Canadian Social Research Newsletter
June 19, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,435 subscribers.

************************************************************************

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...



IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Making Toronto Safer A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Transitional Housing Supports for Men Leaving Incarceration (John Stapleton, Brendon Pooran and René Doucet)
2. [Ontario] Laidlaw Foundation 2010 Annual Report - June 2011
3. [Ontario] Income Delivery Architecture: Where Does Your Cheque Come From? And Why Does It Matter? (Income Security Advocacy Centre ) - June 2
4. Income of Canadians, 2009 (Statistics Canada) - June 15
5. Action to End Poverty in Alberta
6. Ontario poverty rate up since last election (Social Planning Network of Ontario) - June 17
7. [Toronto] How the mayor can keep a roof over TCHC’s head (Nick Falvo in the Toronto Star) - June 19
8. Minister Flaherty Introduces the Supporting Vulnerable Seniors and Strengthening Canada's Economy Act (Finance Canada) - June 14
9. Tough on poverty, tough on crime? (Citizens for Public Justice) - May 2
10. Ontarians need a housing benefit [Toronto Hunger Snapshot] (Daily Bread Food Bank) - June 15
11. Tax Freedom Day is nothing to celebrate (Vancouver Sun) - June 10
12. Social Assistance reform policy proposals (New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice) - May 25, 2011
13. Brigit's Notes, June 2011 (Canadian Women's Health Network)
14. Poverty Act Introduced in the BC Legislature (Citizens for Public Justice) - June 3
15. Government of Canada 2011-12 main estimates tabled - June 3
16. The Economic Well-Being of Canadians: Is there a Growing Gap? (Chris Sarlo, Fraser Institute)  -
May 2009
17. Christopher Sarlo advocated for a guaranteed annual income in 2001? (Fraser Institute)
18. Fraser Institute school report cards --- War on public schools rages (Donald Gutstein in rabble.ca) - May 17
19. June 1 : Sun News "cultural philistine" attacks Margie Gillis and arts funding
20. The Tobin Tax : The case for a tax on international monetary transactions (James Tobin in the CCPA Monitor - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - April 1
21. In the wake of our G-20 violence: Canada can learn from the police reforms in Northern Ireland
(April 2011 issue of the CCPA Monitor - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)
22.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Income of Canadians, 2009 - June 15

--- 2008 Census Test: Content Analysis Report (the long-form Census questionnaire and the National Housing Survey) - June 14
--- Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds), Fourth quarter 2010 - June 14

23. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit
24. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
25. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

International content

26. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
27. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)


Have a great week!
Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]


1. Making Toronto Safer A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Transitional Housing Supports for Men Leaving Incarceration - April 2011
(John Howard Society and the Toronto Community Foundation)

Housing for ex-cons: Spend a little, save a lot
By Jim Rankin
June 15, 2011
(...) The John Howard Society of Toronto is hoping a transitional housing program already successful in Ottawa will stop the cycle (cycling in and out of jail) earlier for other released inmates and, in turn, save taxpayers’ money — and make Toronto safer. In an effort to persuade governments to invest, the society commissioned a cost-benefit analysis of the program, which provides just-released inmates a room in a controlled facility where they can live up to a year before permanent housing is found. The study, funded by the Toronto Community Foundation, looked at existing research and applied it to what could be saved if two ex-prisoner groups in Toronto — the homeless and serious offenders subject to certain conditions — had access to the program.
Source:
Toronto Star

---

From
The John Howard Society of Toronto
:

Cost-benefit analysis shows that providing transitional housing for ex-prisoners could
save millions of dollars in tax-payer’s money while increasing community safety
(PDF - 67K, 1 page)
News Release
TORONTO- A study funded by The Toronto Community Foundation and Commissioned by The John Howard Society of Toronto entitled, “Making Toronto Safer: A Cost Benefit Analysis” examined two specific groups of ex-prisoners; the homeless and those at high risk of re-offending sexually or violently against a minor.

Complete study:

Making Toronto Safer
A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Transitional Housing Supports
for Men Leaving Incarceration
April 2011
By Open Policy and Chronicle Analytics
(John Stapleton, Brendon Pooran, René Doucet)
Commissioned by:
The John Howard Society Toronto
& Toronto Community Foundation
(...) The cost benefit analysis clearly demonstrates that with transitional housing and supports in place, better outcomes can be achieved at lower costs. Such benefits are enjoyed by the public first and foremost. The likelihood of re-offending decreases thereby creating safer communities. At the same time, the tax dollars spent on prisoners throughout the criminal justice process and beyond is far less than the alternative of continued reincarceration.
The per-person estimated savings provided by Transitional Housing and support is estimated to be:
° $350,000 for a homeless person; and
° $109,000 for a Section 810 prisoner (sexual offender).

Related links:

Toronto Community Foundation
The Toronto Community Foundation connects philanthropy with community needs and opportunities in order to make Toronto the best place to live, work, learn, and grow. We are one of the largest of Canada's 165 community foundations. Established in 1981, we have grown to hold over $225 million in assets and to work with hundreds of concerned Torontonians and high-impact community organizations.

John Howard Society of Ontario

John Howard Society of Canada

Open Policy (John Stapleton's website)

Chronicle Analytics (Brendan Pooran and René Doucet's website)

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. [Ontario] Laidlaw Foundation 2010 Annual Report - June 2011

Laidlaw Foundation 2010 Annual Report (PDF - 543K, 21 pages)
June 2011
Excerpt, page 3:
"In 2010, The Foundation published Not So Easy to Navigate (PDF - 511K, 40 pages), the result of a commissioned policy research and advocacy project. John Stapleton and Anne Tweddle produced three related papers that identify ways to link and leverage various federal and provincial income security entitlements to maximize RESP benefits for children and youth in care. The Government of BC is exploring the introduction of new legislation and the Child Welfare League of Canada has received federal funding support to work with the provinces to explore implementation. Copies of the guidebook have been circulated through the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies and the Toronto Children’s Aid Society."

Source:
Laidlaw Foundation
The Laidlaw Foundation promotes positive youth development through inclusive youth engagement in the arts, environment and in the community.
[ More about the Laidlaw Foundation ]

[Proactive disclosure : I've known and collaborated with John Stapleton since the mid-1970s, and I've been married to Anne Tweddle for over 20 years. They make an excellent research team, and I'm pleased to highlight not only their work but the accolades they receive and so richly deserve.]

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

3. [Ontario] Income Delivery Architecture: Where Does Your Cheque Come From? And Why Does It Matter? - June 2
(
Income Security Advocacy Centre )

Income Delivery Architecture: Where Does Your Cheque Come From?
And Why Does It Matter
?

June 2, 2011
Several proposals have been made in the last few years about how to change the way income supports are delivered to people in Ontario.
Why are people proposing a different “delivery architecture”?
What problems would a different system help to resolve?
What are some of the options for different kinds of systems? What do they look like, and how would they work?

ISAC and the Ontario community legal clinic system’s Social Assistance Action Committee (SAAC) held a roundtable discussion on May 30, 2011, to try explore these questions – in order to help prepare advocates and caseworkers for the Social Assistance Review consultations.

Three important speakers made presentations at the roundtable. Please click on the links below to view their PowerPoint presentations.

Michael Mendelson is Senior Scholar at the Caledon Institute of Social Policy, and has held senior public service positions in both Ontario and Manitoba.

John Stapleton operates his own public policy consultancy, Open Policy Ontario, after a 28-year career in social assistance policy in the Ontario government.

Lisa Philipps is a Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School at York University, where she teaches and does research in the fields of taxation law and fiscal policy.

This was the second in a series of information events held by ISAC and SAAC to help community legal clinic caseworkers – and others – prepare for Ontario’s Social Assistance Review. Videos of presentations made at the first event, called “Transforming Ontario Works”, are available here.

Source:
Social Assistance Review
[ Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC)
]
The Income Security Advocacy Centre works with and on behalf of low income communities in Ontario to address issues of income security and poverty.

See also:

Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario
Govt. of Ontario website
[Commissioners : Frances Lankin and Munir A. Sheikh]

Version française du site du gouvernemental:
Commission d'examen du système d'aide sociale de l'Ontario

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

4. Income of Canadians, 2009 - June 15
(Statistics Canada)

June 15, 2011
Income of Canadians, 2009
Median after-tax income for Canadian families of two or more people amounted to $63,800 in 2009, virtually unchanged from 2008. This was the second consecutive year without significant change in after-tax income following four years of growth. (...) After-tax income for unattached individuals remained stable at $25,500, though this was not the case for all unattached individuals. For senior unattached individuals, the median rose 4.5% to $23,300.
NOTE : With this release, users now have free access to the 202 CANSIM Series tables. Tables are accessible using a PC or Mac via the web browser.

- includes three tables:
----- Selected income concepts by main family types
----- Selected income concepts for economic families of two persons or more by province, 2009
----- Percentage of persons in low income (1992 base after-tax income low income cut-offs)

Source:
Income in Canada - product main page *
Income in Canada is an annual analytical report which summarizes the economic well-being of Canadians. It includes an extensive collection of income statistics, covering topics such as income distribution, income tax, government transfers, and low income back to 1976.
---
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related subjects at StatCan:

* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household, family and personal income
* Low income and inequality

Related external links:

Poverty report shows single men faring less well than single moms
June 15, 2011
By Bruce Cheadle and Heather Scoffield
(...) A new national study by Statistics Canada shows poverty is still much higher among single mothers than among the general public. But with one in five single moms living in poverty, they have seen a steady improvement for the last 15 years — even during the recession. The same study, released Wednesday, found that almost a third of single men are living in poverty.About 21.5 per cent of single mothers were living below the low-income cutoff in 2009, according to StatsCan. That's less than in the 23.4 per cent in 2008 and steep drop from the mid-1990s, when more than half of single mothers were considered to be living in poverty. The dramatic improvement is partly because single mothers are far more active in the workforce now than 15 years ago, says Armine Yalnizyan, senior economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. (...)
Plus, key social programs developed in the late 1990s have greatly benefited mothers, said Toronto-based social scientist John Stapleton. The benefits are usually attached to children — such as the Child Tax Benefit. Stapleton believes child support has also improved as courts have become more vigilant, and are able to enforce guidelines and use DNA evidence to force fathers to pay more.
Source:
Macleans.ca

---

Poverty in Canada has increased: STATSCAN reports
Jun 16, 2011
As expected, the effects of the recession were felt across the country and caused an increase in the number of Canadians struggling with low-income. Yesterday, STATSCAN released its report on incomes for 2009, which indicated that almost 10% of the population (3.2 million) is struggling with poverty, and average incomes have stagnated. This confirms what many social justice and anti-poverty advocates have long stated in the past year looking at recent foodbank and social assistance reports – poverty in Canada is getting worse.
Source:
Canada Without Poverty (CWP)
Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization dedicated to the elimination of poverty in Canada. [ More info ]
NOTE : Canada Without Poverty was founded in 1971 as the National Anti-Poverty Organization and changed its name to CWP in April 2009

Partners:

Dignity for All: the campaign for a poverty-free Canada
Dignity for All is a multi-year, multi-partner, non-partisan campaign. This campaign’s vision is to make a poverty-free and more socially secure and cohesive Canada a reality by 2020. The conviction behind this campaign is that Canadians must respect and defend the right of every person to dignity and security. [ More info ]

Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ)
Mission : to promote public justice in Canada by shaping key public policy debates through research and analysis, publishing and public dialogue. CPJ encourages citizens, leaders in society and governments to support policies and practices which reflect God’s call for love, justice and stewardship. [ More info ]

Make Poverty History
The Make Poverty History campaign is a coalition of organizations that have come together for the common cause of making poverty history both at home and abroad. [ More info ]

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

5. Action to End Poverty in Alberta

Action to End Poverty in Alberta

The Inter-City Forum on Social Policy (ICFSP) has been researching the impacts of poverty in Alberta for several years. In 2010, member municipalities of ICFSP agreed to play a leadership role in engaging interested stakeholders to promote the need for a comprehensive poverty-reduction plan for Alberta. In November 2010, "A Dialogue on Poverty" was hosted by the ICFSP and the Family and Community Support Services Association of Alberta (FCSSAA). Over 100 concerned Albertans from across the province participated. Response from the forum unanimously supported the development of a poverty reduction plan.

Poverty reports, publications
and links to poverty organizations

What you can do
Poverty in Alberta can be reduced and ultimately eliminated. However, it will take the collective efforts of all of us to do so: in government, in business, in the non-profit sector and those most affected, the people living in poverty.
The following tabs provide information and tools to persons in government, both elected and members of administration. Additionally there is information for organizations and anyone else interested in helping reduce and ultimately eliminate poverty in Canada.

What you can do:
* For elected officials
* For government administrators
* For organizations
* For citizens
* eNewsletter signup
* Donate

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Alberta Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

6. Ontario poverty rate up since last election - June 17
(
Social Planning Network of Ontario)

Ontario poverty rate up since last election
By Laurie Monsebraaten
June 17, 2011
Almost 300,000 more Ontarians sunk into poverty since the McGuinty government was elected in 2007 on a pledge to fight the problem, according to the latest Statistics Canada income data from 2009 released this week. Despite the 2008 recession that battered Ontario industries, the province’s 13.1 per cent poverty rate was still slightly below the national average of 13.3 per cent, says Ontario’s Social Planning Network. The network of social planning councils crunched the numbers using the Low Income Measure, after taxes, the province’s new method of measuring poverty. But Ontario’s 17 per cent growth in poverty since 2007 was the highest in the country, the group says.

[ Comments (23) ]

Source:
Toronto Star

---

From the
Social Planning Network of Ontario:

2009 Figures Show Growth Rate of Poverty
in Ontario the Highest of All Regions in Canada since 2007 Election

Media Release
June 17, 2011
[ PDF version - 370K, 2 pages ]
Statistics Canada figures released this week [ Income of Canadians, 2009] show that Ontario’s poverty rate increased to 13.1% in 2009, a growth rate of 17% since the 2007 provincial election year. “Using the province’s official low income poverty measure, Ontario’s poverty rate of 13.1% is slightly below the Canadian average of 13.3%,” comments Peter Clutterbuck, Coordinator of SPNO’s Poverty Free Ontario campaign, “The rate of Ontario’s poverty growth, however, has increased the highest of all other regions of Canada since 2007.” A total of 1,689,000 Ontarians in 2009 lived in poverty, which is 277,000 more than in 2007.
- includes one table : "Poverty Levels in Ontario and Rates of Growth/Decrease Compared to Other Regions in Canada and for Life Stage and Adults Living Alone,
2007-2009"

Poverty Free Ontario (PFO)
The mission of Poverty Free Ontario is to eliminate divided communities in which large numbers of adults and children live in chronic states of material hardship, poor health and social exclusion. An Ontario free of poverty will be reflected in healthy, inclusive communities with a place of dignity for everyone and the essential conditions of well-being for all.

Source:
Social Planning Network of Ontario (SPNO)
[Poverty Free Ontario is an initiative of the SPNO]
SPNO is a coalition of social planning councils, community development councils, resource centres, and planning committees located in various communities throughout Ontario. SPNO plans to launch an initiative to build cross-community support for a Poverty Free Ontario by the end of this decade.

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

7. [Toronto] How the mayor can keep a roof over TCHC’s head - June 19
(Nick Falvo in the Toronto Star)

Toronto

How the mayor can keep a roof over TCHC’s head
June 19, 2011
By Nick Falvo
Mayor Rob Ford recently backtracked on a crucial issue. First, he threatened to use revenue from the sale of public housing units to balance the city’s budget. Twenty-four hours later, he flip-flopped and agreed that the revenue should be used to fix Toronto’s existing social housing stock (as originally promised). Ford’s about-face speaks to the real-life nightmare that would ensue if important repairs were not made to existing public housing units. It also speaks to the power of advocates who are both glaringly aware of what those nightmares would look like, and are prepared to fight tooth and nail for social housing. (...) Rent in most parts of Canada — especially in large cities — is out of reach for a substantial portion of households. Today in Toronto, average rent for a two-bedroom apartment is more than $1,100 a month. Yet the maximum shelter allowance that a single adult with one child receives on social assistance is just $578 a month.
Source:
Toronto Star

Related link:

City Moves to Sell-Off Toronto Community Housing:
Ford will destroy public housing unless we stop him!
June 14, 2011
Source:
Ontario Coalition Against Poverty
OCAP is a direct-action anti-poverty organization based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We mount campaigns against regressive government policies as they affect poor and working people.

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

8. Minister Flaherty Introduces the Supporting Vulnerable Seniors and Strengthening Canada's Economy Act - June 14
(Finance Canada)

Minister Flaherty Introduces the Supporting Vulnerable Seniors and Strengthening Canada's Economy Act
June 14, 2011
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today introduced in Parliament Bill C-3, the Supporting Vulnerable Seniors and Strengthening Canada’s Economy Act, which implements key measures from Budget 2011—the Next Phase of Canada’s Economic Action Plan: A Low-Tax Plan for Jobs and Growth
- includes a list of the specific measures introduced.
Source:
Department of Finance Canada

---

- Go to the 2011 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2011.htm

9. Tough on poverty, tough on crime? - May 2
(Citizens for Public Justice)

Tough on poverty, tough on crime?
By Chandra Pasma
May 27, 2011
Earlier this year, Senator Hugh Segal published a great op-ed in the Toronto Star calling for those concerned about crime to get tough on poverty. “Less than 10 per cent of Canadians live beneath the poverty line but almost 100 per cent of our prison inmates come from that 10 per cent. There is no political ideology, on the right or left, that would make the case that people living in poverty belong in jail,” the Senator argued. “To be tough on crime means we must first be tough on the causes of poverty,” he concludes.
Segal argues for a Guaranteed Annual Income, also known as a Guaranteed Livable Income, noting that it would take only $12,000-$20,000 annually to bring a person above the poverty line but we spend $147,000 a year per federal prisoner.
Source:
Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ)
Mission : to promote public justice in Canada by shaping key public policy debates through research and analysis, publishing and public dialogue. CPJ encourages citizens, leaders in society and governments to support policies and practices which reflect God’s call for love, justice and stewardship. [ More info ]

---

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

10. Ontarians need a housing benefit [Toronto Hunger Snapshot]- June 15
(Daily Bread Food Bank)

New from the
Daily Bread Food Bank in Toronto:

Ontarians need a housing benefit (PDF - 156K, 1 page)
June 15, 2011
Media release
TORONTO – Despite an improving economy, people visiting food banks in the Greater Toronto Area are still struggling. The Hunger Snapshot report, released today, shows that food bank clients spend 72 per cent of their income on housing costs. When families are struggling to make ends meet and have to make a choice between paying the rent and putting food on the table, it is usually food that is sacrificed.

Hunger Snapshot:
Fighting Hunger
(PDF - 1.3MB, 6 pages)
2011 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area
June 15, 2011
This snapshot here is just that – some statistical highlights from the 2011 survey to provide you with a brief picture of poverty and hunger in the GTA. This year, we will be releasing the full report on the results of the survey on September 21, 2011 at the launch of Daily Bread’s Fall Drive.
[ Publications - links to earlier Toronto hunger reports back to 2005 ]

Housing Benefit --- find out more about the proposed Ontario Housing Benefit and how you can help make it a reality.

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank
(Toronto)

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

11. Tax Freedom Day is nothing to celebrate - June 10
(Vancouver Sun)

Tax Freedom Day is nothing to celebrate
Don't like paying for government? Just try living without it
By Craig McInnes
June 10, 2011
(...)What offends me ... and what I believe is dangerous to our way of life, is the underlying message of Tax Freedom Day, which is that the taxes we pay to support governments and the services they provide somehow work against us rather than enabling the quality of life we enjoy.
(...)
The insidious aspect of looking at taxes in the absence of the benefits they pay for is that we lose sight of why we pay taxes. After that, pressure intensifies for politicians to cut taxes to the point where the consequences are ignored. That has already happened in the U.S., where opposition to taxes is bankrupting states and undermining the value of the once mighty American dollar. There are plenty of countries in the world with lower taxes than Canada's. There are few with a higher quality of life.
Source:
Vancouver Sun

Related link:

Tax Freedom Day underscores need for tax relief
By Charles Lammam and Niels Veldhuis
June 6, 2011
Happy Tax Freedom Day! When Canadians return to work on Monday (June 6), they will finally be working for themselves. In other words, if we had to pay all our taxes up front, we would have to pay each and every dollar we earned from January 1 to June 5 to various levels of government.
Source:
Fraser Institute
Motto: "A free and prosperous world through choice, markets and responsibility"

Tax Freedom Day - from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

---

- Go to the The Tax Freedom Day Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/tax_freedom_day.htm

12. Social Assistance reform policy proposals - May 25, 2011
(New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice)

PROPOSED MODIFICATIONS REGARDING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE POLICIES
BRIEF TO THE MINISTER OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND
THE COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL ASSISTANCE REFORM
BY
THE N.B. FRONT COMMUN FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE, INC.
(Word file - 750K, 14 pages)
Moncton, N.B.
May 25, 2011
For a long time, the New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice has been aware that social assistance policies did not work to the advantage of recipients. There are many policies that, in our view, are inadequate and need changes or revisions. This is why we decided to write a Brief concerning some key policies which must be modified. Our document target nine of these policies that we believe the committee looking a social assistance revision should seriously consider. We have analysed each one, explained their weaknesses and made recommendations for changes so that these policies can help recipients, not hinder them.
Source:
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice
The Common Front for Social Justice is one of the largest democratic and popular organizations in New Brunswick, with close to 75,000 group and individual members. The Common Front brings together individuals as well as local, regional and provincial organizations to work towards the eradication of poverty.

-----------------------------

Version française:

MODIFICATIONS PROPOSÉES AUX POLITIQUES DE L'AIDE AU REVENU
MÉMOIRE ADRESSÉ À LA MINISTRE DU DÉVELOPPEMENT SOCIAL ET
AU COMITÉ SUR LA RÉFORME DE L'AIDE SOCIALE
PAR LE FRONT COMMUN POUR LA JUSTICE SOCIALE INC.
(PDF - 2.7Mo, 15 pages)
Moncton, NB
Le 25 mai 2011
Pendant plusieurs années, le Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brusnwick était conscient que les politiques d’assistance sociale présentes n’étaient pas en faveur des bénéficiaires. Il y avait plusieurs politiques qui n’étaient pas adéquates et avaient besoin de changements ou de modifications; c’est pourquoi nous avons décidé de proposer des changements à certaines d’entre elles. Notre document cible neuf politiques que nous croyons que le comité de révision des politiques sur l’aide sociale à besoin de se pencher dessus. Nous avons analysé chacune d’entre elles, expliqué leurs faiblesses et fait des recommandations de changements afin de s’assurer que les politiques ne mettent pas les bénéficiaires dans une situation plus précaire qu’ils ne le sont présentement.

Source:
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick

Le Front commun pour la justice sociale est un des plus importants organismes démocratiques et populaires au NB. Il compte environ 75 000 membres individuels et collectifs. Il regroupe des individus et des organisations locales, régionales et provinciales travaillant ensemble à l'élimination de la pauvreté.

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

13. Brigit's Notes, June 2011
(Canadian Women's Health Network)

Brigit's Notes, June 2011
[ Version française ]
In this issue:
* See the new online tool on Coalescing on Women and Substance Use website
* New! Every Woman Matters: A Report on Accessing Primary Health Care for Black Women and Women of Colour in Ontario
* Is your sunscreen protecting you? Find out with the new sunscreen database
* How safe is that medication during pregnancy?
* Is Prozac a feminist drug?
* Intersections – the Spring newsletter from the Institute of Gender and Health
* Apply to host a Gender, Sex and Health Café Scientifique
* Two new YWCA Canada reports released on the state of women
*National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health - Environmental Scan 2010
* New Canadian Virtual Health Library online

[ Earlier issues of Brigit's Notes - monthly, back to February 2010 ]

Source:
Brigit's Notes: Women's Health E-bulletin
[ version française :
Le Bloc-notes de Brigit : Babillard électronique foisonnant de nouvelles en santé des femmes
]
Brigit's Notes is an electronic bulletin full of great women's health news. This monthly bulletin will keep you informed about what's new on the the CWHN web site, including new policy initiatives, research, calls for submissions, events and conferences, new resources and updates on women's health issues and activism.
[ Canadian Women's Health Network:
Sharing information, resources and strategies, and building links to improve women's health.]
[ Le Réseau canadien pour la santé des femmes ]

---

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

14. Poverty Act Introduced in the BC Legislature - June 3
(Citizens for Public Justice)

Poverty Act Introduced in the BC Legislature
June 3, 2011
Yesterday, the official opposition in BC presented a private members anti-poverty Bill for the province. NDP MLA Shane Simpson introduced the “BC Poverty Reduction Act”, which proposes the establishment of poverty targets and measures, and most importantly, government accountability. Within one year, the Act will push the province to reduce the depth and breadth of poverty. It will also appoint a Minister to oversee the plan and produce annual reports on progress. This Bill comes after years of campaigning by social justice groups – including the BC Poverty Reduction Coalition that is solely dedicated to the establishment of a provincial poverty plan.
Source:
Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ)

---

- Go to the BC Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

15. Government of Canada 2011-12 main estimates tabled - June 3

From
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat:

Treasury Board President Clement Lays
Groundwork for Responsible Government Spending

June 3, 2011
Ottawa – The Honourable Tony Clement tabled his first document as President of the Treasury Board today, laying the foundation for responsible government spending with the 2011–12 Main Estimates. (...) The 2011–12 Main Estimates total $250.8 billion in expenditures for transfer payments and operating and capital costs, as well as public debt charges. The Main Estimates provide a listing of the resources required by individual departments and agencies for the upcoming fiscal year.

Backgrounder - the big picture.

2011–12 Part III - Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP)
Recommended reading!
Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are one of the more useful federal government tools for analysts interested in the nuts and bolts of departmental programs and spending. [ Read more about RPPs ]
The 2011-2012 reports are organized by Department.
Click the 2011-12 link above, then select a department or agency and enlighten yourself...

Sample content:
Human Resources and Skills Development (HRSDC)
- includes links to:
* 2011–12 Reports on Plans and Priorities <===detailed information at the Department level
* Supplementary Information (Tables)
* Details on Transfer Payments Programs <=== spending forecasts and estimates from 2011-2012 to 2013-2014
* Greening Government Operations (GGO)
* Horizontal Initiatives
* Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the next three fiscal years
* Sources of Respendable and Non-respendable Revenue
* Strategic Outcomes [Duh. Dead link as at June 18.]

---

- Go to the 2011 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2011.htm

16. The Economic Well-Being of Canadians: Is there a Growing Gap? May 2009
(Chris Sarlo, Fraser Institute)

The Economic Well-Being of Canadians:
Is there a Growing Gap?
(PDF - 842K, 58 pages)
By Chris Sarlo
May 2009
(...) Public attitudes about inequality, arguably influenced by media attention, are such that a significant majority of Canadians believe that the gap between the rich and the poor is growing. (...)
This paper has two purposes. First and principally it is a critical examination of the evidence for a "growing gap" in Canada. The paper will attempt to look at inequality in a somewhat broader context than is customary. Evidence drawn largely from household-spending data files as well as from household facility-ownership data and household net-worth data can shed additional light on the trend in inequality for Canada. Second, the paper will examine the issue of data reliability in the context of the measurement of inequality.
Source:
The Fraser Institute
Motto: A free and prosperous world through choice, markets and responsibility

---

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

17. Christopher Sarlo advocated for a guaranteed annual income in 2001?
(Fraser Institute)

Christopher Sarlo...and guaranteed annual income?

I was cleaning up some links on the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page of my site when I got sidetracked re-reading parts of a ten-year-old report on poverty measurement by Christopher Sarlo entitled Measuring Poverty in Canada. Professor Sarlo, the father of the so-called "calorie-from-starvation diet", is the Fraser Institute's poverty poster boy, and his work on poverty in Canada is considered by many to be the Bible of absolute poverty measurement in this country --- the "Sarlo Poverty Line".

I decided to highlight the 2001 Sarlo report (the link below) because you (speaking to my leftie buddies here...) might be as surprised as I was to learn in that report that the absolute poverty poster boy advocated a guaranteed annual income as a "more efficient alternative" to what he saw as ineffective programs and policies. Hmmm - when someone from the Fraser Institute endorses a guaranteed income scheme, the Devil must be in the details.
Follow the links below if this is something of interest to you.

Measuring Poverty in Canada
July 2001
By Christopher Sarlo
Excerpt:
"In Canada, there is a vast array of inefficient and employment-reducing programs and policies with overlapping function and jurisdiction: welfare and minimum wage are two examples. A more efficient alternative might be a guaranteed annual income issued as a universal demogrant--a transfer payment to all citizens (or residents) with no conditions on employment, earning, or income. "

For more details concerning the Sarlo guaranteed annual income proposal,
see p. 55-56 in Part II of the report (the second link below).

Complete report
in three PDF files:

Report Part I (PDF file - 236K, 10 pages) - cover, table of contents, executive summary
Report Part II (PDF file - 982K, 50 pages) - main chapters of the report
Report Part III (PDF file - 284K, 22 pages) - appendices

Source:
The Fraser Institute

---

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

18. Fraser Institute school report cards --- War on public schools rages - May 17
(Donald Gutstein in rabble.ca)

War on public schools rages
By Donald Gutstein
May 17, 2010
The Fraser Institute's school report-card program is merely the opening salvo in a campaign to strip public education of its funding and direct the resources to the private and nonprofit sectors. Every year the institute spends hundreds of thousands of dollars to compile and disseminate its rankings of elementary and secondary schools. It has undreamed-of support from corporate media, which turn over dozens of pages each year for school rankings in the Vancouver Sun, Calgary Herald, Edmonton Sun, Toronto Sun, Ottawa Citizen, Windsor Star, and Quebec newsmagazine L'Actualité.

Every year teachers-union executives and education experts write op-ed pieces pointing out the serious deficiencies in the rankings. And every year the media play the rankers and their critics as a debate between two equally valid viewpoints. Lost in the debate are the goals of universally accessible, publicly funded education, such as preparing children for citizenship, cultivating a skilled work force, and developing critical-thinking skills.
Source:
rabble.ca

Related link:

CompareSchoolRankings.org
Rankings for schools in Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Québec
Source:
The Fraser Institute

---

- Go to the Education Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm

19. June 1 : Sun News "cultural philistine" attacks Margie Gillis and arts funding

Sun News Interview with Margie Gillis
By Chris Dupuis
On June 1, 2011 Sun New anchor Krista Erickson interviewed Canadian dance icon Margie Gillis, ostensibly as part of an “ongoing examination of funding to the arts”. What resulted was an unfortunately typical right-wing attack on the systems that fund arts and culture within our country.

Comment by Gilles:
To view the two-part video (Subtitle"How Not to Conduct an Interview with a Canadian Cultural Legend", click the two YouTube links below rather than clicking the video links in the above blog post by Chris Dupuis, which take you to the Sun News website. Viewing the YouTube version of the videos doesn't rack up the viewership stats for Sun News so they can crow about how popular they are online. After watching both parts of the interview, I'm sure you'll feel as I do that Margie Gillis handled herself with poise and grace under fire, and that Krista Erickson is a batshit crazy shill for a segment of society that questions the contributions of the arts in shaping the values of our society and in promoting Canadian culture around the world. If you're mad enough to want to do something after viewing the videos, follow the link below to a longer article by Louis Laberge-Côté that offers not only an extensive and articulate rebuttal (with links to sources) to Krista the Philistine's uninformed, dismissive and downright rude verbal assault on Ms. Gillis and the arts community in Canada. Laberge-Côté offers over a dozen options for making your views known on this subject. (My personal favourite is #1 : "Do not watch Sun TV and avoid visiting their website as they receive money from their sponsors each time you do so.")

YouTube videos:
* Sun News "Interview" with Margie Gillis - part 1 (Duration 10:08)
* Sun News "Interview" with Margie Gillis - part 2 (Duration 10:59)

In response to the Sun News Network interview with Margie Gillis
June 7, 2011
By Louis Laberge-Côté
(Contemporary dancer / choreographer / teacher / arts lover / taxpayer)
[NOTE : the above link takes you to a Facebook page which may require you to have a Facebook account to view the content.]

Another comment by Gilles:
It's not a coincidence that this item follows the Fraser Institute's report on schools on this page.
Sun News and the Fraser Institute are both using a " Harper Government™ "* technique to advance the social and fiscal conservative agenda : pick a target (the arts, CBC, public service pensions, etc.), then trash-talk about it in the media for awhile, then (when public opinion has turned against the target), cut funding.
Argh.
---
* Anyone else notice that the decision to rebrand all federal releases as being from the Harper Government™ seems to have been reversed?
The latest federal news releases have discreetly gone back to "the Government of Canada" vs "the Harper Government™"
Good.
It was an egregious example of megalomania
.
And we already have enough of those, thank you.

20. The Tobin Tax : The case for a tax on international monetary transactions - April 1
(James Tobin in the CCPA Monitor - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

The Tobin Tax
The case for a tax on international monetary transactions

By James Tobin
April 1, 2011
This article is based on a speech delivered in 1995 at a CCPA conference in Ottawa by U.S. economist James Tobin, who died in 2002 at the age of 84. A prominent supporter of Keynesian economics and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1981, Prof. Tobin is now widely known for his suggested imposition of a tax on foreign exchange transactions. Such a tax, he argued, would reduce speculation in the international currency markets, which he saw as dangerous and unproductive. Unfortunately, the proposed “Tobin Tax” was never implemented. Had it been in effect over the past decade, it would probably have prevented (or at least minimized) the greed-driven speculation in international financial trading that caused the disastrous economic crash in 2008. As a result of the recent meltdown, interest in the Tobin Tax has been re-ignited, and the case its creator made for it to CCPA members 16 years ago remains just as strong and persuasive today.
Source:
CCPA Monitor
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives ]

---

- Go to the The Tobin Tax Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/tobin.htm

21. In the wake of our G-20 violence: Canada can learn from the police reforms in Northern Ireland
(April 2011 issue of the CCPA Monitor - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Also from the CCPA Monitor:

Approaching the first anniversary of the June 26-27 Meeting of the G-20 in Toronto...

In the wake of our G-20 violence:
Canada can learn from the police reforms in Northern Ireland
(PDF - 144K, 1 page)
April 2011
By Barbara Ann Vocisano
When a police force is responsible for human rights violations, it defeats the purpose of policing. That is a lesson learned from Northern Ireland’s post-conflict transition, which offers lessons for Canadians as we deal with our controversial G-20 aftermath.Last summer’s G-20 policing disaster
raises alarm bells for those familiar with the conflict in Northern Ireland. Toronto images of police in full riot gear firing rubber bullets at peaceful demonstrators and brutally clubbing them were similar to those in Northern Ireland in January 1972 during Bloody Sunday.

[ Barbara Ann Vocisano is a Master of Arts-Legal Studies candidate in Carleton University’s Department of Law. She presented a longer version of this paper at the Sixth Annual Political Science Graduate Symposium at Dalhousie University, on March 10-11.]
Source:
CCPA Monitor
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives ]

---

- Go to the G8 / G20 / Globalization Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/global.htm

22. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Income of Canadians, 2009 - June 15

--- 2008 Census Test: Content Analysis Report (the long-form Census questionnaire and the National Housing Survey) - June 14
--- Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds), Fourth quarter 2010
- June 14

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

June 15, 2011
Income of Canadians, 2009
NOTE : this study is covered in detail elsewhere in this newsletter.

---

June 14, 2011
The long-form Census questionnaire and the National Housing Survey:
2008 Census Test: Content Analysis Report
Forward *
The 2008 Census Test: Content Analysis Report provides the testing results of the proposed questions for the 2011 Census, that is, the 2A short-form and 2B long-form questionnaires. The proposed content for the 2011 Census was informed by the results of ongoing consultation with data users and stakeholders, thorough qualitative and quantitative (statistical) testing, and evaluation of previous census results and other data sources. (...) The 2011 Census will consist of the same eight questions that appeared on the 2006 Census short-form questionnaire, with the addition of two questions on language. It will be conducted in May 2011. The census 2A questionnaire underwent additional qualitative testing in Ottawa to obtain feedback on the new format and the additional language questions.The information previously collected by the long-form census questionnaire will be collected as part of the new voluntary National Household Survey (NHS).
---
* Hey, StatCan!
Forward
is a direction.
Foreword is an introduction or a preface.
---
Source:
2011 Census Consultation
[ StatCan Main Census Page ]

---

June 14, 2011
Employer pension plans (trusteed pension funds), Fourth quarter 2010
The value of Canadian employer pension funds surpassed the $1 trillion mark ($1.05 trillion) for the first time during the fourth quarter, a 5.1% increase from the third quarter. Employer pension funds have not only recovered from losses experienced during the 2008 financial crisis, they have also posted two consecutive years of double-digit gains. After falling 13.1% in 2008, pension fund assets rose 10.5% in 2009 and 14.4% in 2010.

Related subjects:

* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Pension plans and funds and other retirement income programs
* Labour
* Non-wage benefits
* Seniors
* Income, pensions and wealth

-----------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

23. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

June 19, 2011

What's new online this week:

Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

"I should have applied before I was pregnant": How child care in Toronto fails mothers
17 Jun 2011
Report from the Mothers' Task Force on Child Care presents the findings from a community consultation and survey of mothers on what works and what doesn't in child care in Toronto.

Children with special educational needs in early childhood
15 Jun 2011
Concept paper by Ryerson University's Kathryn Underwood and Rachel Langford for the Atkinson Centre Early Years Task Force.

Early learning in Ontario: From policy to implementation
15 Jun 2011
Presentations and posters from the Atkinson/GBC Summer Institute 2011 held on June 1st. Video coming soon.

An agenda for amazing children: Final report of the ECE Taskforce
15 Jun 2011
Report from New Zealand by a government-appointed taskforce presents 65 recommendations for reforming the ECEC system, including reinstating funding previously scrapped by the national government.

Staff preparation, reward, and support: Are quality rating and improvement systems including all of the key ingredients necessary for change?
15 Jun 2011
Report from the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment (University of California at Berkeley) examines the extent to which quality improvement schemes support practitioners.

MORE research, policy & practice

--------------------------------

Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Toronto mothers cry out for child care
17 Jun 2011 Ontario

Alberta struggles with all-day kindergarten
15 Jun 2011 Alberta

Kindergarten pilot only preliminary
15 Jun 2011 Canada

Nordic childcare model best for economic and social wellbeing
15 Jun 2011 Europe

Swedish childcare system is hardly a utopian model
15 Jun 2011 Europe

MORE Child care in the news

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

24. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

June 17:
Social Services Database - New York City
Achievement Gap - Utah
Access to Health Care for Children on Public Insurance
US Unemployment

June 16:
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - Indiana
Jobless Benefits - Pennsylvania

June 15:
HUD Report on Homelessness in the US
Income and Poverty - Canada
States and Medicaid Funding

June 14:
Extension of Jobless Benefits - Arizona
Rule of Law Index
No Child Left Behind and Proficiency

June 13:
State Medicaid Programs - New Jersey, Massachusetts
High School Graduation Rates

---------------------------------------

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

25. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter

15 June 2011 - CRINMAIL Issue 1229
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Domestic work Convention: Update
- Business & children: New online portal!
- World Days: Child labour (Uzbekistan, US), Africa
- State violence: Syria
- New developments: Americas
- New reports: Disability, Commercialism
- Call for submissions: Harmful traditional practices
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

---------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (second link up) does not include the table of contents for each issue.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com

 

Explore the amazing TEDxTalks
--- 7,000+ videos, now findable
http://blog.ted.com/2011/06/18/explore-the-amazing-tedxtalks-video-collection-7000-videos-now-findable/

Here's a partial list (1,900+ links) of TEDxTalks video links:
https://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?key=pjGlYH-8AK8ffDa6o2bYlXg&gid=0
- presented as a hyperlinked spreadsheet , so it's simple to skim through the list to find a video you wish to view...

One of my personal favourites is the video of Bobby McFerrin and the pentatonic scale.
(You might remember Bobby as the "Don't Worry, Be Happy" guy...)
http://www.ted.com/talks/bobby_mcferrin_hacks_your_brain_with_music.html
Description: "In this fun, 3-min performance from the World Science Festival, musician Bobby McFerrin uses the pentatonic scale to reveal one surprising result of the way our brains are wired."

---

Political Databases of the Americas
http://pdba.georgetown.edu/
* Constitutions and Comparative Constitutional Study
* Executive Branch
* Legislative Branch
* Judicial Branch
* Electoral Systems and Data
* Political Parties
* Decentralization and Local Governance
* Democracy and Citizen Security
* Indigenous Peoples and Democracy
* Civil Society
* Links
-------------


You are now aware.
http://imgur.com/gallery/M2dE9

---------------

LOOOUUUUUUUUUUU!
http://imgur.com/r/funny/HjcA4

-------------------

Simon's cat
http://www.simonscat.com/

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