Canadian Social Research Newsletter
August 18, 2013

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,657 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Raising Ontario's minimum wage makes good economic sense (Toronto Star) - August 13
2. Health Care : Let's Talk About It. (Ottawa Council on Aging Bulletin, Summer 2013)
3. Le système de santé : Parlons-en (Bulletin du Conseil sur le vieillissement d'Ottawa - Été 2013)
4.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Statistics Canada delays final release of National Household Survey - August 13
--- Tracking government finances - July 17 StatCan blog post

5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
7. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm ]
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. Raising Ontario's minimum wage makes good economic sense - August 13
(Toronto Star)

Raising Ontario's minimum wage makes good economic sense
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2013/08/13/raising_ontarios_minimum_wage_makes_good_economic_sense.html
By Navjeet Sidhu and Yvonne Kelly, members of the Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage.
The Ontario government has committed to reducing poverty in the province. The most effective way is to put money directly in workers’ pockets, which gets reinvested into the local economy they live and work in. Workers are talking about working and making wages to escape poverty. Being able to pay the bills, feed the kids and maybe pay down some debt. Not a radical solution. Common sense, economic sense — let’s hope the Ontario government is listening.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

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Ontario Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage
http://raisetheminimumwage.ca/
The Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage was launched in March 2013, with communities across Ontario demanding the government break the freeze [in the minimum wage]. Creative actions and rallies took place in 14 cities with local community groups and activists delivering our message to local MPP’s and Ministry of Labour offices.
The Ontario government has said that it will have a panel study minimum wages.
But Ontarians can’t wait for another commission.
We need a raise now.
Take Action! Help organize for a minimum wage increase in your community

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- Go to the Minimum Wage / Living Wage Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

2. Health Care : Let's Talk About It. (Ottawa Council on Aging Bulletin, Summer 2013)

NOTA : La version française suit l'anglais ci-dessous.
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Health Care : Let's Talk About It.
Ottawa Council on Aging Bulletin, Summer 2013
(PDF - 9.9MB, 18 pages)
http://coaottawa.ca/about-us/documents/2013BulletinHealthCareENG.pdf
Today there are deep seated issues facing Canada’s health care system: the population is aging, the institutional structure of the system is considered by many to be inefficient, and cost increases for health care services far outstrip inflation. Articles in this edition focus on: the need for private clinics as a way of improving access and services, the need for better funding and organization of the public health care system, a proposed a blending of private and public systems, etc.

Table of Contents

* Federal Health Funding to the Provinces: What is at stake? - Allan Moscovitch
* The Earlier the Better
(long term care planning as an integral part of the family financial plan.) - Ken Browness
* The Doctor Will See You Now (reducing health care costs in Ontario) - Mark Stabile
* The Future of Our Health System - Michel Bilodeau
* Time to Fight for Universal Pharmacare - Steve Morgan and Jamie Daw
* The Next Generation of Health Care - Libby Davies
* Canada Favours Mixed Model System - Steve Morgan and Jamie Daw
* Planning to Age at Home? - Jana Mitchell
* Better Value Trends in Spending on Healthcare - Stuart Soroka and Adam Mahon

Source:
Council on Aging of Ottawa
http://coaottawa.ca/
The Council on Aging works with and for seniors to voice issues and concerns to all levels of government and to the general public.

3. Le système de santé : Parlons-en (Bulletin du Conseil sur le vieillissement d'Ottawa - Été 2013)

Le système de santé : Parlons-en
Bulletin du Conseil sur le vieillissement d'Ottawa - Été 2013
(PDF - 3,4Mo., 14 pages)
http://www.coaottawa.ca/about-us/documents/2013BulletinHealthCareFR.pdf
[Veuillez noter que certains articles diffèrent entre les versions anglaise et française de ce bulletin.]

Le système de santé canadien offre des soins qui sont accessibles à tous. Cependant, le coût de ces soins continue d’augmenter et le financement du secteur de la santé ne cesse d’augmenter. Nous espérons que la lecture de notre bulletin vous éclairera sur les enjeux et les solutions qui devront être mises de l’avant afin que nous et les générations qui nous suivent bénéficient d’un accès à un système de santé de qualité et à coûts raisonnables pour l’ensemble des Canadiennes et des Canadiens

Source:
Conseil sur le vieillissement d'Ottawa

http://coaottawa.ca/
Le Conseil sur le vieillissement travaille avec et pour les aînés afin de faire connaître leurs questions d'intérêt et préoccupations à tous les paliers gouvernementaux ainsi qu'au grand public.

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- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

4. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Statistics Canada delays final release of National Household Survey - August 13
--- Tracking government finances - July 17 StatCan blog post

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

OOPSIE.

August 14, 2013
2011 National Household Survey announcement: new release date
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130814/dq130814a-eng.htm
The release of the third and final set of data from the 2011 National Household Survey is postponed to September 11, 2013. The release focuses on income, earnings, housing and shelter costs. Statistics Canada found issues in data processing that need to be addressed prior to release. All the data previously released from the National Household Survey are not affected.

---

Related link
from the Toronto Star:

Statistics Canada delays final release of National Household Survey
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/08/13/statistics_canada_delays_final_release_of_national_household_survey.html
August 13, 2013
OTTAWA—Statistics Canada has postponed the third and final release of data from the 2011 National Household Survey, the controversial replacement for the cancelled long-form census. The release — originally scheduled for Wednesday — will instead take place Sept. 11, said Statistics Canada census chief Marc Hamel.
“We always perform quality checks up until the last minute on all of our data outputs, and in the course of doing these normal procedures over the weekend, we noticed some issues in some of the data we were looking at,” Hamel said.
(...)
Critics have complained that a voluntary survey can’t produce data that’s as accurate or as representative of Canada as a mandatory one, but Hamel insisted the latest problem has nothing to do with how the information was gathered.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

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StatCan's original announcement
regarding the National Household Survey release:

August 7, 2013
2011 National Household Survey announcement: Income and Housing
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130807/dq130807d-eng.htm
On Wednesday, August 14, 2013, Statistics Canada will release the third and final set of data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The release focuses on income, earnings, housing and shelter costs.
It also features two analytical reports:
- The first report will provide an overview of income in Canada, including income composition, the breakdown of income from private and public sources as well as individual and family characteristics. The second report will provide an analysis of homeownership in Canada.

Three companion reports will also be available. They will present information on condominium dwellings, low-income neighbourhoods as well as the education and occupation of high-income earners in Canada.

Various products and services will be found on
the 2011 National Household Survey website:
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/index-eng.cfm

Related subjects:

Families, households and housing
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Housing and dwelling characteristics
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=2921&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Income, pensions, spending and wealth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=3868&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

Tracking government finances
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/interaction/eng/blog-blogue/cs-sc/tracking-suivi
July 17, 2013
(...) Statistics Canada has been tracking the ins and outs of government finance, stretching back to before the days of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. As Canadian society became more complex, Statistics Canada grew more sophisticated at measuring government finances, adjusting accounting methods, fine-tuning and tracking.

The next leap comes next summer. In 2014, Statistics Canada will publish data according to a new international standard, Government Finance Statistics (GFS), a program that provides standardized and comprehensive statistics—revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities—on all levels of government, including government business enterprises. (...) GFS is a comprehensive framework developed by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). It will allow users to make international comparisons more easily.

Source:
StatCan Blog

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng
The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.

Note (by Gilles):
That's about it for social-policy-type releases from StatCan for the week ending August 16.
If you'd like to review the latest releases for yourself, follow the link immediately below...

Check past issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select a month and year from the two drop-down menus to access all issues of The Daily for a particular month.



Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]


StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng
The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.

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- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

August 17, 2013
What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Why do the people raising our children earn poverty wages? Women who care for poor kids are often mothers living in poverty themselves
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/08/why-do-people-raising-our-children-earn-poverty-wages-women
14 Aug 2013 | United States
Article and video in The Nation interviews home child care providers in the US and exposes how they struggle to make a living wage from parent fees and underfunded fee subsidies that don't cover the actual cost of care.

Pre-K for every child: A matter of fairness
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/08/pre-k-every-child-matter-fairness
13 Aug 2013 | United States
Report examines the unequal access to early childhood education and care for American children and advocates for universal provision.

Trouble with childcare
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/08/trouble-childcare
12 Aug 2013 | Australia and New Zealand
Report analyzes access difficulties to child care in Australia between 2001 and 2010 and finds that "each time the government has taken steps to reduce the proportion of household income spent on childcare services [through tax credits and fee subsidies for parents] the increased assistance has quickly been absorbed through the charging of higher service fees".

Early developments: Bridging the gap between evidence and policy in early-years education
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/08/early-developments-bridging-gap-between-evidence-and-policy
12 Aug 2013 | Europe
Report from the Institute for Public Policy Research (UK) "reviews the evidence of both the benefits of quality childcare, and the policies which have been successful in improving standards in the UK and abroad".

The “royal we”: Caledon commentary
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/08/%E2%80%9Croyal-we%E2%80%9D-caledon-commentary
6 Aug 2013 | Canada
Sherri Torjman from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy comments that "Despite the wide-ranging agenda [at the recent Council of the Federation meeting], a clear message emerged. The Premiers would like to have a national partner with whom they can engage in conversation regarding their myriad challenges".

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

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2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.1

Taking Te Whariki to India
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/08/taking-te-whariki-india
16 Aug 2013 | Australia and New Zealand

Should your child attend an unlicensed daycare?
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/08/should-your-child-attend-unlicensed-daycare
16 Aug 2013 | Canada

School-based daycare squeezed by full-day kindergarten
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/08/school-based-daycare-squeezed-full-day-kindergarten
15 Aug 2013 | Ontario

18-month-old girl dies at unregistered day home
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/08/18-month-old-girl-dies-unregistered-day-home
14 Aug 2013 | Alberta

Subsidized child care: For the poor, by the poor
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/08/subsidized-child-care-poor-poor
14 Aug 2013 | United States

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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CRRU Archive

All newer content from January 2013 to date is archived in a special section of the Early Childhood Development Links of this site.
Click the link immediately below to go there:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm#crru

For links to weekly issues of this weekly alert from June 2009 to December 2012*,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

* NOTE (by Gilles):
I recently (Dec. 2012) discovered that my HTML editing software crashes when I try to open the above archive page to add or edit something.
After several hours of tinkering in a vain attempt to make everything work, I finally decided to go with Plan B : you can still click the link above to access the CRRU archive (including contents of each issue from June 2009 to December 2012), but all new content since then is archived on the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm.

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Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/

Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

August 16, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/08/16/
State Medicaid Program – Missouri
Medicaid Patients and Hospital Readmissions
New Orleans Economic Report

August 15, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/08/15/
Workforce Development

August 14, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/08/14/
Medicaid Expansion – Ohio

August 13, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/08/13/
School Accountability Formula – Florida
Foster Care and Adoption

August 12, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/08/12/
Public Housing Waiting List – Milwaukee, WI
Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Drug Savings

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Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page: [ http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/ and click on a date in the calendar in the top right-hand corner of the page. Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page and click on a category or a tag in the right-hand margin.
4. See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm (more complete listing, but only goes back to December 2011)

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NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

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Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

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- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

7. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)

Here's the link to the latest issue of CRINMAIL:

14 August 2013 - CRINMAIL issue 1340
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4826
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Asylum-seekers banned from public places
- Call to give aboriginal abuse victims role in court
- Specialist judges to preside over sex abuse cases
- Inheritance discrimination under court review
- Law gives choice to transgender children
- Call for contributions: OHCHR study
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Portugal
Upcoming events
Employment
Also in this issue:
- World news
- Reports
- Events
- Issues
- Law
- Advocacy
- Challenging breaches
- Take action
- Campaigns

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CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as in the above, back to 2009-2010

NOTE : The official CRINMAIL archive [ http://goo.gl/C0JNx ] --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue as in the most recent issues above. Users must click on the link to each issue to see its contents, but the collection of links goes back much further (pre-2006).

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NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is one of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter online subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

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Twenty-Five Easily Confused or Misused Words

Some words sound so similar, it's easy to confuse or misuse them when writing. Computer spell check won't catch these mistakes! Use this list as a reference whenever you're unsure about which word fits in the context.

affect / effect
Effect is usually a noun that means a result or the power to produce a result: “The sound of the falling rain had a calming effect, nearly putting me to sleep.” Affect is usually a verb that means to have an influence on: “His loud humming was affecting my ability to concentrate.” Note that effect can also be a verb meaning to bring about or execute: “The speaker's somber tone effected a dampening in the general mood of the audience.”

all right / alright
Although alright is widely used, it is considered nonstandard English. As the American Heritage Dictionary notes, it's not “all right to use alright.”

all together / altogether
All together is applied to people or things that are being treated as a group. “We put the pots and pans all together on the shelf.” All together is the form that must be used if the sentence can be reworded so that all and together are separated by other words: “We put all the pots and pans together on the shelf.” Altogether is used to mean entirely: “I am altogether pleased to be receiving this award.”

allusion / illusion
Allusion is a noun that means an indirect reference: “The speech made allusions to the final report.” Illusion is a noun that means a misconception: “The policy is designed to give an illusion of reform.”

alternately / alternatively
Alternately is an adverb that means in turn; one after the other: “We alternately spun the wheel in the game.” Alternatively is an adverb that means on the other hand; one or the other: “You can choose a large bookcase or, alternatively, you can buy two small ones.”

beside / besides
Beside is a preposition that means next to: “Stand here beside me.” Besides is an adverb that means also: “Besides, I need to tell you about the new products my company offers.”

bimonthly / semimonthly
Bimonthly is an adjective that means every two months: “I brought the cake for the bimonthly office party.” Bimonthly is also a noun that means a publication issued every two months: “The company publishes several popular bimonthlies.” Semimonthly is an adjective that means happening twice a month: “We have semimonthly meetings on the 1st and the 15th.”

capital / capitol
The city or town that is the seat of government is called the capital; the building in which the legislative assembly meets is the capitol. The term capital can also refer to an accumulation of wealth or to a capital letter.

cite / site
Cite is a verb that means to quote as an authority or example: “I cited several eminent scholars in my study of water resources.” It also means to recognize formally: “The public official was cited for service to the city.” It can also mean to summon before a court of law: “Last year the company was cited for pollution violations.” Site is a noun meaning location: “They chose a new site for the factory just outside town.”

complement / compliment
Complement is a noun or verb that means something that completes or makes up a whole: “The red sweater is a perfect complement to the outfit.” Compliment is a noun or verb that means an expression of praise or admiration: “I received compliments about my new outfit.”

comprise / compose
According to the traditional rule, the whole comprises the parts, and the parts compose the whole. Thus, the board comprises five members, whereas five members compose (or make up) the board. It is also correct to say that the board is composed (not comprised) of five members.

concurrent / consecutive
Concurrent is an adjective that means simultaneous or happening at the same time as something else: “The concurrent strikes of several unions crippled the economy.” Consecutive means successive or following one after the other: “The union called three consecutive strikes in one year.”

connote / denote
Connote is a verb that means to imply or suggest: “The word ‘espionage’ connotes mystery and intrigue.” Denote is a verb that means to indicate or refer to specifically: “The symbol for ‘pi’ denotes the number 3.14159.”

convince / persuade
Strictly speaking, one convinces a person that something is true but persuades a person to do something. “Pointing out that I was overworked, my friends persuaded [not convinced] me to take a vacation. Now that I'm relaxing on the beach with my book, I am convinced [not persuaded] that they were right.” Following this rule, convince should not be used with an infinitive.

council / councilor / counsel / counselor
A councilor is a member of a council, which is an assembly called together for discussion or deliberation. A counselor is one who gives counsel, which is advice or guidance. More specifically, a counselor can be an attorney or a supervisor at camp.

discreet / discrete
Discreet is an adjective that means prudent, circumspect, or modest: “Her discreet handling of the touchy situation put him at ease.” Discrete is an adjective that means separate or individually distinct: “Each company in the conglomerate operates as a discrete entity.”

disinterested / uninterested
Disinterested is an adjective that means unbiased or impartial: “We appealed to the disinterested mediator to facilitate the negotiations.” Uninterested is an adjective that means not interested or indifferent: “They seemed uninterested in our offer.”

elicit / illicit
Elicit is a verb that means to draw out. Illicit is an adjective meaning unlawful. “No matter how hard I tried to elicit a few scandalous stories from her, she kept all knowledge of illicit goings-on discreetly to herself. ”

emigrant / immigrant
Emigrant is a noun that means one who leaves one's native country to settle in another: “The emigrants spent four weeks aboard ship before landing in Los Angeles.” Immigrant is a noun that means one who enters and settles in a new country: “Most of the immigrants easily found jobs.” One emigrates from a place; one immigrates to another.

farther / further
Farther is an adjective and adverb that means to or at a more distant point: “We drove 50 miles today; tomorrow, we will travel 100 miles farther.” Further is an adjective and adverb that means to or at a greater extent or degree: “We won't be able to suggest a solution until we are further along in our evaluation of the problem.” It can also mean in addition or moreover: “They stated further that they would not change the policy.”

few / less
Few is an adjective that means small in number. It is used with countable objects: “This department has few employees.” Less is an adjective that means small in amount or degree. It is used with objects of indivisible mass: “Which jar holds less water?”

figuratively / literally
Figuratively is an adverb that means metaphorically or symbolically: “Happening upon the shadowy figure, they figuratively jumped out of their shoes.” Literally is an adverb that means actually: “I'm not exaggerating when I say I literally fell off my chair.” It also means according to the exact meaning of the words: “I translated the Latin passage literally.”

flammable / inflammable
These two words are actually synonyms, both meaning easily set on fire. The highly flammable (inflammable) fuel was stored safely in a specially built tank. Use nonflammable to mean not flammable.

flaunt / flout
To flaunt means to show off shamelessly: “Eager to flaunt her knowledge of a wide range of topics, Helene dreamed of appearing on a TV trivia show.” To flout means to show scorn or contempt for: “Lewis disliked boarding school and took every opportunity to flout the house rules.”

foreword / forward
Foreword is a noun that means an introductory note or preface: “In my foreword I explained my reasons for writing the book.” Forward is an adjective or adverb that means toward the front: “I sat in the forward section of the bus.” “Please step forward when your name is called.” Forward is also a verb that means to send on: “Forward the letter to the customer's new address.”

Source:
Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0200807.html

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And, in closing...

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Caffeine in Food (from Health Canada)
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/securit/addit/caf/food-caf-aliments-eng.php
"...for the average adult, moderate daily caffeine intake at dose levels of 400 mg/day is not associated with any adverse effects."
One cup of brewed coffee = 135 milligrams of caffeine
One cup of instant coffee = 75 to 100 milligrams of caffeine
One can of regular Coke = 45 milligrams of caffeine
One can of Diet Coke = 50 milligrams of caffeine

Caffeine in Energy Drinks
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/media/nr-cp/_2011/2011-132-eng.php

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Ten Fascinating Facts About Canada
http://listverse.com/2013/07/01/ten-fascinating-facts-about-canada/

Fifty Insane Facts About Canada
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/08/13/insane-facts-canada-infographic_n_3748965.html

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Smallest Car in the World (video, duration 8:07)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFdBcYN3sNw

 

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