Canadian Social Research Newsletter
February 19, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,534 subscribers.

******************************************************

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
******************************************************



IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Proposed Old Age Security reforms (moving age of eligibility from 65 to 67) : Prime Minister's new policy would force up to 50,000 to live in poverty for two more years (John Stapleton for CARP) - February 10
2. [Ontario] Report of the Commission on the Reform of Ontario's Public Services (Drummond Report) - February 15
3. [Ontario] The Social Assistance Review Options Paper: What Does It Say and What Does It Mean?
(Income Security Advocacy Centre webinar) - February 17
4. [Ontario] Trillium Gift of Life Network : Organ and tissue donor registration
5. [British Columbia] Improving the Care of Seniors : BC Ombudsperson Releases Report with 176 Recommendations - February 14
6. The Market Basket Measure : How to destroy a good poverty line (By Michael Goldberg, Steve Kerstetter and Seth Klein in the Vancouver Sun) - February 14
7. Twenty-Five reasons Stephen Harper is bad for Canada
(WhyNotHarper.ca --- a website on the 2011 federal election) - May 2011
8.
Affordability of Post-Secondary Education (Nick Falvo, Carleton University) - February 9
9. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Consumer Price Index, January 2012 - February 17
--- Employment Insurance, December 2011 -
February 17
--- Leading indicators, January 2012 - February 17
--- Canadian Economic Observer - February 2012 issue - February 16
--- Health Reports - February 2012 - February 16
-------- Assessment of validity of self-reported smoking status
-------- Health of First Nations children living off reserve and Métis children younger than age 6
10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
12. The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2013 (The White House) - February 13
13. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------------------------------------------------

Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm



1. Proposed Old Age Security reforms (moving age of eligibility from 65 to 67) : Prime Minister's new policy would force up to 50,000 to live in poverty for two more years (John Stapleton for CARP) - February 10

Proposed Old Age Security reforms
(moving age of eligibility from 65 to 67):

Prime Minister's new policy would force up to 50,000 to live in poverty for two more years
http://goo.gl/XDbdc
February 10, 2012
By John Stapleton
By providing OAS and GIS at age 65, Canada has greatly reduced the incidence of poverty among seniors. By moving the age of eligibility for OAS to 67, absent any other measures, the Conservative government will place a whole new age cohort into risk of poverty. My own estimate is that almost 50,000 social assistance recipients, most of them persons with disabilities, would be forced to live in poverty for up to two more years.
Clearly, if the age threshold for OAS is to be raised to 67, we must do more to ensure that the 65 -67 age cohort escapes poverty. Perhaps then, some higher income families with non-working spouses could wait just a bit longer for the extra money they have demonstrated they don’t require.

- John Stapleton is a Toronto social policy consultant.
http://www.openpolicyontario.com/

Source:
CARP

http://www.carp.ca/
CARP is a national, non-partisan, non-profit organization committed to a ‘New Vision of Aging for Canada’ promoting social change that will bring financial security, equitable access to health care and freedom from discrimination. Our mandate is to promote and protect the interests, rights and quality of life for Canadians as we age.

---

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

2. [Ontario] Report of the Commission on the Reform of Ontario's Public Services (Drummond Report) - February 15

Ontario Receives Report From Drummond Commission on the Reform of Ontario's Public Services
http://news.ontario.ca/mof/en/2012/02/ontario-receives-report-from-drummond-commission.html

February 15, 2012
News Release

The McGuinty government today received the report of the Commission on the Reform of Ontario's Public Services. (...) Recognizing that this new era of slower global economic growth requires lowering program spending growth further, in March 2011 the government established the commission to provide additional advice on how to make long-term, fundamental changes to the way government delivers services. The report will inform the 2012 Budget. The McGuinty government will decide how to move forward.
Source:
Government of Ontario
http://www.ontario.ca/

The Drummond Report:
[Ontario Ministry of Finance website]

1. Executive Summary
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/reformcommission/chapters/summary.html

2. Complete report:

Public Services for Ontarians : A Path to Sustainability and Excellence
Commission on the Reform of Ontario's Public Services

February 2012
By Don Drummond

PDF version (5.6MB, 562 pages)
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/reformcommission/chapters/report.pdf

HTML version
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/reformcommission/index.html

Table of Contents:
NOTE: Only the Health and Social Programs chapters are highlighted below.
To select another chapter, click the HTML version link above.
* Message from the Chair
* Commission Member Biographies
* Executive SummaryChapter 1: The Need for Strong Fiscal Action
Chapter 2: The Fiscal Challenge in Context
Chapter 3: Our Mandate and Approachnd Services Look Like?
Chapter 4: Making Transformation Work: Process and Structures
Chapter 5: Health
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/reformcommission/chapters/ch5.html
Chapter 6: Elementary and Secondary Education
Chapter 7: Post-Secondary Education
Chapter 8: Social Programs
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/reformcommission/chapters/ch8.html
Chapter 9: Employment and Training Services
Chapter 10: Immigration
Chapter 11: Business Support
Chapter 12: Infrastructure, Real Estate and Electricity
Chapter 13: Environment and Natural Resources
Chapter 14: Justice Sector
Chapter 15: Labour Relations and Compensation
Chapter 16: Operating and Back-Office Expenditures
Chapter 17: Government Business Enterprises
Chapter 18: Revenue Integrity
Chapter 19: Liability Management
Chapter 20: Intergovernmental Relations
Appendix 1: Commission Recommendations
Appendix 2: List of Acronyms

---

Chapter 8
Social Programs
Recommendations:

http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/reformcommission/chapters/ch8.html
* Hold growth in social programs spending to 0.5 per cent per year.
* Move aggressively towards a fully integrated benefits system
* The Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario should examine system design options that deliver a more efficient and higher-quality service to social assistance recipients. This examination should consider combining Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program, and having the combined program delivered at the local level.
* Advocate for federal reforms in two key areas:
--- Work with other provinces and the federal government to establish a national income-support program for people with disabilities who are unlikely to re-enter the workforce.
--- Implement the final recommendations of the Mowat Centre Employment Insurance Task Force.
* the maximum level of the Ontario Child Benefit should be frozen.
* [Click the link above for more recommendations, including changes to child and youth mental health services, children’s services, health, education, youth justice, developmental services funding, the non-profit sector, etc.]

Source:
Commission on the Reform of Ontario's Public Services

http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/reformcommission/announcement.html

---

From the
Toronto Star:

Drummond Report: Hospital amalgamations and more power for LHINs among recommendations
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1131861
February 15, 2012
By Tanya Talaga
The prescription to fix Ontario’s health system may sound harsh — amalgamating hospitals, reducing the powers of doctors in policy decisions and empowering local health integration networks — but it may be necessary for patients, says the commission in charge of reforming public services. Economist Don Drummond believes a 20-year plan — shepherded by a new health commission — is needed to achieve the 105 recommendations he says must happen to drive down out-of-control health spending costs.

Drummond Report: Higher hydro bills, more user fees urged in sweeping report
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1131820
February 15, 2012
By Robert Benzie
Gloom — or doom. Ontarians could face higher hydro bills, bigger school classes, fewer hospitals, more expensive tuition and user fees to protect the future of provincial public services. That’s the grim message from Don Drummond, chair of the commission on public-service reform. His two-volume, 665-page report delivered Wednesday is so weighty that a table collapsed when Ontario Provincial Police officers unloaded copies in the media lock-up.
Comments (52):
http://goo.gl/t443w

Walkom: The real victims of the Drummond report’s cuts
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1133243
February 17, 2012
By Thomas Walkom
In his former life as a bank economist, Drummond routinely calculated the effect of government spending on employment. Yet in this report there is nothing, even though he acknowledges he is proposing cuts on an “unprecedented” scale. (...) if we maintain, as Drummond once did, that government spending does matter, a different picture emerges. Rough calculations, based on his figures and finance department estimates, suggest that the Drummond plan will end up throwing roughly 250,000 additional Ontarians out of work by 2018. Even without another global crisis, that translates into an unemployment rate of about 11 per cent.
Is this really where the McGuinty government wants to go?
Comments (55):
http://goo.gl/RZZfz

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

From the
Progressive Economics Forum:

Drummond: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/02/15/drummond-good-bad-ugly/
By Erin Weir
February 15, 2012
The Good
While the McGuinty government prevented the Commission from considering tax rates, it proposes some sensible measures to raise revenue, including combating corporate tax avoidance and cracking down on the underground economy. (...) We should ... scrutinize the supposed benefits of cutting the corporate income tax rate.
(...)
The Bad
Unfortunately, the McGuinty government appointed the Commission to usher in an age of austerity. Drummond does so by positing that spending will grow twice as fast as, and revenue will grow much less than, provincial budget projections (Table 1.1). Instead of a balanced budget by 2017-18, Drummond’s scenario projects a $30-billion deficit that year.
(...)
The Ugly
The Drummond report contains several seemingly unpalatable cuts such as cancelling full-day kindergarten (except at the few schools that already have it). These objectionable proposals could serve to allow the McGuinty government to make other deep cuts that seem less painful. Drummond recommends that “the province either terminate the Pension Benefits Guarantee Fund or explore the possibility of transferring it to a private insurer.” This fund backstops pensions when an employer goes bankrupt, safeguarding the retirement income of Ontario workers.

The Ontario government should adopt the good, minimize the bad by reversing corporate tax cuts and permanently restricting HST input tax credits, and forget the ugly.

Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics Blog
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/relentless/

[ Progressive Economics Forum (PEF)
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/
The Progressive Economics Forum aims to promote the development of a progressive economics community in Canada. The PEF brings together over 125 progressive economists, working in universities, the labour movement, and activist research organizations. ]

-----------------------------------

From
MapleLeafWeb:

The Drummond Report : It seems very Mike Harrisish
47 comments
http://www.mapleleafweb.com/forums//index.php?showtopic=20348&st=0

Source:
MapleLeafWeb
Forums
http://www.mapleleafweb.com/forums//index.php

MapleLeafWeb:
http://www.mapleleafweb.com/

NOTE : Since January 2011, the MapleLeafWeb site is no longer actively maintained [ http://goo.gl/FjKnh ].
However, MapleLeafWeb Forums are still active.

-----------------------------------

From the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

Ten Points on Recession, Deficits, and Austerity in Ontario
February 14, 2012
By Jim Stanford
(...) The budget-cutting set are ramping up the rhetoric pretty dramatically: warning that Ontario is fast becoming the “Greece of Canada,” that we are about to hit the “debt wall,” that interest rates will skyrocket when the debt raters wake up, and similar nonsense. This is pure shock-doctrine stuff (reminiscent of like propoganda that set the stage for Paul Martin’s austerity in the mid-1990s), and must be called out for what it is.

Source:
Behind the Numbers Blog

http://www.behindthenumbers.ca/

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

-----------------------------------

From the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE):

Drummond austerity cure: bad medicine for ailing economy
http://cupe.ca/government/drummond-austerity-cure-bad-medicine
February 15, 2012
TORONTO – The Drummond Report released today is an “austerity” plan that will kill Ontario’s economic recovery, delay balanced budgets and put thousands more Ontarians out of work, said the president of Ontario’s largest union. “If Ontario’s economy is sick, then this report is bad medicine,” said Fred Hahn, president of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Ontario.

Source:
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)
http://cupe.ca/

-----------------------------------

From the
Wellesley Institute:

Misdiagnosis: Drummond’s Health Care Prescription Misses Equity
http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/news/drummond-report/
February 15, 2012
The Drummond Report’s emphasis on reform and innovation in the way health care is organized and delivered is vital. The objectives of long-term planning, a shift to home and community care, prevention, and integration of health services are right on the mark. But a huge element is missing: equity. Equitable access to services, equitable outcomes and improved population health must also be fundamental goals of reform.

Source:
Wellesley Institute

http://wellesleyinstitute.com

-----------------------------------

Pre-release links (thanks to Alizeh Hussain of
Family Service Toronto):
http://www.familyservicetoronto.org/

· TVO production puts a few things into perspective:
http://theagenda.tvo.org/blog/agenda-blogs/waiting-drummond

· The Toronto Star reports that more than a quarter of Drummond’s recommendations will be on health care http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1131426--drummond-report-controversial-prescription-in-store-for-health-care

· Don Drummond on his experience of running the commission and writing the report
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/business/don-drummond-says-ont-deficit-report-the-culmination-of-his--career-139344583.html

· In the Globe and Mail - “…starting Wednesday, it will also fall to Ontarians to decide what they think is palatable; to consider the balance between sustainability and immediate need that other parts of the Western world are already agonizing over. And it will fall to their government to start implementing difficult changes that, at some level, it’s long known are needed.”
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/adam-radwanski/ontario-gears-up-for-a-different-life-post-drummond/article2338738/

· RNAO Economist Kim Jarvi’s Op Ed in the Hamilton Spectator – “Drummond says cut, but a wider conversation on options is needed” http://www.thespec.com/opinion/columns/article/671371--ontario-sleepwalking-over-a-precipice

---

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

3. [Ontario] The Social Assistance Review Options Paper: What Does It Say and What Does It Mean? - February 17
(Income Security Advocacy Centre webinar)

The Options Paper:
What Does It Say and What Does It Mean?
(webinar and backgrounders)
http://sareview.ca/isac-resources/options-paper-webinar/
February 17, 2012
The Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario released its Options Paper, entitled “Discussion Paper 2: Approaches for Reform”, on February 3, 2012. There is a very short period for public response and feedback – the deadline for responding is March 16. The options could have far-reaching implications for people on low incomes. In this webinar, Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre presents information that will help groups and individuals understand and respond to the Commission’s Options Paper. The webinar explains where the review process is now and what some of the problems with the paper are, gives a brief overview of the current political and economic context, dissects the paper to construct a picture of what is actually being proposed, and goes through some of the implications.

NOTE : Click the link above to access the main webinar/resources page, then scroll down to the video screen and click the Start button. The duration of the webinar is just under two hours, but it isn't a humongous download because the video itself is black-and-white powerpoint slides that follows along with the voice of presenter Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre.

Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre

http://www.incomesecurity.org/

The Discussion paper:

Discussion Paper 2 : Approaches for Reform (PDF - 1.2MB, 77 pages)
http://goo.gl/RyvnX
February 2012
Source:
Commission for the
Review of Social Assistance in Ontario

http://www.socialassistancereview.ca/

---

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

4. [Ontario] Trillium Gift of Life Network : Organ and tissue donor registration

Ontario Residents:
Have you signed an organ/tissue donor card?

Did you know that you need to register to be added to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s database even if you signed a donor card? A signed donor card is not recorded in the database and may not be available when needed. Organ and tissue donor registration is the only secure and guaranteed way to make your decision to save lives known. Make sure you discuss your decision to donate your organ(s) and tissue upon your death with your family members.

I've just registered (Feb. 17) - why don't you join me on the list?
Gilles

[Ontario] Trillium Gift of Life Network
http://giftoflife.on.ca/en/
Trillium Gift of Life Network was created to help save and enhance lives by maximizing organ and tissue donations for transplantation. Organ donation from one individual can help up to eight others. Tissue donation from one individual can help up to 75 others. And living donation is becoming an increasingly important source of organs for transplant.

Organ and tissue donor registration
http://www.ontario.ca/en/services_for_residents/ONT05_039074.html

Also for Ontario residents:

BeADonor.ca
http://beadonor.ca/
The goal of BeADonor.ca is to encourage all Ontarians to become registered organ and tissue donors and educate them on the impact of their generous decision to give.

----------------------

For all Canadians:

Canadian Association of Transplantation
http://www.transplant.ca/
What started in 1980 as an informal gathering of organ donor coordinators, dedicated to creating a network of information and expertise, has grown into the Canadian Association of Transplantation. CAT is a national association whose members have built a caring and professional foundation for the transplantation process in Canada.

5. [British Columbia] Improving the Care of Seniors : BC Ombudsperson Releases Report with 176 Recommendations - February 14

Improving the Care of Seniors:
BC Ombudsperson Releases Report with 176 Recommendations
(PDF - 260K, 2 pages)
http://www.bcombudsperson.ca/images/pdf/seniors/Best_of_Care_News_Release_final.pdf
February 14, 2012
VICTORIA – Today Ombudsperson Kim Carter released a 400 plus page report on her office’s three year investigation into the care of seniors in British Columbia. The Best of Care: Getting it Right for Seniors in British Columbia (Part 2) is a comprehensive and in depth investigation that makes 143 findings and 176 recommendations. The recommendations are designed to improve home and community care, home support, assisted living and residential care services for seniors.

Seniors' Care Report Part 2 : main page
http://www.bcombudsperson.ca/seniors/seniors-care-investigation/seniors-report-part-two

Report Overview (PDF - 9.3MB, 226 pages)
http://www.bcombudsperson.ca/images/pdf/seniors/Seniors_Report_Overview.pdf
February 2012
This report is a comprehensive and in-depth look at home and community care issues affecting seniors in British Columbia from an Ombudsperson’s perspective. (...) The complexity of seniors’ care issues and the division of responsibility between different provincial public authorities led to a long systemic investigation which has resulted in a two-part public report. Part 1 was released in December 2009 and addressed an important but narrow range of issues in the area of residential care. Part 2 deals not only with residential care but also general home and community care issues; home support; and assisted living – in short, a significant range of interconnected seniors’ care services in British Columbia. As a consequence, Part 2 is a more detailed and diverse report that includes a total of 143 findings and 176 recommendations.

Seniors’ Report Volume 1 (PDF - 4.3MB, 214 pages)
http://www.bcombudsperson.ca/images/pdf/seniors/Seniors_Report_Volume_1.pdf

Seniors' Report Volume 2 (PDF - 8.3MB, 254 pages)
http://www.bcombudsperson.ca/images/pdf/seniors/Seniors_Report_Volume_2.pdf

In addition to the two volumes of this report, the report main page
http://www.bcombudsperson.ca/seniors/seniors-care-investigation/seniors-report-part-two
...contains links to the following backgrounders:
[Click the link above to select a backgrounder.]
* Fact Sheet
* Home and Community Care Backgrounder
* Home Support Backgrounder
* Assisted Living Backgrounder
* Residential Care Backgrounder
* more...

Source:
BC Ombudsperson
http://www.bcombudsperson.ca/

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Government response to Ombudsperson report
on senior care problems doesn't go far enough

http://www.povnet.org/node/4852
February 16, 2012
The BC Ombudsperson, Kim Carter released the second of two planned reports on her office’s three year investigation into the care of seniors in British Columbia. The Best of Care: Getting it Right for Seniors in British Columbia (Part 2) makes 143 findings and 176 recommendations designed to improve home and community care, home support, assisted living and residential care services for seniors. (...) Seniors' advocates and critics say that the government's plan falls short of protecting vulnerable seniors from abuse.
- includes links to three related articles in the BC media.
Source:
Povnet
http://www.povnet.org/

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Also from the
BC Ombudsperson
:

First report on care of seniors
December 17, 2011

News release (PDF - 112K, 2 pages)
http://goo.gl/D7efN

List of findings and recommendations (PDF - 96K, 3 pages)
http://goo.gl/qgY7l

Full report (PDF - 1.2MB, 70 pages)
http://goo.gl/v1zMC

---

- Go to the BC Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm

6. The Market Basket Measure : How to destroy a good poverty line - February 14
(Michael Goldberg, Steve Kerstetter and Seth Klein in the Vancouver Sun
)

How to destroy a good poverty line
http://www.vancouversun.com/business/destroy+good+poverty+line/6149044/story.html
By Michael Goldberg, Steve Kerstetter and Seth Klein
February 14, 2012
More than a decade ago, the federal and provincial governments started work on a new poverty line, the Market Basket Measure (MBM). After decades of distracting and divisive debates about poverty lines, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada crafted a methodology for the MBM that passed the test of common sense. These days, the federal government appears more intent on throwing all that work into the garbage heap. Two years ago, the bean-counters in Ottawa changed the methodology. In particular, they started calculating housing costs in a way that produced figures that were patently absurd. Suddenly, the much-lauded MBM no longer passed the test of common sense.
(...)
The MBM is worth getting right. Unlike other poverty measures, it is intuitive and easily understood because it is based on the actual cost of basic goods and services. The MBM is also grounded in real local expenses in cities and towns across Canada rather than using a single figure for all major cities regardless of variations in local costs. And it was designed to be reasonable.
(...)
The three of us (all longtime researchers of social policy and poverty issues) were early supporters of the MBM. While recent revisions to the costs for food, clothing, transportation and other items in urban and rural regions of each province met the test of common sense, the same could not be said for the revisions to the shelter costs. (...) Regrettably, we are forced to recommend - once again - that the MBMs not be used until they are fixed.
---
Michael Goldberg is a former director of research at the Social Planning and Research Council of BC.
Steve Kerstetter is a former director of the National Council of Welfare in Ottawa.
Seth Klein is B.C director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

Source:
Vancouver Sun

http://www.vancouversun.com/

Related link:

The Market Basket Measure
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm#mbm
- this link will take you to a section of the Canadian Poverty Measures Links page of this website, where you can find more info about the MBM.

---

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

7. Twenty-Five reasons Stephen Harper is bad for Canada - May 2011
(WhyNotHarper.ca --- a website on the 2011 federal election
)

NOTE : The link below isn't a recent upload, but I found that it summarizes quite well the reasons why 60% of eligible voters rejected Stephen Harper in the 2011 federal election. If you like the first link below, you'll want to check out the "More reasons..." link for several resources, a list from rabble.ca [ http://rabble.ca/ ] of 87 organizations and people attacked by The Harper Government™ from 2006 to 2011 and more...

Twenty-Five reasons Stephen Harper is bad for Canada
http://www.whynotharper.ca/#printablelist
1. Found to be in contempt of Canadian parliament in March 2011
2. Cheated in the 2006 Election
3. Turned Canada's Surplus into Debt
4. Wants US-style bank deregulation
5. Opposes Medicare
6. Harper shut down Parliament. Twice.
7. Wants to replace the stable CPP with the untested PRPP.
8. Shut down Women's and Minority advocacy groups
9. The Economic Action plan has been to the benefit of the super rich
10. Fraud (Bruce Carson)
Click the link above to see all 25 reasons Harper is bad for Canada
+ links to sources (mostly media) for each of the 25 reasons.

NOTE: I found the above list on the Why Not Harper website [ http://www.whynotharper.ca/ ] , which was launched before the 2011 federal election. The site is based on the information collected by http://shitharperdid.com

Related link:

Project Democracy
http://projectdemocracy.ca/
Canadians don’t have an electoral system that directly reflects the ballot box. With our 'first-past-the-post' electoral system, vote splitting means Canadians end up with a majority Harper Government with as little as 35 percent of the popular vote. This is not the outcome most Canadians want, and avoiding it requires voter knowledge and cooperation.

---

More reasons Stephen Harper is bad for Canada:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2011_fed_election.htm#why_stop_harper
- this link will take you to a section of the 2011 Federal Election Links page.

---

Bonus link:

Saint Stephen? (Video, duration 1:54)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbJwd9Bj0BU&
Source:
Operation Maple

http://www.operationmaple.com/

---

- Go to the 2011 Federal Election and General Political Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2011_fed_election.htm

8. Affordability of Post-Secondary Education - February 9
(Nick Falvo, Carleton University
)

Affordability of Post-Secondary Education (Powerpoint [.PPT] presentation - 560K, 23 slides)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/Falvo_7feb2012.ppt
By Nick Falvo
February 9, 2012

* Rising Inequality Meets Rising tuition
* Less Funding, More Students
* Class Sizes Getting Bigger
* Student debt Rising
* More...

[Nick Falvo is a Ph.D. Candidate in Public Policy at Carleton University in Ottawa.]

---

- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

9. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Consumer Price Index, January 2012 - February 17
--- Employment Insurance, December 2011 -
February 17
--- Leading indicators, January 2012 - February 17
--- Canadian Economic Observer - February 2012 issue - February 16
--- Health Reports - February 2012 - February 16
-------- Assessment of validity of self-reported smoking status
-------- Health of First Nations children living off reserve and Métis children younger than age 6

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

February 17, 2012
Consumer Price Index, January 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120217/dq120217a-eng.htm
Consumer prices rose 2.5% in the 12 months to January, following a 2.3% increase in December. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices increased 0.5% in January.
- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Source:
The Consumer Price Index - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-001-X&lang=eng
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
* On the product main page, click View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ earlier editions of this report:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-001-X&chropg=1&lang=eng ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-557-X&lang=eng

Related subjects:

* Prices and price indexes
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3956&lang=eng&more=0

* Consumer price indexes
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=3956&id=2178&lang=eng&more=0

 

February 17, 2012
Employment Insurance, December 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120217/dq120217b-eng.htm
The number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits edged up 4,200 (+0.8%) to 544,700 in December. The number of beneficiaries remained relatively stable during the final quarter of the year, but was down 109,400 (-16.7%) compared with 12 months earlier.
- includes three tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related link:

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps, December 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/73-002-x/73-002-x2011012-eng.htm
- change in number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations.
- incl. Intro to maps + link to December 2011 maps [in the left margin]

Source:
Employment Insurance Statistics Maps - Product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=73-002-X&lang=eng
Set of maps presenting Employment Insurance Statistics. The maps show the percentage change in the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs), using 2001 Census geography. Data are also shown in a tabular format.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Tables by subject: Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/ind01/l3_2621_2627-eng.htm?hili_none

Related subjects:

* Labour
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=2621&lang=eng&more=0

* Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2621&id=2627&lang=eng&more=0

* Non-wage benefits
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2621&id=2628&lang=eng&more=0

[ earlier editions of this report:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=73-002-X&chropg=1&lang=eng

 

February 17, 2012
Leading indicators, January 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120217/dq120217c-eng.htm
The composite leading index increased 0.7% in January, following an identical gain in the previous month. This was the seventh consecutive increase in the index. The increase was concentrated in manufacturing, housing and services employment, and was offset by declines in durable goods sales and equity prices.

Source:
Canadian Economic Observer - Product main page*
This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations.
[ * Click "View" for the latest issue of this periodical; click "Chronological" index for earlier editions. ]

Related subjects:

* Business performance and ownership
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=2239&lang=eng&more=0

* Current conditions
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2239&id=712&lang=eng&more=0

* Economic accounts
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3764&lang=eng&more=0

* Leading indicators
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=3764&id=1880&lang=eng&more=0

 

February 16, 2011
Canadian Economic Observer - February 2012 issue
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-010-x/11-010-x2012002-eng.htm
Sections:
1. Current economic conditions
2. Economic events
3. Recent feature articles
4. National accounts
5. Labour markets
6. Prices
7. International trade
8. Goods-producing industries (manufacturing, construction and resources)
9. Services (trade, transportation, travel and communications)
10. Financial markets
11. Provincial (latest Unemployment rates and Consumer Price Index)
Tables
Charts
Appendices
User information
Related products

Source:
Canadian Economic Observer - Product main page*
This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations.
[ * Click "View" for the latest issue of this periodical; click "Chronological" index for earlier editions. ]

Related subjects:

* Business performance and ownership
* Current conditions
* Economic accounts
* Leading indicators

 

February 15, 2012
Health Reports - February 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/82-003-x2012001-eng.htm
A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

The February 2012 online edition of Health Reports contains the following articles:
(Click the link above to access these two articles.)

* Assessment of validity of self-reported smoking status
By Suzy L. Wong et al.
The health risks associated with cigarette smoking are well-documented and widely recognized— cancer, respiratory illness, heart disease, and stroke. In Canada, smoking contributes to more than 37,000 deaths a year. Tobacco-related health care expenditures amount to billions of dollars annually, with additional indirect costs such as lost productivity, longer-term disability and premature death.

* Health of First Nations children living off reserve and Métis children younger than age 6
By Leanne Findlay and Teresa Janz
Research has shown that Aboriginal children experience poorer health than do non- Aboriginal children. For example, a recent report revealed substantial Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal health differences, including higher rates of injury, accidental death, and sudden infant death syndrome. Aboriginal children are at higher risk of otitis media (chronic ear infection), respiratory tract infections, obesity, dental problems, and hospitalization due to asthma.

Source:
Health Reports - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=82-003-x&lang=eng
Health Reports, published by the Health Analysis Division (HAD) of Statistics Canada, is a peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research. It is designed for a broad audience that includes health professionals, researchers, policymakers, and through media coverage, the general public. The journal publishes articles of wide interest that contain original and timely analyses of national or provincial/territorial surveys or administrative databases.
---
* Click the product main page link, then "View"
to read the latest issue or "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Health
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=2966&lang=eng&more=0

* Diseases and health conditions
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2966&id=1887&lang=eng&more=0

* Lifestyle and social conditions
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2966&id=2968&lang=eng&more=0

 

The Daily Archives
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

February 19, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Efficiency and evidence-based practice in early childhood education and care: CRRU’s analysis of the ECEC recommendations in the Drummond report
http://goo.gl/nDX6n
17 Feb 2012 | Ontario
CRRU's response to the Drummond report (Commission on the Reform of Ontario's Public Services)"responds to the FDK recommendations and to the virtual omission of child care from the perspective of efficiency and evidence-based practice, two of the Commission's declared approaches."

Commission on the reform of Ontario's public services (The Drummond report)
http://goo.gl/GEsJz
15 Feb 2012 | Ontario
Long awaited "Drummond Report" recommends cancelling or downgrading staffing in full-day kindergarten. It makes little mention of child care. A response from CRRU will be posted shortly.

Waiting for Drummond: The play
http://goo.gl/kXAdp
15 Feb 2012 | Ontario
Video from TVO's The Agenda makes light of the fact that "Queen's Park seems to be re-enacting Samuel Beckett's famous absurdist play, "Waiting for Godot," as they wait for the release of Don Drummond's report on Ontario's financial situation.

The working poor in the Toronto Region: Who they are, where they live, and how trends are changing
http://goo.gl/CQEwD
14 Feb 2012 | Ontario
Report from the Metcalf Foundation identifies the growing number of working poor in the Toronto Region. Argues that in a region with the highest cost of living "earnings from a job – even a full-time job – may not be enough to escape poverty."

The price of motherhood: Women and part-time work
http://goo.gl/GJryj
14 Feb 2012 | Europe
Survey finds that many women "are forced into lower-skilled, part-time work after having children" and that "a lack of affordable childcare appears to be the most important barrier to mothers working full-time."

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Early life's long reach forward: Can a parenting co-op in Cape Breton save the economy?
http://goo.gl/uYxXI
15 Feb 2012 | Nova Scotia

Full-day kindergarten never at risk
http://goo.gl/U1GS5
15 Feb 2012 | Ontario

Any strategy for growth must include decent childcare for all
http://goo.gl/ZdLFJ
14 Feb 2012 | Europe

PhD student unfairly denied child care subsidy, students renew call for fair subsidy process
http://goo.gl/Odz4x
14 Feb 2012 | Ontario

From House to crèche, women are still juggling bébé and work
http://goo.gl/89Gkz
14 Feb 2012 | Canada

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

NOTE: For links to earlier (weekly) issues of this weekly alert going back to June 2009,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

February 17:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/17/
Long-Term Unemployment Benefits
State Medicaid Cuts - Illinois
Poverty Rate - Portugal
Poverty and HIV/AIDS - Malawi
Poverty and Nutrition

February 16:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/16/
Child and Senior Poverty
State Medicaid Programs - Arizona, Minnesota
Child Welfare Reform - Colorado

February 15:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/15/
Earned Income Tax Credit - Iowa
SNAP Asset Tests - Michigan, Pennsylvania
Need for Public Benefit Programs

February 14:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/14/
Poverty Rate - Nigeria
Earned Income Tax Credit - Connecticut, Michigan

February 13:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/13/
Poverty Rate - Maine
State Medicaid Programs - New Hampshire, Florida, Kentucky

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

12. The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2013 - February 13
(The White House)

The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2013
February 13, 2011

Each year, the President of the United States submits his budget request to Congress for the following fiscal year (beginning October 1), as required by the Budget and Accounting Act of 1921. Current law (31 U.S.C. § 1105(a)) requires the President to submit a budget no earlier than the first Monday in January, and no later than the first Monday in February.
Source:
Excerpt from United States federal budget:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_federal_budget
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2013
http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/
February 13, 2011
After decades of eroding middle-class security as those at the very top saw their incomes rise as never before and after a historic recession that plunged our economy into a crisis from which we are still fighting to recover, it is time to construct an economy that is built to last.
- includes links to:
* President's Message * Mid-Session review * The Budget * Overview * Cuts, Consolidations and Savings * Analytical Perspectives * Historical Tables * Supplemental Materials * Appendix * Supplementals, Amendments, and Releases * OMB Contributors to the Budget * Fact Sheets * Past Budgets

The Budget:
HTML version
(Table of contents + links to each section of the Budget and summary tables, all in separate PDF files)
http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/Overview
PDF version (4.6MB, 256 pages, all in one PDF file)
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/budget/fy2013/assets/budget.pdf

Source:
Office of Management and Budget
http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/

[ The White House
http://www.whitehouse.gov/ ]

Also from
the White House:

President Obama's 2013 Budget is a Blueprint for an America Built to Last
http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2012/02/13/president-obamas-2013-budget-blueprint-america-built-last
By Matt Compton
February 13, 2012
Source:
White House Blog

http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog

---

Related links:

From CLASP
(Center for Law and Social Policy):

CLASP Statement on the proposed budget for Fiscal Year 2013
February 15, 2012
On Monday, President Obama released his proposed budget for Fiscal Year 2013. After looking through the proposal, CLASP believes that given the difficult political and economic environment, the president's budget sets the right tone and lays out a vision for restoring prosperity and creating broader opportunity.
While the proposal includes a plan for long-term deficit reduction, it makes short-term investments in child care and early education programs, workforce development, and postsecondary education and training. In addition, the president calls for a fairer tax code by raising taxes for the wealthiest, eliminating corporate tax loopholes, and permanently expanding tax credits for working poor and middle class families.
Source:
Email alert from CLASP

CLASP Full Statement on the Proposed Budget
http://www.clasp.org/issues/pages?type=poverty_and_opportunity&id=0067

NOTE : Scroll to the bottom of the full statement for links to the following CLASP responses to the president's FY 2013 budget by issue:
* President's Budget Includes Subsidized Employment and Job Training Opportunities
* President Proposes to Restore Legal Aid Funding, But More Is Needed
* President's Budget Includes Promising News for Early Childhood
* President's Proposal Demonstrates Commitment to Disconnected Youth, but Doesn't Go Far Enough
* Education and Training Are Top Priorities in President Obama's 2013 Budget
*
President Proposes New Investments in America's Workforce

The budget process now moves to Congress. CLASP will continue working with our partners to advocate for an inclusive budget that’s fair and invests in sound policies that provide opportunity for families to access the education, training and other resources they need to thrive.

Source:
CLASP (Center for Law and Social Policy)
http://www.clasp.org/
Since 1969, CLASP has been a trusted resource, a creative architect for systems change, and one of the country's most effective voices for low income people.

---

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP):

Statement by Robert Greenstein, President, on President Obama’s 2013 Budget
February 16, 2012
By Robert Greenstein
The President’s budget would, if enacted, make significant progress in reducing deficits, although policymakers would have to take further steps, especially for future decades. Under its economic assumptions, it would achieve what most budget analysts, and all recent bipartisan commissions or panels, have identified as the crucial fiscal goal for the decade ahead — stabilizing the debt so that it no longer rises faster than the economy. To meet that goal, deficits must shrink to a bit less than 3% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and the President’s budget would stabilize deficits at 2.8% of GDP from 2019 through 2022. The budget also would stop the debt from rising as a share of the economy in 2014 and reduce it slightly as a share of GDP over the following eight years.

View the full statement:

HTML version:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3680

PDF version (small PDF file, 3 pages)
http://www.cbpp.org/files/2-13-12bud.pdf

http://www.cbpp.org/files/2-13-12bud.pdf 3pp.

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)

http://www.cbpp.org/

---

From the
Washington Post:

Obama budget: National debt will be $1 trillion higher in a decade than forecast
http://goo.gl/mq0T0
By Lori Montgomery
February 13
President Obama rolled out an election-year budget on Monday that would delay action to reduce the national debt in favor of fresh spending on Democratic priorities aimed at rebuilding the American middle class. In his final budget request before facing voters in November, Obama called for $350 billion in new stimulus to maintain lower payroll taxes, bolster domestic manufacturing, lure jobs back from overseas, hire teachers, retrain workers and fix the nation’s crumbling infrastructure. There would be only modest trims to federal health-care programs and no changes to Social Security, the biggest drivers of future borrowing, despite last year’s raucous political debate over the federal debt.

Source:
Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/

---

From the
New York Times:

A Responsible Budget
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/14/opinion/a-responsible-2013-budget.html
February 13, 2012
President Obama’s 2013 budget was greeted on Monday with Republican catcalls that it is simply a campaign document, but election-year budgets are supposed to explain priorities to voters. This one offers a clear and welcome contrast to the slashing austerity — and protect-the-wealthy priorities — favored by Republican Congressional leaders and the party’s presidential candidates

Four Ways to Slice Obama’s 2013 Budget Proposal
Explore every nook and cranny of President Obama's federal budget proposal.
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/02/13/us/politics/2013-budget-proposal-graphic.html

Source:
New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

13. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)
Latest issue:

15 February 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1263
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4102
In this issue:
Exclusive CRIN interview with the Council of Europe's new Commissioner for Human Rights!
Latest news and reports
- CRC complaints mechanism opens for signature
- International pressure does the job
- Downgrading children's rights
- No end in sight to state violence
- Calls for submissions
- Funding opportunity
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Madagascar
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010:

Option 2:
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

--------------------------------------------------

NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

45 Lessons Life Taught Me

By Regiana Bret, 90 years old

1. Life isn't fair, but it's still good.
2. When in doubt, just take the next small step.
3. Life is too short to waste time hating anyone. Change the way you think.
4. Your job won't take care of you when you are sick. Your friends and family will. Stay in touch.
5. Pay off your credit cards every month.
6. You don't have to win every argument. Agree to disagree.
7. Cry with someone. It's more healing than crying alone.
8. Release your children when they become adults, it's their life now.
9. Save for retirement starting with your first paycheque.
10. When it comes to chocolate, resistance is futile.
11. Make peace with your past so it won't screw up the present.
12. It's OK to let your children see you cry.
13. Don't compare your life to others. You have no idea what their journey is all about.
14. If a relationship has to be a secret, you shouldn't be in it.
15. Everything can change in the blink of an eye.
16. Take a deep breath. It calms the mind.
17. Get rid of anything that isn't useful, beautiful or joyful.
18. Whatever doesn't kill you really does make you stronger.
19. It's never too late to have a happy childhood. But the second one is up to you and no one else.
20. When it comes to going after what you love in life, don't take no for an answer.
21. Burn the candles, use the nice sheets, wear the fancy lingerie. Don't save it for a special occasion. Today is special.
22. Just because you believe you are right, doesn't mean you are. Keep an open mind.
23. Be eccentric now. Don't wait for old age to wear purple.
24. The most important sex organ is the brain.
25. No one is in charge of your happiness but you.
26. Frame every so-called disaster with these words 'In five years, will this matter?'
27. Always choose life.
28. Forgive everyone everything.
29. What other people think of you is none of your business. 30. Time heals almost everything. Give time time.
31. However good or bad a situation is, it will change.
32. Don't take yourself so seriously. No one else does.
33. Believe in miracles.
34. Your job is to love your children, not choose who they should love.
35. Don't audit life. Show up and make the most of it now.
36. Growing old beats the alternative -- dying young.
37. Your children get only one childhood.
38. All that truly matters in the end is that you loved.
39. Get outside every day. Miracles are waiting everywhere.
40. If we all threw our problems in a pile and saw everyone else's, we'd grab ours back.
41. Envy is a waste of time. You already have all you need.
42. The best is yet to come...
43. No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.
44. Yield.
45. Life isn't tied with a bow, but it's still a gift.

Source:
http://www.snopes.com/glurge/lifelessons.asp

---------------------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

Man plays every instrument and sings every part of Bohemian Rhapsody. (video, duration 6:28)
http://www.wimp.com/manplays/

---

How to use an Apostrophe
http://theoatmeal.com/comics/apostrophe

---

Number of deaths annually by cause
http://www.wimp.com/mobilityscooter/

---

Fees you should PAY:
http://www.moneyville.ca/article/1128056--11-fees-worth-paying

Fees you should AVOID:
http://www.moneyville.ca/article/1124628

---

An interesting view of the Eiffel tower
http://imgur.com/LztoN

An interesting view of the London Olympics swimming pool
http://imgur.com/r/pics/Br6Dp

---