Canadian Social Research Links logo 
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 16, 2011


Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,372 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:


Canadian content

1. Saskatchewan woman guilty of census refusal (CBC News) - January 14
2. [Toronto] Poverty by Postal Code 2 : Vertical Poverty (United Way Toronto) - January 12
3. ACJNet re-launched as three web portals : LawNet Alberta - LawNet Canada - LawNet Français - January 12
4. Poverty - The 1% Solution (Andrew Jackson in the Progressive Economics Forum) - January 11
5. [New Brunswick] The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Reality of Poverty in 2010 (Common Front for Social Justice) - December 2010

6. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Study: Comparing the 2008-2010 recession and recovery with previous cycles - January 13
7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - January 16

International content

8. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
9. Homelessness Resource Center (U.S. Government website)
10. Who is poor? Many of America's neediest may look a lot like you (STLtoday.com - St. Louis MO)
- January 7
11. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content
--- Financial and non-financial support to formal and informal out of home carers - January 5
--- Paternalism in social policy: when is it justifiable? - January 5
--- Homelessness Information Clearinghouse
12. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]


1. Saskatchewan woman guilty of census refusal - January 14
(CBC News)

Saskatchewan woman guilty of census refusal
Sandra Finley says she's also concerned that
Statistics Canada used the services of a U.S. military contractor, Lockheed Martin Canada.
January 14, 2011
A Saskatoon woman who refused to fill out a long-form census has been found guilty of violating Canada's census law. A provincial court judge ruled Thursday that community activist Sandra Finley's privacy rights were not violated by the requirement to fill out the long form in 2006. It's the same form, containing detailed questions about households that the Conservative federal government now says should not be mandatory. Finley was charged before the government made that decision.
Source:
CBC News

NOTE: The "Comments" section at the bottom of of this article contains 412 comments, the most popular of which was the following admonition from wise commenter "v0ci3cau3a", who wrote:

Canada asks precious little of their citizens. There is no mandatory military service. You can choose your religion, your school, your career. All they ask if that if called, you perform jury duty, and if asked, you fill out a long form census. You have to be extraordinarily self centered, selfish and unappreciative of all that this country and those who serve for it do for you, your family, your neighbours and your nation, to not fill in a census.

Nine hundred and eleven people agreed with this view.
I'm one of them.

-----------------------------------

Some recent Census news
from datalibre.ca:

* Race Questions and the Census - January 11, 2011
* Census update from Save the Census Campaign
- January 6, 2011
* Abolition to StatCan Cost Recovery Policy on the Census
- January 6, 2011

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

2. [Toronto] Poverty by Postal Code 2 : Vertical Poverty - January 12
(United Way Toronto)

Just released by the
United Way Toronto
:

Poverty by Postal Code 2 : Vertical Poverty
This report presents new data on the growing concentration of poverty in the City of Toronto and the role that high-rise housing is playing in this trend. The report tracks the continued growth in the spatial concentration of poverty in Toronto neighbourhoods, and in high-rise buildings within neighbourhoods. It then examines the quality of life that high-rise buildings are providing to tenants today. Its primary focus is on privately owned building stock in Toronto’s inner suburbs.

* Complete report (PDF - 8MB, 238 pages)
* Executive Summary (PDF - 25.4MB, 29 pages)
* Key findings
* Key maps
* Recommendations made by United Way Toronto
* Supplemental Resources
* Poverty by Postal Code (1)
- April 2004
- includes links to the full report, the executive summary and a speech by Frances Lankin about the report

United Way Toronto report reveals the geographic concentration
of poverty is growing vertically - in inner suburban high-rise apartments
.
Media Release
January 12, 2011
Agency's latest report shows the number of high poverty neighbourhoods in Toronto
has quadrupled, poverty has intensified and 92% more low-income families are living in high-rise buildings.

This research is part of United Way Toronto’s
Building Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy
.

Source:
United Way Toronto
Established in 1956, United Way Toronto is a charity working to advance the common good and create opportunities for a better life for everyone in our city. Working in partnership with others, we mobilize people and resources to address the root causes of social problems and to change community conditions for the better.

Related link:

Toronto’s poor concentrated in aging highrises
January 12, 2011
By Laurie Monsebraaten
They rise up among the postwar bungalows of Toronto's inner suburbs. Towering buildings that house hundreds of thousands of the city's poorest people. These apartments are often the first home for those who came to this country looking for a better life. Once built to house modest-income and middle-class families, these aging highrises have increasingly fallen into disrepair and become rife with problems — drug dealing, vandalism, bug infestations, overcrowding — and increasing poverty. That is the bleak reality for too many highrise dwellers in Toronto, according to Vertical Poverty, a landmark report released by the United Way Wednesday.
[ Comments (37) ]
Source:
Toronto Star

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

3. ACJNet re-launched as three web portals : LawNet Alberta - LawNet Canada - LawNet Français - January 12

Three new legal info portals launched with LawNet
Posted on: January 12, 2011
The Legal Resource Centre is pleased to announce the launch of LawNet (formerly ACJNet), three web portals that will help you find the legal-related information you need: LawNet Alberta, LawNet Canada, and LawNet Français.
LawNet connects you to resources that will help you understand the legal system so that you know what to expect when dealing with a legal problem.
More Information:

LawNet Alberta is a portal or collection of links to law-related information and educational resources on justice and legal issues of interest to Albertans. Our purpose is to create an educated public who understands their rights and responsibilities under the law, and who knows where to go for legal help and referral.
LawNet Alberta is a program of the Legal Resource Centre of Alberta Ltd, a non-profit and registered charity working in association with the Faculty of Extension, University of Alberta. It is supported by funding from the Alberta Law Foundation.

LawNet Canada is the website formerly known as the Access to Justice Network (ACJNet).
* Statutes and Regulations - includes links to all federal, provincial and territorial statues and regulations

LawNet Français est un portail ou une collection de liens vers des renseignements en matière juridique ainsi que des ressources éducatives concernant la justice et les enjeux juridiques d’intérêt pour les Canadiens. Notre but consiste à créer un public éduqué qui comprend ses droits et ses responsabilités dans le cadre de la loi, et qui sait où s’adresser pour trouver de l’aide juridique et des références.
[ Droit Canadien | Services | Centre de Ressources | Vulgarisation de l'Information Juridique | Recherche Juridique ]

NOTE: I found the reference to the launch of these law portals
in a recent news item from PovNet, which is well worth a visit in its own right.

- Go to the Alberta Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm
- Go to the Welfare and Welfare Reforms in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welref.htm
- Go to the Legislation and Law Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bookmrk.htm#Legislation

4. Poverty - The 1% Solution - January 11
(Andrew Jackson in the Progressive Economics Forum)

Poverty - The 1% Solution
Posted by Andrew Jackson
January 11, 2011
Statistics Canada provides free of charge a very rich set of data on income issues (see the StatCan link below), including low income (aka poverty) in 20/20 format. Here you can find data on the incidence of low income by four different measures; by family type; and by quite detailed geography. (You have to play around with the active dimension to get at all of the data. Clicking “show all” will indicate the total menu under a dimension.) The data include statistics on the depth of low income ie the degree to which the incomes of a particular group in low income fall short of the relevant poverty line. One measure provided is the shortfall of incomes of those in low income compared to the total income of the whole group.
One rather striking triple factoid is this.
In 2008, the incidence of low income for all persons in Canada measured by the LICO After Tax measure was 9.4%, and the average gap or income shortfall relative to the LICO AT line was 33%. That gap in turn is equivalent to 1% of the after tax income of all Canadians. In short, we could eliminate poverty by shifting just 1% of our collective income to the almost one in ten Canadians living in low income. Now just why is that so difficult to do? (By the way, the 1% figure is the same if you prefer the Market Basket Measure of low income to the LICO line.)
Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics Blog
[ Progressive Economics Forum ]
Economic policy-making and economics instruction in Canada have both increasingly come to reflect a conservative, free-market perspective. There is an urgent need to promote an alternative, progressive economics community in Canada.Over 125 progressive economists—working in universities, the labour movement, and activist research organizations—have joined forces to make our collective, critical perspective heard. We have formed the Progressive Economics Forum. [ About PEF ]

Andrew Jackson is National Director of Social and Economic Policy with the Canadian Labour Congress.
[ More postings by Andrew Jackson ]

--------------------------------

From Statistics Canada:

Data tables : Series 800 – Low income (for the year 2008)*
- incl. links to tables showing:
* Low income cut-offs before and after tax for rural and urban areas, by family size, 2008 constant dollars
* Persons in low income
* Persons in low income families, by age and sex of major income earner
* Persons in low income, by economic family type
* Transitions of persons into and out of low income, by selected characteristics
* Persistence of low income, by selected characteristics
* Low income measures by income source and household size, 2008 constant dollars, annual
* Market Basket Measure Thresholds (2008 base) for reference family, by Market Basket Measure region and component, 2008 constant dollars, annual

* COMMENT for the nice folks at StatCan:

HEY - WASSUP with the proprietary browser??
If I click on the above "Data tables" link above and then select a particular table, a new window opens with a link to a file that ends in ".ivt", along with the following note from StatCan:

To access the Beyond 20/20 (IVT) version, you need the Beyond 20/20 Table Browser, which may be downloaded below. To install this product, run «ProBrowser.exe». [The link is to "Beyond 20/20 Browser for Windows operating systems" (18.9 mb)]

C'mon, really?
#1. The Beyond 20/20 (IVT) version is the *only* version that appears to be available on the site. Most people have Excel or a similar spreadsheet program on their computer, and everyone has a PDF reader. Forcing people to download and install yet another tool to access this information is an impediment to accessibility for many, in my view.
#2. Most institutional networks (e.g., university, government, large NGOs) prevent downloading and installing programs unless one has "admin" privileges. For regular users, this means asking the tech support people to do the downloading and installation (in their own time and at their own pace) or going without.
#3. Most home networks, as a general rule, allow anyone to download and install programs. However, this doesn't mean that people working at home are willing - or able - to download
and install programs. StatCan's link to the program states that the program is almost 19 MB in size - that's enormous for someone still using dialup connection or a slower broadband connection. And there's a link to the Windows version only - but nothing for Mac users or Linux users or anyone except Windows users.

NOTE : The source for Series 800 - Low income is the Data Tables from Income in Canada 2008.
The above comment re. the need for proprietary software to open the low income data tables applies to all tables in Series 100 to 900 (below)

---

Source:
Data Tables
[Click this link to access any of the series below.]
Series 100 - Earnings
Series 200 - Market income
Series 300 - Government transfers
Series 400 - Total income
Series 500 - Income tax
Series 600 - After-tax income
Series 700 - Tables with multiple income concepts
Series 800 - Low income
Series 900 - Background tables
Source:
Income in Canada 2008 - Posted June 2010

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

5. [New Brunswick] The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Reality of Poverty in 2010 - December 2010
(Common Front for Social Justice)

New Brunswick

New from the
Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ):
[Posted January 15, 2011]

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Reality of Poverty in 2010 (PDF - 60K, 2 pages)
News Release 
December 28, 2010
"This year had its good, bad and ugly side for people living in poverty" stated Linda McCaustlin, co-­-chair of the Common Front for Social Justice. The Common Front for Social Justice did an analysis of the actions taken by the Shawn Graham and David Alward governments over the past year that had a direct impact on the financial situation of more than 100,000 individuals and families living in poverty in this province.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Reality of Poverty in 2010 (PDF - 134K, 6 pages)
With 2010 coming to an end, the Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ) seizes the opportunity to take a close look at the actions and/or inactions of the government of NB with regard to the reduction of poverty during the past year. The following outlines some areas which had a direct impact on the financial situation of citizens during the past year and where the CFSJ has noted some progress but also, unfortunately, some drawbacks.
Source:
Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ)

As a non-profit community organization composed of social, unions and religious groups, the CFSJ scrutinizes the various social policies in order to see how they affect low income people. It also aims at promoting more solidarity within our society.

***

Liens vers la version française
du communiqué et de l'analyse:

Communiqué de presse (fichier PDF - 60Ko., 2 pages)
Le 28 décembre 2010

Analyse:
La bonne, la méchante et l'affreuse réalité de la pauvreté au Nouveau-Brunswick en 2010 (fichier PDF - 123Ko., 7 pages)

Source:
Front commun pour la justice social
À titre d'organisme à but non lucratif formé de groupes sociaux, syndicaux et religieux, le Front commun pour la justice sociale s’est donné comme mission de scruter les diverses politiques sociales pour voir comment elles affectent les gens à faible revenu. Sa vision est celle de voir un jour une société plus solidaire.

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

6. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Study: Comparing the 2008-2010 recession and recovery with previous cycles - January 13

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

January 13, 2011
Study: Comparing the 2008-2010 recession and recovery with previous cycles
By most conventional measures, the 2008-2009 recession was less severe than the previous two recessions in Canada. However, both output and employment in the early stages of the downturn contracted at the fastest rate of any post-war recession. Overall, the decline in output in the 2008-2009 recession in Canada was also less than in the other major industrialized countries, and the subsequent recovery quicker and more complete. As a result, Canada is the only G7 nation where real output and employment have returned to pre-recession levels.

The study, "How did the 2008-2010 recession and recovery compare with previous cycles?" is included in the January 2011 Internet edition of the Canadian Economic Observer.

Related subjects:
* Economic accounts
* Gross domestic product
* International trade
* Labour
* Employment and unemployment

Source:
Canadian Economic Observer - Product main page*
This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations.
[ * Click "View" for the latest issue of this periodical; click "Chronological" index for earlier editions. ]

That's it for StatCan this week in social policy.
Check for yourself by clicking the archives link immediately below.

-------------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - January 16

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

-------

January 9, 2011

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

In the best interests of children and families: Early childhood education and care in Alberta
5 Jan 11
- Report from the Muttart Foundation provides an overview of the current funding and delivery of ECEC in Alberta and an alternate vision for ECEC that can better meet the needs of Alberta's children and their families.

Letters to UBC President re: UBC child care and Kids and Company
5 Jan 11
- Correspondence between the Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC and University of British Columbia regarding UBC's use of a for-profit child care service.

Beyond centers and homes: The workforce in three California early childhood infrastructure organizations
5 Jan 11
- Report from the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at University of California at Berkeley examines the career backgrounds and professional development needs of 1,588 staff in three organizations.

Australia's paid parental leave scheme: Supporting working Australian families
5 Jan 11
- January 1, 2011 marked the start of Australia's new paid parental leave, which provides 18 weeks of leave paid at the national minimum wage of $570 a week before tax.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· Paid parental leave icing on the cake for new mothers
[AU] 2 Jan 11

· Sure Start children's centres axed by Tories despite David Cameron's pledge to protect them
[GB] 1 Jan 11

· Mom says no time to job hunt while on maternity leave
[CA-NB] 30 Dec 10

· Record on education is Ontario Premier's best case for re-election
[CA-ON] 22 Dec 10

· Travel ban on ABC Learning founder for another 11 weeks
[AU] 17 Dec 10

· Our kids are not for sale
[US] 16 Nov 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

8. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

January 14:
State Medicaid Plan - Mississippi
Paid Family Leave - California
State of the States 2011 - Stateline.org Series
Post-Earthquake Haiti
Child Care Subsidies - California

January 13:
Recession and Homelessness
Concentrated Poverty - Toronto
Child Poverty among Palestinian Refugees - Lebanon

January 12:
State Medicaid Programs
State Budget Cuts - California, Pennsylvania

January 11:
Unemployment and Wages
Homelessness and Housing - Rhode Island

January 10:
Foster Care System and Program Eligibility - Virginia
Editorial: Poverty Measurement in the US
Bail System - New York

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

9. Homelessness Resource Center (U.S. Government website)

Homelessness Resource Center (U.S. Government website)
We are an interactive community of providers, consumers, policymakers, researchers, and public agencies at federal, state, and local levels. We share state-of-the art knowledge and promising practices to prevent and end homelessness. (...) We seek to improve the lives of people affected by homelessness who have mental health conditions, substance use issues, and histories of trauma.
[About this site]

Topics:
* Best Practices for Providers * Cost of Homelessness * Self-Care for Providers * Housing/Shelter * Youth Drop-in Centers * Trauma * Health and Wellness * Mental Health * Substance Use and Addiction * Employment * Homelessness Prevention * Homeless Populations * International * HRC Feature Articles * HRC Special Journal Issues * Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) * Co-Occurring and Homeless Activities Branch (CHAB)

Library
- subjects include : families, substance use, poverty, children, mental health, definitions, estimates and report cards, housing, shelters and hostels, advocacy and policy, youth, health, supportive housing, employment, treatment, services, demography & characteristics of homelessness, women, causes of homelessness, affordable housing, homelessness

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

10. Who is poor? Many of America's neediest may look a lot like you - January 7
(STLtoday.com - St. Louis MO)

Who is poor? Many of America's neediest may look a lot like you
January 7, 2011
Americans fuss and fight over many aspects of public policy, from climate change to health care reform. But here’s something about which there’s not much argument: If you fall below the federal threshold for “poverty,” you are poor. You aren’t just needy or disadvantaged. At best, you hover somewhere between broke and destitute. (...) In addition to the numbers from the 2010 census, the Census Bureau has begun to publish reams of research that challenges its own methods. Determining the poverty threshold is one such topic. (...) Most striking is that people living in official poverty “have characteristics more similar to the total population.” People end up poor, it seems, even when they are trying their hardest not to. They can be pushed into poverty by paying to get to and from work, finding child care, keeping up with child support obligations, medical expenses and caring for children who are not their own. Who’s poor? More often than you’d think, people just like you.
Source:
STLtoday.com - the #1 St. Louis website

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

11. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content
--- Financial and non-financial support to formal and informal out of home carers - January 5
--- Paternalism in social policy: when is it justifiable? - January 5
--- Homelessness Information Clearinghouse

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

Most viewed this week (ending January 16) on APO:

1. POLITICS - Coalition still favourite for the poll
2. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
3. Garma Festival 2009 key forum address
4. The Rudd government: Australian Commonwealth administration 2007–2010
5. Communications Policy and Research Forum 2009

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Most viewed this week (ending January 16)
in the Social Policy section:

1. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
2. Australian Youth Forum
3. National cultural policy: discussion framework
4. Social media and young adults
5. Aboriginal spirituality: Aboriginal philosophy, the basis of Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

-----------------------------------------------------------

A few links that may interest you:

Financial and non-financial support to formal and informal out of home carers
By Marilyn McHugh and Kylie Valentine
05 January 2011
This report explores the supports and services available to formal and informal out-of-home carers (foster, grandparent and kinship carers).
Source:
Social Policy Research Centre

---

Paternalism in social policy: when is it justifiable?
Matthew Thomas, Luke Buckmaster
05 January 2011
This paper argues that paternalist policies may be considered justifiable under circumstances where high stakes decisions are involved, the decisions being made by individuals are irreversible and it is possible to identify failures in people’s reasoning.
Source:
Parliamentary Library

---

Homelessness Information Clearinghouse
A website for sharing information and good practice solutions for the homelessness service sector in Australia.

---

On the APO Home Page:
* Top Economics reports 2010 * Top Justice reports 2010 * Top Environment & Planning reports 2010 * Top Politics reports 2010 * Top Indigenous reports 2010 * Top Social Policy reports 2010 * Top Creative & Digital reports 2010 * Top International reports 2010 * Top Education reports 2010 * Top Health reports 2010

---------------

Top Social Policy reports 2010
Australian Policy Online
The five most read reports and commentary pieces in the Social Policy area in 2010 were:
1. Who will benefit from the 1 July 2010 tax cuts?
2. Asylum seekers and refugees: what are the facts?
3. Boat arrivals in Australia since 1976: January 2010 update
4. Poverty versus inequality (July 2009)
5. Welfare quarantining: reversing the burden of truth (February 2010)
Source:
New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

--------------

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL
(children's rights newsletter):

12 January 2011, CRINMAIL issue 1208
In this issue:
- UN Committee on the Rights of the Child: Session 56

The 56th session of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child will take place in Geneva, Switzerland from 17 January - 4 February 2011.?The Committee will examine reports from Afghanistan, Belarus, Denmark, Lao People's Democratic Republic, New Zealand, Singapore and Ukraine on measures they have taken to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). The Committee will also review State reports on the Optional Protocol on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography (OPSC) for Belarus and Mexico and reports on the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict (OPAC) for Belarus, Mexico and Ukraine.
- Latest news and reports
- Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRINMAIL)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


 


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You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

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Privacy Policy:
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I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


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25 More Useless
But Fascinating Facts

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1. "Stewardesses" is the longest word typed with only the left hand

2. "Lollipop" is the longest word typed with your right hand.

3. No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver, or purple.

4."Dreamt" is the only English word that ends in the letters "mt".

5. Our eyes are always the same size from birth, but our nose and ears never stop growing.

6. The sentence: "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" uses every letter of the alphabet.

7. There are only four words in the English language which end in "dous": tremendous, horrendous, stupendous, and hazardous.

8. There are two words in the English language that have all five vowels in order: "abstemious" and "facetious."

9. "Typewriter" is the longest word that can be made using the letters only on one row of the keyboard.

10. A cat has 32 muscles in each ear.

11. A goldfish has a memory span of three seconds.

12. A "jiffy" is an actual unit of time for 1/100th of a second.

13. A snail can sleep for three years.

14. Almonds are a member of the peach family.

15. Babies are born without kneecaps. They don't appear until the child reaches 2 to 6 years of age.

16. February 1865 is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon.

17. In the last 4,000 years, no new animals have been domesticated.

18. Leonardo Da Vinci invented the scissors.

19. Peanuts are one of the ingredients of dynamite.

20. Rubber bands last longer when refrigerated.

21. The cruise liner QE 2 moves only six inches for each gallon of diesel that it burns.

22. There are more chickens than people in the world.

23. Winston Churchill was born in a ladies' room during a dance.

24. Women blink nearly twice as much as men.

25. All the ants in Africa weigh more than ALL the Elephants

Source:
Can't recall...

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And, in closing...

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Canoeing in McDonalds shows devastation of Brisbane Australia floods (Video)
http://tinyurl.com/5rwbxvm

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The Mariana Trench Shown To Scale
The Mariana trench is the deepest known part of the ocean at over 11,000 metres.
http://www.piggynap.com/awesome/the-mariana-trench-shown-to-unsettling-scale/

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Off The Rails: 2010 In Fox News Misinformation
http://goo.gl/wQp9i

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How to photograph a drop of water (video)
http://www.wimp.com/photographwater/

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MMMMMM - Wal-Mart Wines!
http://www.c4vct.com/kym/humor/walmartw.htm
My faves are #5 and #10.