and non-partisan research and policy institute. Our focus is on developing research and community-based policy solutions to the problems of urban health and health disparities.

Related links:

* Exciting news: Bill to create national housing plan passes second reading in House of Commons today (September 30, 2009)
* Bill C-304, An Act to ensure secure, adequate, accessible and affordable housing for Canadians
* Libby Davies, NDP Member of Parliament for Vancouver East
* Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (HUMA) Committee

---

Canadian Housing and Renewal Association
Releases National Affordable Housing Policy: Supports Bill C-304
OTTAWA, November 5, 2009
The Canadian Housing and Renewal Association (CHRA) will testify today at the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development (HUMA) hearing on Bill C-304 to call for an Affordable Housing Policy for Canada. (...) The CHRA Affordable Housing Policy we are releasing today clearly outlines the rationale, principles, roles and responsibilities that will create and maintain a sustainable housing system.

An Affordable Housing Policy for Canada
November 2009
Complete report (PDF - 423K, 4 pages)
Executive Summary (PDF - 467K, 10 pages)

Bill C-304, An Act to ensure secure, adequate, accessible and affordable housing for Canadians
(40th Parliament - 2nd Session; Jan. 26, 2009 - )
Libby Davies (Vancouver East)
- includes links to:
* Text of the Bill
* Major Speaker's Rulings and Statements (House of Commons)
* Major Speeches in Parliament
* Status of the Bill
* Bill Reintroduced
* Selected Recorded Votes
* Coming into Force Information

Source:
Canadian Housing and Renewal Association
Established in 1968, the Canadian Housing and Renewal Association is a national non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and strengthening the social housing sector. CHRA´s mission is to ensure that Canada has decent affordable housing for all.

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Canadian Economic Observer November 2009 - November 12
----- What does the Pension Satellite Account tell about Canada’s pension system?
--- Summary Table - Key Indicators (October 2007 -October 2009)
--- General Social Survey: An Overview, 2009
- November 12
-
Study: Canada's employment downturn, October 2008 to October 2009 - November 12

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

November 12, 2009
Canadian Economic Observer November 2009
This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations.
Table of contents:
1. Sections 2. Tables 3. Charts 4. Appendices 5. User information 6. Related products
Feature article:
What does the Pension Satellite Account tell about Canada’s pension system?
By Philip Cross and Joe Wilkinson
Statistics Canada initiated the creation of a Pension Satellite Account (PSA) to fully articulate the total wealth position of pensions at the beginning of each year (the stock); the inflows of contributions and income earned into these different plans; the outflow of withdrawals; and the revaluation of pension assets during the year to arrive at the wealth position at the end of each year.

Related subjects
o Economic accounts
o Financial and wealth accounts
o Income and expenditure accounts
o Income, pensions, spending and wealth
o Pension plans and funds and other retirement income programs

Summary Table - Key Indicators (October 2007 - October 2009)
- includes monthly figures for the following key indicators:
* Employment * Unemployment * Composite leading index * Housing starts * Consumer price index
* Real gross domestic product * Retail sales volume * Merchandise exports * Merchandise imports
Source:
Canadian Economic Observer

November 12, 2009
General Social Survey: An Overview, 2009
- incl. links to : Introduction * Background * Target population * Collection methodology * Content and product description
The two primary objectives of the General Social Survey (GSS) are:
a) to gather data on social trends in order to monitor changes in the living conditions and well-being of Canadians over time; and
b) to provide immediate information on specific social policy issues of current or emerging interest.

November 12, 2009
Study: Canada's employment downturn, October 2008 to October 2009
Employment declined much faster in the early months of the current economic downturn than it did in the early months of the recessions in 1981 and 1990. However, employment levels in the next seven months of this current downturn were relatively stable, while employment had continued to decline in previous downturns. In October 2008, employment had reached an all-time high in Canada. Five months later, it had fallen by 2.1%. After five months in 1981 and 1990, it had declined by 0.8% and 0.6%, respectively.
Related subjects:
o Labour
o Employment and unemployment
o Hours of work and work arrangements
o Industries
o Wages, salaries and other earnings
o Non-wage benefits

---

Check The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - November 15

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

November 15, 2009

How France is providing child care to a nation
11 Nov 09
- Study findings from projects sponsored by the French-American Foundation that sent US professionals to observe France’s early childhood system to inform US practice.

School closings and declining enrolment in Ontario
11 Nov 09
- Report from People for Education on school closing and the declining enrolment of students. Recommendations are provided.

Play and exploration: Early learning program guide
11 Nov 09
- Program guide from the Ministry of Education, Government of Saskatchewan, promoting high quality, age-appropriate, and play-based learning for 3-5 year olds.

From preschool pedagogy to nanotechnology: Education and research in Sweden
11 Nov 09
- Paper from the Ministry of Education and Research, Government of Sweden focusing on the Swedish education system and the Government’s policy on knowledge.

We CAN do better: 2009 update
11 Nov 09
- Report from NACCRRA examining US states child care centre licensing regulations and the oversight of those regulations.

A commitment to Ontario's children: Moving forward with full day early learning for four and five year olds
31 Oct 09
- Media and other documents focusing on Ontario's plan and the Premier's announcement to move forward with a full day of learning in Ontario for four and five year olds.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· UVic mulls 'big box' childcare; Large for-profit company would clear long waiting list for care
[CA-BC] 11 Nov 09

· Analysis: Why vouchers will always make sense
[GB] 11 Nov 09

· Education advocates urge Ont. to turn mothballed schools into community hubs
[CA-ON] 10 Nov 09

· Charles Pascal an excellent advocate for children
[CA-ON] 7 Nov 09

· Trader junks offer for ABC Learning centres
[AU] 6 Nov 09

· Corporate childcare is not the solution to University of Victoria crisis [CA-BC] 4 Nov 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

---

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

November 13:
Poor Nations and Climate Change
Joblessness and Unemployment
Poverty Measurement - Alabama
Food Stamp Participation and Eligibility - Rhode Island, Texas
Paid Sick Leave and H1N1
Child Hunger and Malnutrition

November 12:
Foreign Aid and the Poor - Honduras
TANF Job Training Program - Washington, DC
Report: Child Poverty - Northern Ireland

November 11:
Budget Cuts to Social Services - Indiana
Low-wage Work, Unemployment, and Household Debt
Affordable Housing and Public Housing - Hawaii

November 10:
High School Career Diplomas - Louisiana
Longer School Days and the Achievement Gap
States and Health Plans for the Poor
Children and Food Stamp Enrollment

November 9:
Opinion: Homelessness and Housing in the US
Foster Care Reform - Nebraska

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. Million-Dollar Murray: Why problems like homelessness may be easier to solve than to manage - February 13
(Gladwell.com)

Pause for reflection:

Million-Dollar Murray:
Why problems like homelessness may be easier to solve than to manage
February 13, 2006
"(...) Murray Barr used more health-care dollars than almost anyone in the state of Nevada. It would probably have been cheaper to give him a full-time nurse and his own apartment."
The cost of chronic homelessness in America, and Philip Mangano's solution.
Source:
Gladwell.com

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

12. Controversy and conversation continue about the transparency of microcredit lending organizations

Controversy and conversation continue about the transparency of microcredit lending organizations

Since Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in 2006 for their work on microcredit lending, a number of institutions working on similar issues have received a great deal of attention and press coverage. One such organization is Kiva, which was founded in 2005 by Matt and Jessica Flannery. Kiva prides itself on serving as a link "between small individual lenders and small individual borrowers", and on their website visitors can select the person they would like to support. Recently, this personal connection came under question by David Roodman, a research fellow at the Center for Global Development. In a lengthy blog post, Roodman questioned the direct one-to-one relationship between the lender and the borrower, while remaining largely positive about Kiva's mission. Some commentators have continued to raise the question of transparency, and in the wake of the news, Kiva amended a statement on their website to state simply "Kiva connects people through lending to alleviate poverty." This controversy has not been bad for Kiva, and the president of Kiva, Premal Shah, commented this week "If anything, it has drawn more people into the nuance and beauty of this model of microfinance. It's highly imperfect, but it's like a 3 ½ year-old child: it has a lot of potential." [KMG]

The first link below will take users to an article from this Monday's New York Times which talks about this recent controversy surrounding Kiva. The second link leads to an article from the Mercury News that provides additional background on the nature of microfinance programs and their mission. Moving on, the third link leads visitors to David Roodman's original blog post about Kiva. The fourth link will whisk users away to a post on creating a "real marketplace for development" by Dennis Whittle, the CEO of Global Giving. The fifth link leads to the Microfinance Gateway homepage. Here visitors can learn about how microfinance works in different countries around the world, read papers from their online library, and peruse announcements from the microfinance industry. The last link leads to the homepage of Kiva, and it's well worth looking at some of the profiles and success stories featured here.

Confusion on Where Money Lent via Kiva Goes
[Free registration may be required]
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/09/business/global/09kiva.html

Microfinance programs harness Web to connect borrowers and lenders
http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_13726179?nclick_check=1

Kiva is Not Quite What It Seems
http://blogs.cgdev.org/open_book/2009/10/kiva-is-not-quite-what-it-seems.php

Innocuous Changes vs. Grand Designs
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dennis-whittle/innocuous-changes-vs-gran_b_350588.html

Microfinance Gateway
http://www.microfinancegateway.org/p/site/m/

Kiva
http://www.kiva.org/

Reviewed by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2009.
http://scout.wisc.edu/

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

13. Australian Policy Online - recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

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New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

14. CRINMAIL - November 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

12 November 2009 - CRINMAIL 1125
* CRC: From moral imperatives to legal obligations [news]
* CRIN: Discrimination and the media
* UNICEF: The Development of Juvenile Justice Systems in Eastern Europe and Central Asia [publication]
* TURKEY: Govt to debate law on child protestors [news]
* BURMA/MYANMAR: Rights group demand Security Council protection for children [news]
* CHINA: Advocates urge child-abuse laws [news]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

10 November 2009 - CRINMAIL 1124
* EGYPT-NIGERIA: African Committee issues first concluding observations [news]
* IRAN: Revoke Death Sentences for Juvenile Offenders [news]
* PETITION: Lobby Europe to create an institutional mechanism for children’s participation
* ARGENTINA: Child benefits expanded to unemployed and informal workers [news]
* TANZANIA: Children's Act passed [news]
* CHINA: State to ban beating web addicts [news]
* EMPLOYMENT: Childhope
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

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Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



**********************************

What's that called again??

**********************************


Mid-men, the male versions of mid-wives, are called accouchers.

The plastic things on the end of shoelaces are called aglets.

The apparatus used in alcohol distilleries for freeing the spirit from water is called the dephlegmator.

One who speaks two languages - is bilingual - can be said to be diglot.

Ducks are never male. The males of the species are called drakes.

Shoemakers are commonly called cobblers but correctly speaking a cobbler is a shoe repairmen. A shoemaker is a cordwainer.

The white part of your fingernail is called the lunula.

The thin line of cloud that forms behind an aircraft at high altitudes is called a contrail.

A depth of 2 fathoms (3,6 metres) is called a Mark Twain. Originally a fathom was the space reached by with two arms outstretched.

The tendency of the leaves or petals of certain plants to assume a different position at night is called nyctitropism.

The back of the human hand is the opisthenar.

Someone who uses as few words as possible when speaking is called pauciloquent.

People who study fish are called ichthyologists.

Compulsive shopping was identified by a German psychiatrist almost a hundred years ago. Clinically it is known as oniomania. Shopaholics are the people who do not suffer from chrematophobia, which is the fear of touching money. Also see phobias

A philologist studies linguistics and etymology.

The hairless area of roughened skin at the tip of a bear's snout is called the rhinarium.

Source:
http://www.didyouknow.org/

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According to Alexa:

Canadiansocialresearch.net users come from these countries:
    * 30.6% Canada
    * 27.2% China
(eh?)
    * 17.5% United States
    * 24.5% OTHER

How Canadiansocialresearch.net is ranked around the world:
    * 57,113 Canada
    * 200,296 China
(eh?)
    * 635,954 United States

Source:
http://www.alexa.com


----------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------



Watch out for this guy --- he's got the clap!
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