Canadian Social Research Newsletter Logo
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 16, 2005

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter, a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1499 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. Make Poverty History Day of Action to End Child Poverty in Canada - October 17
2. October 17: 24 hours of feminist mobilization --- World March of Women --- Canadian Women's March 2005
3. New from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:
--- The share of income tax paid by the rich - October 13
--- Federal fiscal forecasting - October 5

4. New from Statistics Canada:
--- Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, 2003 - October 13
--- University enrolment, 2003/04 - October 11
--- University degrees, diplomas and certificates, 2003 - October 11

5. Health Care in Canada 2005 (Canadian Institute for Health Information) - June 8
6. Federal consultations on seniors and people with disabilities extended until the end of 2005 (Social Development Canada)

7. Government of Canada Response to "Accessibility for All" (Social Development Canada) - October 2005
8. Alberta's $400 Resource Rebate cheques misguided (Parkland Institute - University of Alberta)
- October 10
9. Microcredit

10.
What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit ( University of Toronto) - October 14

International Content

11. Poverty Dispatch Digest : U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- October 13
12. Poor and Homeless Continue to Face Major Challenges in Urban Areas - U.S.
13. Globalisation and the Reform of European Social Models (Bruegel - new European think tank) - September 2005
14. International Day for the Eradication of Poverty (United Nations) - October 17


Have a great  week!
gs

Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Make Poverty History Day of Action to End Child Poverty in Canada - October 17

Make Poverty History Day of Action
to End Child Poverty in Canada

News Release
October 13, 2005
"Canadians from Vancouver to Charlottetown will be wearing white bands on October 17 and calling for an end to child poverty in Canada. October 17 is the United Nations International Day for the Eradication of Poverty and the Make Poverty History campaign will be focusing on the sad reality of child poverty in Canada. More than one million children in Canada - that's one in six - are poor. Every month, 770, 000 people use food banks. Forty percent of those relying on these food banks are children."

Make Poverty History Events Calendar of Activities across Canada
for the National Day of Action to End Child Poverty in Canada (October 17)

Source:
Make Poverty History (Canada) [Platform] - "...united by the common belief that poverty can be ended."
Related Link:
Make Poverty History (International)

-----

October 17th - A Call to End Child Poverty in Canada
Source:
Campaign 2000

-----

Celebrate Oct. 17 - International Day for the Eradication of Poverty
- October 17 Information Kit (PDF file - 415K, 6 pages)
Source:
National Anti-Poverty Organization

-----

Google Web Search Results : "End Child Poverty in Canada"
Google News search Results : "End Child Poverty in Canada"
Source:
Google.ca

-----

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm
- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

2.
- October 17 --- 24 hours of feminist mobilization
- World March of Women
- Canadian Women's March 2005

World March of Women
October 17, 2005 - Join us for the 24 hours of feminist mobilization
"On October 17, women in all time zones will successively take to the streets at noon to stage actions for one hour. This is how they will show their support for the blueprint for society depicted in the Women's Global Charter for Humanity."

Relay of the Women's Global Charter for Humanity, March 8 - October 17, 2005
Between March 8 and october 17, 2005, there will be the world relay of the Women's Global Charter for Humanity. The women from various countries will be passing the Charter from country to country. They will also organise actions to highlight this symbolic passing and the values of the Charter. These women will be sewing together a solidarity quilt that will illustrate the values of the Charter.

Women's Global Charter for Humanity

Canadian Women’s March 2005
Get Ready for October 17th, 2005
24 Hours of Feminist Action and Solidarity
"The Canadian Women’s March 2005 Coalition is committed to the elimination of poverty and violence in Canada and to making the links between local and global actions. We are committed to continuing our work to meet the 13 demands developed by the World March of Women in 2000 to eliminate poverty and violence against women in Canada. Today, major investments on social programs are still needed and none of the 13 demands have been met. This is why in May 2005 we supported relaying the Global Charter for Humanity across Canada. The Charter was created and agreed upon by 6000 women’s organizations world wide. It is based on five core values; equality, freedom, solidarity, justice and peace. It is a feminist vision of a world free of exploitation, poverty and violence."
Related Link:
World March of Women in the Year 2000 - September 2000

Google Web Search Results : "Women’s March 2005"
Google News search Results : "Women’s March 2005"
Source:
Google.ca

- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm
- Go to the Links to International Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womeninternat.htm

3. New from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:
--- The share of income tax paid by the rich - October 13
--- Federal fiscal forecasting - October 5

Canada’s high-income earners are not overtaxed—report
Press Release
October 13, 2005
"Despite recent reports to the contrary, Canada’s high-income earners do not pay a disproportionately large share of personal income tax. A new analysis by Prof. Neil Brooks of Osgoode Hall Law School, released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, takes a closer look at the numbers in Statistics Canada’s “Tax Incidence in Canada.” The Stats Can report sparked a series of news stories this spring claiming the top 10% of income earners pay 52% of the total tax bill but Brooks finds these figures both misleading and incomplete in assessing the fairness of the tax system.

The Statistics Canada study showed that the share of federal income taxes paid by the top 10% increased from 46% in 1990 to 52.6% in 2002. Brooks points out, however, that this increase is not a result of the tax system becoming more progressive. Instead, the main reason for the increase was because the share of earned income going to the most affluent among us increased by 12.6% over that same period, while the share going to the bottom 50% of tax-filers declined."

Complete analysis:

The Share of Income Tax Paid by the Rich:
The Business Press Gives another Lesson on How to Deceive with Statistics
(PDF file - 115K, 7 pages)

Related Link

Study: Federal Personal Income Tax: Slicing the Pie, 1990 to 2002
April 22, 2005
"The one-tenth of Canadian taxfilers who were in the highest earnings bracket provided more than one-half of the revenue from federal personal income tax in 2002, according to a new study. In addition, their share of the tax pie has been increasing since 1990."
Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

--------------------------

Also from CCPA:

The O’Neill Report on Federal Fiscal Forecasting
The dilemmas created by the government’s “no-deficit” fiscal rule
October 5, 2005

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

4. What's New from Statistics Canada:
--- Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, 2003 - October 13
--- University enrolment, 2003/04 - October 11
---
University degrees, diplomas and certificates, 2003 - October 11

What's New from The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

October 13, 2005
Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, 2003
Two years after they arrived in Canada, prime working-age immigrants had made significant progress integrating into the labour force, but they still faced some challenges, according to the second wave of a longitudinal survey which examines how newcomers adjust over time.
Complete report:
Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada:
Progress and Challenges of New Immigrants in the Workforce - 2003
(PDF file - 224K, 17 pages)

October 11, 2005
University enrolment, 2003/04
Enrolment at Canadian universities recorded its strongest increase in 28 years during the academic year 2003/04, due to a rise in the number of students aged 18 to 24, Ontario's double cohort and a record gain in students from other countries.

October 11, 2005
University degrees, diplomas and certificates, 2003
University students received a record number of bachelor's and master's degrees in 2003, as the overall number of degrees, certificates and diplomas rose for the fifth straight year.Universities granted a record high 201,700 degrees, diplomas and certificates in 2003, an 8.3% increase from 2002. This was the strongest rate of growth since 1974.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

5. Health Care in Canada 2005 - June 8
(Canadian Institute for Health Information)

Health Care in Canada, 2005
June 2005
"Part A: A Look Inside Canada's Health System summarizes recent developments in health and health care. It includes an overview of health spending and updated information on how Canadians view the health system and the services that they have received.
* Part B: A Focus on Volumes and Outcomes includes information on the distribution of select procedures across Canada and in-depth analyses of the relationship between hospital volumes and patient outcomes.."
Table of Contents --- List of Selected Figures
- Incl. links to downloads by section and the entire report in a single file
- includes links to the complete report and to individual chapters

Mortality Rate Lower in Higher-Volume Hospitals
News Release
June 8, 2005
"
A new report released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) shows that Canadians have a better chance of surviving some types of highly specialized surgeries in hospitals where greater numbers of these procedures are performed."

Source:
Health Care in Canada (annual report)
"This report provides up-to-date information on what we know and don't know about the performance of Canada's health care system. Topics covered in the report include the outcomes of care, health expenditures and Canada's health care professionals. Included with this report is a Health Indicators insert, providing new data on a range of health and health system-related indicators at both regional and provincial/territorial levels."
- incl. links to reports for current and previous years back to 2000
[ Canadian Institute for Health Information ]

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

6. Federal consultations on seniors and people with disabilities extended until the end of 2005
(Social Development Canada)

From the Social Development Canada Consultation Website:

Social Development Canada's consultations concerning persons with disabilities and seniors have been extended from mid-October until December 31.

Persons with Disabilities Consultation
-
Resource Area

Seniors Consultation
- Resource Area

Source:
Social Development Canada

- Go to the Disability Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm
- Go to the Social Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/sdc.htm

7. Government of Canada Response to "Accessibility for All" - October 2005
(
Social Development Canada)

Government of Canada Response to "Accessibility for All":
Eighth Report of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills Development, Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
- October 2005
HTML version
PDF version - 217 kb, 32 pages
Table of Contents:
1. Overview
2. Background
3. Summary of recommendations
4. Synopsis of Government response
5. Leadership and instruments: the foundations of accessibility
6. Access to services
7. Access to programs
8. Government as a model of accessibility
9. The way forward
10. Steadfast commitment
11. Detailed responses to the recommendations
12. Conclusion
13. Appendix 1: List of Recommendations from Accessibility for All

Source:
Social Development Canada

Related Links:

Accessibility for All:
Report of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills Development,
Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
Raymonde Folco, M.P., Chair
Subcommittee on the Status of Persons with Disabilities
Ken Boshcoff, M.P., Chair
June 2005
Table of Contents:
1. Follow-up on Recommendations by the Technical Advisory Committee on Tax Measures for Persons with Disabilities
2. Accessibility of Federal Buildings
3. Accessibility of Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefits
4. Accessibility of Modes of Transportation Under Federal Jurisdiction
5. Accessibility of Jobs in the Federal Public Service
6. Accessibility to the Parliamentary Precinct
Conclusion
List of Recommendations
App. A - List of Witnesses
Request for Government Response
Dissenting Opinion - Bloc Québécois
Minutes of Proceedings

More HUMA Reports and Govt. Responses

Source:
House of Commons
Standing Committee on
Human Resources, Skills Development, Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (HUMA)

- Go to the Disability Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm

8. Alberta's $400 Resource Rebate cheques misguided - October 10
(Parkland Institute - University of Alberta)

Some much better ways to use Klein's $1.4B giveaway
We could banish poverty, and give children top quality daycare. Now that's a legacy
October 10, 2005
by Gordon Laxer
"Giving out $400 prosperity cheques to each resident is a foolish squandering of Alberta's heritage.(...)
The proponents of the so called "Alberta Advantage" argue that to attract investment and make Alberta more competitive, we need low taxes, oil royalty holidays, a low minimum wage, low public expenditures and low welfare payments. They assume a trade-off between economic efficiency and generous, universal public services. If you have extensive public services and anti-poverty policies, you can't have a vigorous economy, they say.
But are they right?
What would be the reaction if I recommended that Alberta adopt:
- The right to free day care.
- Free dental care for children.
- Grants to most university students covering tuition, subsidized meals and housing.
- Extended home care and parental leaves.
- Real job retraining programs for the unemployed.
- A legal guarantee that all who are unable to meet their day to day necessities are entitled to the necessary basic income and care.
- Five weeks paid vacation, with two weeks extra holiday pay for all workers.
I would be laughed out of court as hopelessly out of touch. Alberta couldn't afford these things. And if we did adopt them, it would make Alberta less competitive, slothful and drive up taxes too much. Right? Wrong. Last year, the World Economic Forum ranked countries for competitiveness.
Which country came in first place -- the U.S. or another country which follows the "Alberta Advantage" prescription? No. Finland was ranked first and provides all the things listed above. Finland did those things without having any oil or natural gas revenues. How much easier then it would be for Alberta, with no government debt and lots of resource royalties, to do all those things. The other Nordic countries -- Norway, Sweden and Denmark, all with similarly generous public services, hold three of the top six positions in the WEF's competitiveness ratings. The U.S. was second; Canada,15th. (There was no separate rating for Alberta.) So much for a trade off between competitiveness and social equity."
Source:
Parkland Institute
[ University of Alberta ]

Related Links:

$400 resource rebate will arrive in the new year
Updated October 11, 2005
- brief program description + FAQ
Source:
Government of Alberta

- Go to the Alberta Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

9. Microcredit

Canadian Gateway to Microcredit
http://www.microfinance.ca

International Year of Microcredit Site
http://www.yearofmicrocredit.org

Exclusive Global Microfinance Forum to be held at the United Nations in November
November 7, 8, and 9, 2005
Location: UN Headquarters, New York City
http://www.yearofmicrocredit.org/pages/getinvolved/getinvolved_forum2005.asp

The Global Microcredit Summit 2006 will be held from November 12-15, 2006 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
More than 2,000 delegates from over 100 countries are expected to participate at the event, assessing progress made toward the Campaign's goal of reaching 100 million of the world's poorest people by the end of 2005, and launching the second phase of the Campaign. Reduced rate, early bird online registration will be open by the end of August. Delegates who register in 2005 must have submitted a 2005 Institutional Action Plan (IAP); delegates who register in 2006 must have submitted a 2006 IAP.

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

10. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - October 14
( University of Toronto)


What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is content from the most recent issue of the notifier.

14-Oct-05

---------------------------------------------------
WHAT’S NEW
---------------------------------------------------

>> Early learning and child care submission
by Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada
Submission by the Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada to the pre-budget consultation of the Federal Standing Committee on Finance calls for increased funding to child care combined with stronger policy and greater accountability.

>> Reducing child poverty to increase productivity: A human capital strategy
by Laurel Rothman
Consultation submission from Campaign 2000 recommends that a national early learning and child care system be a “priority investment” area for the federal government.

>> Preschool child care and parents’ use of physical discipline
by Katherine Magnuson & Jane Waldfogel
US study from Infant and Child Development explores the correlation between children's participation in Head Start and other child care arrangements and parents' use of physical discipline.

---------------------------------------------------
CHILD CARE IN THE NEWS
---------------------------------------------------

>> Beware of corporate day cares: analyst [CA-NB]
CBC News, 13 Oct 05
Child care advocates are warning against a possible flood of big businesses that may try to cash in on federal money. Australian social policy analyst Lynne Wannan says when the her government increased funding for child care, so many businesses cashed in on the largesse that four years of funding disappeared in a year.

>> Child care debts ground parents [AU]
Courier-Mail (Australia). 13 Oct 05
About 500 Australian parents have been prevented from leaving the country by the Child Support Agency, who has directed the Australian Federal Police to stop people at the departure gate at Australian airports, if they have not paid their child care maintenance bills.

>> Region sees $350,000 of federal fund for children [CA-BC]
Victoria Times-Colonist, 13 Oct 05
Helping children get the most from their early years is the aim of a $2.2-million federal funding announcement made in Victoria. Ken Dryden told a gathering that B.C.'s share of federal money for the Understanding the Early Years (UEY) program has been distributed among six communities.

Fathers to be offered six months leave [GB]
Guardian, 10 Oct 05
The British government is to announce that fathers should have the right to six months' unpaid paternity leave independent of the decision of the female partner to take leave.

Strike holds valuable life lessons for little ones [CA-BC]
Vancouver Sun, 8 Oct 05
My four-year-old son crossed his first picket line Friday. He wasn't alone -- he had his faithful bear-bear, a long stuffed snake, and a child care worker to escort him. The only thing he didn't have was mom or dad.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This message was forwarded through the Childcare Resource
and Research Unit e-mail news notifier. For information on the
CRRU e-mail notifier, including instructions for (unsubscribing,
see http://www.childcarecanada.org

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Related Links:

What's New? - Canadian, U.S. and international resources from Jan 2000 to the present.
Child Care in the News - media articles from January 2000 to the present
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

Also from CRRU:

Towards a national system of early learning and child care
Regularly updated
"(...) On April 29, 2005 the governments of Canada and Manitoba struck an historic Agreement-in-Principle on early learning and child care. This was followed by a similar agreement between the federal government and the province of Saskatchewan. These agreements are the beginning of what is hoped to be a series of strong bilateral agreements between the federal government and the provinces/territories. These historic agreements build on a meeting of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services in November 2004 and a subsequent meeting in February 2005. They (with the exception of Quebec) agreed to shared principles to guide the development of a new national system of early learning and child care."
NOTE: this is a large (and growing) collection that includes government and non-governmental reports, press releases, news articles and other documents dealing with the new federal-provincial-territorial arrangements for early learning and child care in Canada.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

11. Poverty Dispatch Digest :
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- October 13

POVERTY DISPATCH Digest
Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin
This digest offers dozens of new links each week to full-text articles in the U.S. media (mostly daily newspapers) on poverty, poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, and much more...
The Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison offers a free e-mail service that consists of an e-mail message sent to subscribers each Monday and Thursday, containing a dozen or so links to articles dealing with the areas mentioned above. The weekly Canadian Social Research Links Poverty Dispatch Digest is a compilation, available online, of the two dispatch e-mails for that week --- with the kind permission of IRP.

Here's the complete collection of U.S. media articles in this week's Poverty Dispatch Digest:
(click the link above to read all of these articles)

October 13, 2005

Today's subjects include:  Poverty Statistics - Opinion // Marriage and Fertility Study // Community Redevelopment Strategies // Hurricane Katrina and Poverty // Homelessness Study // Health Care Savings Account Proposal // World Poverty and Gender Discrimination // Urban Poverty Study // Urban Poverty - Milwaukee // Child Support Pass-Through - Wisconsin // Marriage and Fertility Study - Selected States // Homelessness - Philadelphia // Low-Income Energy Assistance

October 10, 2005

Today's subjects include: Poverty Factoids // Poverty and Personal Responsibility - Opinion // Benefits for Hurricane Evacuees // Hurricanes, Poverty, and Depression - Opinion // Child Tax Credit and the Poor - Editorial // Plight of the Poor - Bronx, NY // Call to End Poverty in California // Looming Cuts in Health Services - Maine // Health Insurance for Children - Illinois // Use of Food Stamps - Colorado, Queens, NY // Student Achievement Gap and Wealth - Guilford County, NC // Student Achievement Gap - Colorado // Minimum versus Livable Wage - Maine // Heating Assistance - Ohio // Homelessness - Arizona

Each of the weekly digests offers dozens of links or more to media articles that are time-sensitive.
The older the link, the more likely it is to either be dead or have moved to an archive - and some archives [but not all] are pay-as-you-go.
[For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH Digest link above]

The Poverty Dispatch weekly digest is a good tool for monitoring what's happening in the U.S.; it's a guide to best practices and lessons learned in America.

Subscribe to the Poverty Dispatch!
Send an e-mail message to John Wolf [ jwolf@ssc.wisc.edu ] to receive a plain text message twice a week with one to two dozen links to media articles with a focus on poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, health, Medicaid from across the U.S.
And it's free...

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH Digest link at the top of this section.
Recently-archived POVERTY DISPATCH weekly digests:

- October 6, 2005
- September 29
- September 22
- September 15
- September 8
- September 1

POVERTY DISPATCH description/archive - weekly issues back to January 2005, 50+ links per issue
NOTE: this archive is part of the Canadian Social Research Links American Non-Governmental Social Research page.

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

12. Challenges of the Poor and the Homeless in America - October 11, 12
(Selected U.S. media)

Poor and Homeless Continue to Face Major Challenges in Urban Areas - U.S.

Crowded Out By Luxury Lofts, Poor Seek Relief
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-downtown12oct12,0,2051236.story?coll=la-home-local

Polk Gulch cleanup angers some
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2005/10/12/POLKSTREET.TMP

Nation taking a new look at homelessness, solutions
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-10-11-homeless-cover_x.htm

Study: U.S. poor trapped in urban areas
http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/10/12/poverty.study.ap/index.html

Katrina’s Window: Confronting Concentrated Poverty Across America [pdf]
http://www.brookings.edu/metro/pubs/20051012_concentratedpoverty.htm

United States Interagency Council on Homelessness [pdf]
http://www.ich.gov/

"As the recent tragedy wrought by Hurricane Katrina revealed, poor and homeless residents of America’s cities remain particularly vulnerable. Whether it is the phenomenon of gentrification or the world of natural hazards, many continue to remain marginalized in terms of opportunities, whether they be economic or otherwise. This week, a number of news pieces once again reminded the general public about the precarious situation faced by this group. In Los Angeles, the City Council decided to impose the first limits on the luxury loft and condo boom that is gradually pushing out single-room-occupancy hotels, most of which are concentrated in the city’s downtown area. While this type of creeping development may affect the poor in increasingly popular urban places, less successful cities continue to have many neighborhoods with concentrated poverty. As a report from the Brookings Institution released this week noted, poor planning over the past several decades has continued to concentrate public housing at the urban core. Generally, the end result is that many urban dwellers remain cut off from the rapid economic and housing growth that has been experienced around the urban fringe. [KMG]

The first link will lead users to a nice article from this Wednesday’s Los Angeles Times that discusses the recent action taken by the City Council. The second link leads visitors to a San Francisco Chronicle article that discusses the recent trend towards gentrification in the city’s Polk Gulch neighborhood. The third link leads to a USA Today article from this past Monday, which talks about how the recent Hurricane Katrina tragedy may transform certain aspects of addressing the homelessness situation in the country. The fourth link will take visitors to a CNN news piece, which talks about the recent report from the Brookings Institution that examines the concentration of urban poverty throughout a number of US cities. The fifth link leads to the full text of that report, authored by Alan Berube. The final link will take users to the homepage of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness. [KMG]"

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2005.
http://scout.wisc.edu/

NOTE: The Scout Report is a weekly newsletter that's available by e-mail or online.
Just go to the Scout Report site to check out the rest of the current issue as well as back issues, and to sign up for the e-mail edition.

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

13. Globalisation and the Reform of European Social Models - September 2005
(Bruegel - new European think tank)

Globalisation and the Reform
of European Social Models

André Sapir
Background document for the presentation at ECOFIN Informal
Meeting in Manchester, 9 September 2005

Complete paper (PDF file - 117K, 19 pages)
Executive summary (PDF file - 26K, 2 pages)

Four European Social Models

"There are so many differences among national welfare state systems that the very notions of “European model” or “Social Europe” are rather dubious. I prefer to use the now familiar grouping of national systems into four different social policy models in order to examine the relative performance of each model along a number of dimensions. The four models cover four different geographical areas.

Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland and Sweden, plus the Netherlands) feature the highest levels of social protection expenditures and universal welfare provision. There is extensive fiscal intervention in labour markets based on a variety of “active” policy instruments. Strong labour unions ensure highly compressed wage structures.

Anglo-Saxon countries (Ireland and the United Kingdom) feature relatively large social assistance of the last resort. Cash transfers are primarily oriented to people in working age. Activation measures are important as well as schemes conditioning access to benefits to regular employment. On the labour market side, this model is characterized by a mixture of weak unions, comparatively wide and increasing wage dispersion and relatively high incidence of low-pay employment.

Continental countries (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany and Luxembourg) rely extensively on insurance-based, non-employment benefits and old-age pensions. Although their membership is on the decline, unions remain strong as regulations extend the coverage of collective bargaining to non-union situations.

Finally, Mediterranean countries (Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain), concentrate their social spending on old-age pensions and allow for a high segmentation of entitlements and status. Their social welfare systems typically draw on employment protection and early retirement provisions to exempt segments of the working age population from participation in the labour market. The wage structure is, at least in the formal sector, covered by collective bargaining and strongly compressed."
[Excerpt from the paper, pp. 5-6]

Source:
BRUEGEL (Brussels)
"... a new think tank whose aim is to contribute to the quality of economic policymaking in Europe"

- Go to the Globalization Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/global.htm

14. International Day for the Eradication of Poverty (United Nations) - October 17

First United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (1997-2006)
- incl. links to : Information on the Decade - Reports and resolutions (current and previous sessions) - Bulletin on Poverty Eradication - Meetings/Events - more...

October 17 - International Day for the Eradication of Poverty
"The United Nations General Assembly declared 17 October as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, to be observed beginning in 1993. It noted that activities undertaken with respect to the Day will take into account those undertaken each 17 October by certain non-governmental organizations and invited all States to devote the Day to presenting and promoting, as appropriate in the national context, concrete activities on the eradication of poverty and destitution. The General Assembly also invited intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to assist States, at their request, in organizing national activities for the observance of International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, paying due attention to the specific problems of the destitute."
[General Assembly resolution 47/196 of 22 December 1992]
- incl. links to messages from the Secretary-General and the President of the General Assembly, official press release, press briefing and conference, summary of events planned around the world and more...

Source:
United Nations
Economic and Social Development

Related UN Links:

UN News Centre
UN Economic and Social Council
United Nations Economic and Social Development

- Go to the United Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/un.htm



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Ten Little-Known Animal Facts
(Found somewhere on the Net...)


1. Most cows give more milk when they listen to music.

2. A male moth can smell a female moth from 100 yards away.

3. Walt Disney was afraid of mice.

4. More types of fish swim in Brazil's Amazon River than in the entire Atlantic Ocean.

5. The owl can catch a mouse in utter darkness, guided only by tiny sounds made by its prey.

6. The camel first evolved in North America.
It died out in the ice ages, but some had emigrated
and survived in South America, Eurasia, and North Africa.

7. Dogs cannot see as well as humans and are considered color blind.
A dog sees objects first by their movement, second by their brightness, and third by their shape.

8. Kittens are born with both eyes and ears closed.
When the eyes open, they are always blue at first.
They change colour over a period of months to the final eye colour.

9. Cats are pure carnivores. They need a high level of protein in their diets
- around 30% - and lack the digestive equipment to do well on a diet of grains,
fruits or vegetables. Hence although dogs do just fine on a vegetarian diet, cats do not.

10. If you could count the number of times a cricket chirps in one minute, divide by 2,
add 9 and divide by 2 again, you would have the correct temperature in Celsius degrees.