Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 16, 2014

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,744 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Revealing power imbalances: What do cigarettes, casino card counters and Jian Ghomeshi have to do with financial literacy? (John Stapleton, Open Policy) - November 9
2. Restoring the Mandatory Long-Form Census (Private Member's Bill tabled by M.P. Ted Hsu)
3. Harper Government Releases Economic and Fiscal Update (Department of Finance Canada) - November 12
4. Toronto tops Canada in child poverty rates: report
(CBC News) - November 14
5. Minister Deb Matthews at Ontario Nonprofit Network Conference 2014 (Ontario Nonprofit Network) - November 3
6.
And then there was one! BC is now dead last in Canada when it comes to fighting poverty! (BC Poverty Reduction Coalition) - November 13
7. At What Cost? The Impacts of Rushing to Balance the Budget (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - November 12
8. Andrew Coyne, income splitting, and the child care blindspot (Broadbent Institute) - November 10
9. Back to the kitchen, Mrs. Cleaver: Income-splitting and social engineering
(iPolitics.ca) - November 5
10. The Parent Trap : Child Care Fees in Canada’s Big Cities - November 10 (David Macdonald and Martha Friendly, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - November 10
11. Ontario Government To Increase Minimum Wage - November 10
12.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Graduating in Canada: Profile, labour market outcomes and student debt of the class of 2009/2010, 2013 - November 14
--- Study: Agriculture in Canada - November 13
---- Canadian Megatrends – Fertility: Fewer children, older moms - November 13
--- Population growth: Migratory increase overtakes natural increase
- October 9
--- Canada's population estimates: Age, sex and marital status, July 1, 2014- November 13
---- Beta testing: Revising how Statistics Canada publishes information, November 12 to December 12, 2014

13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
15. [United States] Some 50 million Americans Face Cuts with expiration of working-family tax credits (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) - November 12
16. [United States] Recent releases from the Annie E. Casey Foundation:
--- Creating Opportunity for Families: A Two-Generation Approach - November 12
--- 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book - July 22

17. US wealth inequality - top 0.1% worth as much as the bottom 90% (The Guardian) - November 13
18. Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm ]
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. Revealing power imbalances: What do cigarettes, casino card counters and Jian Ghomeshi have to do with financial literacy? - November 9
(John Stapleton, Open Policy)

November is Financial Literacy Month in Canada!

Revealing power imbalances: What do cigarettes, casino card
counters and Jian Ghomeshi have to do with financial literacy?
http://openpolicyontario.com/revealing-power-imbalances-what-do-cigarettes-casino-card-counters-and-jian-ghomeshi-have-to-do-with-financial-literacy/
By John Stapleton
November 9, 2014
[This is John Stapleton's submission to the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada [ http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/ ] for inclusion in its consultation with Canadians on financial literacy for priority groups [SEE LINKS BELOW].
(...) The financial literacy movement is a good thing. It is especially good for disadvantaged groups who have the most to gain from understanding our public facing financial institutions in Canada. Financial literacy means having the knowledge, skills and confidence to make responsible financial decisions. But financial literacy as a movement ‘locates’ the problem of poor financial decision-making with the individual as opposed to our financial infrastructure and governments. Individuals have little power in comparison to large financial institutions and their products are subject to what governments can and will regulate. Low income people who comprise priority groups for financial literacy have the least power of all.
(...)

There are five elements of this power imbalance that relate to the poor:

1. A power imbalance in onus.
Key examples: right of offset; insufficient funds (NSF), credit card balance limit fees

2. A power imbalance in products.
Key Examples: Balance protection, accident and no-medical life insurance, pre-paid credit cards with up-front fees.

3. A power imbalance in advice.
Key Examples: RRSP’s to low income near aged; high MER mutual funds, get rich quick schemes

4. A power imbalance in expertise.
Key Examples: failure of financial advisors to recommend early CPP and TFSA’s over RRSP’s.

5. A power imbalance in advertising and media availability.
Key examples: High MER mutual funds and no-medical life insurance

If the five elements of this power balance were redressed and low income people became even marginally financially literate, most if not all of the above named products in the key examples above would virtually disappear as the small sliver of the population that could actually benefit from them would be insufficient to sustain their markets. However, the size and complexity of the financial maze in Canada is growing at a much faster rate than the reach of the financial literacy tools designed to navigate it.

Source:
Open Policy Ontario
(John's website/blog)
http://openpolicyontario.com/

---

Also by John Stapleton:

Retiring on a low income
http://openpolicyontario.com/retiring-on-a-low-income-3/
By John Stapleton
- contains resources for Canadians on planning for retirement on a low income. Some examples relate to Ontario only.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Related links:

Financial Literacy Month
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/financialLiteracy/initiativesProjects/FLM/Pages/home-accueil.aspx
November is Financial Literacy Month (FLM) in Canada, and the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada is proud to play a role in raising awareness and mobilizing organizations across Canada to take part.

Canadian Financial Literacy Database
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/resources/Pages/FLRDSAT-OAEBDRLF.aspx
Find the tools you need to improve your knowledge and skills to make better financial decisions. This is your one-stop shop for information on budgeting, money management, insurance, saving, investing, taxes, fraud prevention and so much more.

Tools and calculators
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/resources/toolsCalculators/Pages/home-accueil.aspx
Compare and choose the financial products and services that suit your needs.
Save time and money with the following interactive tools:

* Financial literacy self-assessment quiz
--- Find out how your money management skills measure up

* Credit card tools
--- What is the best way to choose and use a credit card?

* Mortgage calculators
--- Are you shopping around for a mortgage?

* Budgeting Tool
--- Do you have a realistic budget?

* Financial Goal Calculator
--- How can you achieve your financial goals?

* Account Selector tool
--- Which bank accounts are right for you?

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National Strategy for Financial Literacy—Development and Consultations
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/financialLiteracy/financialLiteracyCanada/strategy/Pages/home-accueil.aspx
The Government of Canada is developing a national strategy for financial literacy that is inclusive, relevant and accessible for all Canadians and takes into consideration ways to meet the needs of those who may have different financial literacy challenges. The development process includes three phases of consultations to seek input, which will help ensure the strategy will meet the needs of all Canadians. The full national strategy for financial literacy will be published in 2015.

Current consultations:

Phase 3: Strengthening the financial literacy of young and adult Canadians
This final phase of the consultations focuses on children, youth and adults, to gain insight on how they could benefit from strengthening their financial literacy. The Financial Literacy Leader invites discussion and comments on the consultation paper and ways to bolster financial literacy for young and adult Canadians. Comments are invited from all Canadians.

Please submit your comments by Wednesday, December 10, 2014.

Consultation paper: Toward a National Strategy for Financial Literacy, Phase 3: Young Canadians and Adults (PDF, 221 KB)
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/financialLiteracy/financialLiteracyCanada/strategy/Documents/YoungCanadiansAndAdultsEN.pdf

Consultation questions at a glance and how to submit comments
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/financialLiteracy/financialLiteracyCanada/strategy/Pages/ConsultQ3-Question3.aspx

---

Phase 2: Strengthening the financial literacy of priority groups
The Financial Literacy Leader invites comments on questions raised in the consultation paper on the financial literacy needs of priority groups, including low-income Canadians, Aboriginal peoples and newcomers. These comments will inform the development of the national strategy for financial literacy.

Please submit your comments by Wednesday, December 10, 2014.

Consultation paper: Toward a National Strategy for Financial Literacy, Phase 2: Priority Groups (PDF, 179 KB)
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/financialLiteracy/financialLiteracyCanada/strategy/Documents/PriorityGroupsEN.pdf

Consultation questions at a glance and how to submit comments
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/financialLiteracy/financialLiteracyCanada/strategy/Pages/ConsultQ-Question.aspx
The Financial Literacy Leader will meet with stakeholders that provide services to members of the priority groups in order to gather their expertise. The Task Force on Financial Literacy identified priority groups through analyzing the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey. Other research has shown that the low-income population includes disproportionate numbers of people with disabilities, women and single adults.

---

Previous consultation (completed):

Phase 1:
Seniors’ financial literacy strategy: Strengthening Seniors’ Financial Literacy

Consultation paper: Toward a National Strategy for Financial Literacy, Phase 1: Strengthening Seniors’ Financial Literacy (PDF, 540 KB, 23 pages)
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/financialLiteracy/financialLiteracyCanada/strategy/Documents/seniors_financial_literacy_consultation.pdf

Photos: Consultations on Strengthening Seniors’ Financial Literacy
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/resources/multimedia/Pages/PhotoGal-Galeried.aspx#p1

Consultation submissions
http://www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/Eng/financialLiteracy/financialLiteracyCanada/strategy/Pages/submissions-soumissions.aspx
- incl. links to 39 individual and group submissions.

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (O-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk4.htm

2. Restoring the Mandatory Long-Form Census - November 14
(Private Member's Bill tabled by M.P. Ted Hsu)

Restoring the Mandatory Long-Form Census

From the
Globe and Mail:

Ending mandatory long-form census has hurt Canada
http://goo.gl/ZftBhU
Editorial
November 6, 2014
Bill C-626, a private member’s bill that would restore the mandatory long-form census and shield the Chief Statistician of Canada from political interference, has no chance of becoming law. It was introduced by a Liberal MP, Ted Hsu, and has limited support in Parliament. Even more foreboding, its adoption would require the Harper government to do something it loathes: admit an error.
But an error it was – and a now well-documented one – for the government to eliminate the mandatory long-form census in 2010 and replace it with the voluntary National Household Survey.
(...)
Statisticians are statisticians so we don’t have to be. If they say they need accurate, regular, comparable census, then that’s what they should get from the government. Mr. Hsu’s bill may be doomed, but it will go down fighting to reverse a decision that has harmed the country in tangible ways.

Source:
The Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

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From the website of
Ted Hsu, Liberal Member of Parliament for Kingston and the Islands:
[ http://www.tedhsu.ca/ ]

Let’s reinstate the long-form census
and expand the authority of the Chief Statistician!

http://www.tedhsu.ca/C626/
- includes : Overview * Bill C-626 Text * News Articles * Ted's Bill in the Media * Endorsements * Blog Posts * Press Releases * What Can I Do?

In 2010, the Conservative government eliminated the long-form census, against the advice of the Chief Statistician and other experts at Statistics Canada. We need the data from the census so we can make the best possible decisions about important social services, to address employment and labour market needs, to make business investment decisions and to plan for the future.

My new private member's bill (see Bill C-626, below ] would bring back the mandatory long-form census. Debate on this bill began last week in Parliament and now we need your help to build momentum leading up to the vote expected in February.

The government replaced the former long-form census with a voluntary National Household Survey (NHS) [ http://goo.gl/cJJu5 ]. Unsurprisingly, the NHS data is of poor quality [ http://goo.gl/IuTwsi ] and can't be compared with previous census data. Experts who rely on this data, and the continuity of these data sets, call the NHS data worthless [ http://goo.gl/V2RX0b ]. That’s why I have put forward Bill C-626, a private member’s bill to reinstate the long-form census and expand the authority of the Chief Statistician. This bill will be up for debate this fall, and will come to a vote this winter

---

M.P. Ted Hsu's website
http://www.tedhsu.ca/
Liberal Member of Parliament for Kingston and the Islands

Bill C-626
An Act to Amend the Statistics Act
http://www.tedhsu.ca/C626/bill-c-626.html

What can I do?
http://www.tedhsu.ca/C626/what-can-i-do.html
If you would like to help spread the word about Bill C-626, here are some ways you can help:
1) Call or write personally to your MP
2) Write a personal letter to your local newspaper
3) Ask your friends to help
4) Circulate a petition
5) Tweet your support on Twitter
6) Share your support on Facebook

---

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

3. Harper Government Releases Economic and Fiscal Update - November 12
(Department of Finance Canada)

Harper Government Releases Economic and Fiscal Update
Canada remains on track for a balanced budget in 2015

http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?mthd=tp&crtr.page=2&nid=903509&crtr.tp1D=1
News Release
November 12, 2014
Finance Minister Joe Oliver today released the annual Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections,which confirms that the Government remains on track for a balanced budget in 2015, with an expected surplus of $1.9 billion.

Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections
http://www.budget.gc.ca/efp-peb/2014/pub/toc-tdm-eng.html
[ PDF version (3.4MB, 80 pages) : http://www.budget.gc.ca/efp-peb/2014/pub/pdf/efp-peb-14-eng.pdf ]

Frequently Asked Questions: Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections
http://www.fin.gc.ca/afc/faq/efp-peb-14-eng.asp

Economic Action Plan 2014
http://www.budget.gc.ca/2014/home-accueil-eng.html

Source:
Department of Finance

http://www.fin.gc.ca/

-----------------------------------------------

Related links

From the
Toronto Star:
[ http://www.thestar.com/ ]

The political point of Joe Oliver’s economic update: Walkom
By spending the surplus, Stephen Harper’s Conservatives want to put Liberals, NDP in an impossible bind.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2014/11/12/the_political_point_of_joe_olivers_economic_update_walkom.html
NDP Leader Tom Mulcair says his party will fight the government's proposed income splitting, while Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau says the proposal reflects the government being 'out of touch.'
By Thomas Walkom
November 12, 2014
Sorry, Justin Trudeau. Tough luck, Tom Mulcair. We’ve spent all the money. There’s nothing left. That, in a nutshell, is the message Finance Minister Joe Oliver delivered to the opposition parties Wednesday in a particularly partisan economic update.
-
Mulcair & Trudeau criticize government's fiscal plans (video, duration 1:15)
http://www.thestar.com/news/2014/11/12/mulcair_trudeau_criticize_government_s_fiscal_plans.html
November 12, 2014
NDP Leader Tom Mulcair says his party will fight the government's proposed income splitting, while Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau says the proposal reflects the government being 'out of touch.'
.
Ottawa’s economic update previews 2015 election clashes (video, duration 1:19)
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2014/11/12/ottawa_to_post_small_29b_budget_deficit.html
Wed Nov 12 2014
The latest look at the financial books showed Ottawa would have been much better off financially if the government had not recently announced a package of tax-and-spending breaks for families.

-------------------------

From CBC News:
[ http://www.cbc.ca/news/ ]

Joe Oliver challenges Justin Trudeau for middle-class votes
Finance minister's economic update promises 2015 surplus

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/joe-oliver-challenges-justin-trudeau-for-middle-class-votes-1.2832413
By Laura Payton
November 12, 2014
Finance Minister Joe Oliver used his 2014 fall economic update to challenge the opposition parties — and specifically Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau — over their plans for an already spent federal surplus.
Canada will see a razor-thin $1.9-billion surplus in 2015, Oliver said today, after the Conservatives committed billions to tax cuts announced weeks ago. And that narrow surplus is a number that the Conservatives are already using to argue that only they can keep the country's economy on track.
.
Click the link above to access the following related articles:
*
Federal deficit shrinks to $300 million in August
* Stephen Harper says last year's deficit was $5.2B, down from $16.6B
* Joe Oliver says he'll balance the budget despite falling oil prices
* Canada's deficits and surpluses, 1963-2014

* Income splitting: What it is and who it benefits
* Infographic: Income splitting and the 'family tax cut'

---

- Go to the 2014 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2014.htm

4. Toronto tops Canada in child poverty rates: report - November 14
(CBC News)

Toronto tops Canada in child poverty rates: report
Almost 146,000 children growing up in low-income families in Toronto
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/toronto-tops-canada-in-child-poverty-rates-report-1.2835604
November 14, 2014
A report released Friday says Toronto has the highest rate of child poverty in the country, a situation its authors call "the hidden epidemic." The report says almost 30 per cent of children in Toronto are now from low-income families, a situation that leaves them less likely to graduate from high school and more likely to be sick. Co-authored by the Children's Aid Society of Toronto, the report also finds there are almost 146,000 children growing up in low-income families in Toronto — a number that grew by 10,000 between 2010 and 2012.

Complete report:

The Hidden Epidemic : A Report on
Child and Family Poverty in Toronto
November 2014
To read this report online in e-Pub format, click the link above and then scroll halfway down on the next page.
TIP #1 : If you prefer to read the online version, be sure to click the "Enlarge" symbol in the lower left corner of the first page of the e-Pub

PDF version of this report (3.9MB, 40 pages):
http://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/1361178/the-hidden-epidemic-a-report-on-child-and-family.pdf
TIP #2 : You can download the PDF version to your computer to read later, but you can't download the e-Pub version.

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/

This report was co-authored by the three agencies below:

Children's Aid Society of Toronto
http://www.torontocas.ca/

Family Service Toronto
http://www.familyservicetoronto.org/

Colour of Poverty
Website :
http://accessalliance.ca/community/advocacy/colourofpoverty
Facebook page : https://www.facebook.com/groups/colourofpoverty.colourofchange/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

5. Minister Deb Matthews at Ontario Nonprofit Network Conference 2014 - November 3
(Ontario Nonprofit Network
)

Minister Deb Matthews at Ontario Nonprofit Network Conference 2014 (YouTube video, duration 16:37)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2gyiZRjmTk&spfreload=10
November 3, 2014
Ontario's Deputy Premier, the Honourable Deb Matthews, honoured the impact the nonprofit sector has on communities, and recognized funding challenges they face for sustainability. But she also challenged nonprofits to refocus on the outcomes for the people they're serving, not the organizations they work at. Her rousing remarks sparked lively discussions on how the nonprofit sector is- or isn't- getting proactive about changing times in the province, fiscally and more.

At the 7:22 point in the Minister's speech, she singles out and recognizes John Stapleton ("...a marvellous resource") for his work with her Ministry on the first AND the second Ontario poverty reduction strategies.

YAY --- well-deserved kudos, John!

Source:
Ontario Nonprofit Network

http://theonn.ca/
Organized in 2007, the Ontario Nonprofit Network (ONN) is the convening network for the approximately 55,000 nonprofit organizations across Ontario. As a 7,000-strong provincial network, with a volunteer base of 300 sector leaders, ONN brings the diverse voices of the sector to government, funders and the business sector to create and influence systemic change.

Related link:

Ontario Nonprofit Network Conference 2014
http://theonn.ca/onn-conference-2014/
September 17-18, 2014
- incl. links to six videos from the conference

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (O-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk4.htm

6. And then there was one! BC is now dead last in Canada when it comes to fighting poverty! - November 13
(
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition)

And then there was one!
BC is now dead last in Canada when it comes to fighting poverty!

http://goo.gl/gwDGc6
November 13, 2014
On October 22 (2014), the Government of Saskatchewan announced in their Throne Speech that it would commit to the development of a poverty reduction strategy, making British Columbia the very last province in Canada without a plan to tackle poverty. And we still have the highest poverty rate in the country!

Congratulations to our friends at Upstream [ http://www.thinkupstream.net/ ] in Saskatchewan who were a big part in making this happen through their collaboration in the Poverty Costs campaign [ http://www.povertycosts.ca/ ]!

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction Coalition
http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/
We are a coalition that includes community and non-profit groups, faith groups, health organizations, First Nations and Aboriginal organizations, businesses, labour organizations, and social policy groups. We have come together around a campaign aimed at seeing the introduction of a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan from the government of British Columbia that would include legislated targets and timelines to significantly reduce poverty and homelessness

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

7. At What Cost? The Impacts of Rushing to Balance the Budget - November 12
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

At What Cost?
The Impacts of Rushing to Balance the Budget
(PDF - 179K, 10 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2014/11/At_What_Cost.pdf
By David Macdonald Kayle Hatt
November 12, 2014
This study reviews the extent of federal government cuts and provides tangible examples of how these cuts have negatively impacted important public services. While undermining Canada's economic recovery, the rush to balance the budget has also impacted federally delivered services, with the biggest cuts made in areas where Canadians most heavily rely on the federal government.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice.

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

8. Andrew Coyne, income splitting, and the child care blindspot - November 10
(Angella MacEwen, Broadbent Institute)

Andrew Coyne, income splitting, and the child care blindspot
http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/en/blog/andrew-coyne-income-splitting-and-child-care-blindspot
November 10, 2014
By Angella MacEwen
Columnist Andrew Coyne is a huge fan [ http://goo.gl/wAQ4dF ] of the Conservative government's new income splitting proposal. It's in the interest of fairness, you see. Single-earner couples, so his logic goes, aren't getting a fair shake in being taxed more than their dual-earner couple counterparts with the same total income.
By now, however, we are familiar with some of the patently unfair aspects of the Conservative scheme. There's the fact that the tax giveaway stands to exclude single parent families that need the most help. Or that even with the $2,000 cap, benefits from income splitting will accrue disproportionately to wealthy single-earner families.
(...)
Coyne believes the current system is skewed in favour of dual earner spouses and proposes that if there were some mechanism that made it thousands of dollars more expensive for women to work than to stay home, then addressing that inequity would top our priority list. Apparently Coyne hasn't been paying attention to the thousands of women calling for affordable child care solutions over the past 40 years [ http://goo.gl/jCuk1b ]. Or doesn't realize that child care costs thousands of dollars per year, and that parents need child care to return to work.
(...)
Not frequently mentioned in the income splitting debate is that the Canadian tax code already has a slight benefit for couples where one spouse chooses to stay home. A non-earning spouse may transfer their basic personal credit, which will be $11,351 for 2015, to the higher earning spouse. This results in a maximum tax savings of $1,703 for couples with a stay at home spouse. When the non-earning spouse is considering returning to the labour market, they have to consider that every dollar they earn reduces this spousal credit.
(...)
Maybe instead of redistributing income between different types of rich families, we could provide the types of universal public services that we all need and value.

[ Angella MacEwen is a senior economist at the Canadian Labour Congress and a Broadbent Fellow. ]

Source:
Broadbent Institute
http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

9. Back to the kitchen, Mrs. Cleaver: Income-splitting and social engineering - November 5
(iPolitics.ca)

Back to the kitchen, Mrs. Cleaver: Income-splitting and social engineering
http://www.ipolitics.ca/2014/11/05/back-to-the-kitchen-mrs-cleaver-income-splitting-and-social-engineering/
By Linda McQuaig | Nov 5, 2014
Stephen Harper is gearing up for the next election with a plan for rewarding “hardworking Canadian families”. Or at least a few of them.
In truth, Harper plans to give something to all families by enriching the Universal Child Care Benefit by $60 a month per child — thereby providing parents with an extra $2 a day. Having taken care of the “fairness” issue with this toonie-a-day (almost enough to buy a child an ice cream cone) Harper goes on to propose what really interests him: a new tax cut that moves in the direction of ending progressive taxation, the long-established notion that the rich should pay higher tax rates than the rest.
(...)
Imagine three families, all raising kids, all with total household incomes of $100,000.
In the first household, the breadwinner is a single mother. Her benefit from the Family Tax Cut: zero.
The second consists of two working spouses, each earning $50,000. Their benefit from the Family Tax Cut: zero.
The third consists of a man earning $100,000 with a stay-at-home wife. Their benefit from the Family Tax Cut: Bingo! They get $2,000.
Three households, all with the same household income — but only one qualifies for the ‘Family Tax Cut’. By what stretch of logic could that be considered fair? Are the other two families not “hardworking” enough? Does the Harper government consider them defective in some way?
(...)
Harper is proposing a regressive form of social engineering, using government tax policy to remake the country along the lines of Father Knows Best.

Source:
IPolitics.ca

http://www.ipolitics.ca/

---

- Go to the 2015 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2015.htm

10. The Parent Trap : Child Care Fees in Canada’s Big Cities - November 10
(David Macdonald and Martha Friendly, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

The Parent Trap
Child Care Fees in Canada’s Big Cities
(PDF - 795K, 32 pages)
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2014/11/Parent_Trap.pdf
By David Macdonald and Martha Friendly
November 10, 2014
This study examines the median unsubsidized child care fees in Canada’s biggest 22 cities for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. It also develops an affordability index

New study reveals the most and least affordable Canadian cities for child care
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/news-releases/new-study-reveals-most-and-least-affordable-canadian-cities-child-care
News release
November 10, 2014
[ Version française du communiqué:
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/news-releases/une-nouvelle-%C3%A9tude-r%C3%A9v%C3%A8le-les-villes-canadiennes-o%C3%B9-les-garderies-sont-les ]

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

11. Ontario Government To Increase Minimum Wage - November 10

From the
Ontario Government Newsroom:

Province Passes Legislation to Increase Minimum Wage:
Ontario Strengthening Protections for Vulnerable Workers
http://news.ontario.ca/mol/en/2014/11/province-passes-legislation-to-increase-minimum-wage.html
November 6, 2014
Today, Bill 18, the Stronger Workplaces for a Stronger Economy Act, 2014 [ http://goo.gl/NqDY2j ], passed third reading with all party support in the Ontario legislature. The new act supports Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy [ http://goo.gl/4y5y2o ], and is designed to further increase protections for vulnerable workers.

The act will help workers by:
* Tying future minimum wage increases to the Consumer Price Index for Ontario which will be announced by April of each year, and come into effect on Oct.1
* Ensuring Occupational Health and Safety Act coverage for unpaid co-op students and other unpaid learners , which will give them protection under the OHSA such as the right to know about workplace hazards and the right to refuse unsafe work
* Eliminating the $10,000 cap on the recovery of unpaid wages through Ministry of Labour orders to pay and increasing the period of recovery to two years
* Expanding employment protections to cover all foreign employees who come to Ontario under an immigration or foreign temporary employee program
* Holding temporary help agencies and their employer clients accountable for certain employment standards violations, such as failure to pay regular wages, overtime pay, and public holiday entitlements.

---

Related link:

Report and Recommendations to the Minister of Labour:
2014 Minimum Wage Advisory Panel

HTML version : http://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english/es/pubs/mwap/index.php
PDF version (2.3MB, 91 pages) : http://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english/es/pdf/mwap_report.pdf
January 27, 2014
Source:
Ontario Ministry of Labour
http://www.labour.gov.on.ca/

2014 Minimum Wage Advisory Panel
http://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english/es/pubs/mwap/index.php

---

Current and Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates for Adult Workers in Canada
http://srv116.services.gc.ca/dimt-wid/sm-mw/rpt1.aspx?lang=eng

---

- Go to the Minimum Wage / Living Wage Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

12. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Graduating in Canada: Profile, labour market outcomes and student debt of the class of 2009/2010, 2013 - November 14
--- Study: Agriculture in Canada - November 13
---- Canadian Megatrends – Fertility: Fewer children, older moms - November 13
---
Population growth: Migratory increase overtakes natural increase - October 9
--- Canada's population estimates: Age, sex and marital status, July 1, 2014- November 13
---- Beta testing: Revising how Statistics Canada publishes information, November 12 to December 12, 2014

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/a-daily-quotidien-eng.htm

Past issues of The Daily
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last

[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

November 14, 2014
Graduating in Canada: Profile, labour market outcomes and student debt of the class of 2009/2010, 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141114/dq141114b-eng.htm
In 2009/2010, 4 in 10 graduates chose to continue their postsecondary education after graduating from their program. Among those who did not pursue further studies, 90% of college graduates, 92% of bachelor and master's graduates and 93% of doctorate graduates had found employment by 2013.

November 13, 2014
Study: Agriculture in Canada
Farm area on Canada's best agricultural land declined by almost one million hectares from 2001 to 2011.
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141113/dq141113a-eng.htm
Canada has more than 50.5 million hectares of agricultural land classified as dependable agricultural land—areas deemed suitable for long-term cultivation. From 2001 to 2011, farm area located on dependable agricultural land declined by 969 802 hectares (-2.6%), according to "Agriculture in Canada," a new study in Human Activity and the Environment.

November 13, 2014
Canadian Megatrends – Fertility: Fewer children, older moms
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-630-x/11-630-x2014002-eng.htm

Despite some fluctuations, the total fertility rate in Canada has been below the replacement level for over 40 years. In fact, 1971 was the last year the replacement-level fertility of 2.1 children per woman was reached—meaning that couples, on average, had produced enough children to replace themselves. In 2011, the total fertility rate was 1.61 children per woman, up slightly from the record low of 1.51 about a decade earlier.

Fertility patterns—specifically the number of children born and the average age at childbearing—affect the dynamics of population growth and the age structure of Canadian society, as well as family formation and household composition. This demographic shift over the last 150 years has resulted in a transition from a country with a relatively young and growing population to one with an aging population, which is increasingly reliant on immigration for population growth.

Earlier report from Canadian Megatrends:

Population growth: Migratory increase overtakes natural increase
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-630-x/11-630-x2014001-eng.htm
October 9, 2014
In recent times, the contribution of natural increase to population growth has waned as the Canadian population aged and fertility rates declined. Today, natural increase accounts for less than one-third of Canada’s population growth and has ceased to be the major player in the equation. Meanwhile, migratory increase plays an increasing role in Canada’s population growth.

Migratory increase currently accounts for about two-thirds of Canada’s population growth.

November 13, 2014
Canada's population estimates: Age, sex and marital status, July 1, 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141113/dq141113e-eng.htm
Canada's population estimates by marital status, legal marital status, age and sex, as of July 1, 2014, are now available.

See CANSIM table 051-0042:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?lang=eng&retrLang=eng&id=0510042&paSer=&pattern=&stByVal=1&p1=1&p2=31&tabMode=dataTable&csid=
[ NOTE : This link will take you to the bottom of the table --- you must scroll to the top of the page for the table content. ]

November 12, 2014
Beta testing: Revising how Statistics Canada publishes information, November 12 to December 12, 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141112/dq141112d-eng.htm
Explore the new way we are organizing and publishing our information.
Give feedback on a page or join the discussion forum and share your thoughts.

Statistics Canada Beta site
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/beta/n1/en

Check past issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select day / month / year to access issues of The Daily going back to 1995.

StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng
The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.
Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

November 15, 2014
What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Coming in 2020: A national child care program for Canada
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/coming-2020-national-child-care-program-canada
5 Nov 2014 | Canada
In a paper for Our schools/Our selves, Martha Friendly and Bozica Costigliola describe how and why the upcoming national child care policy conference was organized and how Canada can have a national child care program by 2020. The authors argue that "the federal government, while respecting issues of provincial/territorial jurisdiction, must step up to the plate".

Selected works by ChildCare2020 speaker David Macdonald
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/selected-works-childcare2020-speaker-david-macdonald
10 Nov 2014 | Canada
In advance of the ChildCare2020 conference, CRRU is featuring selected works by conference speakers. This week: David Macdonald.

The parent trap: child care fees in Canada's biggest cities
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/parent-trap-child-care-fees-canadas-biggest-cities
10 Nov 2014 | Canada
Study from CCPA examines the median unsubsidized child care fees in Canada’s biggest 22 cities for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. It also develops an affordability index that compares those fees to the median income of women aged 25 to 34 in that city, revealing the most and least affordable cities for child care in Canada.

Early childhood education and care for Aboriginal children in Canada
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/early-childhood-education-and-care-aboriginal-children-cana
5 Nov 2014 | Canada
Policy brief by Jane Preston discusses contextual factors that are important to quality Aboriginal early childhood education and argues that "strong collaborative efforts are needed by multi-level leaders to ensure that quality Aboriginal early childhood education is actualized throughout Canada". This policy brief is part of the Moving Child Care Forward project.

Harper announces 'Family Tax Cut' (income splitting) and increases to the UCCB and Child Care Expense Deduction
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/11/harper-announces-family-tax-cut-income-splitting-and-increa
5 Nov 2014 | Canada
The Harper government announced their plans to implement income splitting under their new Family Tax Cut, as well as increasing the Universal Child Care Benefit and the amount that can be claimed under the Child Care Expense Deduction. CRRU has collected current and related analysis and news of the Harper government's proposal

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

ChildCare2020: Let's put child care back on the public agenda
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/childcare2020-lets-put-child-care-back-public-agenda
10 Nov 2014 | Canada

Ontario city has least affordable daycare in Canada, study says
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/ontario-city-has-least-affordable-daycare-canada-study-says
10 Nov 2014 | Canada

Childcare quality does not drive up costs: study
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/childcare-quality-does-not-drive-costs-study
5 Nov 2014 | Australia and New Zealand

Child care advocates say parents have clear choice in next federal election
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/child-care-advocates-say-parents-have-clear-choice-next-federal-elec
5 Nov 2014 | Canada

New rural daycare will keep Manitoba parents from crossing boarder
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/11/new-rural-daycare-will-keep-manitoba-parents-crossing-boarder
5 Nov 2014 | Manitoba

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CRRU Archive

All newer content from January 2013 to date is archived in a special section of the Early Childhood Development Links page of this site.
Click the link immediately below to go there:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm#crru

For links to weekly issues of this weekly alert from June 2009 to December 2012*,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

* NOTE (by Gilles):
In December 2012, my HTML editing software was crashing whenever I would open the above archive page to add or edit something.
After several hours of tinkering in a vain attempt to make everything work, I finally decided to go with Plan B : you can still click the link above to access the CRRU archive (including contents of each issue from June 2009 to December 2012), but all new content since then is archived on the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/

Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag.
Tags include:
* Academic achievement * Affordable Care Act (ACA) * Applicants * Budget cuts * California * Cash assistance * Census * Child poverty * Child welfare * Child well-being * Cities * Economic stimulus * Eligibility * Enrollment * Florida * Food insecurity * Foster care * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless families * Income * Indiana * Jobless benefits * Job losses * Jobs * Kids Count * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Michigan * Minnesota * Neighborhoods * Ohio * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Privatization * Recession * Safety net * Schools * Shelters * SNAP/Food Stamps * States * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Texas * Unemployment rate * Wisconsin

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

November 14, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/11/14/
Medicaid and Children’s Preventive Care
Food Stamp Trafficking
State Minimum Wage – Oklahoma
Intergenerational Poverty (2 articles)
States and Drug Testing for Public Assistance
Gentrification

November 13, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/11/13/
Poverty and Debt

November 12, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/11/12/
Working Households and Basic Needs – Florida
Medicaid Provider Access

November 11, 2014
No Poverty Dispatch today.

November 10, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/11/10/
Hiring Bias Against the Long-Term Unemployed

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page: [ http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/ and click on a date in the calendar in the top right-hand corner of the page.
2. Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page and click on a category or a tag in the right-hand margin.
4. See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm (more complete listing, but only goes back to December 2011)

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

15. [United States] Some 50 million Americans Face Cuts with expiration of working-family tax credits - November 12
(Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)

Letting Key Provisions of Working-Family Tax Credits Expire
Would Push 16 Million People Into or Deeper Into Poverty:
Some 50 Million Americans Face Cut

HTML version : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=4228
PDF version (6 pp.) : http://www.cbpp.org/files/11-12-14tax.pdf
By Chuck Marr, Bryann DaSilva and Arloc Sherman
November 12, 2014
More than 16 million people in low- and modest-income working families, including 8 million children, would fall into — or deeper into — poverty in 2018 if policymakers fail to make permanent key provisions of two important tax credits. Some 50 million Americans, including 31 million children, would lose part or all of their Child Tax Credit (CTC) or Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). The appendix provides state-by-state data.

Related areas of research:

* Tax — Federal
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=30

* EITC and Child Tax Credit
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=27

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

http://www.cbpp.org/

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

16. [United States] Recent releases from the Annie E. Casey Foundation:
--- Creating Opportunity for Families: A Two-Generation Approach - November 12
---
2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book - July 22

Recent releases from the Annie E. Casey Foundation:

Nearly half of America's families with young children struggle to make ends meet
http://www.aecf.org/blog/nearly-half-of-americas-families-with-young-children-struggle-to-make-ends/
Blog post
November 12, 2014
With almost half the nation’s young children growing up in low-income households, a new report from the Casey Foundation calls for a comprehensive effort to lift kids out of poverty. (...) The KIDS COUNT® policy report, Creating Opportunity for Families: A Two-Generation Approach, outlines how the public, nonprofit and private sectors must work together to reduce poverty among the 10 million low-income families with young children in the United States.

The complete report:

Creating Opportunity for Families: A Two-Generation Approach (PDF - 1.9MB, 20 pages)
http://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-CreatingOpportunityforFamilies-2014.pdf
Nearly half of the nation's families with young children struggle to make ends meet. This report makes the case for creating opportunity for families by addressing the needs of parents and their children simultaneously. The report describes the Foundation's two-generation approach, which calls for connecting families with early childhood education, job training and other tools to achieve financial stability and break the cycle of poverty, and recommends ways to help equip families with what they need to thrive.
(...)
The report outlines three broad recommendations:
1. Create policies that equip parents and children with the income, tools and skills they need to succeed — as a family and as individuals.
2. Put common sense into common practice by structuring public systems to respond to the realities facing today’s families.
3. Use existing child, adult and neighborhood programs and platforms to build evidence for practical pathways out of poverty for entire families.

A Collection of Resources on Two-Generation Approaches
http://www.aecf.org/blog/learn-more-a-collection-of-resources-on-two-generation-approaches/
November 12, 2014

---

2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book
http://www.aecf.org/resources/the-2014-kids-count-data-book/
July 22, 2014
The 25th edition of Casey’s annual report on child well-being — the 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book — examines how U.S. children have fared since 1990. While national and state policies have resulted in positive gains in child health and education, the Data Book notes a decline in the economic well-being of children and the communities in which they live. In addition to its retrospective analysis, the report looks at the latest data and uses 16 key indicators to rank states on child well-being. Using an index of 16 indicators, the 2014 report ranks states on overall child well-being and in four domains: (1) economic well-being, (2) education, (3) health, and (4) family and community. For 2014, the three highest-ranked states for child well-being were Massachusetts, Vermont and Iowa; the three lowest-ranked were Nevada, New Mexico and Mississippi

The complete report:

The 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book:
An annual report on how children are faring in the United States
(PDF - 6.3MB, 60 pages)
http://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-2014kidscountdatabook-2014.pdf

Child Well-Being Rankings by state (small PDF file)
http://www.aecf.org/m/databook/aecf-2014kidscountdatabook-rankings-2014.pdf
Overall Rank - Economic Well-Being Rank - Education Rank - Health Rank - Family and Community Rank

2014 National and State Data Profiles
http://www.aecf.org/resources/the-2014-kids-count-data-book/national-and-state-data-profiles/

News Releases for the 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book (national and state level)
http://www.aecf.org/resources/the-2014-kids-count-data-book/news-releases/

Most Popular KIDS COUNT Resources
http://www.aecf.org/work/kids-count/
Includes links to the following:
* Creating Opportunity for Families * The 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book * Race for Results * Early Reading Proficiency in the United States * The 2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book * Early Warning! Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters * The First Eight Years * Why Income Inequality Hurts Kids and Families * Reducing Youth Incarceration in the United States

KIDS COUNT Network
http://www.aecf.org/work/kids-count/kids-count-network/
A group of state-based child advocacy and research organizations that use data to promote smart policies on issues ranging from child welfare and juvenile justice to education and economic opportunity.

Kids Count Data Center
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/
A project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, KIDS COUNT is the premier source for data on child and family well-being in the United States. Access hundreds of indicators, download data and create reports and graphics on the KIDS COUNT Data Center that support smart decisions about children and families.

Source:
Annie E. Casey Foundation

http://www.aecf.org/
The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a private philanthropy that creates a brighter future for the nation’s children by developing solutions to strengthen families, build paths to economic opportunity and transform struggling communities into safer and healthier places to live, work and grow.

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

17. US wealth inequality - top 0.1% worth as much as the bottom 90% - November 3
(The Guardian)

US wealth inequality - top 0.1% worth as much as the bottom 90%
Not since the Great Depression has wealth inequality in the US been so acute, new in-depth study finds

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/nov/13/us-wealth-inequality-top-01-worth-as-much-as-the-bottom-90
November 13, 2014
Wealth inequality in the US is at near record levels according to a new study by academics. Over the past three decades, the share of household wealth owned by the top 0.1% has increased from 7% to 22%. For the bottom 90% of families, a combination of rising debt, the collapse of the value of their assets during the financial crisis, and stagnant real wages have led to the erosion of wealth. The share of wealth owned by the top 0.1% is almost the same as the bottom 90%.
NOTE: SCroll to the bottom of the article for 551 comments

Source:
The Guardian (U.K.)
http://www.theguardian.com/

---

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

18. Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://crin.org/

CRIN is a global children’s rights advocacy network. Established in 1995, we press for rights - not charity - and campaign for a genuine shift in how governments and societies view and treat children. We link to nearly 3,000 organisations that between them work on children’s rights in every country in the world and rely on our publications, research and information sharing.

Our Vision
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all their human rights guaranteed by the United Nations, regional organisations and national governments.

Link to the latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

12 November 2014 - CRINmail issue 1403
https://www.crin.org/en/home/what-we-do/crinmail/1403
In this issue:
Child policy data: Realising the promises of the CRC
Latest news and reports
Access to justice for children in Saint Kitts and Nevis
Upcoming events
Employment
Also in this issue:
World news
Publications
Events
Issues
Law
Advocacy
Challenging breaches
Take action
Campaigns
Guides

---------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as in the above, back to 2009-2010

--------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to CRINMAIL English
http://www.crin.org/en/node/293
NOTE : In addition to CRINmail English, you can subscribe to the following newsletters:
* Armed Conflict CRINmail
* Child Rights at the United Nations
* Children in Court CRINmail
* CRINmail EN ESPAÑOL
* CRINmail Francais
* CRINmail in Arabic
* CRINmail in Russian
* Violence CRINmail

--------------------------------------------------

CRIN News Archive
http://crin.org/en/library/news-archive

--------------------------------------------------

CRIN Country Pages : CANADA
http://crin.org/en/library/countries/canada

--------------------------------------------------

Children's rights Wiki - from CRIN
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php
The Children's Rights Wiki assembles all information about children's rights in every country in one place. The purpose of the project is to make the huge volume of information that exists on children's rights more accessible, assist children's rights advocates in identifying persistent violations, and inspire collective action. This is a web-based, multi-lingual and interactive project.

--------------------------------------------------

Canada and Children's Rights
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php?title=Canada
- from the Children's Rights Wiki

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you don't already receive this weekly newsletter by email but would like to, you can sign up for the Canadian Social Research Newsletter on the online subscription page : http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com




ACTUAL NEWS HEADLINES

Squad Helps Dog Bite Victim

Shot Off Woman's Leg Helps Nicklaus to 66

Enraged Cow Injures Farmer with Ax

Plane Too Close to Ground, Crash Probe Told

Miners Refuse to Work after Death

Juvenile Court to Try Shooting Defendant

Stolen Painting Found by Tree

Two Soviet Ships Collide, One Dies

Drunken Drivers Paid $1000

'84 War Dims Hope for Peace

If Strike isn't Settled Quickly, It May Last a While

Cold Wave Linked to Temperatures

Something Went Wrong in Jet Crash, Expert Says

Police Begin Campaign to Run Down Jaywalkers

Safety Experts Say School Bus Passengers Should Be Belted

Farmer Bill Dies in House

Is There a Ring of Debris around Uranus?

Stud Tires Out

Panda Mating Fails; Veterinarian Takes Over

British Left Waffles on Falkland Islands

Lung Cancer in Women Mushrooms

Eye Drops off Shelf

Teacher Strikes Idle Kids

Reagan Wins on Budget, But More Lies Ahead

Source:
http://www.robinsweb.com/humor/headlines.html

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The Ultimate List of educational websites
http://imgur.com/gallery/5xn3uC1

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Free online tools
http://imgur.com/gallery/LDzpYGr

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Pointer Pointer
http://www.pointerpointer.com/
I
t does what it says it does.

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No traffic lights?
No problem
http://www.wimp.com/streettraffic/
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