Canadian Social Research Newsletter
September 18, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail alert for this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,468 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content


1. Welfare Incomes 2010 (National Council of Welfare) - September 2010
2. Ontario election resources:
--- The Troubled Geometry of Tim Hudak’s “changebook” (Jim Stanford) - September 13
--- 2011 Ontario provincial election special - from the Toronto Star
--- The Citizens’ Agenda: Low-Income in Ontario - September 13
--- TVOntario panel discussion : Confronting poverty - September 13
--- Welcome to Tim Hudak’s Tea Party - September 12
--- TVOntario panel discussion : The Ontario NDP Platform - September 12
--- Jennefer Laidley's Ontario election links (links to 13 recent articles from various Ontario media sources)
--- McGuinty Proposes Undergraduate Tuition Grant - September 14
3. Post-Secondary Education in Newfoundland and Labrador (Nick Falvo in the Progressive Economics Forum)- September 16
4.
Canada Without Poverty events - September 29, 30 (Ottawa) and October 13 (Vancouver)
5. Inequality is bad for business (Armine Yalnizyan in the Progressive Economics Forum) - September 15
6. [New Brunswick] Open letter to the Minister of Social Development regarding a home heating upplement for the coming winter (NB Common Front for Social Justice) - September 13
7. The Fraser Institute Produces Junk: Graham Steele [Nova Scotia Finance Minister] (Metro Halifax News) - September 13
8. When the middle class becomes homeless [video] ( Commffest Global Community Film Festival - Toronto) - September 25
9. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- University tuition fees, 2011/2012 - September 16
--- Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective, 2011 - September 13
--- Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds), first quarter 2011 - September 13
10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
12. Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States 2010 (U.S. Census Bureau) - September 13
13. Understanding Poverty in the United States: Surprising Facts About America's Poor (Heritage Foundation) - September 13
14. World Income Inequality : Is the world becoming more unequal? (Conference Board of Canada) - September 2011
15. OECD Employment Outlook (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development - OECD) - September 15
16. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]



1. Welfare Incomes 2010 - September 2010
(National Council of Welfare)

From the
National Council of Welfare:

Welfare Incomes 2010
September 2010
The National Council of Welfare has just updated its cross-Canada welfare incomes report to reflect the estimated incomes (in constant and current dollars) for 2010 of four typical welfare households in each province and territory:
- a single employable person
- a single person with a disability
- a lone parent with a 2-year-old child
- a two-parent family with two children aged 10 and 15
Click the link above, then move your cursor over each province or territory to view welfare incomes by household type for 2010 .
Click on a province or territory to see a chart of welfare incomes over time for that jurisdiction. This feature requires Macromedia Flash; if you don't have Flash or if you've disabled it, click the link below the map of Canada to access the same information in HTML.

Adequacy of Welfare Incomes
This isn't the most user-friendly interface I've ever used, but once you get the hang of it, you can compare welfare benefit levels for all jurisdictions and all household categories for all years from 1986 (1989 for a person with a disability) to 2010 using any one of five measures of adequacy: After-tax average income - After-tax LICO - After-tax median income - Before-tax LICO - Market basket measure (MBM).

Special features on the Council's home page:
* You can subscribe to the RSS feed (in the left margin) if you're into RSS.
* You can test your welfare income smarts by answering the NCW Quiz question of the week.
[
Do *you* know which province increased the adequacy of its welfare benefits for a single employable person the most from 2009 to 2010?
Answer the NCW Quiz and find out!]
* In the top right corner of the home page, you'll find links to media summaries on issues of interest to the Council.
These summaries include links to the full articles, they're posted to the site every two days, and the Council's website includes an extensive archive of media summaries (back to October 2010) to browse through. (Or subscribe to the RSS feed to receive the media summaries in your RSS reader.)

Source:
National Council of Welfare
The National Council of Welfare was established as an advisory group to the Minister of National Health and Welfare by the Government Organization Act of 1969. The Council now reports to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The mandate of the Council is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

2. Ontario election resources:
--- The Troubled Geometry of Tim Hudak’s “changebook” (Jim Stanford) - September 13
--- 2011 Ontario provincial election special - from the Toronto Star
--- The Citizens’ Agenda: Low-Income in Ontario - September 13
--- TVOntario panel discussion : Confronting poverty - September 13
--- Welcome to Tim Hudak’s Tea Party - September 12
--- TVOntario panel discussion : The Ontario NDP Platform - September 12
--- Jennefer Laidley's Ontario election links (links to 13 recent articles from various Ontario media sources)
---
McGuinty Proposes Undergraduate Tuition Grant - September 14

Ontario election 2011

From the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (Ontario Office):

Conservative platform’s geometry found faulty
September 13, 2011
TORONTO—A detailed statistical review of the 13 statistical graphs contained in the Conservative changebook platform document finds that not one of them conforms to the normal requirements of academic or professional practice.
That’s the conclusion of a detailed review of the platform by Jim Stanford, economist and Research Associate with the Ontario office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Stanford finds that at least three of the graphs (which illustrate various statistical arguments related to the Conservative platform) present data that is clearly false. All of the others contain major errors in the labeling of variables or axes; internally inconsistent or manipulative scaling of bars and data; and misleading or incomplete references to source data.

Full report:

The Troubled Geometry of Tim Hudak’s “changebook” (PDF - 431K, 15 pages)
by Jim Stanford

Source:
Ontario Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

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2011 Ontario provincial election special - from the Toronto Star

---

From TVOntario:

Your Vote 2011

September 13, 2011
The Citizens’ Agenda: Low-Income in Ontario
By Michael Lehan
Excellent infographics providing a snapshot of low income, unemployment and poverty in Ontario.
Click on any of the pink city/region names to see how low-income affects different age groups in the population differently in those centres.
- includes links to the following related resources:
* The Income Spread - an overall image of the income distribution in the province; it shows how unemployment numbers don’t tell the whole story.
* The Single Parent Trap - reveals the impact of continued income inequality between genders in single parent families (who dominate the low-income family category)
* Receiving Aid in Ontario takes a look at the increase in Ontario Works recipients over the past two years.


September 13, 2011

The Agenda host Steve Paikin moderates a panel discussion entitled "Confronting Poverty".

[ Duration of the video : 35:42 ]

Participants include:

* Laurel Broten, Ontario Minister of Children and Youth Services and Liberal MPP, Etobicoke-Lakeshore

* Cheri DiNovo, NDP MPP, Parkdale-High park

* Tim Grant, Green Party candidate, Trinity-Spadina

* Laurel Rothman, National Coordinator, Campaign 2000

(The Ontario PC Party declined the invitation to participate.)

NOTE : If your browser can't display the video above, try:
http://www.tvo.org/TVO/WebObjects/TVO.woa?videoid?1158153794001

Source:
TVOntario

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Welcome to Tim Hudak’s Tea Party
September 12, 2011
By Charles Pascal
Progressive Conservative Leader Tim Hudak’s public response to a program designed to help well-educated and trained citizens gain Canadian experience by providing modest support to those employers who hire them is a prime example of bringing north the ugly and divisive politics below the 49th parallel. And American politics have never been uglier. (...) As far back as 1984, an Ontario report discussed the requirement to remove barriers for foreign-trained professionals so that our labour-market supply needs in many areas could be filled more adequately. We have not made the kind of progress that our economy needs. And this hurts us all. As well, the changes made to our immigration policy several years back require an unprecedented level of education to qualify for immigration to Canada and citizenship. Hudak claims discrimination while invoking alarming discriminatory images. Of course we need to do all we can do for all who are unemployed. But equity doesn’t mean sameness. Having all qualified hands on deck for a productive economy requires special initiatives for special and different populations in our midst. But that’s too complicated to explain on a hot-button bumper sticker.

[ Author Charles Pascal is a professor of human development and applies psychology at OISE/University of Toronto and a former Ontario deputy minister. ]
Source:
Toronto Star

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The Ontario NDP Platform (34-minute video from TVOntario)
September 12, 2011
Steve Paikin of TVOntario moderates a discussion/debate about the NDP platform.
Participants:
* Janet Ecker, President of the Toronto Financial Services Alliance
* Erin Weir, Economist for the United Steelworkers' Union
* John Duffy, Principal at Strategy Corp
* Adam Radwanski, Globe and Mail Queen's Park columnist
TVOntario
Source:
The Agenda
See also:
Your Vote 2011
[
TVOntario ]

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Jennefer's Ontario election links
Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre in Toronto does a regular media scan that she distributes to her mailing list.
Below, you'll find a selection of the links that she circulated recently pertaining to the Ontario election.
Merci, Jennefer!

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Windsor launches Poverty Free Ontario campaign
http://www.windsorstar.com/business/Group+making+poverty+election+issue/5410904/story.html

Candidates not coming to Social Planning All Candidates’ Meetings to talk about poverty:
http://www.therecord.com/news/local/article/594641--efforts-to-place-poverty-on-election-agenda-face-obstacles

NDP releases affordable housing and anti-poverty plan:
http://ontariondp.com/en/ontario-new-democrats-release-affordable-housing-and-anti-poverty-plan


The Ontario NDP's affordable housing and anti-poverty plan

"Over five years, we will phase in a new housing benefit that will help almost 200,000 low-income individuals and families to better afford their rent. The average amount of the benefit, when fully phased in, will be $96/month for individuals and $120/month for families. The program will cost $240 million a year when fully implemented. We are investing $545 million in the housing benefit over the next four years.

We are committing to a 10-year affordable housing plan to build 50,000 new affordable housing units. With sustained provincial funding reaching $150 million a year, we will build over 14,000 units in the next four years.

These ambitious targets will be achieved through:
* Partnered funding with the federal government (starting with a 3-year, $480 million bilateral agreement).
* Improved housing provider access to low-cost financing through the expansion and reform of the Infrastructure Ontario Affordable Housing Loan Fund.
* Legislation enabling Ontario municipalities to implement inclusionary housing policies that require a minimum percentage of affordable units in new housing developments.

We will put in place a new dental care program that will provide emergency dental care to 50,000 low-income adults each year using unspent funds from the government’s 2008 Healthy Smiles Ontario program"

Ontario NDP Affordable Housing & Anti-Poverty Plan

Source:
email from Ontario NDP HQ (Sept. 16)
NOTE : the email contains more detailed information than the Ontario NDP site. The email also contains a list of previously announced anti-poverty commitments. I was informed by an Ontario NDP official that the full platform - including more detailed information on the affordable housing and antipoverty plan - will be posted to their site within a week or so.

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New ways to vote – especially for people with disabilities:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/story/2011/09/06/ont-votes-ottawa-voter-access.html

PC support is plummeting:
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/provincialelection/article/1053245--pcs-plummet-while-liberals-climb-new-polls-suggests

Elections Ontario relocates voting locations out of colleges:
http://www.torontosun.com/2011/09/10/elections-canada-to-relocate-polling-stations-from-colleges

A challenge to Hudak’s math – and whether or not he can be trusted – in THE SUN of all places – and read the comments!
http://www.torontosun.com/2011/09/02/simple-math-challenges-hudaks-big-plans

Hudak’s promises to lead country in job growth:
http://www.torontosun.com/2011/09/09/hudak-vows-to-lead-country-in-job-growth

Green jobs from the Libs:
http://www.torontosun.com/2011/09/16/mcguinty-sticks-to-green-jobs-theme

Skepticism on Horwath’s transit pledge:
http://www.torontosun.com/2011/09/16/horwaths-transit-pledge-met-with-skepticism

McGuinty defends poor fiscal rating:
http://www.torontosun.com/2011/09/13/mcguinty-defends-poor-fiscal-rating

Healthcare cutbacks: Walkom:
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/provincialelection/article/1053108--walkom-the-health-care-cutbacks-no-party-will-talk-about

Where’d the Greens go?
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/provincialelection/article/1053971--cohn-the-greens-have-fallen-off-the-scales

Contributed by:
Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre

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McGuinty Proposes Undergraduate Tuition Grant
By Nick Falvo
September 14, 2011
[NOTE : Read the Comments section at the bottom of the article for clarification of the Liberal tuition grant promise (the Devil's in the details...) and links to further information.]

An Ontario election is slated for October 6, and the reigning Liberal Party will attempt to pull off a third consecutive majority government. In that vein, the Liberals have recently made a slew of campaign promises in the post-secondary education (PSE) sector. Notably, they’ve committed to reducing undergraduate tuition for “middle-class Ontario families” by 30 percent, amounting to “$1600 per student in university and $730 per student in college.” According to a September 5 Toronto Star article: “The tuition break would be available only to students from families with a gross household income of $160,000 or less a year — about 86 per cent of the 360,000 students currently enrolled — and would take effect Jan. 1.”

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

3. Post-Secondary Education in Newfoundland and Labrador - September 16
(Nick Falvo in the Progressive Economics Forum)

Post-Secondary Education in Newfoundland and Labrador
By Nick Falvo
September 16, 2011
Last March, Keith Dunne and I wrote an opinion piece on Danny Williams’ post-secondary education (PSE) legacy in Newfoundland and Labrador. Among other things, we pointed out that average undergraduate tuition fees (for domestic students) in Newfoundland and Labrador are $2,624/yr., compared with $5,138 for Canada as a whole and $6,307 in Ontario. With a provincial election slated to take place in Newfoundland and Labrador on October 11, Newfoundland and Labrador’s NDP is proposing to take the province even further down the path of PSE affordability.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

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- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

4. Canada Without Poverty events - September 29, 30 (Ottawa) and October 13

Join Canada Without Poverty
for one of our upcoming events!

Get Up Stand Up: An Evening of Insight and Inspiration
Poverty and social and economic rights in Canada: where are we today, 40 years after the founding of Canada Without Poverty (as the National Anti-Poverty Organization)? To explore this question, join us for an evening of information, insight and inspiration: Thursday, September 29, 7:00-9:00pm

Benefit Concert Featuring Will Ackerman
Grammy-award winning musician, composer and music producer, William Ackerman, will headline a special benefit concert for Canada Without Poverty on September 30th in Ottawa. Performing with Will will be long-time accompanying guitarist, Grammy-award winning David Cullen and Jill Haley.

Poverty & Punchlines Vancouver – Tickets on Sale!
Join us on Thursday, October 13th at the Waterfront Theatre on Granville Island from 7-10pm for a night of ‘laughter with a message’ in support of Canada Without Poverty, a national charity dedicated to eliminating poverty in Canada. Local BC comedians Ivan Decker and Erica Sigurdson will bring down the house, and the message [...]

Source:
Canada Without Poverty
Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization dedicated to the elimination of poverty in Canada.

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

5. Inequality is bad for business - September 15
(Armine Yalnizyan in the Progressive Economics Forum)

Inequality is bad for business
By Armine Yalnizyan
September 15, 2011
In August Canadian Business magazine published my article on why inequality is bad for business.
[ http://www.canadianbusiness.com/article/39123--inequality-is-bad-for-business ]

Last week the International Monetary Fund, not known for left-leaning views, released a series of articles entitled “Why Inequality Throws Us Off Balance”.
[ http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2011/09/index.htm ]

One of the papers is by Andrew Berg and Jonathan Ostry entitled “Equality and Efficiency: Is there a trade-off or do the two go hand in hand?
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2011/09/Berg.htm

A few months earlier they had written a provocative piece “Inequality and Unsustainable Growth” documenting how lower inequality is linked to more sustained periods of growth….and that higher inequality means more volatility.
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/sdn/2011/sdn1108.pdf

Yesterday the Conference Board of Canada released its second report on income inequality, looking at trends in income inequality internationally, between and within nations. It follows an earlier report on trends in income inequality in Canada. These authoritative pieces of research are funded by 25 big businesses and one government.
http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/hot-topics/worldInequality.aspx

---

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

6. [New Brunswick] Open letter to the Minister of Social Development regarding a home heating supplement for the coming winter - September 13
(NB Common Front for Social Justice)

Open letter to The Honourable Sue Stultz (Word file, 35K)
Minister of Social Development
Fredericton, NB
September 13, 2011
[ Version française de la lettre - fichier format Word, 35Ko. ]
Hon. Stultz:
There are approximately 100,000 New Brunswickers living below the poverty line. A certain percentage of them will, as they did in years past, need help to offset the cost of heating their homes this coming winter. Market prices indicate that N.B. citizens will pay more in 2011-2012 than they did last winter to keep themselves and their family warm.
Source:
NB Common Front for Social Justice
[ Front commun pour la justice sociale ]

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- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Nouveau-Brunswick :
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbf.htm

7. The Fraser Institute Produces Junk: Graham Steele (Nova Scotia Finance Minister) - September 13
(Metro Halidfax News)

Nova Scotia

The Fraser Institute Produces Junk: Graham Steele (Nova Scotia Finance Minister)
By Alex Boutilier
September 13, 2011
After delivering an update on Nova Scotia's 2011-2012 budget forecast, Finance Minister Graham Steele was asked what he thinks about a new report from the Fraser Institute that ranked Premier Darrell Dexter first among sitting Canadian premiers in terms of fiscal restraint.
(...)
The Fraser Institute produces junk. It is not a serious institution, it is a political organization. And it is no accident that their focus is on the Ontario election (Premier Dalton McGuinty came second last). They're trying to make themselves relevant to the Ontario election. It is no accident that the three premiers they rank at the bottom (PEI's Robert Ghiz, McGuinty, and Quebec Premier Jean Charest) are three non-Conservative premiers who are up for re-election right now. So the next time the Fraser Institute issues something that has Nova Scotia at the bottom, remember that when they put us at the top, my answer is still: the Fraser Institute produces junk. It does not deserve any serious consideration.
[Speaking directly to the interviewer:]
Remember that the next time you ask me about something else the Fraser Institute produces, that even when I could say 'yes, this is validation of what we're saying.' It's ... it's crap.
Source:
Metro News Halifax

HEAR, HEAR!

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- Go to the Social Research Organizations (II) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research2.htm

8. When the middle class becomes homeless (video) - September 25
( Commffest Global Community Film Festival - Toronto)

COMING TO TORONTO ON SEPTEMBER 25:

World premiere of When the Middle Class Becomes Homeless, a documentary by Toronto homelessness activist Ronzig (Ron Carver) about the descent of the middle class into homelessness to be shown at a joint venue with the Toronto International Film Festival and the Commffest Global Community Film Festival.

Commffest Global Film Festival (Toronto)
September 22-25, 2011
"...screening over 50 new films from communities around the world that address social and cultural issues, with more than half being Canadian."
The theme of the Commffest Film Festival this year is homelessness. Festival organizers approached Toronto homelessness activist Ronzig (Ron Carver) and asked him to produce a film documentary on the topic. The world premiere of the resulting 35-minute short subject, entitled When the Middle Class Becomes Homeless, will be screened on Sunday, September 25.

When the middle class becomes homeless (Web trailer, duration : 4:52)
By Ronzig (Ron Craven)
Interviews from the downtown core of Toronto.
Ron discovers the growing epidemic of homelessness among the middle class.

Go to http://www.commffest.com/ to learn how you can attend this premiere or how to obtain a copy of the film for yourself.

[ 15 more videos by Ronzig ]

Ronzig is a Digital Photo Artist and social activist, ex homeless addict in Toronto explores people and places from a unique perspective emphasizing the lifestyle of those forgotten members of our society whose suffering has been neglected for too long and compares their circumstances with the accepted norm. His art, photography and commentary provide an exceptional opportunity to understand social trends in Toronto at the outset of the 21st century.

See also:

Ronzig's Gallery - Ronzig's art is a multimedia merging of photography, computer manipulation and acrylic painting producing unique artwork suitable for the office the home or institutional installations.

Ronzig's Facebook page

---

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

9. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
University tuition fees, 2011/2012 - September 16
--- Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective, 2011 - September 13
--- Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds), first quarter 2011 - September 13

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

September 16, 2011
University tuition fees, 2011/2012
Canadian full-time students in undergraduate programs paid 4.3% more on average in tuition fees for the 2011/2012 academic year this fall than they did a year earlier. This follows a 4.0% increase in 2010/2011.
- includes four tables:
--- Average undergraduate tuition fees for Canadian full-time students, by province
--- Average graduate tuition fees for Canadian full-time students, by province
--- Average undergraduate tuition fees for Canadian full-time students by faculty
--- Average graduate tuition fees for Canadian full-time students by faculty

Related subjects:
* Education, training and learning
* Education finance

---

September 13, 2011
Education indicators in Canada: An international perspective, 2011
See the table of contents in the left margin of the page.
Source:
Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective - Product main page*
This report is a product of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP). It is intended to facilitate the comparison of educational systems in Canada's provinces and territories with those of countries that belong to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
- incl. Introduction - Highlights - Notes to readers - Chapters - Tables and charts Committees and organizations - More information - PDF version
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

September 13, 2011
Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds), first quarter 2011

----------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

September 18, 2011

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Parents and the high cost of child care: 2011 report
14 Sep 2011
Report from US National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies provides the average cost of child care for infants, 4-year-olds, and school-age children in centers and family child care homes across the US; finds the cost of child care continues to increase while families struggle to afford quality care.

Making work pay - The childcare trap
14 Sep 2011
Study from the UK's Daycare Trust and Save the Children reports on a survey of parents about the impact of childcare costs; finds families on low-incomes across the UK are having to turn down jobs or are considering leaving work because they can't afford to pay for childcare.

Taking the pulse: Full day K in British Columbia -- Year one
14 Sep 2011
Report for the BC Principals’ and Vice-Principals’ Association aims to "document the first wave of full-day kindergarten implementation in BC so that insight gained could influence further stages of implementation."

The debate: Confronting poverty
14 Sep 2011
Segment on TVO's The Agenda examining the issue of poverty in the Ontario election features discussion of child care issues. Guests are: Min. Laurel Broten, NDP's Cheri DiNovo, Green candidate Tim Grant and Campaign 2000's Laurel Rothman.

Both/And: Reflections on recent Anglo/Western early childhood curriculum statements
14 Sep 2011
Article from the International Journal of Child Care and Education Policy by Alan Pence and Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw "identifies innovative work on curriculum undertaken in New Zealand in the 1990s as inspirational for recently developed frameworks in Australia and parts of Canada."

MORE research, policy & practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Cities seek help to meet immigrant demands
14 Sep 2011 Canada

Why parents shouldn't feel guilty if they can't devote time to their toddlers
14 Sep 2011 Europe

Scarborough could see high loss of subsidized child care spaces
14 Sep 2011 Ontario

Full-day kindergarten a necessity; Half-day public school system leads family to enroll daughter in private school
13 Sep 2011 Newfoundland

Teachers’ union slams ‘implementation’ of all-day kindergarten
13 Sep 2011 British Columbia

MORE child care in the news

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Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

September 16:
US Census: Income, Poverty and Health Insurance, 2010
State Medicaid Programs - North Dakota, Utah, California
Unemployment and Jobless Benefits
State Minimum Wage - Oregon
SAT Scores and Academic Achievement

September 15:
US Census: States - Income, Poverty and Health Insurance, 2010
Older Adults and Food Insecurity

September 14:
US Census: Income, Poverty and Health Insurance, 2010

September 13:
US Census: Income, Poverty and Health Insurance, 2010

September 12:
The Low-Income and Access to Dental Care
Technology and Innovation for Developing Countries
Jail and Nonpayment of Child Support

---------------------------------------

Poverty Dispatch Archive

The IRP Poverty Dispatch Archive (2nd link below) hasn't been updated since June 2009.
The first link below is to an itemized archive for Poverty Dispatches since August 2011.

Poverty Dispatch Archive (a Canadian Social Research Links page)
- links to each dispatch (starting August 22, 2011) and a short blurb about its contents, as above.

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IRP Past Poverty Dispatches (June 2006 to June 2009 only, offers links but no content)
The IRP Poverty Dispatch Archive hasn't been updated since June 2009.

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

12. Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States 2010 - September 13
(U.S. Census Bureau)

On September 13, 2011, the U.S. Census Bureau released the 2010 edition of its annual report entitled
Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States.

Record poverty last year as household income dips
Median household income declines

September 13, 2011

By Ruth Mantell
WASHINGTON— A record number of people were in poverty last year as households saw their income decrease, according to data released by the Census Bureau Tuesday demonstrating the weakness of the economy even after the recession ended.
The 46.2 million people in poverty in 2010 was the largest group for the 52 years that estimates have been published, and the number of people in poverty rose for the fourth consecutive year as the poverty rate climbed to 15.1% — the highest since 1993 — up from 14.3% in 2009.

[ Comments (99) ]

Source:
MarketWatch
MarketWatch, published by Dow Jones & Co., tracks the pulse of markets for engaged investors with more than 16 million visitors per month.

------------

From the U.S. Census Bureau:

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010
News Release and Summary of Key Findings
September 13, 2011
The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that in 2010, median household income declined, the poverty rate increased and the percentage without health insurance coverage was not statistically different from the previous year. Real median household income in the United States in 2010 was $49,445, a 2.3 percent decline from the 2009 median.

The nation's official poverty rate in 2010 was 15.1 percent, up from 14.3 percent in 2009 - the third consecutive annual increase in the poverty rate. There were 46.2 million people in poverty in 2010, up from 43.6 million in 2009 - the fourth consecutive annual increase and the largest number in the 52 years for which poverty estimates have been published.

The number of people without health insurance coverage rose from 49.0 million in 2009 to 49.9 million in 2010, while the percentage without coverage -16.3 percent - was not statistically different from the rate in 2009.

This information covers the first full calendar year after the December 2007-June 2009 recession.

These findings are contained in the report Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010. The results for the nation were compiled from information collected in the 2011 Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC).

-----------------------------------------
Complete report and related
Census Bureau resources
-----------------------------------------

Income, Poverty, and
Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010
(PDF - 4.9MB, 95 pages)
Issued September 2011

* Fact Sheet: Health Insurance 2010 [PDF - 29K, 3 pages]
* Fact Sheet: Income and Poverty 2010 [PDF- 31K, 2 pages]
* Income and Poverty Estimates: Guidance on When to Use Each Survey [PDF - 51K, 2 pages]

* Highlights
* Tables & Figures
* Detailed Tables
* Historical Tables
* Source and Accuracy
[PDF - 1.4MB]

------------

Census Blog Entry:

Households Doubling Up
September 13, 2011
By David Johnson, US Census Bureau
In coping with economic challenges over the past few years, many of us have combined households with other family members or individuals. These “doubled-up” households are defined as those that include at least one “additional” adult – in other words, a person 18 or older who is not enrolled in school and is not the householder, spouse or cohabiting partner of the householder. The Census Bureau reported today that the number and share of doubled-up households and adults sharing households across the country increased over the course of the recession, which began in December 2007 and ended in June 2009. In spring 2007, there were 19.7 million doubled-up households, amounting to 17.0 percent of all households. Four years later, in spring 2011, the number of such households had climbed to 21.8 million, or 18.3 percent. All in all, 61.7 million adults, or 27.7 percent, were doubled-up in 2007, rising to 69.2 million, or 30.0 percent, in 2011.

Source:
Random Samplings:
the official Census Bureau blog

------------

Earlier editions of
Income, Poverty and Health Insurance in the United States
- back to 1985

-------------

Related Census Bureau links:

Income
- incl. links to : * Income Statistics * Guidance about Sources * Income Inequality * State Median Income * Local Area Data * Historical Data

Poverty
- incl. links to : * Overview / Highlights * Definitions * Poverty Data Sources * Microdata Access * Poverty Thresholds

Health Insurance
- incl. links to : * Help for CPS Users * Revised CPS ASEC Health Insurance Data - * Help for ACS Users - * Help for SIPP Users
----
* CPS ASEC =Annual Social and Economic Supplement [ part of the Current Population Survey ]
* ACS = American Community Survey
* SIPP = Survey of Income and Program Participation

Source:
Census Bureau

------------------------------------
NGO and media Analysis
------------------------------------

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Understanding the New Census Poverty & Health Data:
*
Poverty Rate Second-Highest In 45 Years; Record Numbers Lacked Health Insurance, Lived In Deep Poverty
* Greenstein Statement on Census’ 2010 Poverty, Income, & Health Insurance Data
Off the Charts Blog Post: Tuesday’s Census Report in Pictures
Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

---

From the
Economic Policy Institute:
*
A lost decade: Poverty and income trends continue to paint a bleak picture for working families - September 14, 2011
* 2010 marks another year of decline for employer-sponsored health insurance coverage - September 13, 2011
* 2010 marks another year of decline for employer-sponsored health insurance coverage - September 13, 2011
Source:
Economic Policy Institute

---

From the
Center for Law and Social Policy:
*
How Many More Have to Fall into Poverty Before We Say Enough? - September 13, 2011
* Poverty Reduction: The Invisible Hand of Government - September 13, 2011
* Why the New Poverty Numbers Should be a Wake Up Call - September 13, 2011
* To Grow the Economy, We Must Pay Attention to Child Poverty - September 13, 2011
Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy

-------------------------------------------------------

From the University of Wisconsin's
Poverty Dispatch :
Click a date below to access all links to articles for that date.

September 13, 2001:
* U.S. Poverty rate up, household income down, By Arlette Saenz, September 13, 2011, ABC News
* Household income falls, poverty rate rises, By Conor Dougherty, September 13, 2011, Wall Street Journal
* Nearly 1 in 6 Americans in poverty, Census says, By Hope Yen (AP), September 13, 2011, Houston Chronicle
* Poverty rate rises in America, By Annalyn Censky, September 13, 2011, CNNMoney.com
* No change in number of uninsured Americans, By Kirsten Stewart, September 13, 2011, Salt Lake Tribune

September 14, 2011:
* U.S. poverty totals hit a 50-year high, By Don Lee, Noam Levey and Alejandro Lazo, September 14, 2011, Los Angeles Times
* Young people hit hard as U.S. poverty rate increases to 15.1 percent, By Matt O’Brien, September 13, 2011, San Jose Mercury News
* Census figures show record numbers of Americans in poverty, By Alfred Lubrano, September 14, 2011, Philadelphia Inquirer
* Government aid keeps millions out of poverty, By Tami Luhby, September 14, 2011, CNNMoney.com
* Rising poverty rate shows holes in safety net, By John W. Schoen, September 13, 2011, MSNBC.com
* Poverty rate rises, especially for Hispanics, By Schuyler Velasco, September 13, 2011, Christian Science Monitor

September 15, 2011
* Census finds more people than ever living in poverty, By William Mullen, Ryan Haggerty and John Keilman, September 14, 2011, Chicago Tribune
* California poverty rate rises in 2010 for fourth year in a row, By Alana Semuels and Duke Helfand, September 13, 2011, Los Angeles Times
* State poverty hits 10.8%, incomes slide, By Warren Wolfe and Jeremy Olson, September 13, 2011, Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune
* Poverty hitting harder in Indiana, By Bill McCleery, September 13, 2011, Indianapolis Star
* Median income in Ohio hits 27-year low, By Bill Bush, September 14, 2011, Columbus Dispatch
* Poverty at new heights in Georgia, nation, By Carrie Teegardin and Craig Schneider, September 13, 2011, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

September 16, 2011
* Poor are still getting poorer, but downturn’s punch varies, Census data show, By Jason DeParle and Sabrina Tavernise, September 15, 2011, New York Times
* Health insurance, poverty: Numbers of poor, uninsured increase, census figures show, By Jeff Kunerth and Kate Santich, September 13, 2011, Orlando Sentinel
* State Medicaid Programs - North Dakota, Utah, California
* Unemployment and Jobless Benefits
* State Minimum Wage - Oregon
* SAT Scores and Academic Achievement

---

Nearly one in six in poverty in the U.S.; children hit hard, Census says
September 13

By Michael A. Fletcher
Nearly one in six Americans was living in poverty last year, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday, a development that is ensnaring growing numbers of children and offering vivid proof of the recession’s devastating impact. The report portrays a nation where many people are slipping backward in the wake of a downturn that left 14 million people out of work and pushed unemployment rates to levels not seen in decades.

[ Comments (3000+) ]

Source:
Washington Post

---

Soaring Poverty Casts Spotlight on ‘Lost Decade’
By Sabrina Tavernise

September 13, 2011
WASHINGTON — Another 2.6 million people slipped into poverty in the United States last year, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday, and the number of Americans living below the official poverty line, 46.2 million people, was the highest number in the 52 years the bureau has been publishing figures on it. And in new signs of distress among the middle class, median household incomes fell last year to levels last seen in 1996

[ Comments (800) ]

Graphics : Income and Poverty Rate at 1990s Levels

Source:
New York Times

[ Related NY Times articles and interactive features ]

---

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

13. Understanding Poverty in the United States: Surprising Facts About America's Poor - September 13
(Heritage Foundation)

Understanding Poverty in the United States: Surprising Facts About America's Poor
By Robert Rector and Rachel Sheffield
September 13, 2011
The Census Bureau’s annual poverty report presents a misleading picture of poverty in the United States. Few of the 46.2 million people identified by the Census Bureau as being “in poverty” are what most Americans would consider poor—lacking nutritious food, adequate warm housing, or clothing. The typical “poor” American lives in an air-conditioned house or apartment and has cable TV, a car, multiple color TVs, a DVD player, and a VCR among other conveniences. (...) Congress should reorient the massive welfare state to promote self-sufficient prosperity rather than expanded dependence. As the recession ends, able-bodied recipients should be required to work or prepare for work as a condition of receiving aid.
Source:
Issues : Poverty and Inequality
[ The Heritage Foundation]
The Heritage Foundation is a research and educational institution—a think tank—whose mission is to formulate and promote conservative public policies based on the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional American values, and a strong national defense.

---

How Rich Are Poor People?
The Census Bureau says there are more Americans in poverty than ever.
Are the poor better off today than they used to be?
By Brian Palmer
September 14, 2011
How many amenities do people below the poverty line tend to have?
More than 46 million Americans are now living below the poverty threshold, according to numbers released by the Census Bureau on Tuesday. That's the highest number since the Bureau started keeping track of the statistic in 1959. Are poor people better off now than they were 52 years ago?
Much better, in absolute material terms. Robert Rector of the Heritage Foundation recently published an analysis of the lifestyle of people below the poverty line in 21st-century America. He found that many poor people have amenities that were available only to the wealthy (if they existed at all) in 1959.
Source:
Slate Magazine

Counterpoint:

Study dismisses poverty, but try telling that to the poor
By Courtland Milloy
September 13, 2011
As the fortunes of middle-class Americans continue to dwindle, some might be wondering what it’s like to be poor. A study released this year by the Heritage Foundation argues that living in poverty isn’t as bad as most of us imagine. Indeed, from the way poverty is portrayed by the conservative think tank, you’d think that the average poor person was actually living large.
Source:
Washington Post

---

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

14. World Income Inequality : Is the world becoming more unequal? - September 2011
(Conference Board of Canada)

From the
Conference Board of Canada:

Hot Topic: World Income Inequality
Is the world becoming more unequal?
September 2011

Key Messages:
* Of total world income, 42 per cent goes to those who make up the richest 10 per cent of the world’s population, while just 1 per cent goes to those who make up the poorest 10 per cent.
* Income inequality among countries in the world rose sharply between the 1980s and the mid-1990s, before levelling off and then falling after 2000.
* Countries with very high inequality are clustered in South America and southern Africa. Countries with low inequality are mostly in Europe. Canada and the U.S. have medium income inequality.
* The increase in income inequality has been more rapid in Canada than in the U.S. since the mid-1990s.

Click the link above to access the following
collection of information in question-and-answer format:

Is world income inequality increasing?
How do we define a “rich” country? How do we define a “poor” country?
How do we measure world income inequality?
Method 1: Is there an income gap between rich and poor countries? Has the gap increased?
Method 2: Has world income inequality increased? If so, why?
Method 3: Are there large gaps between rich and poor people within each country? Are these gaps increasing?
What is happening to income inequality in Canada and its peer countries?
Why has income inequality increased in the United States?
Why is income inequality rising in China?
Has there been income inequality throughout history?
Is your income level determined by where you live?

See also:
Canadian Income Inequality
July 2011

Source:
Conference Board of Canada

Related links:

Record poverty last year as household income dips
Median household income declines; families ‘doubled up’

September 13, 2011
WASHINGTON — A record number of people were in poverty last year as households saw their income decrease, according to data from the Census Bureau Tuesday, demonstrating the weakness of the economy even after the official end of the recession.
The 46.2 million people in poverty in 2010 was the most for the 52 years that estimates have been published, and the number of people in poverty rose for the fourth consecutive year as the poverty rate climbed to 15.1% — the highest since 1993 — up from 14.3% in 2009.
Source:
MarketWatch
MarketWatch, published by Dow Jones & Co., tracks the pulse of markets for engaged investors with more than 16 million visitors per month.

---

Income inequality rising quickly in Canada
Tavia Grant
September 13, 2011
The gap between the rich and the rest is growing ever wider -- with the chasm increasing at a faster pace in Canada than in the United States.
That’s the conclusion of a Conference Board of Canada study Tuesday, which says income inequality has been rising more rapidly in Canada than in the U.S. since the mid-1990s.

[ 661 comments ]

Source:
Globe and Mail

Related Globe and Mail articles:

* We're ignoring inequality at our peril
* Does hike in minimum wage cut poverty? Findings say no
* Nearly 1 in 6 Americans live in poverty: Census

---

Our self-image needs a reality check
September 15, 2011
By Carol Goard
We’re closing the gap — and it’s nothing to be proud of.
For generations, we have taken comfort in the belief that we live in a more equitable country than the United States. Globally, Canada might be in the middle of the pack, but compared to our American neighbours, we are a compassionate people. Our rich-poor divide might be widening, but it is modest relative to theirs. A new report from the Conference Board of Canada shatters that myth. Since the mid-1990s, income inequality has been rising faster in Canada than the U.S. They’re still in top spot, but we’re catching up. Our Gini index, which measures income equality, rose by 9 per cent over the last decade. Theirs increased by 4.7 per cent.
(...)
There are two policy levers Canada could use to counter the trend of the last decade:
• We could make our tax system more progressive. (...)
• We could strengthen our social programs. What differentiated Canada from the U.S. for most of our history was our sturdy safety nets. They protected us in times of adversity, caught people before they fell into destitution and gave everyone a measure of security against the risk of illness and a precipitous drop in income. But over the last 30 years Ottawa has switched to narrowly targeted benefits and the provinces have become tight-fisted. The wealthy are largely unaffected; the poor are more exposed to market forces.
B
ut both options are non-starters in Ottawa. The Harper government is calling on low- and middle-income Canadians to tighten their belts while it lowers corporate tax rates. The provinces are dismantling their disparity-fighting mechanisms. And there is no public pressure for a change of direction. Canada was never a land of equal opportunity, although we clung to that self-image. Now we can’t escape the truth: We’re galloping in the opposite direction, outpacing even the U.S.
Source:
Toronto Star

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

---

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

15. OECD Employment Outlook - September 15
(Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development - OECD)

New from the
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD):

Governments must act on rising long-term unemployment and youth joblessness
News Release
September 15, 2011
Unemployment remains stubbornly high in the OECD area with the latest economic forecasts suggesting job creation will remain anaemic in the near term, according to a new OECD report. The OECD’s latest Employment Outlook says that in mid 2011 the number of unemployed people in the OECD area had declined to just over 44 million, still more than 13 million higher than immediately before the crisis.

OECD Employment Outlook 2011
The OECD Employment Outlook provides an annual assessment of labour market developments and prospects in member countries.
Contents:
Editorial
- Unfinished business: investing in youth.
Chapter 1
- Income support for the unemployed: How well has the safety-net held up during the "Great Recession"?
Chapter 2
- The labour market effects of social protection systems in emerging economies.
Chapter 3 - Earnings volatility: causes and consequences.
Chapter 4 - Right for the job: over-qualified or under-skilled?
* Statistical annex
* Key employment statistics
* Compare your country
(Excel file)
* Canada labour market outcomes, 2000 to 2010 (HTML)

[ Previous editions of OECD Employment Outlook ]
[ More OECD reports about Canada ]

Source:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
The mission of the OECD is to promote policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world. The OECD provides a forum in which governments can work together to share experiences and seek solutions to common problems. We work with governments to understand what drives economic, social and environmental change.

Related links:

Job creation to remain ‘anemic,’ OECD says
By Tavia Grant
September 15, 2011
Canada’s labour market is healing faster than in other industrialized nations, but a faltering global recovery may temporarily prevent the country from returning to pre-crisis unemployment levels.
An employment outlook published Thursday (see the link above) by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development shows several soft spots linger in Canada’s labour market.

Youth and low-skilled workers are lagging the broader recovery. Social assistance programs for the unemployed haven’t been adapted to elevated jobless rates, leaving the unemployed vulnerable to financial difficulties once jobless benefits run out. And income inequality is growing.

MORE RELATED TO THIS STORY:
* U.K. jobless data fuel growth worries
* U.S. census highlights financial toll recession has claimed
* What’s on the job market horizon

Source:
Globe and Mail

---

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

16. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter

14 September 2011 - CRINMAIL Issue 1242 (latest newsletter)
In this issue:
A children's rights fact-file:
Demonstrations & freedom of association
Latest news and reports
- State violence: Syria, Europe
- State of emergency issues: Trinidad & Tobago
- Sex ed & homophobia in school: China, US, Poland
- New laws: United States, Kenya
- Advice on migrant children: South America
- Bad news abounds: United Kingdom
- UN News
Upcoming events
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

---------

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 

Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

FIFTEEN FACTS ABOUT SLEEP YOU PROBABLY DIDN'T KNOW...
(OR WERE TOO TIRED TO THINK ABOUT)

-The record for the longest period without sleep is 18 days, 21 hours, 40 minutes during a rocking chair marathon. The record holder reported hallucinations, paranoia, blurred vision, slurred speech and memory and concentration lapses.

- It's impossible to tell if someone is really awake without close medical supervision. People can take cat naps with their eyes open without even being aware of it.

- Anything less than five minutes to fall asleep at night means you're sleep deprived. The ideal is between 10 and 15 minutes, meaning you're still tired enough to sleep deeply, but not so exhausted you feel sleepy by day.

- A new baby typically results in 400-750 hours lost sleep for parents in the first year

- One of the best predictors of insomnia later in life is the development of bad habits from having sleep disturbed by young children.

- The continuous brain recordings that led to the discovery of REM (rapid eye-movement) sleep were not done until 1953, partly because the scientists involved were concerned about wasting paper.

- REM sleep occurs in bursts totalling about 2 hours a night, usually beginning about 90 minutes after falling asleep.

- Dreams, once thought to occur only during REM sleep, also occur (but to a lesser extent) in non-REM sleep phases. It's possible there may not be a single moment of our sleep when we are actually dreamless.

- REM dreams are characterised by bizarre plots, but non-REM dreams are repetitive and thought-like, with little imagery - obsessively returning to a suspicion you left your mobile phone somewhere, for example.

- Certain types of eye movements during REM sleep correspond to specific movements in dreams, suggesting at least part of the dreaming process is analagous to watching a film

- No one knows for sure if other species dream but some do have sleep cycles similar to humans.

- Elephants sleep standing up during non-REM sleep, but lie down for REM sleep.

- Some scientists believe we dream to fix experiences in long-term memory, that is, we dream about things worth remembering. Others reckon we dream about things worth forgetting - to eliminate overlapping memories that would otherwise clog up our brains.

- Dreams may not serve any purpose at all but be merely a meaningless byproduct of two evolutionary adaptations - sleep and consciousness.

- REM sleep may help developing brains mature. Premature babies have 75 per cent REM sleep, 10 per cent more than full-term bubs. Similarly, a newborn kitten puppy rat or hampster experiences only REM sleep, while a newborn guinea pig (which is much more developed at birth) has almost no REM sleep at all.

Source:
http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifehack/40-facts-about-sleep-you-probably-didnt-know.html

 

----------------------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

The best free software for students
http://www.moneyville.ca/article/1047827--the-best-free-software-for-students

----------------------------------------

Remember this guy?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asJJ2xoWgus
"Torn" interpreted by David Armand & Natalie Imbruglia

Well, he's back!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkzsoJf-UsA
(Click the

------------------------------------------

Jazz for cows
http://www.todaysbigthing.com/cute-animals/2011/09/12

Remote roundup
http://www.wimp.com/carscows/
(Rollin', rollin', rollin', keep them dogies rollin', Rawhide)

------------------------------------------

PALINDROMOPHILE ALERT!!!

BOB - The Palindrome Song by Weird Al Yankovic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nej4xJe4Tdg
(It's a parody of a Bob Dylan song from way back when...]

-----------------------------------------

As they saw it
News & articles published shortly after events occurred, they reflect the information available at that time and how people reacted
http://astheysawit.com/

-----------------------------------------

Higher Ground
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hGSqqhhokE
Source:
Playing for Change
http://playingforchange.com/