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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 18, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1949 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.   Flaherty faces five choices on Employment Insurance (Carol Goar, in the Toronto Star) - January 12
2. Données sociales du Québec. Édition 2009 (Institut de la statistique du Québec) - January 13
3. Economy best served by reducing government spending and permanently cutting taxes (The Fraser Institute) - January 12
4. Submissions to the Federal Pre-Budget Consultation (from Ontario 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction) - January 2009
5. Abilities Canada launches its new website (Disability-related resources)
6. [Federal] Young offender laws a success: study (Vancouver Sun) - January 12
7. What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
--- Aboriginal Peoples Survey: School experiences of First Nations children aged 6 to 14 living off reserve, 2006 - January 16
--- Canada's population by age and sex, as of July 1, 2008 (correction) - January 15
--- Canadian Economic Observer January 2009 - January 15
--- Study: Impact of public infrastructure on productivity, 1962 to 2006 - January 14
8. What's new from The Socialist Project (Toronto):
--- Breaking the Cycle or Going Around in Circles? The Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy - January 3
--- Economic Crisis and the Poor: Probable Impacts, Prospects for Resistance - December 8
9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - January 14

International  content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
11. What's new from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (U.S.) - Updated January 14
--- Facing deficits, two-thirds of states are imposing cuts that hurt vulnerable residents
--- Most states are cutting education
--- States budget troubles worsen
--- Current and projected state deficits
--- Policy Points: Overview of States and the Weak Economy
12. Can the Cellphone Help End Global Poverty? (New York Times) - April 13, 2008
13. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content
14. Human Rights Watch World Report 2009
(Human Rights Watch) - January 14
15. CRINMAIL (January 2009) - (Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Have a great week!

Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. Flaherty faces five choices on Employment Insurance - January 12
(Carol Goar, in the Toronto Star)

Flaherty faces five choices on EI
January 12, 2009
By Carol Goar
Canada's employment insurance system is outdated, inequitable, stingy and at serious risk of insolvency in a protracted economic downturn. The dilemma facing Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, should he decide to fix it, is figuring out which problem to tackle first. He is not short of advice. Business lobbyists, union officials, municipal leaders, economists and social activists have all put forward their prescriptions in the run-up to this month's budget. But Flaherty can't say yes to everybody. Even if he were to make significant investment in jobless benefits – say $3 billion – he'd have to set priorities. The damage done by 30 years of cutting and dismantling can't be undone in one budget. The finance minister has five basic options...

[ earlier articles by Carol Goar ]

Source:
Toronto Star

Also on EI by Carol Goar:

Employment Insurance in desperate need of repair
January 9, 2009

From the website of
Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC)
:
*
Employment Insurance

- More Employment Insurance Links :
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm#ei

(this is part of the HRSDC Links page of this site)

2. Données sociales du Québec. Édition 2009 - January 13
(Institut de la statistique du Québec)

[ Pour la version en français des liens ci-dessous, voir la page de
liens de recherche sociale au Québec
: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm. ]

---------------------------------------------------

What's new from the
Institut de la statistique du Québec
:

In 2006 disposable income for women was 76% of that for men versus 58% in 1981
News Release
January 13, 2009
In 2006 disposable income for women was 76% of that for men: $22,840 versus $30,244. This is an improvement compared to 2000 when the ratio was 69%, and to 1981 with a ratio of 58%. The gap is narrowing due to the increase in women’s income (29%) during that period, since men’s income was substantially the same in 2006 as in 1981. In the group aged 25-44, women’s income was 84% of men’s. These results were taken from the 2009 edition of the publication Données sociales du Québec, released today by the Institut de la statistique du Québec.
- includes more highlights from the report...

Données sociales du Québec. Édition 2009
January 2009
NOTE: this report is available in French only.
Read the highlights above, then scan the table of contents below.
If you find something you wish to examine,
you can use Google Language Tools to translate table headings and other text.
Each of the chapters below is downloadable as a PDF file by clicking the title link above,
or you can download the complete report in one PDF file (1.2MB, 235 pages)

Table of contents
(unofficial translation added in red):

Chapitre 1 Population, ménages et familles
(Population, households and families)
Chapitre 2 Santé : perceptions et comportements
(Perceptions and Behaviours)
Chapitre 3 Éducation, insertion en emploi et formation continue
(Education, labour force integration and ongoin training)
Chapitre 4 Travail et cycle de vie
(Work and life cycle)
Chapitre 5 Revenu et patrimoine
(Income and assets)
Chapitre 6 Faible revenu et inégalité
(Low income and income inequality)
Chapitre 7 Dépenses des ménages
(Household expenses)
Chapitre 8 Logement et transport
(Housing and transportation)
Chapitre 9 Tendances dans l’emploi du temps, 1986-2005
(Trends in time usage, 1986-2005)

Source:
Official Statistics : The Economy and Finance --- Economic Structure --- Society
[ Institut de la statistique du Québec:
The mission of the Institut de la statistique du Québec is to provide reliable, relevant and objective statistical information on the socioeconomic evolution of Québec. It is also responsible for conducting statistical surveys of general interest. Thus, the Institut, via the production of quality statistics supporting the public debate, plays a preponderant role in Québec society. ]

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm
- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

3. Economy best served by reducing government spending and permanently cutting taxes - January 12
(The Fraser Institute)

Tax cuts, not spending, needed to stimulate economy: think-tank
By Eric Beauchesne
January 12, 2009
OTTAWA - The federal government should cut spending but permanently decrease personal income and business taxes in its Jan. 27 budget to stimulate the economy, the Fraser Institute advised Monday. “Increasing government spending, whether it’s on bailouts for inefficient industries or increased unemployment benefits, will lead to a deficit that will saddle Canadians with higher taxes in the future,” said Niels Veldhuis, senior economist at the Vancouver-based think-tank.
(...)
The advice, however, runs counter to that from left-leaning groups, which have called for increased spending - especially on the unemployed and low-income workers to cushion them against the impact of the recession and stimulate the economy. It’s also different from most mainstream economists and business groups, which have called for, and what Finance Minister Jim Flaherty has indicated will be in the budget, which is a combination of increased spending and lower taxes.
Source:
Vancouver Sun

Related links:

Economy best served by reducing government spending and permanently cutting taxes
News Release
January 12, 2009
Source:
The Fraser Institute

---

But the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives begs to differ...

An economic stimulus plan for Canada’s economy and its people
Editorial
January 13, 2009
By David Macdonald & Armine Yalnizyan
In the weeks leading up to the January 27 federal budget, Jim Flaherty is hinting that he will turn, once more, to the traditional Conservative fix for everything: tax cuts. Not only is this response yesterday’s news, it is the wrong answer for today’s problems. Tax cuts are not the kind of economic stimulus that would re-ignite consumer confidence, and there’s proof of that south of the border.

Related link:

Leadership for Tough Times:
Alternative Federal Budget Fiscal Stimulus Plan
(PDF - 330K, 28 pages)
[ version française (PDF - 358Ko.) ]
January 2009

Source:
Alternative Federal Budget - incl. links to over two dozen earlier alternative budget papers
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives ]

- Go to the Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm

4. Submissions to the Federal Pre-Budget Consultation - January 2009
(from Ontario 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction
)

Family Security in Insecure Times:
Poverty Reduction as Poverty Prevention
Submission to
Federal Conservative Pre-Budget Consultation
January 8, 2009
By Laurel Rothman
National Coordinator, Campaign 2000
"(...) Increased public expenditures are needed to prevent further child and family poverty and to stem an even wider gap between rich and poor as Canada enters a recession. The cost of poverty is high for all Canadians. There is good evidence that as a society we either share the collective responsibility to prevent and reduce child and family poverty, or we face rising costs in health care services, criminal justice and education and reduced output due to high unemployment. The majority of Canadians agree; in a recent study, an overwhelming majority (92%) say that if other nations like the UK and Sweden can reduce poverty, so can Canada. Our choice is clear – we can pay now or pay later. Campaign 2000 believes that paying now to improve life chances and provide more opportunities for independence and success makes good sense."
Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000.

Open Letter to Finance Minister Jim Flaherty
from the (Ontario) 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction
January 13, 2008
Dear Minister Flaherty,
We are writing on behalf of the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction to urge you to make social investments and poverty reduction top priorities in the upcoming January 27 federal budget. Evidence is mounting that investments in infrastructure, such as affordable housing and early learning and child care, along with strengthening the incomes of vulnerable families and adults, will reduce poverty. At the same time it will create jobs and stimulate demand in local economies across Canada.On the other hand, general income tax and GST cuts have been shown to be ineffective and a weak substitute for social investments when it comes to economic stimulus...
Source:
25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction
25-in-5 is a multi-sectoral network endorsed by more than 1500 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working on eliminating poverty. We have organized ourselves around the call for a Poverty Reduction Plan with a goal to reduce poverty in Ontario by 25% in 5 years and 50% in 10 years.

Related links from 25 in 5:

The Recession Relief Fund Coalition
...is pressing the federal government to support essential services to our most vulnerable people. The Coalition has launched a Declaration that also calls for a National Housing Program.

Get Real… it’s the economy, make it work for us
The Canadian Labour Congress has a plan to stimulate the economy and to create and protect jobs, pensions and public services.

Support Affordable Housing in the Budget and Stimulus Package
- Action Alert from ACORN

Flaherty must do all he can to throw Canadians a lifeline
...say Armine Yalnizyan and David Macdonald in Toronto Star op-ed (Jan 10).
Instead of the usual tax cuts, he should target tax initiatives to social investments where they'll be most effective.

---------------

NOTE: The online Federal Budget 2009 consultations ended at midnight on January 9.
(See http://www.fin.gc.ca/n08/08-103-eng.asp - 4th paragraph)

< Begin rhetorical questions>

1. Why does Finance Canada cut off submissions to the pre-budget consultation on January 9 if the budget date is the 27th?
Do the Finance Canada analysts read that slowly?

2. Why doesn't Finance Canada offer links to pre-budget submissions from groups and individuals?
I searched the Finance Canada site for "2009 pre-budget consultation" and came up with exactly zero results
So much for a "transparent" budget process, I guess.

< / End rhetorical questions >

---------------

- Go to the Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm

5. Abilities Canada launches its new website - (Disability-related resources)

Abilities Canada
The Canadian Abilities Foundation is excited to announce the launch of our new web site. Please visit us and join the conversation by creating an account. See our new and enhanced features, including the new blogs and our CEO and Founder’s welcoming video. We will be adding new content daily and hope to engage all communities across Canada and North America in dialogue and sharing of information relevant to people with disabilities and the broader community, including decision makers in the public and private sectors. We welcome your feedback and look forward to making http://www.abilities.ca the place to go when you need information or just want to share your news, issues, concerns and success stories.

- Go to the Disability Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm

6. [Federal] Young offender laws a success: study - January 12
(Vancouver Sun)

Young offender laws a success: study
Academics warn Prime Minister Stephen Harper's government not to pursue promise to toughen laws

By Janice Tibbetts
January 12, 2009
Canada's revamped young offender laws -- described by Prime Minister Stephen Harper as an "unmitigated failure" -- have been a clear success in keeping adolescents out of court and custody without increasing youth crime, an academic analysis concludes. And the report's three authors warn the Harper government not to pursue a promise to toughen the Youth Criminal Justice Act. They argue it won't enhance public safety, but it will cost provincial governments significantly more money to punish young people by jailing them.
Source:
Vancouver Sun

Related links:

The Youth Criminal Justice Act
Updated to December 13, 2008
- incl. links to the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), the Youth Criminal Justice Act Review 2008, explanatory materials on the YCJA and other information on the YCJA and its implementation.
Source:
Justice Canada

Conservative plan would name violent young offenders
September 22, 2008
Source:
CTV.ca News

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnbkmrk.htm

7. What's New in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
--- Aboriginal Peoples Survey: School experiences of First Nations children aged 6 to 14 living off reserve, 2006 - January 16
--- Canada's population by age and sex, as of July 1, 2008 (correction) - January 15
--- Canadian Economic Observer January 2009 - January 15
---
Study: Impact of public infrastructure on productivity, 1962 to 2006 - January 14

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

January 16, 2009
Aboriginal Peoples Survey: School experiences of
First Nations children aged 6 to 14 living off reserve, 2006
First Nations children aged 6 to 14 who lived off reserve were as likely as all children in Canada to be doing well in school (based on parents' knowledge of their child's school work, including report cards).
[ Complete report ]
[ Related fact sheet ]
[ Key indicators from the 2006
Aboriginal Children's Survey and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey
]

January 15, 2009
Canada's population by age and sex, as of July 1, 2008
(correction)
As of July 1, 2008, the median age of Canada's population was 39.4 years. Almost one Canadian out of seven (13.7%) is aged 65 and over, while 16.8% (correction) of the population is aged less than 15. Although the Canadian population has been ageing since the end of the baby-boom, it still remains one of the youngest among the members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
[ Table : Population, age distribution and median age by province and territory, as of July 1, 2008 ]

January 15, 2009
Canadian Economic Observer January 2009
Contents:
1. Sections ( incl. * Current economic conditions * Feature article * Economic events * Recent feature articles * National accounts * Labour markets * Prices * International trade * Goods-producing industries (manufacturing, construction and resources) * Services (trade, trasportation, travel and communications) * Financial markets * Provincial)
2. Tables
3. Charts
4. Appendices
5. User information
6. Related products

January 14, 2009
Study: Impact of public infrastructure on productivity, 1962 to 2006
Between 1962 and 2006, roughly one-half of the total growth in multifactor productivity in the private sector was the result of growth in public infrastructure.
[ complete report ]

The Daily Archives - select a year and month from the drop-down menu to view releases in chronological order

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

8. What's new from The Socialist Project:
--- Breaking the Cycle or Going Around in Circles? The Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy - January 3
--- Economic Crisis and the Poor: Probable Impacts, Prospects for Resistance - December 8

What's new from The Socialist Project:

Breaking the Cycle or Going Around in Circles?
The Ontario Poverty Reduction Strategy
January 3, 2009
By Peter Graefe
"(...)what should we make of the McGuinty strategy, and of the 25in5 campaign around it? Is a strategy of positive engagement a wise one for making gains, or will it only deliver thin gruel?"

Also from The Socialist Project:

Economic Crisis and the Poor:
Probable Impacts, Prospects for Resistance
December 8, 2008
By John Clarke
Now that the crisis of the financial markets has become a crisis of the 'real' economy, it is obvious that those who already face poverty (or live on the edge of it) will be hit extraordinarily hard in the days ahead. Over the last three decades, social programs that served to partially redistribute wealth or limit the disciplinary power of unemployment on the working class were massively reduced. With this 'social safety net' seriously compromised, we can expect a rapid and deep process of impoverishment to take effect as the downturn unfolds. The scale and severity of this will pose major challenges but open up huge possibilities in terms of mobilizing poor communities.

Source:
The Socialist Project
At a meeting in Toronto in the fall of 2000, some 750 activists responded to a call to “rebuild the left” by developing a structured movement against capitalism. (...) The Socialist Project does not propose an easy politics for defeating capitalism or claim a ready alternative to take its place. We oppose capitalism out of necessity and support the resistance of others out of solidarity. This resistance creates spaces of hope, and an activist hope is the first step to discovering a new socialist politics.

Socialist Links - 200+ online resources for social activists!

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - January 14

From the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):

January 14, 2009

ICMEC International Seminar Series: Seminar two
14 Jan 09
- Presentations from the second ICMEC seminar in December. Presentations focused on the social stratification of child care in the England.

Breaking down barriers: Immigrant families and early childhood education in New York City
14 Jan 09
- Policy brief from the Coalition for Asian American Children and Families examining immigrant families and their access to early childhood education in New York City.

CCCABC BC budget 2009 consultation submission
14 Jan 09
- Submission for the 2009 BC budget from the Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC on making the investment in child care a top priority.

Early learning prevents youth violence
14 Jan 09
- Report from the Centre for Excellence for Early Childhood Development on what is known about childhood aggression and what can be done about it.

The child care transition: A league table of early childhood education and care in economically advanced countries
11 Dec 08
- UNICEF Innocenti Report Card 8 compares ECEC in wealthy countries; Canada ranks at the bottom of 25 countries, meeting only one of ten key benchmarks.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Duncan vows focus on early childhood education, innovation [US]
13 Jan 09

· Le Neve Groves alleges forgery on ABC loans [AU]
13 Jan 09

· Fourth childcare group hit by ABC collapse [AU]
13 Jan 09

· One in 10 childcare centres a failure [AU]
12 Jan 09

· NWT child care 'at the bottom' [CA–NT]
12 Jan 09

· Child care – Canada can’t work without it [CA]
8 Jan 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(
Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S). ===> the content of this link changes twice a week
IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches twice a week. Each issue of the dispatch provides links to U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media.

January 15, 2009
* Kids Count Report - Michigan
* States and Unemployment Insurance
* State Budgets and Economic Stimulus
* State Children's Health Insurance Program
* State Medicaid Programs - West Virginia, Iowa, Kentucky
* Rates of Homelessness
* Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program
* Food Assistance Programs
* Education Costs and Funding
* Medical and Prescription Drug Costs

January 12, 2009
* Joblessness and Unemployment
* The Unemployed and Health Insurance Coverage
* Welfare-to-Work Programs - California
* Food Stamp Program
* WIC Program and Nutrition - Kentucky
* Child Care Assistance - North Carolina, California
* Report: Child Well-Being - Texas
* Sales Taxes on Food - Tennessee, Alaska
* Section 8 Housing Program - Delaware
* Children's Health Insurance Coverage
* Homelessness and Housing - Hawaii, Massachusetts, Florida
* School Districts and Homeless Students
* Medicaid Reform - Rhode Island
* Dallas Morning News Investigative Series

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

If you wish to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail,
please send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. What's new from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (U.S.) - Updated January 14
--- Facing deficits, two-thirds of states are imposing cuts that hurt vulnerable residents
--- Most states are cutting education
--- States budget troubles worsen
--- Current and projected state deficits
--- Policy Points: Overview of States and the Weak Economy

What's new from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (U.S.)?

Facing deficits, two-thirds of states are imposing cuts that hurt vulnerable residents (12 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009
By Nicholas Johnson, Elizabeth Hudgins and Jeremy Koulish
At least 33 states have made or proposed budget cuts that threaten vital services for many residents. Targeted areas include:
* Public health: 22 states
*
Elderly and disabled services: 21 states
*
K-12 education: 21 states
*
Colleges and universities: 28 states
*
State workforce reductions: 34 states
*
At least fourteen states have increased taxes or taken other revenue raising measures.

Related link:

Most states are cutting education (3 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009

States budget troubles worsen (9 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009
By Elizabeth C. McNichol and Iris Lav
At least 45 states faced or are facing shortfalls in their budgets for this and/or next year, and severe fiscal problems are highly likely to continue into the following year."
* Combined state budget gaps for the remainder of this fiscal year and fiscal years 2010 and 2011 are estimated to total more than $350 billion.
* At least 45 states faced or are facing shortfalls in their budgets for this and/or next year, and severe fiscal problems are highly likely to continue into 2011. Texas has joined this list since the last update.
* Mid-year shortfalls of $43 billion have opened up in the 2009 budgets of at least 41 states and the District of Columbia. This new round of mid-year shortfalls is in addition to the budget gaps of $48 billion that 29 states closed as they adopted their budgets for this fiscal year.
* Thirty-nine states already project shortfalls totaling more than $80 billion for fiscal 2010. This total 2010 shortfall is expected to grow to about $145 billion. Joining this list since the last update: Texas.

For additional background on the Center's state budget estimates, please see:

Current and projected state deficits (3 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009

Policy Points: Overview of States and the Weak Economy (3 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009
This snapshot of state budget problems has been updated to reflect the new data on state budget cuts and shortfalls included in the above analyses.

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

12. Can the Cellphone Help End Global Poverty? - April 13, 2008
(New York Times)

Can the Cellphone Help End Global Poverty?
April 13, 2008
"(...) After Muhammad Yunus, the Nobel-winning founder of Grameen Bank, began making microloans to women in poor countries so that they could buy revenue-producing assets like cows and goats, he was approached by a Bangladeshi expat living in the U.S. named Iqbal Quadir. Quadir posed a simple question to Yunus — If a woman can invest in a cow, why can’t she invest in a phone? — that led to the 1996 creation of Grameen Phone Ltd. and has since started the careers of more than 250,000 “phone ladies” in Bangladesh, which is considered one of the world’s poorest countries. Women use microcredit to buy specially designed cellphone kits costing about $150, each equipped with a long-lasting battery. They then set up shop as their village phone operator, charging a small commission for people to make and receive calls. The endeavor has not only revolutionized communications in Bangladesh but also has proved to be wildly profitable: Grameen Phone is now Bangladesh’s largest telecom provider, with annual revenues of about $1 billion.
Source:
New York Times

Related link:

Reality check: Will cellphones really solve Africa’s problems?
January 2009
Some observers have seized on the rapid increase in mobile phone use and predicted that they will play a key role in solving the continent’s economic and social problems. These experts applaud the technological leapfrogging — Africa still has relatively few land lines — and the potential for mobile telephony to bring Africa’s widely dispersed people in closer contact with one another. But is this optimism justified?
Source:
International Development Research Centre
IDRC is a Crown corporation created by the Parliament of Canada in 1970 to help developing countries use science and technology to find practical, long-term solutions to the social, economic, and environmental problems they face. Our support is directed toward creating a local research community whose work will build healthier, more equitable, and more prosperous societies.

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

13. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content

APO Weekly Briefing
The content of this page changes each week, and it includes links to a few book/report reviews, about two dozen new reports, a few job ads and 60 events (mostly conferences) of interest to social researchers...
Source:
Australian Policy Online (APO) - home page
With nearly 120 member centres and institutes, Australian Policy Online offers easy access to much of the best Australian social, economic, cultural and political research available online.
NOTE: the APO home page includes links to the five most popular reports on the APO website, and this list is updated each week.

APO Archive
The APO archive is grouped into 23 subject areas, with entries appearing in reverse chronological order.
* Ageing *Asia and the pacific * Citizenship and the law * Disability * Economics and trade * Education * Employment and workplace relations * The environment * Foreign policy and defence * Gender and sexuality * Health * Housing * Families and households * Immigration and refugees * Income, poverty and wealth * Indigenous * Media, communications and cultural policy * Politics and government * Population, multiculturalism and ethnicity * Religion and faith * Rural and regional * Science and technology * Social policy * Urban and regional planning * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

14. Human Rights Watch World Report 2009 - January 2009
(Human Rights Watch)

2009 World Report: Obama Should Emphasize Human Rights
Stop Abusive States From Playing System to Avert Criticism

News Release
January 14, 2009
(Washington, DC) - The incoming Obama administration will need to put human rights at the heart of foreign, domestic, and security policy if it is to undo the enormous damage of the Bush years, Human Rights Watch said today in issuing its World Report 2009.

Complete report:

Human Rights Watch World Report 2009 (PDF - 4.5MB, 576 pages)
January 2009
This report is Human Rights Watch's nineteenth annual review of human rights practices around the globe. It summarises key human rights issues in more than 90 countries and territories worldwide, drawing on events through November 2008. Each country entry identifies significant human rights issues, examines the freedom of local human rights defenders to conduct their work, and surveys the response of key international actors, such as the United Nations, European Union, Japan, the United States, and various regional and international organisations and institutions.
Source:
Human Rights Watch

Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes.]

[ Links to Human Rights Watch's work on children's rights ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
- Go to the Human Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm

15. CRINMAIL - January 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

15 January 2009 - CRINMAIL 1050
* Human Rights Watch World Report 2009
(see above)
* TURKEY: NGO programme for Roma children is bulldozed in urban makeover [news]
* CHINA: Police crack baby sale gang [news]
* INTERNET: Technology alone can't protect children online, says experts [news]
* DISABILITY: Monitoring Child Disability in Developing Countries - Results from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys [publication]
* SLAVERY: Project grants [call for applications]
* CRIN: We have moved! Please note our new contact details
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

13 January 2009 - CRINMAIL 1049
* GLOBAL: Kids Abroad: Ignore them, abuse them or protect them? Lessons on how to protect children on the move from being exploited [publication]
* HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL: Gaza resolution condemns bloodshed [news]
* ETHIOPIA: Parliament adopts repressive new NGO law [news]
* UNITED STATES: Rights groups alarmed over Obama's pace on Guantánamo [news]
* COMMITTEE ON THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD: 50th session underway [event]
* CORPORAL PUNISHMENT: Global Initiative e-newsletter Issue 6 [publication]
* CALL FOR INFORMATION: E-learning
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 300+ earlier weekly issues
, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


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Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

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Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


*************************

The laws of ultimate reality

*************************

Law of Mechanical Repair:
After your hands become coated with grease, your nose will begin to itch and you’ll have to pee.

Law of Gravity:
Any tool, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible corner.

Law of Probability:
The probability of being watched is directly proportional to the stupidity of your act.

Law of Random Numbers:
If you dial a wrong number, you never get a busy signal and someone always answers.

Law of the Alibi:
If you tell the boss you were late for work because you had a flat tire, the very next morning you will have a flat tire.

Variation Law:
If you change lines (or traffic lanes), the one you were in will always move faster than the one you are in now (works every time).

Law of the Bath:
When the body is fully immersed in water, the telephone rings.

Law of Close Encounters:
The probability of meeting someone you know increases dramatically when you are with someone you don’t want to be seen with.

Law of the Result:
When you try to prove to someone that a machine won’t work, it will.

Law of Biomechanics:
The severity of the itch is inversely proportional to the reach.

Law of the Theater:
At any event, the people whose seats are furthest from the aisle arrive last.

The Starbucks Law:
As soon as you sit down to a cup of hot coffee, your boss will ask you to do something which will last until the coffee is cold.

Murphy’s Law of Lockers:
If there are only two people in a locker room, they will have adjacent lockers.

Law of Physical Surfaces:
The chances of an open-faced jelly sandwich landing face down on a floor covering are directly correlated to the newness and cost of the carpet/rug.

Law of Logical Argument:
Anything is possible if you don’t know what you are talking about.

Brown’s Law of Physical Appearance:
If the shoe fits, it’s ugly.

Oliver’s Law of Public Speaking:
A closed mouth gathers no feet.

Wilson’s Law of Commercial Marketing Strategy:
As soon as you find a product that you really like, they will stop making it.

Doctors’ Law:
If you don’t feel well, make an appointment to go to the doctor, by the time you get there you’ll feel better. Don’t make an appointment and you’ll stay sick.

Source:
http://bitsandpieces.us/2008/09/02/the-laws-of-ultimate-reality/


***************************

And, in closing...

***************************


Broken Government : Bush Administration Failures, 2000-2008
http://www.publicintegrity.org/investigations/broken_government/articles/full_list/


How large is Africa?
http://strangemaps.files.wordpress.com/2006/11/africa_in_perspective_map.jpg


Chart : When good condiments go bad
http://foodproof.com/photos/full/table-of-condiments-when-they-go-1317
Example:
Sour cream goes bad after 3 months.
(How can they tell?)

Online Photo Editors
http://lifehacker.biz/articles/online-photo-editors/